National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for depth thickness porosity

  1. Porosity reduction in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Porosity and grain density were determined for different lithologies from throughout a 1.2-km thick section of the Monterey and Sisquoc formations in the Santa Maria basin area, California. Porosity reduction by physical and chemical compaction in the predominantly siliceous sediment is controlled largely by the bulk sediment composition and silica phase transformations. Physical compaction of sediment grains from increasing overburden pressure is responsible for most of the gradual porosity reduction with increasing burial depth in opal-A siliceous ooze and diatomite. The porous, incompressible diatom frustule maintains a high porosity relative to clayey and calcareous sediment. Therefore, a positive correlation exists between porosity and biogenic silica (diatom) content of the sediment. During the opal-A to opal-CT silica phase transformation, solution of the porous diatom frustule and precipitation of cryptocrystalline opal-CT results in a porosity reduction that roughly correlates with the biogenic silica content of the sediment. Local porosity reduction occurs in pore-filling dolomite and chert nodules. Dry bulk density as well as porosity reduction tend to increase with sediment depth. Dolomite and organic matter have the most significant influence on the bulk density because of their respective high and low density. The maximum burial depth of the uplifted and eroded section is estimated by overlapping the porosity-depth relation of average deep-sea siliceous ooze.

  2. Constraints on Moho depth and crustal thickness in the Liguro-Provencal basin from a 3D gravity inversion: geodynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    Constraints on Moho depth and crustal thickness in the Liguro- Provencal basin from a 3D gravity~ologie, CNRS-URA 1316, Ecole Normale Sup&ieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France (e-mail: rooke and reflection data to constrain a new Moho depth map in the Liguro-Proven~al basin (Western Mediterranean Sea

  3. Dual-porosity ribbed fuel cell cathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Richard; Yuh, Chao-Yi; Alexander, Michael

    2005-05-10

    A fuel cell cathode comprising a cathode body having rib regions and base regions which connect the rib regions, the rib regions being of greater thickness and of less porosity than the base regions.

  4. Generalized methodology for thermal diffusivity depth profile reconstruction in semi-infinite and finitely thick inhomogeneous solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    . The amplitude and phase of the thermal wave generated by an optical or other thermal energy sourceGeneralized methodology for thermal diffusivity depth profile reconstruction in semi, Canada and Manufacturing Research Corporation of Ontario, 1075 North Service Road West, Suite 201

  5. Porosity in hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, D.W.; Beaucage, G.; Loy, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Multicomponent, or hybrid composites are emerging as precursors to porous materials. Sacrifice of an ephemeral phase can be used to generate porosity, the nature of which depends on precursor structure. Retention of an organic constituent, on the other hand, can add desirable toughness to an otherwise brittle ceramic. We use small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering to examine porosity in both simple and hybrid materials. We find that microphase separation controls porosity in almost all systems studied. Pore distributions are controlled by the detailed bonding within and between phases as well as the flexibility of polymeric constituents. Thus hybridization opens new regions of pore distributions not available in simple systems. We look at several sacrificial concepts and show that it is possible to generate multimodal pore size distributions due to the complicated phase structure in the precursor.

  6. Microparticles with hierarchical porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petsev, Dimiter N; Atanassov, Plamen; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Carroll, Nick; Olson, Tim

    2012-12-18

    The present disclosure provides oxide microparticles with engineered hierarchical porosity and methods of manufacturing the same. Also described are structures that are formed by templating, impregnating, and/or precipitating the oxide microparticles and method for forming the same. Suitable applications include catalysts, electrocatalysts, electrocatalysts support materials, capacitors, drug delivery systems, sensors and chromatography.

  7. Deep porosity preservation in the Norphlet Formation, Mobil Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajdukiewicz, J.M.; Paxton, S.T.; Szabvo, J.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Compaction and pressure solution have commonly been assumed to destroy primary intergranular porosity in deeply buried sandstones. However, primary porosities of up to 20% are preserved at depths greater than 20,000 feet in the Norphlet Formation of Mobile Bay. Previous workers have called upon a number of mechanisms to preserve these high porosities in the Norphlet, specifically chlorite rim cements, gas emplacement, overpressuring, and decementation. In contrast, our study of data from 23 Norphlet wells, including 450 thin sections, indicates that these suggested mechanisms are not the primary cause of porosity preservation in the Norphlet. The authors propose an alternative interpretation: that in the Norphlet, as in other well-sorted, ductile-grain-poor sandstones, porosity loss from compaction did not go to completion under reservoir (premetamorphic) conditions, but stabilized at depths of about 5,000-8,000 feet and porosity values of about 26%. Porosity loss below these values is due to cementation. For cementation to occur, both an adequate source of cement and geochemical conditions favoring cement precipitation must be present. Computer simulations of Norphlet burial history, including post-depositional fluid-flow patterns, suggest that conditions favorable to quartz cementation never occurred in the bulk of the Norphlet because of the formation's stratigraphic position and isolation from a basinward source of silica-saturated fluids.

  8. Porosity in polysilsesquioxane xerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOY,DOUGLAS A.; SCHNEIDER,DUANE A.; BAUGHER,BRIGITTA M.; RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR

    2000-05-09

    Polysilsesquioxanes, [RSiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n} are a class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials in which silicon atoms are linked with up to three siloxane bonds to other monomer units in the polymer and the organic group is a pendent functionality. Polysilsesquioxanes are prepared by the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrialkoxysilanes (Scheme l). Organotrialkoxysilanes RSi(OR{prime}){sub 3}, have been extensively used as coupling agents for composites or surface treatments for materials. Polysilsesquioxanes have become increasingly popular for generating specialty coatings such as low k dielectric materials for microelectronic applications. While there is extensive information on the formation of polysilsesquioxanes, there has not been a survey of the ability of organotrialkoxysilanes to form gels until recently. The formation of polysilsesquioxanes gels has been shown to be very sensitive to the nature of the organic group. Many monomers will only form soluble oligomers or polymers upon hydrolysis and condensation, even when the reaction is conducted solvent-free with neat monomer and aqueous catalyst. Furthermore, there is little information concerning the influence of the organic group, R, on the porosity of the polysilsesquioxanes gels that are formed. In this paper the authors describe the preparation of polysilsesquioxane gels where R = H, methyl, ethyl, cyanoethyl, vinyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, chloromethyl, and chloromethylphenyl, and the characterization of the porosity of the respective xerogels. Gels were prepared from the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrimethoxysilanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}, and organotriethoxy-silanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}.

  9. Porosity in Polysilsesquioxane Xerolgels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baugher, B.M.; Loy, D.A.; Rahimian, K.

    1999-08-17

    Polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes is a convenient method for introducing organic functionality into hybrid organic-inorganic materials. However, not much is known about the effects of the organic substituent on the porosity of the resulting xerogels. In this study, we prepared a series of polysilsesquioxane xerogels from organotrialkoxysilanes, RSi(OR{sup 1}){sub 3}, with different organic groups (R = H, Me, Et dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, vinyl, chloromethyl, (p-chloromethyl) phenyl, cyanoethyl). Polymerizations of the monomers were carried out under a variety of conditions, varying monomer concentration, type of catalyst, and alkoxide substituent. The effect of the organic substituent on the sol-gel process was often dramatic. In many cases, gels were formed only at very high monomer concentration and/or with only one type of catalyst. All of the gels were processed as xerogels and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry to evaluate their pore structure.

  10. Processing and characterization of high porosity aerogel films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.

    1994-11-22

    Aerogels are highly porous solids having unique morphology among materials because both the pores and particles making up the material have sizes less than wavelengths of visible light. Such a unique morphology modifies the normal molecular transport mechanisms within the material, resulting in exceptional thermal, acoustical, mechanical, and electrical properties. For example, aerogels have the lowest measured thermal conductivity and dielectric constant for any solid material. Special methods are required to make aerogel films with high porosity. In this paper, we discuss the special conditions needed to fabricate aerogel films having porosities greater than 75% and we describe methods of processing inorganic aerogel films having controllable thicknesses in the range 0.5 to 200 micrometers. We report methods and results of characterizing the films including thickness, refractive index, density (porosity), and dielectric constant. We also discuss results of metallization and patterning on the aerogel films for applications involving microminiature electronics and thermal detectors.

  11. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  12. Dual porosity gas evolving electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, C.W.

    1994-11-15

    A dual porosity electrode is described for use in thermoelectrochemical systems where simultaneous transport of gas and liquid into and/or out of the electrode is required. The electrode includes catalytic electrode particles having diameters ranging from about 25 to 100 angstroms. The catalytic electrode particles are anchored to a support network in clusters which have internal pores ranging in size from 25 to 100 angstroms. The pores between the clusters range in size from between about 1 to 20 microns. A method for making the dual porosity electrodes is also disclosed.

  13. Optimal Porosity Distribution for Minimized Ohmic Drop across a Porous Electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electrode made of lithium cobalt oxide, which is commonly used in lithium-ion batteries for various been used to optimize the electrode thickness or spatially uniform porosity in lithium-ion battery can provide analyti- cal expressions to describe the discharge of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

  14. Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

  15. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Kucera, Eugenia H. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1991-01-01

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers.

  16. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-02-12

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic is described which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers. 3 figures.

  17. Critical porosity: The key to relating physical properties to porosity in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nur, A.M.; Mavko, G.; Dvorkin, J.; Gal, D.

    1995-12-31

    Many classes of rock such as sandstones, dolomites, chalks, and cracked igneous rocks have each a distinct characteristic porosity above which the material behaves as s suspension. The porosity at which this system changes, or transforms from isostress to solid load-bearing is defined here as the critical porosity {phi}{sub c}. It is easy to envision that at {phi}{sub c} not only the mechanical moduli, but also other properties such as strength and electrical conductivity, may also undergo transformations. Consequently, the critical porosity must be a fundamental property of a given porous system, not just of one of its physical properties. The observed values of {phi}{sub c} range from .005 for cracked granites to .30 or .40 for limestones, dolomites and sandstones, .60 for chalks and .90 for volcanic glasses. The data suggest that (1) A critical porosity value {phi}{sub c} exists which is typical of a given class of porous materials. Each class is defined on the basis of its common mineralogy or diagenetic porosity reduction processes. (2) Given {phi}{sub c} it may be possible to closely approximate the relation between porosity and velocity, over the entire range of porosity, with a modified mixture relation, in which the mixed components are the pure solid on one end, and a critical suspension on the other. (3) Without {phi}{sub c}, theory cannot yield reliable or useful velocity-porosity relations.

  18. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  19. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  20. CONSTRAINTS ON POROSITY AND MASS LOSS IN O-STAR WINDS FROM THE MODELING OF X-RAY EMISSION LINE PROFILE SHAPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2013-06-10

    We fit X-ray emission line profiles in high resolution XMM-Newton and Chandra grating spectra of the early O supergiant {zeta} Pup with models that include the effects of porosity in the stellar wind. We explore the effects of porosity due to both spherical and flattened clumps. We find that porosity models with flattened clumps oriented parallel to the photosphere provide poor fits to observed line shapes. However, porosity models with isotropic clumps can provide acceptable fits to observed line shapes, but only if the porosity effect is moderate. We quantify the degeneracy between porosity effects from isotropic clumps and the mass-loss rate inferred from the X-ray line shapes, and we show that only modest increases in the mass-loss rate ({approx}< 40%) are allowed if moderate porosity effects (h{sub {infinity}} {approx}< R{sub *}) are assumed to be important. Large porosity lengths, and thus strong porosity effects, are ruled out regardless of assumptions about clump shape. Thus, X-ray mass-loss rate estimates are relatively insensitive to both optically thin and optically thick clumping. This supports the use of X-ray spectroscopy as a mass-loss rate calibration for bright, nearby O stars.

  1. A Triple-Porosity Model for Fractured Horizontal Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alahmadi, Hasan Ali H.

    2010-10-12

    .................................................................................. 11 3.2 Linear Flow Solutions for Linear Fractured Reservoirs .............. 12 3.3 Derivations of the Triple-porosity Analytical Solutions .............. 12 3.3.1 Model Assumptions...-porosity Model ....................... 19 3.3.7 Triple-porosity Solutions Comparison............................... 20 3.4 Mathematical Consistency of the Analytical Solutions ............... 21 3.5 Flow Regions Based on the Analytical Solution...

  2. Porosity, permeability and fluid flow in the YellowstoneGeothermal System, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hulen, Jeffrey; Simmons, Ardyth

    2002-03-29

    Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of the convective geothermal reservoir. Variations in porosity and matrix permeability observed in the Y-5 and Y-8 cores are primarily controlled by lithology. Y-8 intersects three distinct lithologies: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous ash-flow tuff. The sandstone typically has high permeability and porosity, and the tuff has very high porosity and moderate permeability, while the perlitic lava has very low porosity and is essentially impermeable. Hydrothermal self-sealing appears to have generated localized permeability barriers within the reservoir. Changes in pressure and temperature in Y-8 correspond to a zone of silicification in the volcaniclastic sandstone just above the contact with the perlitic rhyolite; this silicification has significantly reduced porosity and permeability. In rocks with inherently low matrix permeability (such as densely welded ash-flow tuff), fluid flow is controlled by the fracture network. The Y-5 core hole penetrates a thick intracaldera section of the0.6 Ma Lava Creek ash-flow tuff. In this core, the degree of welding appears to be responsible for most of the variations in porosity, matrix permeability, and the frequency of fractures and veins. Fractures are most abundant within the more densely welded sections of the tuff. However, the most prominent zones of fracturing and mineralization are associated with hydrothermal breccias within densely welded portions of the tuff. These breccia zones represent transient conduits of high fluid flow that formed by the explosive release of overpressure in the underlying geothermal reservoir and that were subsequently sealed by supersaturated geothermal fluids. In addition to this fracture sealing, hydrothermal alteration at Yellowstone appears generally to reduce matrix permeability and focus flow along fractures, where multiple pulses of fluid flow and self-sealing have occurred.

  3. Porosity in plasma sprayed alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilavsky, J.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Goland, A.N.; Long, G.G.; Krueger, S.; Allen, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the porosity of plasma sprayed deposits of alumina in as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions. SANS results were compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and water immersion techniques. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering yields a volume-weighted effective pore radius (R{sub eff}), for pores with sizes between 0.08 and 10{mu}m, the pore volume in this size region, and from the Porod region, the surface area of pores of all sizes.

  4. Synthesis of high porosity, monolithic alumina aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poco, J F; Satcher, J H; Hrubesh, L W

    2000-09-20

    Many non-silica aerogels are notably weak and fragile in monolithic form. Particularly, few monolithic aerogels with densities less than 50kg/m3 have any significant strength. It is especially difficult to prepare uncracked monoliths of pure alumina aerogels that are robust and moisture stable. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis of strong, stable, monolithic, high porosity (>98% porous) alumina aerogels, using a two-step sol-gel process. The alumina aerogels have a polycrystalline morphology that results in enhanced physical properties. Most of the measured physical properties of the alumina aerogels are superior to those for silica aerogels for equivalent densities.

  5. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalatur, Ekaterina Narikovich, Anton; Buyakova, Svetlana E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    The article studies the porous ceramics consisting of ultra-fine ZrO{sub 2} powders. The porosity of ceramic samples varied from 15% to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials had a cellular configuration. The distinctive feature of all experimentally obtained strain diagrams is their nonlinearity at low deformations characterized by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations shown in strain diagrams is due to the mechanical instability of cellular elements of the ceramic framework.

  6. Modeling Ozone Removal to Indoor Materials, Including the Effects of Porosity, Pore Diameter, and Thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Elliott T; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Corsi, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    of healthy young volunteers to ozone causes cardiovasculareffects of five common ozone-initiated terpene reactiondecay rates, and removal of ozone and their relation to

  7. Modeling Ozone Removal to Indoor Materials, Including the Effects of Porosity, Pore Diameter, and Thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Elliott T; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Corsi, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    C. Ozone deposition velocities, reaction probabilities andreaction phenomena described by a single parameter, the ozone deposition velocity,velocity, v t (m h ?1 ), a characteristic of the ?uid mechanics of a space, and the reaction

  8. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Integration of borehole imaging data with available open-hole log, core, and well-test data from horizontal and vertical wells allowed for the distribution of fracture parameters, including fracture density, aperture, porosity, and permeability throughout a geocellular model. Analysis of over 5000 fractures showed that changes in lithology, grain size, and/or bed thickness do not correlate with changes in fracture densities. Review of P- and S-wave log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. Fracture permeabilities compare favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix- related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (ER 50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  9. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  10. Well-log interpretation of carbonate reservoirs with bimodal porosity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandircioglu, Ahmet

    1990-01-01

    ) in the flushed zone. The difference between the two was an INDUCTION RESISTIVITY SP-R-2 5 MV 9750 GAS EFFECT 4t W Run I SONIC g SW 26 58% 22 65% st Run 2 Figure 4-%ell-log responses from a Frio sandstone with bimodal porosity, Nueces County, Texas... ~ ~ ~ ' ~ ~ 23 Ol LIPF 5 OAMM* RAY SHIRE' IA POROSITY 55 15 OAL O 0 PORE ~ PERF Figure 9-Gamma-ray (GR), caliper(CAL), density porosity (gD), and neutron porosity (9N) logs through the Smackover in the Shirey 1A well, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana...

  11. Enhanced Tissue Adhesion by Increased Porosity and Surface Roughness...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhanced Tissue Adhesion by Increased Porosity and Surface Roughness of Carbon Based Biomaterials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Tissue Adhesion by Increased...

  12. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwam, David

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.?

  13. MODELING OF POROSITY FORMATION AND FEEDING FLOW IN STEEL CASTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    , or even larger shrinkage cavities found in inadequately fed cast sections. Microporosity can cause leaksMODELING OF POROSITY FORMATION AND FEEDING FLOW IN STEEL CASTING Kent D. Carlson, Zhiping Lin pressure, feeding flow, and porosity formation and growth in steel castings during solidification

  14. Hydroxyapatite based hybrid dental materials with controlled porosity and improved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Dental obturation materials are perhaps the simplest biomaterials introduced into the human body becauseHydroxyapatite based hybrid dental materials with controlled porosity and improved tribological Lobland2 and J. R. Rodriguez1 Hybrid dental materials were designed with controlled porosity and improved

  15. Diagenetic history and the evolution of porosity in the Cotton Valley Limestone, Teague Townsite Field, Freestone County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffensen, Carl Kristian

    1982-01-01

    of Porosity in the Cotton Valley Limestone, Teague Townsite Field, Freestone County, Texas (December, 1982) Carl Kristian Steffensen, B. S. , University of Illinois Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wayne M. Ahr The Cotton Valey Lime was deposited... during a regressive phase of the Late Jurassic, in a shallow sea with an exten- sive platform. Mild salt tectonism has modified depositional and diagenetic environments through time. The Cotton Valley Lime is composed of thick, massive, oolitic...

  16. Data Qualification Report: Calculated Porosity and Porosity-Derived Values for Lithostratigraphic Units for use on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Sanchez

    2001-05-30

    The qualification is being completed in accordance with the Data Qualification Plan DQP-NBS-GS-000006, Rev. 00 (CRWMS M&O 2001). The purpose of this data qualification activity is to evaluate for qualification the unqualified developed input and porosity output included in Data Tracking Number (DTN) M09910POROCALC.000. The main output of the analyses documented in DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is the calculated total porosity and effective porosity for 40 Yucca Mountain Project boreholes. The porosity data are used as input to Analysis Model Report (AMR) 10040, ''Rock Properties Model'' (MDL-NBS-GS-000004, Rev. 00), Interim Change Notice [ICN] 02 (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The output from the rock properties model is used as input to numerical physical-process modeling within the context of a relationship developed in the AMR between hydraulic conductivity, bound water and zeolitic zones for use in the unsaturated zone model. In accordance with procedure AP-3.15Q, the porosity output is not used in the direct calculation of Principal Factors for post-closure safety or disruptive events. The original source for DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) report, ''Combined Porosity from Geophysical Logs'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a and hereafter referred to as Rael 1999). That report recalculated porosity results for both the historical boreholes covered in Nelson (1996), and the modern boreholes reported in CRWMS M&O (1996a,b). The porosity computations in Rael (1999) are based on density-porosity mathematical relationships requiring various input parameters, including bulk density, matrix density and air and/or fluid density and volumetric water content. The main output is computed total porosity and effective porosity reported on a foot-by-foot basis for each borehole, although volumetric water content is derived from neutron data as an interim output. This qualification report uses technical assessment and corroboration to evaluate the original subject DTN. Rael (1999) provides many technical details of the technical assessment and corroboration methods and partially satisfies the intent of the qualification plan for this analysis. Rael presents a modified method based on Nelson (1996) to recompute porosity and porosity-derived values and uses some of the same inputs. Rael's (1999) intended purpose was to document porosity output relatively free of biases introduced by differing computational methods or parameter selections used for different boreholes. The qualification report necessarily evaluates the soundness of the pre-Process Validation and Re-engineering (PVAR) analyses and methodology, as reported in Rael (1999).

  17. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, C.A. |

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  18. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  19. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  20. Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    section of the 0.6-Ma Lava Creek ash-flow tuff. In this core, the degree of welding appears to be responsible for most of the variations in porosity, matrix...

  1. Engineering Strength, Porosity, and Emission Intensity of Nanostructur...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Strength, Porosity, and Emission Intensity of Nanostructured CdSe Networks by Altering the Building-Block Shape Home Author: H. Yu, R. Bellair, R. M. Kannan, S. L....

  2. Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J; Wang, Hsin; Ferber, Mattison K; Liang, Zhenxian

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress all depended on the porosity content in bulk-sintered silver. The only investigated property that was independent of porosity in that range was coefficient of thermal expansion.

  3. Double porosity modeling in elastic wave propagation for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J. G., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures behave in an undrained fashion. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown,the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is completely consistent with, Biot`s theory of poroelasticity and is valid for analysis of elastic wave data from highly fractured reservoirs.

  4. Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

    2009-09-27

    Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

  5. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Thick Section Ni-base Alloys – Advanced Modeling and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debroy, Tarasankar; Palmer, Todd; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Hybrid laser-arc welding of nickel-base alloys can increase productivity and decrease costs during construction and repair of critical components in nuclear power plants. However, laser and hybrid welding of nickel-base alloys is not well understood. This project sought to understand the physical processes during hybrid welding necessary to fabricate quality joints in Alloy 690, a Ni- Cr-Fe alloy. This document presents a summary of the data and results collected over the course of the project. The supporting documents are a collection of the research that has been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals along with a report from the partner at the national lab. Understanding the solidification behavior of Alloy 690 is important for knowing the final properties of the weldment. A study was undertaken to calculate the solidification parameters, such as temperature gradient, solidification rate, and cooling rate in Alloy 690 welds. With this information and measured cell and dendrite arm spacings, an Alloy 690 map was constructed to guide process parameter development and interpret fusion zones in later hybrid welds. This research is contained in “Solidification Map of a Nickel Base Alloy.” The keyhole formed under high laser intensity gives the hybrid welding technique the greater penetration depths compared to arc welding. However, keyhole behavior can form defects in the material, so knowing transient keyhole characteristics is important. With international collaborators, a study was undertaken to validate a new process monitoring tool known as inline coherent imaging (ICI), which is able to measure the keyhole depth with spatial and temporal resolutions on the order of 10 microns and 10 microseconds. ICI was validated for five alloy systems, including Alloy 690. Additionally, the keyhole growth rates at the start of welding were measured with unprecedented accuracy. This research is contained in “Real Time Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Keyhole Depth by Laser Interferometry.” During full penetration welding of thick sections, root defects can form, which result in unacceptable weld quality. A study was undertaken to determine the competing forces in root defect formation by independently changing the weight forces and surface tension forces. The weight force was altered by changing the plate thickness, and the surface tension force was altered by changing the surface condition at the bottom surface. Root defects do depend on these two forces. This research is contained in “Mitigation of Root Defect in Laser and Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding.” Validation of the hybrid laser-arc model is necessary to properly model heat and mass transfer and fluid flow in Alloy 690 hybrid welds. Therefore, the developed model was validated for low carbon steel. Temperatures calculated by the model were included into a microstructural model in order to calculate the phase fractions. Process maps were developed for the selection of welding parameters to avoid martensite formation. This research is contained in “Fusion Zone Microstructure in Full Penetration Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Low Alloy Steel.” Alloy 690 suffers from ductility dip cracking, a form of hot cracking. This type of cracking inhibits the use of multipass welding to join Alloy 690. Our partners at ORNL performed some hot ductility testing with Alloy 690 samples using digital image correlation. The results of this work is contained in the report “Summary of 690 ductility dip cracking testing using Gleeble and digital image correlation.” Macro-porosity is a limiting factor in the widespread deployment of laser and hybrid laser-arc welding for construction and repair of nuclear power plant components. Keyhole instability and fluctuation results in the formation of large bubbles, which become trapped at the advancing solid- liquid interface as pores. Laser and hybrid laser-arc welds were fabricated for a range of conditions. Porosity levels in the welds were measured in X-ray computed tomography (CT), which provides very detailed data on the size and lo

  6. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  7. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Peter M. (Hamburg, NY); Reger, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  8. Critical thickness in silicone thermosets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deopura, Manish, 1975-

    2005-01-01

    Critical thickness effects are utilized to achieve high fracture toughness in brittle polymers. The postulate of critical thickness, which is: "Macroscopically brittle polymers deform in a ductile fashion below a critical ...

  9. Incorporation of Catalytic Compounds in the Porosity of SiC Wall...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incorporation of Catalytic Compounds in the Porosity of SiC Wall Flow Filters - 4 Way Catalyst and DeNOx Application examples Incorporation of Catalytic Compounds in the Porosity...

  10. SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    : Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Shrinkage Porosity, Hot Tears, Modeling Abstract Simulations are performed within commercial casting simulation software to predict shrinkage porosity and hot tears changes are introduced to mitigate the shrinkage and hot tear problems in these castings. The comparisons

  11. Geophysical Prospecting, 2006, 54, 565573 Influence of pore pressure on velocity in low-porosity sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -porosity sandstone: Implications for time-lapse feasibility and pore-pressure study Xiaoxia Xu, Ronny Hofmann (about 3000 psi) for a low-porosity sandstone. Thus, in pore-pressure inversion, an assumption of n = 1

  12. Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

  13. Constitutive Theory for Velocity Dispersion in Rock with Dual Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H F; Berryman, J G

    2002-03-28

    The high frequency behavior of the bulk modulus of fluid-saturated rock can be obtained from a double-porosity constitutive model, which is a direct conceptual extension of Biot's (1941) constitutive equations and which provides additional stiffening due to unrelaxed induced pore pressures in the soft porosity phase. Modeling the stiffening of the shear modulus at high frequency requires an effective medium average over the unequal induced pore pressures in cracks of different orientations. The implicit assumptions are that pore fluid equilibration does not occur between cracks of different orientations and between cracks and porous matrix. The correspondence between the constitutive equations of Berryman and Wang (1995) and Mavko and Jizba (1991) is explicitly noted.

  14. Origin of porosity in arylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, D.W.; Loy, D.A.; Ulibarri, T.A.; Black, E.; Buss, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beaucage, G.B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Materials Science and Engineering; Shea, K.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    The authors investigate the porosity of a series of xerogels prepared from arylene-bridged silsesquioxane xerogels as a function of organic bridging group, condensation catalyst and post-synthesis plasma treatment to remove the organic functionalities. They conclude that porosity is controlled by polymer-solvent phase separation in the solution with no evidence of organic-inorganic phase separation. As the polymer grows and crosslinks, it becomes increasingly incompatible with the solvent and eventually microphase separates. The domain structure is controlled by a balance of network elasticity and non-bonding polymer-solvent interactions. The bridging organic groups serve to ameliorate polymer-solvent incompatibility. As a result, when the polymer does eventually phase separate, the rather tightly crosslinked network limits domain size to tens of angstroms, substantially smaller than that observed in xerogels obtained from purely inorganic precursors where incompatibility drives phase separation earlier in the gelation sequence.

  15. FATIGUE OF 8630 CAST STEEL IN THE PRESENCE OF SHRINKAGE POROSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    FATIGUE OF 8630 CAST STEEL IN THE PRESENCE OF SHRINKAGE POROSITY K.M. Sigl1 , R.A. Hardin2 , R of shrinkage porosity on the mechanical performance of the cast steel. Axial fatigue tests were conducted under.I., and Beckermann, C., "Fatigue of 8630 Cast Steel in the Presence of Shrinkage Porosity," in Proceedings of the 57

  16. EFFECT OF POROSITY ON DEFORMATION, DAMAGE, AND FRACTURE OF CAST STEEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    EFFECT OF POROSITY ON DEFORMATION, DAMAGE, AND FRACTURE OF CAST STEEL Richard Hardin1 , Christoph 52242-1527 Keywords: Casting, Porosity, Tensile Properties, Damage, Fracture Abstract A combined experimental and computational study is performed to investigate the effect of internal shrinkage porosity

  17. Effect of Porosity on Deformation, Damage, and Fracture of Cast Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    shrinkage porosity on deformation, damage, and fracture of cast steel under tensile testing. Steel plates containing shrinkage porosity are cast in sand molds, machined into test coupons, and tensile testedEffect of Porosity on Deformation, Damage, and Fracture of Cast Steel R.A. HARDIN and C. BECKERMANN

  18. IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in local policy debates about fracking. This In-depth Report from Science for Environment Policy explores

  19. Where fast weathering creates thin regolith and slow weathering creates thick regolith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Lebedeva, Marina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Pavich, Milan [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Parkinson, D. Y. [Advanced Light Source, LBNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2012-01-01

    Weathering disaggregates rock into regolith the fractured or granular earthmaterial that sustains life on the continental land surface. Here, we investigate what controls the depth of regolith formed on ridges of two rock compositions with similar initial porosities in Virginia (USA).A priori, we predicted that the regolith on diabasewould be thicker than on granite because the dominant mineral (feldspar) in the diabase weathers faster than its granitic counterpart. However, weathering advanced 20deeper into the granite than the diabase. The 20-thicker regolith is attributed mainly to connected micron-sized pores, microfractures formed around oxidizing biotite at 20m depth, and the lower iron (Fe) content in the felsic rock. Such porosity allows pervasive advection and deep oxidation in the granite. These observations may explainwhy regolithworldwide is thicker on felsic compared tomafic rock under similar conditions. To understand regolith formationwill require better understanding of such deep oxidation reactions and how they impact fluid flow during weathering.

  20. Process of making porous ceramic materials with controlled porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Ku, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

    1993-01-01

    A method of making metal oxide ceramic material is disclosed by which the porosity of the resulting material can be selectively controlled by manipulating the sol used to make the material. The method can be used to make a variety of metal oxide ceramic bodies, including membranes, but also pellets, plugs or other bodies. It has also been found that viscous sol materials can readily be shaped by extrusion into shapes typical of catalytic or adsorbent bodies used in industry, to facilitate the application of such materials for catalytic and adsorbent applications.

  1. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  2. Differential effective medium modeling of rock elastic moduli with critical porosity constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ. CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ. CA (United States); Berryman, J.; Berge, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Rocks generally have a percolation porosity at which they lose rigidity and fall apart. Percolation behaviour is a purely geometrical property, independent of any physical properties, and is a powerful constraint on any valid velocity-porosity relation. The authors show how the conventional Differential Effective Medium (DEM) theory can be modified to incorporate percolation of elastic moduli in rocks by taking the material at the critical porosity as one of the constituents of a two-phase composite. Any desired percolation porosity can be specified as an input. In contrast, the conventional DEM model always predicts percolation at a porosity of either 0 or 100 percent. Most sedimentary rocks however have intermediate percolation porosities and are therefore not well represented by the conventional theory. The modified DEM model incorporates percolation behavior, and at the same time is always consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. The predictions compare favorably with laboratory sandstone data. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Laser detection of material thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of the thickness of the material to the measured time intervals between deflections of the contacted surface.

  4. ASTROMETRIC MASSES OF 26 ASTEROIDS AND OBSERVATIONS ON ASTEROID POROSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, James [James Cook University, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia); Chesley, Steven R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Matson, Robert D., E-mail: jimbaer1@earthlink.net, E-mail: steve.chesley@jpl.nasa.gov [Science Applications International Corporation, 3030 Old Ranch Pkwy., Ste. 250, Seal Beach, CA 90740 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    As an application of our recent observational error model, we present the astrometric masses of 26 main-belt asteroids. We also present an integrated ephemeris of 300 large asteroids, which was used in the mass determination algorithm to model significant perturbations from the rest of the main belt. After combining our mass estimates with those of other authors, we study the bulk porosities of over 50 main-belt asteroids and observe that asteroids as large as 300 km in diameter may be loose aggregates. This finding may place specific constraints on models of main-belt collisional evolution. Additionally, we observe that C-group asteroids tend to have significantly higher macroporosity than S-group asteroids.

  5. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  6. Controlling porosity in bridged polysilsesquioxanes through elimination reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, M.D.; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Prabakar, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.

    1996-06-01

    The retro Diels-Alder reaction was used to modify porosity in hydrocarbon-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Microporous polysilsesquioxanes incorporating a thermally labile Diels-Alder adduct as the hydrocarbon bridging group were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of trans-2,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)norbornene. Upon heating the 2,3-norbornenylene-bridges polymers at temperatures above 250 C, the norbornenylene-bridging group underwent a retro Diels-Alder reaction losing cyclopentadiene and leaving behind a ethenylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane. Less than theoretical quantities of cyclopentadiene were volatilized indicating that some of the diene was either reacting with the silanol and olefinic rich material or undergoing oligomerization. Both scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry revealed net coarsening of pores (and reduction of surface area) in the materials with thermolysis.

  7. Porosity in hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes: Effects of monomer concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baugher, B.; Loy, D.A.; Assink, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Prabakar, S. [Advanced Materials Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shea, K.J.; Oviatt, H. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes can be prepared as mesoporous or non-porous xerogels simply by switching from basic to acidic polymerization conditions. In this study, we looked at the effect of monomer concentration on porosity of hexylene-bridged xerogels prepared under acidic and basic conditions. 1, 6-Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by sol-gel polymerizations of 1, 6-bis(triethoxysilyl)hexane 1 with concentrations between 0. 1 to 1.2 M in ethanol. Gelation times ranged from seconds for 1.2 M concentration to months for 0.2 M. The gels were processed into xerogels by an aqueous work-up and the dry gels characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si CP MAS NMR spectroscopy, and gas sorption porosimetry.

  8. XP-SiC: An Innovative Substrate for Future Applications with Low Weight and High Porosity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    4To develop a substrate with high porosity, low weight and low cost to fulfill the requirements and challenges for current and future soot emission legislations

  9. Predicting porosity in a Saudi Arabian carbonate reservoir using geologic constraints integrated with 3-D seismic and well data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, R.; Thomsen, M. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01

    A method for predicting lateral changes in reservoir porosity using 3-D seismic Aptitudes, calibrated against the amplitude response versus porosity measured at a select number of wells, was implemented and applied to produce a porosity map of a Saudi Arabian carbonate reservoir. The technique relies on the uniform lithologic seismic response of an overlying anhydrite, and thus assigns variations in amplitudes at the reservoir level to changes in reservoir average porosity. Throughout the study area, reservoir porosity and acoustic impedance logs exhibit a firm linear relationship. As reservoir porosity increases, its acoustic impedance decreases, and the greater contrast with the overlying anhydrite translates into larger seismic amplitudes. Thus, we expect the reservoir`s relative amplitude response to also increase linearly with increasing porosity. A check on this hypothesis was provided by computing synthetic seismograms at several wells, and measuring the reservoir`s theoretical amplitude response versus porosity averaged over the producing zone within the reservoir. This trend supported a linear seismic amplitude to porosity transform. Upon verification of the technique`s applicability, the reservoirs amplitude response was extracted from the 3-D seismic volume in the vicinity of several wells. These were used in conjunction with porosities averaged ever the reservoir to derive the amplitude to porosity transform. This transform was used in converting the mapped reservoir amplitudes into variations in average porosities. The success ratio for predicting porosities in wells not used in the analysis was nearly perfect, and the map continues to correctly predict porosities in subsequently drilled wells.

  10. Simulation of the Mechanical Performance of Cast Steel with Porosity: Static Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Simulation of the Mechanical Performance of Cast Steel with Porosity: Static Properties R.A. Hardin.A., and Beckermann, C., "Simulation of the Mechanical Performance of Cast Steel with Porosity: Static Properties1 and C. Beckermann2 1 Research Engineer, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dept. The University

  11. Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity RICHARD A. HARDIN and CHRISTOPH BECKERMANN A simulation methodology for predicting the fatigue life of cast steel components with shrinkage porosity is developed and validated through comparison with previously performed measure- ments

  12. Modeling the Effect of Finite-Rate Hydrogen Diffusion on Porosity Formation in Aluminum Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    in the casting industry. They are typically caused by a lack of feeding of the shrinkage that occurs during from gas to shrinkage dominated porosity and the effects of different solubilities of hydrogen 2007 I. INTRODUCTION POROSITY-RELATED defects are a major cause of casting rejection and rework

  13. MODELING OF POROSITY FORMATION IN ALUMINUM ALLOYS Kent D. Carlson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    that each volume element in the casting is composed of some combination of solid metal (s), liquid metal (l alloys. The model predicts the amount and size of the porosity in a solidified casting. Computation correspondence. Introduction Porosity-related defects are a major cause of casting rejection and re

  14. A conceptual model for the origin of fault damage zone structures in high-porosity sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowie, Patience

    A conceptual model for the origin of fault damage zone structures in high-porosity sandstone Zoe K-porosity sandstones. Damage zone deformation has been particularly well constrained for two 4-km-long normal faults formed in the Navajo Sandstone of central Utah, USA. For these faults the width of the damage zone

  15. System for measuring film thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Kirihara, Leslie J. (Richland, WA); Peters, Timothy J. (Richland, WA); Rasmussen, Donald E. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    A system for determining the thicknesses of thin films of materials exhibiting fluorescence in response to exposure to excitation energy from a suitable source of such energy. A section of film is illuminated with a fixed level of excitation energy from a source such as an argon ion laser emitting blue-green light. The amount of fluorescent light produced by the film over a limited area within the section so illuminated is then measured using a detector such as a photomultiplier tube. Since the amount of fluorescent light produced is a function of the thicknesses of thin films, the thickness of a specific film can be determined by comparing the intensity of fluorescent light produced by this film with the intensity of light produced by similar films of known thicknesses in response to the same amount of excitation energy. The preferred embodiment of the invention uses fiber optic probes in measuring the thicknesses of oil films on the operational components of machinery which are ordinarily obscured from view.

  16. Oxide Film and Porosity Defects in Magnesium Alloy AZ91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Liang [Mississippi State University (MSU); Rhee, Hongjoo [Mississippi State University (MSU); Felicelli, Sergio D. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Berry, John T. [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2009-01-01

    Porosity is a major concern in the production of light metal parts. This work aims to identify some of the mechanisms of microporosity formation in magnesium alloy AZ91. Microstructure analysis was performed on several samples obtained from gravity-poured ingots in graphite plate molds. Temperature data during cooling was acquired with type K thermocouples at 60 Hz at three locations of each casting. The microstructure of samples extracted from the regions of measured temperature was then characterized with optical metallography. Tensile tests and conventional four point bend tests were also conducted on specimens cut from the cast plates. Scanning electron microscopy was then used to observe the microstructure on the fracture surface of the specimens. The results of this study revealed the existence of abundant oxide film defects, similar to those observed in aluminum alloys. Remnants of oxide films were detected on some pore surfaces, and folded oxides were observed in fracture surfaces indicating the presence of double oxides entrained during pouring.

  17. Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes Department of Geophysics, Faculty inversion, seismic anisotropy. 1. Introduction A general formulation of prestack depth migration based numerical methods (Claerbout, 1971) is considered in this paper. A common­shot prestack depth migration

  18. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

    2008-07-01

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  19. R tuart Haszeldine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom Oil Charge Preserves Deep-Burial Porosity in Sandstones and Limestones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    -Burial Porosity in Sandstones and Limestones Debate since 1920, has equivocated over the effects of oil charge on reservoir quality. Regional information and local case-studies from the North Sea, shows sandstones from. As with sandstones, two types of reservoirs exist, those with regional porosity decline and those with raid porosity

  20. The thermal conductivity of sediments as a function of porosity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, James W

    1979-01-01

    as thermal barriers to heat and tend to insulate the surrounding material. Fig, 1 shows how the temperature gradient changes when a high pressured zone is encountered. Assuming the flow of heat through any zone obeys Fourier's law, the following equation... = thermal con- aT ductivity of the material, and z is the depth below the mudline. It can be seen from Equation 1 that if the heat flux, q, is constant and the temperature gradient, ~, is increased as is the case for a high z pressured zone...

  1. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Schuster, George J. (Kennewick, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  2. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  3. Mixing-induced precipitation and porosity evolution in porous media Simon Emmanuel, Brian Berkowitz *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    remain. Such deposi- tional patterns are commonly observed in fractured and high porosity carbonate precipitation in geological formations, the physical parameters that characterize the porous matrix. All rights reserved. Keywords: Reactive transport; Fractures; Specific surface area 1. Introduction

  4. Percolating porosity in ultrafine grained copper processed by High Pressure Torsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegner, Matthias Leuthold, Jörn; Peterlechner, Martin; Divinski, Sergiy V. Wilde, Gerhard; Setman, Daria; Zehetbauer, Michael; Pippan, Reinhard

    2013-11-14

    Defect structures in copper of different purity (nominally 99.99 and 99.999?wt.?%) deformed via High Pressure Torsion (HPT) with varying processing parameters are investigated utilizing the radiotracer diffusion technique. While the degree of deformation is kept constant, the effects of applied quasi-hydrostatic pressure, processing temperature, post-deformation annealing treatments, and of the impurity concentration on the deformed samples are analyzed in terms of the formation of interconnected internal porosity. Furthermore, the anisotropy of the developing porosity network is examined. The porosity channels occurred to be interconnected along the direction parallel to the surface normal with a volume fraction of the order of a few ppm while no long-range penetration along the internal porosity could be detected when measured along the azimuthal or radial directions of a HPT processed sample.

  5. A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Bicheng

    2013-07-15

    The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control...

  6. Effect of the porosity on the fracture surface roughness of sintered materials: From anisotropic to isotropic self-affine scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan Cambonie; Jonathan Bares; Lamine Hattali; Daniel Bonamy; Véronique Lazarus; Harold Auradou

    2015-01-16

    To unravel how the microstructure affects the fracture surface roughness in heterogeneous brittle solids like rocks or ceramics, we characterized the roughness statistics of post-mortem fracture surfaces in home-made materials of adjustable microstructure length-scale and porosity, obtained by sintering monodisperse polystyrene beads. Beyond the characteristic size of disorder, the roughness profiles are found to exhibit self-affine scaling features evolving with porosity. Starting from a null value and increasing the porosity, we quantitatively modify the self-affine scaling properties from anisotropic (at low porosity) to isotropic (for porosity larger than 10 %).

  7. The effect of velocity and porosity profiles on the performance of fixed bed reactors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Kaushik

    1983-01-01

    (m r) R. H. Loeppert (member) C. D. 1 and (Head of the Dept. ) December 1983 ABSTRACT THE Effect of Velocity and Porosity Profiles on the Performance of Fixed Bed Reactors (December 1983) Kaushik Amin, B. S. , M. S. University of Barcda... and velocity profiles in the modeling of fixed bed reactors. The first attempt accounting for the porosity profile in the reactor mcdel was made by Xondelik et al. (1969). They used a one dimensional parallel channel model to predict overall conversion...

  8. Experimental Study of Multi-type Macromolecule Porosity Moisture-Conditioned Material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, X.; Fan, Y.; Di, Y.

    2006-01-01

    , Passive technology, Solar energy 1. INTRODUCTION Large numbers of Chinese existing housing. Urban construction area of china rapid increase from 1996 to date, end of 2003, total area amounted to 1.4091 billion square meters. At the same time... and evaporative cooling effect of the porosity moisture conditioned material is remarkable, and could effectively reduce the cooling load of buildings. Keywords? Passive evaporative, Porosity moisture conditioned material, Energy efficiency in buildings...

  9. Lyman alpha Transfer in a thick, dusty, and static medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang-Hyeon Ahn; Hee-Won Lee; Hyung-Mok Lee

    2000-06-13

    We developed a Monte Carlo code that describes the resonant Lyman alpha line transfer in an optically thick, dusty, and static medium. The code was tested against the analytic formula derived by Neufeld (1990). We explain the line transfer mechanism for a wide range of line center optical depths by tracing histories of photons in the medium. We find that photons escape from the medium by a series of wing scatterings, during which polarization may develop. We applied our code to examine the amount of dust extinction around the Lyman alpha in primeval galaxies. Brief discussions on the astrophysical application of our work are presented.

  10. Self-Assembling Sup-porosity: The Effect On Fluid Flow And Seismic Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    2013-04-27

    Fractures and joints in the field often contain debris within the void spaces. Debris originates from many different mechanisms: organic and/or inorganic chemical reactions/mineralization, sediment transport, formation of a fracture, mechanical weathering or combinations of these processes. In many cases, the presence of debris forms a â??sub-porosityâ?ť within the fracture void space. This sub-porosity often is composed of material that differs from the fracture walls in mineralogy and morphology. The â??sub-porosityâ?ť may partially fill voids that are on the order of hundreds of microns and thereby reduce the local porosity to lengths scales on the order of sub-microns to tens of microns. It is quite clear that a sub-porosity affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. What is not known is how the existence/formation of a sub-porosity affects seismic wave propagation and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the formation or alteration of a sub-porosity. If seismic techniques are to be developed to monitor the injection and containment of phases in sequestration reservoirs or the propping of hydraulically induced fracture to enhance oil & gas production, it is important to understand how a sub-porosity within a fracture affects macroscopic seismic and hydraulic measurements. A sub-porosity will directly affect the interrelationship between the seismic and hydraulic properties of a fracture. This reports contains the results of the three main topics of research that were performed (1) to determine the effect of a sub-porosity composed of spherical grains on seismic wave propagation across fractures, (2) to determine the effect of biofilm growth in pores and between grains on seismic wave propagation in sediment, and (3) to determine the effect of the scale of observation (field-of-view) on monitoring alteration the pore space within a fracture caused by reactive flow. A brief summary of the results for each topic is contained in the report and the full details of the research and approach are contained in the publications found in the Attachment section of this report. A list of presentation and publications of all work associated with this grant is also provided.

  11. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Comparisons of over 5000 fractures identified from core and borehole image data with open-hole log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. The effect of structural curvature on fracture intensity in the reservoir was estimated by mapping the derivative of structural dip. Incorporation of structural curvature explained variations in well test behavior not predicted by initial estimates of fracture density from porosity alone. Resultant fracture permeabilities compared favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix-related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (>50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  12. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1996-01-01

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Comparisons of over 5000 fractures identified from core and borehole image data with open-hole log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. The effect of structural curvature on fracture intensity in the reservoir was estimated by mapping the derivative of structural dip. Incorporation of structural curvature explained variations in well test behavior not predicted by initial estimates of fracture density from porosity alone. Resultant fracture permeabilities compared favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix-related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (>50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  13. Decoupled elastic prestack depth migration Alexander Druzhinin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Decoupled elastic prestack depth migration $ Alexander Druzhinin* British Geological Survey of the formula for common-shot or common-receiver amplitude-preserving elastic prestack depth migration (Pre to enhance strongly polarized wave modes prior to prestack depth migration (PreSDM) (e.g. Dillon et al., 1988

  14. Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes Department of Geophysics, Faculty of a general 3­D common­shot elastic prestack depth migration in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium is studied. Geophys. AS CR, Prague 457 #12;L. Klimes 1. INTRODUCTION A general formulation of prestack depth migration

  15. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  16. Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-01-15

    We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

  17. Comparative Study for the Interpretation of Mineral Concentrations, Total Porosity, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    of SPE copyright. Abstract The estimation of porosity, water saturation, kerogen concentration, water saturation, and kerogen content determine the amount of hydrocarbon-in-place while mineral

  18. Knudsen-Hydrodynamic Crossover in Liquid 3He in High Porosity Aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeuchi, H; Nagai, K; Choi, H C; Moon, B H; Masuhara, N; Meisel, M W; Lee, Y; Mulders, N

    2012-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the drag force acting on a high porosity aerogel immersed in liquid ${}^3$He and its effect on sound propagation. The drag force is characterized by the Knudsen number, which is defined as the ratio of the quasiparticle mean free path to the radius of an aerogel strand. Evidence of the Knudsen-hydrodynamic crossover is clearly demonstrated by a drastic change in the temperature dependence of ultrasound attenuation in 98% porosity aerogel. Our theoretical analysis shows that the frictional sound damping caused by the drag force is governed by distinct laws in the two regimes, providing excellent agreement with the experimental observation.

  19. The development of MRI for the determination of porosity distribution in reservoir core samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shivers, Jon Blake

    1991-01-01

    , was calculated in each of these directions to determine the distance between correlated and uncorrelated porosity values. The results show that the German Sandstone is correlated for about 5 mm in all three directions considered. In the Austin Chalk, porosity..., Y-I WRITE(7, *) A(H), C(H), G(H) 60 CO~ STOP 72 APPENDIX D CORE SAMPLE GEOLOGY The Austin Chalk is best characterized as a very fine- grained carbonate mud containing coarser skeletal tests and fragments. The grain size of the chalk...

  20. Ice thickness measurements by Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pershin, Sergey M; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Yulmetov, Renat N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system with a spectrograph was used for express ice thickness measurements. The difference between the Raman spectra of ice and liquid water is employed to locate the ice-water interface while elastic scattering was used for air-ice surface detection. This approach yields an error of only 2 mm for an 80-mm-thick ice sample, indicating that it is promising express noncontact thickness measurements technique in field experiments.

  1. EVOLUTION OF POROSITY AND TEXTURE IN THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS GROWN BY EB-PVD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, David R.

    coatings (TBCs) have emerged as arguably the most critical materials issue for the next generation of gas of nearly three decades of service in gas turbines, full realization of the TBC potential remains hinderedEVOLUTION OF POROSITY AND TEXTURE IN THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS GROWN BY EB-PVD Scott G. Terry

  2. POROSITY MIGRATION IN RTM 1 W K Chui, J Glimm and F M Tangerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    on the mold filling time as well as on the potential for large­scale process defects. The modeling has mostly of reliable composite components. In the Resin Transfer Mold­ ing (RTM) process, porosity results from molding (RTM) is one particularly attractive technique for many applications since it com­ bines cost

  3. A nanotubular metal-organic framework with permanent porosity : structure analysis and gas sorption studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, S.; Simmons, J. M.; Li, J. R.; Yuan, D.; Weng, W.; Liu, D. J.; Zhou, H. C.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Texas A&M Univ.; NIST

    2009-01-01

    A nanotubular metal-organic framework, PCN-19, was constructed based on a micro3-oxo-trinickel basic carboxylate secondary building unit (SBU) and the 9,10-anthracenedicarboxylate ligand; its permanent porosity was confirmed by N2 adsorption isotherms, and its H2 storage performances were evaluated under both low and high pressures at 77 K.

  4. OCTOBER1997 THE LEADING EDGE 1429 Tight, low-porosity reservoirs can produce significant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    reservoirs using surface seismic data is an important exploration problem that has attracted much attention impor- tant to obtain more information about fractured reser- voirs from 3-D P-wave data. AmpliOCTOBER1997 THE LEADING EDGE 1429 Tight, low-porosity reservoirs can produce significant amounts

  5. Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 455460 Breeder foam: an innovative low porosity solid breeder material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 455­460 Breeder foam: an innovative low porosity solid@ucla.edu (S. Sharafat). breeder pebble beds remains a field of intense R&D for fusion power reactor B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.fusengdes.2005.06.374 #12;456 S. Sharafat et al. / Fusion

  6. Integration of Geology, Rock-Physics, Logs, and Pre-stack Seismic for Reservoir Porosity Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Muhaidib, Abdulaziz

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to obtain reservoir properties, such as porosity, both at the well locations and in the inter-well regions from seismic data and well logs. The seismic and well-log datasets are from an ...

  7. NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE COAGULATION AND POROSITY EVOLUTION OF DUST AGGREGATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki [Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: satoshi.okuzumi@ax2.ecs.kyoto-u.ac.j [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan)

    2009-12-20

    Porosity evolution of dust aggregates is crucial in understanding dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. In this study, we present useful tools to study the coagulation and porosity evolution of dust aggregates. First, we present a new numerical method for simulating dust coagulation and porosity evolution as an extension of the conventional Smoluchowski equation. This method follows the evolution of the mean porosity for each aggregate mass simultaneously with the evolution of the mass distribution function. This method reproduces the results of previous Monte Carlo simulations with much less computational expense. Second, we propose a new collision model for porous dust aggregates on the basis of our N-body experiments on aggregate collisions. As the first step, we focus on 'hit-and-stick' collisions, which involve neither compression nor fragmentation of aggregates. We first obtain empirical data on porosity changes between the classical limits of ballistic cluster-cluster and particle-cluster aggregation. Using the data, we construct a recipe for the porosity change due to general hit-and-stick collisions as well as formulae for the aerodynamical and collisional cross sections. Our collision model is thus more realistic than a previous model of Ormel et al. based on the classical aggregation limits only. Simple coagulation simulations using the extended Smoluchowski method show that our collision model explains the fractal dimensions of porous aggregates observed in a full N-body simulation and a laboratory experiment. By contrast, similar simulations using the collision model of Ormel et al. result in much less porous aggregates, meaning that this model underestimates the porosity increase upon unequal-sized collisions. Besides, we discover that aggregates at the high-mass end of the distribution can have a considerably small aerodynamical cross section per unit mass compared with aggregates of lower masses. This occurs when aggregates drift under uniform acceleration (e.g., gravity) and their collision is induced by the difference in their terminal velocities. We point out an important implication of this discovery for dust growth in protoplanetary disks.

  8. Sound speed and attenuation in water-saturated glass beads as a function of frequency and porosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the frequency and porosity dependency. To begin to address this deficiency, a fluidized bed technique was used meaningful comparisons to various models of sound propagation. Towards this end, a fluidized bed apparatus and then al- lowed to rest overnight to dissolve trapped gas bubbles. Sediment porosity was controlled

  9. Pore-Level Analysis of the Relationship Between Porosity, Irreducible Water Saturation, and Permeability of Clastic Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPE 109878 Pore-Level Analysis of the Relationship Between Porosity, Irreducible Water Saturation permeability from well- log calculations of porosity and irreducible water satura- tion. However, these models of compaction, cementation, and distribution of dispersed hydrated clay minerals. Irreducible water

  10. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-09-12

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided.

  11. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  12. Electrochemical Performance of Graphene as Effected by Electrode Porosity and Graphene Functionalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punckt, Christian; Pope, Michael A.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2010-11-01

    Graphene-based electrodes have recently gained popularity due to their superior electrochemical properties. However, the exact mechanisms of electrochemical activity are not yet understood. Here, we present data from NADH oxidation and ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe experiments to demonstrate that both (i) the porosity of the graphene electrodes, as effected by the packing morphology, and (ii) the functional group and the lattice defect concentration play a significant role on their electrochemical performance.

  13. Electrochemical Performance of Graphene as Effected by Electrode Porosity and Graphene Functionalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punckt, Christian; Pope, Michael A.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2010-12-01

    Graphene-based electrodes have recently gained popularity due to their superior electrochemical properties. However, the exact mechanisms of electrochemical activity are not yet understood. Here, we present data from NADH oxidation and ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe experiments to demonstrate that both (i) the porosity of the graphene electrodes, as effected by the packing morphology, and (ii) the functional group and the lattice defect concentration play a significant role on their electrochemical performance.

  14. The characterization of porous media by porosity, permeability, formation factor, and mercury injection capillary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLallen, Dewitt Liggett

    1959-01-01

    , foraetion factor, ead the aercury injection capillary pressure - seturatioa relstioaship. Such correlstioas are of interest not only ia the charecterisetioa of porous asdie froa a theoretical steadpoiat, but else as sa eid ia the iater- pretetion..., it is possible to derive reletioas betweea porosity, poraeebility, foraetioa factor, ead s capillary pressure persaeter. These ideal relstioas differ frca thosecccurring iu actual porous uedia by a faster, er factors, depeudiug ou the deviatiou of the pere...

  15. Ultrasonic thickness testing of aging offshore structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellison, Brian Kirk

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis concern the use of ultrasonic thickness (UT) testing for use in the offshore industry. Evidence from prior studies conducted at Texas A&M University suggests that the corrosion on the surface ...

  16. Control of electrode depth in electroslag remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM); Damkroger, Brian K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace by driving the electrode at a nominal speed based upon melting rate and geometry while making minor proportional adjustments based on a measured metric of the electrode immersion depth. Electrode drive speed is increased if a measured metric of electrode immersion depth differs from a set point by a predetermined amount, indicating that the tip is too close to the surface of a slag pool. Impedance spikes are monitored to adjust the set point for the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon one or more properties of the impedance spikes.

  17. Relationship between mineralogy and porosity in seals relevant to geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Alexander [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Sheets, Julia [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Cole, David R [ORNL] [ORNL; Welch, Susan P [ORNL] [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Porosity and permeability are key petrophysical variables that link the thermal, hydrological, geochemical, and geomechanical properties of subsurface formations. The size, shape, distribution, and connectivity of rock pores dictate how fluids migrate into and through micro- and nano-environments, then wet and react with accessible solids. Three representative samples of cap rock from the Eau Claire Formation, the prospective sealing unit that overlies the Mount Simon Sandstone, a potential CO 2 storage formation, were interrogated with an array of complementary methods. neutron scattering, backscattered-electron imaging, energydispersive spectroscopy, and mercury porosimetry. Results are presented that detail variations between lithologic types in total and connected nano- to microporosity across more than five orders of magnitude. Pore types are identified and then characterized according to presence in each rock type, relative abundance, and surface area of adjacent minerals, pore and pore-throat diameters, and degree of connectivity. We observe a bimodal distribution of porosity as a function of both pore diameter and pore-throat diameter. The contribution of pores at the nano- and microscales to the total and the connected porosity is a distinguishing feature of each lithology observed. Pore:pore-throat ratios at each of these two scales diverge markedly, being almost unity at the nanoscale regime (dominated by illitic clay and micas), and varying by one and a half orders of magnitude at the microscale within a clastic mudstone.

  18. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  19. Variations of chlorites and illites and porosity in Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D.M.; Hughes, R.E. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Shallow marine, Mississippian, siliclastics in the Illinois basin, although predominantly quartz, contain other minerals that directly influence the porosity and permeability of these reservoir rocks. These sandstones contain more chlorite and kaolinite, relative to illite, than the authors have observed for shales from other Chesterian and Valmeyeran strata. Clay mineral suites in reservoirs appear to be diagenetic. The Aux Vases Sandstone contains illite, illite/smectite, and chlorite; kaolinite is absent. The Cypress Sandstone contains illite, illite/smectite, chlorite, and kaolinite. Chlorite in the Aux Vases Sandstone varies from moderately Fe-rich to Mg-rich, whereas the chlorite in the Cypress Sandstone is uniformly Fe-rich. As the percentage of clay minerals in these rocks decreases, the proportion of chlorite to other clay minerals increases. In some chlorites, the width of the 003 and 005 peaks at half-height is greater than that of the 002 and 004 peaks. This suggests an interlayering of a 7{angstrom} mineral, probably berthierine- or serpentine-like. SEM photos show chlorite coating quartz grains. In some samples there are quartz overgrowths in spite of the presence of a coating of chlorite; in others, chlorite interlayered with the 7{angstrom} phase seems to have interfered with or suppressed overgrowths. Correspondingly, there is a correlation between the 7{angstrom} phase/chlorite and porosity. Therefore, identification of the type of chlorite in a potential reservoir may be an indicator of porosity, as well as a guide for selecting completion and stimulation treatments.

  20. MonolayerThickness of Block Copolymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    .47 · Index of ref. for PS-PEHMA 1.51 #12;Annealing the films · Tg 22nm 24nm Height Images #12;AFM 12-33 26nm 28nm 30nm Bi-continuous #12;12-33Area% 13.08 31.55 41 Area % Thickness (nm) Monolayer: 18.86nm Bilayer: 37.72nm #12;Monolayer thickness 12

  1. Effect of quartz overgrowth precipitation on the multiscale porosity of sandstone: A (U)SANS and imaging analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Cole, David R.; Jackson, Andrew J.; Rother, Gernot; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments to understand the effects of quartz overgrowths on nanometer to centimeter scale pore structures of sandstones. Blocks from two samples of St. Peter Sandstone with different initial porosities (5.8 and 18.3%) were reacted from 3 days to 7.5 months at 100 and 200 °C in aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to quartz by reaction with amorphous silica. Porosity in the resultant samples was analyzed using small and ultrasmall angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscope/backscattered electron (SEM/BSE)-based image-scale processing techniques.Significant changes were observed in the multiscale pore structures. By three days much ofmore »the overgrowth in the low-porosity sample dissolved away. The reason for this is uncertain, but the overgrowths can be clearly distinguished from the original core grains in the BSE images. At longer times the larger pores are observed to fill with plate-like precipitates. As with the unreacted sandstones, porosity is a step function of size. Grain boundaries are typically fractal, but no evidence of mass fractal or fuzzy interface behavior was observed suggesting a structural difference between chemical and clastic sediments. After the initial loss of the overgrowths, image scale porosity (>~1 cm) decreases with time. Submicron porosity (typically ~25% of the total) is relatively constant or slightly decreasing in absolute terms, but the percent change is significant. Fractal dimensions decrease at larger scales, and increase at smaller scales with increased precipitation.« less

  2. Interactive effects of vegetation, soil moisture and bulk density on depth of burning of thick organic soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benscoter, Brian W.

    5, Canada. D University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H1, Canada consumption. We experimentally altered soil moisture profiles of peat monoliths collected from several. Additional keywords: bog, boreal, carbon, fire, ground-layer fuels, peat, peatland, Sphagnum, smouldering

  3. Interactive effects of vegetation, soil moisture and bulk density on depth of burning of thick organic soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    5, Canada. D University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H1, Canada consumption. We experimentally altered soil moisture profiles of peat monoliths collected from several. Additional keywords: bog, boreal, carbon, fire, ground-layer fuels, peat, peatland, smouldering, Sphagnum

  4. Pd conductor for thick film hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felten, J.J. [DuPont Electronics, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Cooperation between a materials developer and sensor designers has resulted in a palladium conductor used ro design and build a new hydrogen sensor that has superior performance characteristics and is also inexpensive to manufacture. Material characteristics give it faster response time and greater thermal/mechanical stability. The thick film palladium conductor paste, which can be fired at 850{degrees}C-950{degrees}C, has provided device designers a practical conductor paste with which to produce the improved sensor. The conductor uses a high surface area Pd powder combined with a binder glass that is chemically very inert, which combination produces a porous conductor that has good adhesion and chemical resistance. The current sensor design consists of three or four thick film Layers. Because of the flexibility of thick film techniques, the sensor element can be configured to any desired size and shape for specific instrument needs.

  5. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

    1987-10-06

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  6. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  7. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  8. Porosity in millimeter-scale welds of stainless steel : three-dimensional characterization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aagesen, Larry K.; Madison, Jonathan D.

    2012-05-01

    A variety of edge joints utilizing a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser have been produced and examined in a 304-L stainless steel to advance fundamental understanding of the linkage between processing and resultant microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Acquisition of three-dimensional reconstructions via micro-computed tomography combined with traditional metallography has allowed for qualitative and quantitative characterization of weld joints in a material system of wide use and broad applicability. The presence, variability and distribution of porosity, has been examined for average values, spatial distributions and morphology and then related back to fundamental processing parameters such as weld speed, weld power and laser focal length.

  9. Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between silica nanoparticles in water. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coating thickness and coverage effects on the...

  10. The Square Root Depth Wave Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin C. Cotter; Darryl D. Holm; James R. Percival

    2009-12-11

    We introduce a set of coupled equations for multilayer water waves that removes the ill-posedness of the multilayer Green-Naghdi (MGN) equations in the presence of shear. The new well-posed equations are Hamiltonian and in the absence of imposed background shear they retain the same travelling wave solutions as MGN. We call the new model the Square Root Depth equations, from the modified form of their kinetic energy of vertical motion. Our numerical results show how the Square Root Depth equations model the effects of multilayer wave propagation and interaction, with and without shear.

  11. Optical spectroscopy of sputtered nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubisova-Liskova, Eva Visnovsky, Stefan; Chang, Houchen; Wu, Mingzhong

    2015-05-07

    Nanometer (nm)-thick yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, YIG) films present interest for spintronics. This work employs spectral ellipsometry and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) spectra to characterize nm-thick YIG films grown on single-crystal Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} substrates by magnetron sputtering. The thickness (t) of the films ranges between 10?nm and 40?nm. Independent on t, the polar MOKE hysteresis loops saturate in the field of about 1.8 kOe, consistent with the saturation magnetization in bulk YIG (4?M{sub s}???1.75?kG). The MOKE spectrum measured at photon energies between 1.3?eV and 4.5?eV on the 38-nm-thick film agrees with that measured on single-crystal YIG bulk materials. The MOKE spectrum of the 12-nm-thick film still preserves the structure of the bulk YIG but its amplitude at lower photon energies is modified due to the fact that the radiation penetration depth exceeds 20?nm. The t dependence of the MOKE amplitude is consistent with MOKE calculations. The results indicate that the films are stoichiometric, strain free, without Fe{sup 2+}, and preserve bulk YIG properties down to t ? 10?nm.

  12. Free Energy of thick Center Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch. Korn; H. Reinhardt; T. Tok

    2005-08-05

    The free energy of thick center vortices is calculated in continuum Yang-Mills theory in one-loop approximation using the proper time regularization. The vortices are represented by Abelian gauge field configurations on the torus which satisfy twisted boundary conditions.

  13. Thick beryllium coatings by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H; Nikroo, A; Youngblood, K; Moreno, K; Wu, D; Fuller, T; Alford, C; Hayes, J; Detor, A; Wong, M; Hamza, A; van Buuren, T; Chason, E

    2011-04-14

    Thick (>150 {micro}m) beryllium coatings are studied as an ablator material of interest for fusion fuel capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). As an added complication, the coatings are deposited on mm-scale spherical substrates, as opposed to flats. DC magnetron sputtering is used because of the relative controllability of the processing temperature and energy of the deposits. We used ultra small angle x-ray spectroscopy (USAXS) to characterize the void fraction and distribution along the spherical surface. We investigated the void structure using a combination focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results show a few volume percent of voids and a typical void diameter of less than two hundred nanometers. Understanding how the stresses in the deposited material develop with thickness is important so that we can minimize film cracking and delamination. To that end, an in-situ multiple optical beam stress sensor (MOSS) was used to measure the stress behavior of thick Beryllium coatings on flat substrates as the material was being deposited. We will show how the film stress saturates with thickness and changes with pressure.

  14. Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Keri Marie

    2013-07-22

    was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

  15. Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth Yi Y. Liu,1 optical depth (VOD) retrievals from three satellitebased passive microwave instruments were merged longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38

  16. Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastalerz, Maria; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Rupp, John A

    2012-01-01

    Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (<2 nm) size distribution. Micropore and mesopore volumes correlate with organic matter content in the samples. Accessibility of pores in coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

  17. Estimates of frequency-dependent compressibility from a quasistatic double-porosity model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J. G.; Wang, H. F.

    1998-09-16

    Gassmann's relationship between the drained and undrained bulk modulus of a porous medium is often used to relate the dry bulk modulus to the saturated bulk modulus for elastic waves, because the compressibility of air is considered so high that the dry rock behaves in a drained fashion and the frequency of elastic waves is considered so high that the saturated rock behaves in an undrained fashion. The bulk modulus calculated from ultrasonic velocities, however, often does not match the Gassmann prediction. Mavko and Jizba examined how local flow effects and unequilibrated pore pressures can lead to greater stiffnesses. Their conceptual model consists of a distribution of porosities obtained from the strain-versus-confining-pressure behavior. Stiff pores that close at higher confining pressures are considered to remain undrained (unrelaxed) while soft pores drain even for high-frequency stress changes. If the pore shape distribution is bimodal, then the rock approximately satisfies the assumptions of a double-porosity, poroelastic material. Berryman and Wang [1995] established linear constitutive equations and identified four different time scales of ow behavior: (1) totally drained, (2) soft pores are drained but stiff pores are undrained, (3) soft and stiff pores are locally equilibrated, but undrained beyond the grain scale, and (4) both soft and stiff pores are undrained. The relative magnitudes of the four associated bulk moduli will be examined for all four moduli and illustrated for several sandstones.

  18. Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster Concepts Nora Broy1,2,3 , Benedikt Zierer instrument cluster. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal more pronounced as auto-stereoscopic displays become available for the car. For instance, H¨akkil¨a et

  19. Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janke, Wolfhard

    OFFPRINT Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers T. Vogel, T.epljournal.org doi: 10.1209/0295-5075/85/10003 Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers the conformational phase diagram of a simple model for flexible polymers with explicit thickness. The thickness

  20. The Consistent Kinetics Porosity (CKP) Model: A Theory for the Mechanical Behavior of Moderately Porous Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRANNON,REBECCA M.

    2000-11-01

    A theory is developed for the response of moderately porous solids (no more than {approximately}20% void space) to high-strain-rate deformations. The model is consistent because each feature is incorporated in a manner that is mathematically compatible with the other features. Unlike simple p-{alpha} models, the onset of pore collapse depends on the amount of shear present. The user-specifiable yield function depends on pressure, effective shear stress, and porosity. The elastic part of the strain rate is linearly related to the stress rate, with nonlinear corrections from changes in the elastic moduli due to pore collapse. Plastically incompressible flow of the matrix material allows pore collapse and an associated macroscopic plastic volume change. The plastic strain rate due to pore collapse/growth is taken normal to the yield surface. If phase transformation and/or pore nucleation are simultaneously occurring, the inelastic strain rate will be non-normal to the yield surface. To permit hardening, the yield stress of matrix material is treated as an internal state variable. Changes in porosity and matrix yield stress naturally cause the yield surface to evolve. The stress, porosity, and all other state variables vary in a consistent manner so that the stress remains on the yield surface throughout any quasistatic interval of plastic deformation. Dynamic loading allows the stress to exceed the yield surface via an overstress ordinary differential equation that is solved in closed form for better numerical accuracy. The part of the stress rate that causes no plastic work (i.e-, the part that has a zero inner product with the stress deviator and the identity tensor) is given by the projection of the elastic stressrate orthogonal to the span of the stress deviator and the identity tensor.The model, which has been numerically implemented in MIG format, has been exercised under a wide array of extremal loading and unloading paths. As will be discussed in a companion sequel report, the CKP model is capable of closely matching plate impact measurements for porous materials.

  1. Use of a Naphthalene-Based Binder in Injection Molding Net-Shape Titanium Components of Controlled Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, K. Scott; Nyberg, Eric A.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2005-07-01

    We have recently developed a naphthalene-based binder system for use in powder injection molding (PIM) of ceramic and metallic materials. The use of a binder that can be removed via sublimation offers several unique advantages relative to the typical thermoplastic and/or thermoset binders employed in PIM. One of these is that essentially no volume change takes place during debindering. This offers a relatively facile method of introducing porosity into a net-shape part of potentially complex geometry. In the study described in this paper, the effects of powder loading and subsequent isostatic compaction on the size and amount of porosity in the components produced by this technique were investigated. In general, it was found that the amount of porosity is inversely proportional to the initial concentration of metal powder in the PIM feedstock. Likewise, average pore size displays a similar relationship with powder loading.

  2. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction and Microstructure Modeling of Porosity-Graded Cathode Using Focused Ion Beam and Homogenization Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamedani, Amani; Baniassadi, Majid; Sheidaei, A.; Pourboghrat, F.; Remond, Y.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2014-02-28

    In this study, microstructure of a porosity-graded lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has been characterized using focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM) combined with image processing. Two-point correlation functions of the two-dimensional (2D) images taken along the direction of porosity gradient are used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) microstructure. The effective elastic modulus of the two-phase porosity-graded cathode is predicted using strong contrast (SC) and composite inclusion (CI) homogenization techniques. The effectiveness of the two methods in predicting the effective elastic properties of the porositygraded LSM cathode is investigated in comparison with the results obtained from the finite element model (FEM).

  3. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 2: Optimized Gaussian packets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 2: Optimized Gaussian packets V#19;aclav Bucha packet prestack depth migration consists of four basic steps: (a) preparation of a velocity model su to the Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Keywords Gaussian packets, Gaussian beams, prestack depth

  4. Experimental study of the relationship between formation factor, porosity, and cementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harig, M.D.; Chaney, R.C.

    1999-07-01

    Cemented granular soils are classified based on the size and distribution of the individual grains and qualitatively on the basis of cementation. To uniquely classify these types of soils, information about the fabric (pore geometry and/or level of cementation) of the specimen needs to be quantified. Electrical resistivity, or its reciprocal, conductivity, methods have been extensively used both in situ and in the laboratory to provide a means for determining a variety of soil index, structural, erosional, and cyclic properties. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between formation factor (F), porosity (n), and cementation factor (m) of remolded sand-cement specimens. This relationship is shown to provide a mechanism for estimating the level of cementation in undisturbed specimens. The formation factor is the ratio of the electrical resistivity of the sand-water-cement mixture to that of the interstitial water.

  5. Volume and porosity thermal regulation in lipid mesophases by coupling mobile ligands to soft membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucia Parolini; Bortolo M. Mognetti; Jurij Kotar; Erika Eiser; Pietro Cicuta; Lorenzo Di Michele

    2015-01-09

    Short DNA linkers are increasingly being exploited for driving specific self-assembly of Brownian objects. DNA-functionalised colloids can assemble into ordered or amorphous materials with tailored morphology. Recently, the same approach has been applied to compliant units, including emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles. The liquid structure of these substrates introduces new degrees of freedom: the tethers can diffuse and rearrange, radically changing the physics of the interactions. Unlike droplets, vesicles are extremely deformable and DNA-mediated adhesion causes significant shape adjustments. We investigate experimentally the thermal response of pairs and networks of DNA-tethered liposomes and observe two intriguing and possibly useful collective properties: negative thermal expansion and tuneable porosity of the liposome networks. A model providing a thorough understanding of this unexpected phenomenon is developed, explaining the emergent properties out of the interplay between the temperature-dependent deformability of the vesicles and the DNA-mediated adhesive forces.

  6. The role and importance of porosity in the deflagration rates of HMX-based materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, E A; Hsu, P C; Springer, H K

    2011-03-15

    The deflagration behavior of thermally damaged HMX-based materials will be discussed. Strands of material were burned at pressures ranging from 10-300 MPa using the LLNL high pressure strand burner. Strands were heated in-situ and burned while still hot; temperatures range from 90-200 C and were chosen in order to allow for thermal damage of the material without significant decomposition of the HMX. The results indicate that multiple variables affect the burn rate but the most important are the polymorph of HMX and the nature and thermal stability of the non-HE portion of the material. Characterization of the strands indicate that the thermal soak produces significant porosity and permeability in the sample allowing for significantly faster burning due to the increased surface area and new pathways for flame spread into the material. Specifically, the deflagration rates of heated PBXN-9, LX-10, and PBX-9501 will be discussed and compared.

  7. Engineering of porosity in amorphous materials. Plasma oxidation of hydrocarbon templates in polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Buss, R.J.; Assink, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shea, K.J.; Oviatt, H. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Arylene- and alkylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by sol-gel processing of bis(triethoxysilyl)-arylene monomers 1--4, and alkylene monomers 5--9. The arylene polysilsesquioxanes were porous materials with surface areas as high as 830 m{sup 2}/g (BET). Treatment with an inductively coupled oxygen plasma resulted in the near quantitative removal of the arylene bridging groups and a coarsening of the pore structure. Solid state {sup 29}Si NMR was used to confirm the conversion of the sesquioxane silicons (T) to silica (Q). The alkylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes were non-porous. Oxygen plasma treatment afforded silica gels with mesoporosity. The porosity in the silica gels appears to arise entirely from the oxidation of the alkylene spacers.

  8. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related in images. This relationship can be described by a natural logarithm equation. Thus, from the one phase-contrast view, depth information can be retrieved from its contrast. Our preliminary biological experiments indicate promise in its application to measurements requiring in vivo and ongoing assessment of lung tumor progression.

  9. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  10. In-depth analysis of CIGS film for solar cells, structural and optical characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slobodskyy, A; ~Ulyanenkova, T; ~Doyle, S; Powalla, M; ~Baumbach, T; ~Lemmer, U

    2010-01-01

    Space-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements performed on gradient-etched CuIn$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$Se$_2$ (CIGS) solar cells provide information about stress and texture depth profiles in the absorber layer. An important parameter for CIGS layer growth dynamics, the absorber thickness-dependent stress in the molybdenum back contact is analyzed. Texturing of grains and quality of the polycrystalline absorber layer are correlated with the intentional composition gradients (band gap grading). Band gap gradient is determined by space-resolved photoluminescence measurements and correlated with composition and strain profiles.

  11. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  12. Evaluation of a permeability-porosity relationship in a low permeability creeping material using a single transient test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghabezloo, Siavash; Saint-Marc, Jérémie; 10.1016/j.ijrmms.2008.10.003

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented for the evaluation of the permeability-porosity relationship in a low-permeability porous material using the results of a single transient test. This method accounts for both elastic and non-elastic deformations of the sample during the test and is applied to a hardened class G oil well cement paste. An initial hydrostatic undrained loading is applied to the sample. The generated excess pore pressure is then released at one end of the sample while monitoring the pore pressure at the other end and the radial strain in the middle of the sample during the dissipation of the pore pressure. These measurements are back analysed to evaluate the permeability and its evolution with porosity change. The effect of creep of the sample during the test on the measured pore pressure and volume change is taken into account in the analysis. This approach permits to calibrate a power law permeability-porosity relationship for the tested hardened cement paste. The porosity sensitivity exponent of the power...

  13. Nanorod PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes with Controlled Porosity M. D. Gasda, G. A. Eisman,* and D. Gallz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Nanorod PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes with Controlled Porosity M. D. Gasda, G. A. Eisman,* and D. Gallz as cathode electrodes in proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells. Deposition on flat substrates yields February 4, 2010. Proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells are promising for future automotive applications

  14. Radiation phantom with humanoid shape and adjustable thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Joerg (Pleasanton, CA); Levy, Joshua (Salem, NY); Stern, Robin L. (Lodi, CA); Siantar, Christine Hartmann (Livermore, CA); Goldberg, Zelanna (Carmichael, CA)

    2006-12-19

    A radiation phantom comprising a body with a general humanoid shape and at least a portion having an adjustable thickness. In one embodiment, the portion with an adjustable thickness comprises at least one tissue-equivalent slice.

  15. Integrated design of castings: effect of porosity on mechanical performance This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Integrated design of castings: effect of porosity on mechanical performance This article has been Contact us My IOPscience #12;Integrated design of castings: effect of porosity on mechanical performance R A Hardin and C Beckermann Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa

  16. Effect of Porosity on the Capacity Fade of a Lithium-Ion Godfrey Sikha,* Branko N. Popov,** and Ralph E. White***,z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effect of Porosity on the Capacity Fade of a Lithium-Ion Battery Theory Godfrey Sikha,* Branko N of a lithium-ion battery. It includes the changes in the porosity of the material due to the reversible the capacity fade in a lithium-ion battery based on the unwanted parasitic reaction that consumes Li along

  17. Thickness determination of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride films by scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, P. Sutter, E.

    2014-09-01

    We assess scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for thickness measurements on few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), the layered dielectric of choice for integration with graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Observations on h-BN islands with large, atomically flat terraces show that the secondary electron intensity in SEM reflects monolayer height changes in films up to least 10 atomic layers thickness. From a quantitative analysis of AES data, the energy-dependent electron escape depth in h-BN films is deduced. The results show that AES is suitable for absolute thickness measurements of few-layer h-BN of 1 to 6 layers.

  18. A Heat Kernel based Cortical Thickness Estimation Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yalin

    thickness, Heat Kernel, Tetrahedral Mesh, Streamline, False Discovery Rate 1 Introduction AlzheimerA Heat Kernel based Cortical Thickness Estimation Algorithm Gang Wang1,2 , Xiaofeng Zhang1.R.China Abstract. Cortical thickness estimation in magnetic resonance imag- ing (MRI) is an important technique

  19. Global Sediment Thickness Dataset updated for the Australian-Antarctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Global Sediment Thickness Dataset updated for the Australian-Antarctic Southern Ocean Joanne author: jo.whittaker@utas.edu.au Key Points - Global minimum sediment thickness compilation updated for Australia Antarctica - Sediment thicknesses computed from seismic reflection and refraction data - Sediment

  20. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Risk and Decision Analysis Dept.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Geologic Integration Group; Di Sanza, F. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA`s 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE`s actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA`s requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health.

  1. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

  2. Ocean General Circula-on near 1000 m depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lherminier, Pascale

    currents near 1000 m depth · Eddy Kine-c Energy near 1000 m depth · Seasonal hemisphere), Kuroshio, Oyashio, East Kamchatka, Alaska Stream, Gulf Stream, Labrador, East and West Greenland (northern hemisphere). · Alternate zonal bands

  3. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qiguang; Williams, Frances; Zhao, Xin; Reece, Charles E.; Krishnan, Mahadevan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials? microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials? crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surface?s top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  4. Pyrolysis of tire rubber: Porosity and adsorption characteristics of the pyrolytic chars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguel, G.S.; Fowler, G.D.; Sollars, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    Tire rubber has been pyrolyzed at various temperatures under a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting chars have been analyzed for their porosity using nitrogen gas adsorption and for their aqueous adsorption characteristics using phenol, methylene blue, and the reactive dyes Procion Turquoise H-A and Procion Red H-E3B. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were modeled to the BET and Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equations to determine effective surface areas, mesopore volumes, and micropore volumes. Results showed that pyrolysis of tire rubber was essentially complete at 500 C and resulted in a char yield of approximately 42 wt%. Pyrolytic chars exhibited BET surface areas up to 85 m{sup 2}/g and micropore volumes up to 0.04 mL/g. Owing to their poorly developed micropore structure, the pyrolytic chars exhibited limited aqueous adsorption capacity for compounds of small molecular weight, such as phenol. However, the chars possessed significantly greater adsorption capacity for species of large molecular weight which was attributed to the presence of large mesopore volumes (up to 0.19 mL/g).

  5. Method and apparatus for in situ determination of permeability and porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagus, Peter L. (Olivehain, CA); Peterson, Edward W. (Del Mar, CA)

    1982-10-12

    A method and apparatus for in situ measurement of flow characteristics in boreholes or the like is disclosed for determining various formation characteristics such as permeability, particularly in the range of approximately 100-1,000 microdarcies and lower. One embodiment of the method and apparatus contemplates formation of a test interval in the borehole by a pair of expandable packers, additional guard zones being formed in the borehole at either end of the test interval by two additional guard packers, suitable flow conditions being simultaneously and separately measured within the test interval and each of the guard zones in order to permit determination of multidirectional components of permeability, porosity and other characteristics of the particular formation. Another embodiment contemplates whole hole testing where similar data is developed for a test interval formed between a single packer and the end of the borehole and one guard zone formed by a single additional guard packer. The method and apparatus of this invention are particularly contemplated for obtaining unambiguous measurements of multidirectional flow in low permeability formations.

  6. Elements of fractal generalization of dual-porosity model for solute transport in unsaturated fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Matveev, L.; Pruess, K.

    2008-09-01

    In this study, new elements were developed to generalize the dual-porosity model for moisture infiltration on and solute transport in unsaturated rocks, taking into account fractal aspects of the percolation process. Random advection was considered as a basic mechanism of solute transport in self-similar fracture systems. In addition to spatial variations in the infiltration velocity field, temporal fluctuations were also taken into account. The rock matrix, a low-permeability component of the heterogeneous geologic medium, acts as a trap for solute particles and moisture. Scaling relations were derived for the moisture infiltration flux, the velocity correlation length, the average velocity of infiltration, and the velocity correlation function. The effect of temporal variations in precipitation intensity on the infiltration processes was analyzed. It showed that the mode of solute transport is determined by the power exponent in the advection velocity correlation function and the dimensionality of the trapping system, both of which may change with time. Therefore, depending on time, various transport regimes may be realized: superdiffusion, subdiffusion, or classical diffusion. The complex structure of breakthrough curves from changes in the transport regimes was also examined. A renormalization of the solute source strength due to characteristic fluctuations of highly disordered media was established.

  7. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in simple models of various anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in simple models of various anisotropy V´aclav Bucha Department Republic, E-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration anisotropy and monoclinic anisotropy. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in two ways: a

  8. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D simple models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D simple models: comparison of triclinic anisotropy depth migration to calculate migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic homogeneous velocity models interface. The anisotropy in the upper layer is triclinic. We apply Kirch- hoff prestack depth migration

  9. Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater Relationship in the Platte River Valley rates were correlated with depth to groundwater (d) values in the wide alluvial valley of the Platte soils with a shallow groundwater table. The transition depth (dt) between negative and positive values

  10. Ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bylenok, Paul J. (Clifton Park, NY); Patmos, William M. (Schenectady, NY); Wagner, Thomas A. (Bronswick, NY); Martin, Francis H. (Melrose, NY)

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system uses an ultrasonic fsed beam probe for measuring thickness of an object, such as a wall of a tube, a computer for controlling movement of the probe in a scanning pattern within the tube and processing an analog signal produced by the probe which is proportional to the tube wall thickness in the scanning pattern, and a line scan recorder for producing a record of the tube wall thicknesses measured by the probe in the scanning pattern. The probe is moved in the scanning pattern to sequentially scan circumferentially the interior tube wall at spaced apart adjacent axial locations. The computer processes the analog signal by converting it to a digital signal and then quantifies the digital signal into a multiplicity of thickness points with each falling in one of a plurality of thickness ranges corresponding to one of a plurality of shades of grey. From the multiplicity of quantified thickness points, a line scan recorder connected to the computer generates a pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses with each quantified thickness point thus being obtained from a minute area, e.g. 0.010 inch by 0.010 inch, of tube wall and representing one pixel of the pictorial map. In the pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses, the pixels represent different wall thicknesses having different shades of grey.

  11. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  12. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  13. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1.What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2.Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3.What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  14. Expanded Prussian Blue Analogues Incorporating [Re6Se8(CN)6]3-/4-Clusters: Adjusting Porosity via Charge Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shores, Matthew P.

    Expanded Prussian Blue Analogues Incorporating [Re6Se8(CN)6]3-/4- Clusters: Adjusting Porosity via of octahedral [M(CN)6]3-/4- complexes for the synthesis of microporous Prussian blue type solids with adjustable to be a direct expansion of Prussian blue (Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3,14H2O), with [Re6Se8(CN)6]4- clusters connected through

  15. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  16. The nature of the alkoxide group, solvent, catalyst, and concentration on the gelation and porosity of hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D. A. (Douglas A.); Small, J. H. (James H.)

    2004-01-01

    Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes are hybrid organic-inorganic materials prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of 1,6-bis(trialkoxysilyl)hexane monomers: (1) R = Methyl; (2) R = Ethyl; and (3) R = n-Propyl. Previous studies showed that high surface area xerogels could be prepared from 2 with base catalyzed polymerizations while non-porous xerogels could be prepared with acidic catalysts. The object of this study was to ascertain the influences of monomer alkoxide group, solvent, catalyst, and monomer concentration on gelation time, and the properties of the resulting xerogels.This study has provided some insight into the chemical parameters that affect the ultimate structure in bridged polysilsesquioxanes. First, gelation times do not necessarily directly reflect the hydrolysis and condensation rates expected for different alkoxide groups. The collapse of porosity during the drying of hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes occurs in nearly all acid-catalyzed samples, save those that form quickly due to concentration or from the methoxide monomer 1 in methanolic solution. This suggests that there may be a kinetic contribution to creating porosity in addition to the network compliance model. It would also appear that syneresis of gels during aging may be the symptom of changes resulting in increased porosity. Whatever these changes may be due to, they do not appear to significantly alter the structural composition. Experiments are underway to provide more information and test some of these hypotheses.

  17. Anomalous porosity preservation and preferential accumulation of gas hydrate in the Andaman accretionary wedge, NGHP-01 site 17A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Kelly K.; Johnson, Joel E.; Torres, Marta E.; Hong, WeiLi; Giosan, Liviu; Solomon, E.; Kastner, Miriam; Cawthern, Thomas; Long, Philip E.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to well established properties that control the presence or absence of the hydrate stability zone, such as pressure, temperature, and salinity, additional parameters appear to influence the concentration of gas hydrate in host sediments. The stratigraphic record at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea, eastern Indian Ocean, illustrates the need to better understand the role pore-scale phenomena play in the distribution and presence of marine gas hydrates in a variety of subsurface settings. In this paper we integrate field-generated datasets with newly acquired sedimentology, physical property, imaging and geochemical data with mineral saturation and ion activity products of key mineral phases such as amorphous silica and calcite, to document the presence and nature of secondary precipitates that contributed to anomalous porosity preservation at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea. This study demonstrates the importance of grain-scale subsurface heterogeneities in controlling the occurrence and distribution of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations in marine sediments, and document the importance that increased permeability and enhanced porosity play in supporting gas concentrations sufficient to support gas hydrate formation. The grain scale relationships between porosity, permeability, and gas hydrate saturation documented at Site 17A likely offer insights into what may control the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate in other sedimentary settings.

  18. The Galactic thick and thin disks: differences in evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Nykytyuk; T. V. Mishenina

    2006-05-26

    Recent observations demonstrate that the thin and thick disks of the Galaxy have different chemical abundance trends and evolution timescales. The relative abundances of $\\alpha$-elements in the thick Galactic disk are increased relative to the thin disk. Our goal is to investigate the cause of such differences in thick and thin disk abundances. We investigate the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk in the framework of the open two-zone model with gas inflow. The Galactic abundance trends for $\\alpha$-elements (Mg, Si, O) and Fe are predicted for the thin and thick Galactic disks. The star formation histories of the thin and thick disks must have been different and the gas infall must have been more intense during the thick disk evolution that the thin disk evolution.

  19. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Surface configuration, ice thick- ness, volume and bedrockconstruction of the ice thick- ness grids. between flightof the physical ice thick- ness, rather than an “ice-

  20. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    php?titleVariableCrustalThicknessInTheWesternGreatBasin-ACompilationOfOldAndNewRefractionData&oldid793047" Categories: Missing Required Information Reference...

  1. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism,...

  2. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies More Documents & Publications Good Practice Guide on Firewall Deployment for SCADA and Process Control Networks Mitigations for...

  3. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  4. Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spudich, James A.

    Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge and Specific Domains and Molecular Biology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America, 3 UNC of America Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating

  5. Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Alfred K.

    Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry P. Dorr, A. K. Louis-physical, optical and geometrical properties of multi-layered samples of paint on a metalic substrate. A special infrared radiometry, paint-#12;lm-thickness is measured using lock-in ampli#12;ers. The phase-di#11;erence

  6. Real Time Head Pose Estimation from Consumer Depth Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    for estimating location and orientation of a person's head, from depth data acquired by a low quality device. OurReal Time Head Pose Estimation from Consumer Depth Cameras Gabriele Fanelli1 , Thibaut Weise2 and the variance of the head position and orientation. We evaluate three different approaches to jointly take

  7. Instrument for Determining Depth of Dehydration of Frozen Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This report describes the design, construction, and operation of a de- hydration depth gauge to measure the degree of dehydration in frozen seafoods. Design The dehydration depth gauge adopts the principle was modified by using a heavier gauge blade having a narrow cutting edge extending I mm below the plane's flat

  8. Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM)

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

  9. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  10. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

  11. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  12. Control for monitoring thickness of high temperature refractory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caines, M.J.

    1982-11-23

    This invention teaches an improved monitoring device for detecting the changes in thickness of high-temperature refractory, the device consists of a probe having at least two electrically conductive generally parallel elements separated by a dielectric material. The probe is implanted or embedded directly in the refractory and is elongated to extend in line with the refractory thickness to be measured. Electrical inputs to the conductive elements provide that either or both the electrical conductance or capacitance can be found, so that charges over lapsed time periods can be compared in order to detect changes in the thickness of the refractory.

  13. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore »to those of other techniques available.« less

  14. Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

  15. OPTICALLY THICK H I DOMINANT IN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: AN ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATION TO ''DARK GAS''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, Y.; Torii, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Okamoto, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Tachihara, K.; Sano, H. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Onishi, T., E-mail: fukui@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Astrophysics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Dark gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) is believed to not be detectable either in CO or H I radio emission, but it is detectable by other means including ? rays, dust emission, and extinction traced outside the Galactic plane at |b| > 5°. In these analyses, the 21 cm H I emission is usually assumed to be completely optically thin. We have reanalyzed the H I emission from the whole sky at |b| > 15° by considering temperature stratification in the ISM inferred from the Planck/IRAS analysis of the dust properties. The results indicate that the H I emission is saturated with an optical depth ranging from 0.5 to 3 for 85% of the local H I gas. This optically thick H I is characterized by spin temperature in the range 10 K-60 K, significantly lower than previously postulated in the literature, whereas such low temperature is consistent with emission/absorption measurements of the cool H I toward radio continuum sources. The distribution and the column density of the H I are consistent with those of the dark gas suggested by ? rays, and it is possible that the dark gas in the Galaxy is dominated by optically thick cold H I gas. This result implies that the average density of H I is 2-2.5 times higher than that derived on the optically thin assumption in the local ISM.

  16. Porosity Characterization Utilizing Petrographic Image Analysis: Implications for Identifying and Ranking Reservoir Flow Units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layman, John Morgan, II

    2004-09-30

    The Spraberry Formation is traditionally thought of as deep-water turbidites in the central Midland Basin. At Happy Spraberry field, Garza County, Texas, however, production is from a carbonate interval about 100 feet thick that has been correlated...

  17. Crustal thickness and support of topography on Venus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Peter Benjamin

    The topography of a terrestrial planet can be supported by several mechanisms: (1) crustal thickness variations, (2) density variations in the crust and mantle, (3) dynamic support, and (4) lithospheric stresses. Each of ...

  18. Reactor physics assessment of thick silicon carbide clad PWR fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloore, David A. (David Allan)

    2013-01-01

    High temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity make silicon carbide (SiC) a potential fuel cladding material that may improve the economics and safety of light water reactors (LWRs). "Thick" SiC ...

  19. Gender Effects on Cortical Thickness , Thompson PM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    thickness was estimated voxel by voxel and projected as a local value (mm) onto the cortical surface, where brains that appears to involve the architecture of the cortical mantle. We detected significantly greater

  20. Thickness trends and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelder, Terry

    Thickness trends and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Formation, Appalachian to the lithostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle and Upper Devonian shale succession of the Appalachian

  1. A comparison of thick film and thin film traffic stripes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keese, Charles J

    1952-01-01

    of this thesis. CONTESTS Introduction ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 Scope and Obfectives Method of Conducting Road Service Tests ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 8 PART I A Comparison of Paint Films of Various Thicknesses . . . . . . . . ~ ~, ~, ~ 72 App1ioation... of Test Stripes . Results of Thiokness Tests . 13 19 Conclusions 2$ PART II A Comparison of Various Thick Film and Thin Film Traffic Stripes. 26 Paint Stripes Over Adhesive Films Rosin Striping Compounds. . . + ~ . , ~ 29 ~ ~ ~ Preforsmd Plastic...

  2. Microfluidic devices with thick-film electrochemical detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph; Tian, Baomin; Sahlin, Eskil

    2005-04-12

    An apparatus for conducting a microfluidic process and analysis, including at least one elongated microfluidic channel, fluidic transport means for transport of fluids through the microfluidic channel, and at least one thick-film electrode in fluidic connection with the outlet end of the microfluidic channel. The present invention includes an integrated on-chip combination reaction, separation and thick-film electrochemical detection microsystem, for use in detection of a wide range of analytes, and methods for the use thereof.

  3. Ionospheric slab thickness in middle and low latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, K.; Liu, X.M. (NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The equivalent slab thickness of the ionosphere at 15 stations in middle and low latitudes was studied to determine its dependence on solar cycle and location. The data were grouped by season. The following are the major conclusions. There appears to be little or no geographical, or geomagnetic, dependence. The slab thickness varies approximately linearly with the 12-month smoothed values of the 10.7-cm solar radio flux. In middle latitudes the winter midnight thickness is essentially independent of the flux, whereas in summer and equinox the midnight thickness increases with increase of solar flux. The noon thickness increases with increase of solar flux in all seasons. The zero-order Fourier coeffficients for the diurnal curves at all 15 stations were expressed as linear functions of the 10.7-cm flux. The higher harmonic coefficients showed no appreciable dependence on solar flux. The pronounced predawn increase in slab thickness is caused by low values of the maximum electron density, not by increase of total electron content. 10 refs.

  4. Computation of Texture and Stereoscopic Depth in Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahle, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    The computation of texture and of stereoscopic depth is limited by a number of factors in the design of the optical front-end and subsequent processing stages in humans and machines. A number of limiting factors in ...

  5. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

  6. In-Depth Temperature Profiles in Pyrolyzing Wood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reszka, Pedro

    The move towards performance-based design of the fire resistance of structures requires more accurate design methods. An important variable in the fire performance of timber structures is the in-depth temperature distribution, as wood is weakened...

  7. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  8. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2014-02-18

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  9. Method and system for producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A. (2262 Hampton Rd., Livermore, CA 94550); Montcalm, Claude (14 Jami St., Livermore, CA 94550); Walton, Christopher (2927 Lorina St., #2, Berkeley, CA 94705-1852)

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for producing a thin film with highly uniform (or highly accurate custom graded) thickness on a flat or graded substrate (such as concave or convex optics), by sweeping the substrate across a vapor deposition source with controlled (and generally, time-varying) velocity. In preferred embodiments, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece that is held stationary while exposed to the source), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of sweep velocity modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a sweep velocity modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a practical method of accurately measuring source flux distribution, and a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal sweep velocity modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. Preferably, the computer implements an algorithm in which many sweep velocity function parameters (for example, the speed at which each substrate spins about its center as it sweeps across the source) can be varied or set to zero.

  10. Wide-angle imaging LIDAR (WAIL): a ground-based instrument for monitoring the thickness and density of optically thick clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Ho, Cheng,

    2001-01-01

    Traditional lidar provides little information on dense clouds beyond the range to their base (ceilometry), due to their extreme opacity. At most optical wavelengths, however, laser photons are not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, and thus eventually escape the cloud via multiple scattering, producing distinctive extended space- and time-dependent patterns which are, in essence, the cloud's radiative Green functions. These Green functions, essentially 'movies' of the time evolution of the spatial distribution of escaping light, are the primary data products of a new type of lidar: Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). WAIL data can be used to infer both optical depth and physical thickness of clouds, and hence the cloud liquid water content. The instrumental challenge is to accommodate a radiance field varying over many orders of magnitude and changing over widely varying time-scales. Our implementation uses a high-speed microchannel plate/crossed delay line imaging detector system with a 60-degree full-angle field of view, and a 532 nm doubled Nd:YAG laser. Nighttime field experiments testing various solutions to this problem show excellent agreement with diffusion theory, and retrievals yield plausible values for the optical and geometrical parameters of the observed cloud decks.

  11. Influence of compensator thickness, field size, and off-axis distance on the effective attenuation coefficient of a cerrobend compensator for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghparast, Abbas; Hashemi, Bijan; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be performed by using compensators. To make a compensator for an IMRT practice, it is required to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient (?{sub eff}) of its material, which is affected by various factors. We studied the effect of the variation of the most important factors on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} of the cerrobend compensator for 6-MV photon beams, including the field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis distance. Experimental measurements were carried out at 100 cm source-to-surface distance and 10 cm depth for the 6-MV photon beams of an Elekta linac using various field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis settings. The field sizes investigated ranged from 4 × 4 to 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} and the cerrobend compensator thicknesses from 0.5–6 cm. For a fixed compensator thickness, variation of the ?{sub eff} with the field size ranged from 3.7–6.8%, with the highest value attributed to the largest compensator thickness. At the reference field size of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}, the ?{sub eff} varied by 16.5% when the compensator thickness was increased from 0.5–6 cm. However, the variation of the ?{sub eff} with the off-axis distance was only 0.99% at this field size, whereas for the largest field size, it was more significant. Our results indicated that the compensator thickness and field size have the most significant effect on the calculation of the compensator ?{sub eff} for the 6-MV photon beam. Therefore, it is recommended to consider these parameters when calculating the compensator thickness for an IMRT practice designed for these beams. The off-axis distance had a significant effect on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} only for the largest field size. Hence, it is recommended to consider the effect of this parameter only for field sizes larger than 25 × 25 cm{sup 2}.

  12. The use of a macroscopic formulation describing the effects of dynamic compaction and porosity on plasma sprayed copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arrigoni, M.; Boustie, M. [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique (LCD UPR CNRS 9028), ENSMA, BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Bolis, C.; Berthe, L. [Laboratoire d'Application des Lasers de Puissance (LALP UPR CNRS 1576), 16 bis Av Prieur de la Cote d'Or, 94114 Arcueil Cedex (France); Barradas, S.; Jeandin, M. [Ecole des Mines de Paris/C2P-Centre de Projection Plasma, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France)

    2008-04-15

    Coatings processed by thermal deposition techniques involve porosity. The Laser adhesion test developed for testing bond strength of a coating on its substrate requires a good knowledge of shock wave propagation in such media. Experiments carried out on plasma sprayed copper samples, about 14% porous, with velocity interferometer system for any reflector measurements display the discrepancy of previously used models. Hence, a one-dimensional formulation of the compaction process, based on a simple P-{alpha} model, is proposed to improve the correlation between experimental and computed data signals obtained on a plasma sprayed copper under dynamic loading. Besides, this improvement allows the estimation of the bond strength of a plasma sprayed copper on aluminum substrate.

  13. Thermal spray and cold spray analysis of density, porosity, and tensile Specimens for use with LIGA applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DECKER,MERLIN K.; SMITH,MARK F.

    2000-02-01

    This analysis provides a preliminary investigation into using Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray and Cold Spray as material deposition processes for LIGA applications. These spray material processes were studied to make an initial determination of their potential as alternatives to producing mechanical parts via the electroplating process. Three materials, UltraMachinable{reg_sign} Stainless Steel, BondArc{reg_sign}, and aluminum, were sprayed using Thermal Spray. Only aluminum was sprayed using the Cold Spray process. Following the spray procedure, the test specimens were released from a copper mold and then tested. Three tests, density, tensile strength, and porosity, were performed on the specimens to determine the spray effect on material properties. Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray did not demonstrate adequate deposition properties and does not appear to be a good process candidate for LIGA. However, Cold Spray yielded better density results and warrants further investigation to analyze the minimum feature size produced by the process.

  14. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  15. Measurement of sheath thickness at a floating potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Oh, Se-Jin; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    In a cylindrical Langmuir probe measurement, ion current is collected from the surface of the sheath surrounded at probe tip, not at the surface of the probe tip. By using this, the sheath thickness can be obtained, if we know some unknown parameters, such as ion current, plasma density, and electron temperature. In this paper, we present a method to measure sheath thickness by using a wave cutoff method and a floating harmonic method. The measured result is in a good agreement with Allen-Boyd-Reynolds theory.

  16. Method and apparatus for thickness measurement using microwaves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul (Bedford, MA) [Bedford, MA; Lamar, David A. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The method for measuring the thickness of a material which transmits a detectable amount of microwave radiation includes irradiating the material with coherent microwave radiation tuned over a frequency range. Reflected microwave radiation is detected, the reflected radiation having maxima and minima over the frequency range as a result of coherent interference of microwaves reflected from reflecting surfaces of the material. The thickness of the material is determined from the period of the maxima and minima along with knowledge of the index of refraction of the material.

  17. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perdieu, Louisa H. (Overland Park, KS)

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  18. Quantum rings of non-uniform thickness in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodríguez-Prada, F. A.; García, L. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-05-15

    We consider a model of crater-shaped quantum dot in form of a thin layer whose thickness linearly increases with the distance from the axis. We show that one-particle wave equation for the electron confined in such structure can be completely separated in the adiabatic limit when the quantum dot thickness is much smaller than its lateral dimension. Analytical solutions found for this model has been used as base functions for analysing the effect of non-homogeneity on the electronic spectrum in the framework of the exact diagonalization method.

  19. Sensing roller for in-process thickness measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, J.L.

    1996-07-16

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for processing materials by sensing roller, in which the sensing roller has a plurality of conductive rings (electrodes) separated by rings of dielectric material. Sensing capacitances or impedances between the electrodes provides information on thicknesses of the materials being processed, location of wires therein, and other like characteristics of the materials. 6 figs.

  20. Very thick holographic nonspatial filtering of laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    of a thick photo- polymer with diffusion amplification (PDA). We report results of holo- graphic nonspatial Society of Photo-Optical In- strumentation Engineers. [S0091-3286(97)01606-1] Subject terms: holography information if the input laser beam has an intensity minimum at a critical feature location. It is also

  1. Noise Analysis and Synthesis for 3D Laser Depth Scanners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Noise Analysis and Synthesis for 3D Laser Depth Scanners Xianfang Sun a,b,, Paul L. Rosin a , Ralph the noise present in range data measured by a Konica Minolta Vivid 910 scanner, in order to better characterise real scanner noise. Methods for denoising 3D mesh data have often assumed the noise to be Gaussian

  2. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  3. Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Unknown Bridge Foundation Depth Determination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjwech, Rungroj

    2012-02-14

    as suitable to investigate unknown bridge foundations. The objective of the present study is to apply advanced 2D electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in order to identify depth of unknown bridge foundations. A survey procedure is carried out in mixed terrain...

  4. Depth Energy Image for Gait Symmetry Quantification Caroline Rougier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignotte, Max

    Depth Energy Image for Gait Symmetry Quantification Caroline Rougier1 , Edouard Auvinet1 , Jean´erationnelle, Universit´e de Montr´eal, Canada {rougierc, auvinet, meunier, mignotte}@iro.umontreal.ca 2 Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Universit´e de Montr´eal, ETS, Canada jacques

  5. Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

  6. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    2014-11-06

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  7. Lower Bounds on Interactive Compressibility by Constant-Depth Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Lower Bounds on Interactive Compressibility by Constant-Depth Circuits Arkadev Chattopadhyay to prove the first lower bounds on general probabilistic multi-round instance compression. We show, and strengthens results of Dubrov and Ishai [DI06]. We also show that a similar lower bound holds for Majority. We

  8. 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M extend from the northern margins of the Amazon rain for- ests to outliers on the southern borders metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

  9. Dual-depth adapted irreducible formal multizeta values Leila Schneps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneps, Leila

    , and the relations between them. Consider the following diagram, in which the four top spaces are Hopf algebras the double shuffle Lie algebra, equipped with the standard weight grading and depth filtration; we write ds = n3dsn and denote the filtration by ds1 ds2 · · ·. The double shuffle Lie algebra is dual

  10. Method for depositing a uniform layer of particulate material on the surface of an article having interconnected porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Lewis, J. Jr.

    1982-09-29

    The invention is a method for depositing liquid-suspended particles on an immersed porous article characterized by interconnected porosity. In one form of the invention, coating is conducted in a vessel containing an organic liquid supporting a colloidal dispersion of graphite sized to lodge in surface pores of the article. The liquid comprises a first volatile component (e.g., acetone) and a second less-volatile component (e.g., toluene) containing a dissolved organic graphite-bonding agent. The liquid also contains an organic agent (e.g., cellulose gum) for maintaining the particles in suspension. A porous carbon article to be coated is immersed in the liquid so that it is permeated therewith. While the liquid is stirred to maintain a uniform blend, the vessel headspace is evacuated to effect flashing-off of the first component from the interior of the article. This causes particle-laden liquid exterior of the article to flow inwardly through its surface pores, lodging particles in these pores and forming a continuous graphite coating. The coated article is retrieved and heated to resin-bond the graphite. The method can be used to form a smooth, adherent, continuous coating of various materials on various porous articles. The method is rapid and reproducible.

  11. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  12. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  13. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  14. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  15. Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmignani, B

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

  16. Thick, low-stress films, and coated substrates formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Kennewick, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Menomonee Falls, WI)

    1991-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation, and the damage resulting therefrom, increases with film thickness. The overcoming of excessive stress by the use of the film material of the present invention, permits the formation of thick films that are necessary for certain of the above described applications. The most likely use for the subject film materials, other than their specialized views as an optical film, is for microelectronic packaging of components on silicon substrates. In general, the subject Si-Al-O-N films have excellent adherence to the underlying substrate, a high degree of hardness and durability, and are excellent insulators. Prior art elevated temperature deposition processes cannot meet the microelectronic packaging temperature formation constraints. The process of the present invention is conducted under non-elevated temperature conditions, typically 500# C. or less.

  17. Probing the neutron skin thickness in collective modes of excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nils Paar; Andrea Horvat

    2014-01-13

    Nuclear collective motion provides valuable constraint on the size of neutron-skin thickness and the properties of nuclear matter symmetry energy. By employing relativistic nuclear energy density functional (RNEDF) and covariance analysis related to $\\chi^2$ fitting of the model parameters, relevant observables are identified for dipole excitations, which strongly correlate with the neutron-skin thickness $(r_{np})$, symmetry energy at saturation density $(J)$ and slope of the symmetry energy $(L)$. Using the RNEDF framework and experimental data on pygmy dipole strength ($^{68}$Ni, $^{132}$Sn, $^{208}$Pb) and dipole polarizability ($^{208}$Pb), it is shown how the values of $J$, and $L$, and $r_{np}$ are constrained. The isotopic dependence of moments associated to dipole excitations in $^{116-136}$Sn shows that the low-energy dipole strength and polarizability in neutron-rich nuclei display strong sensitivity to the symmetry energy parameter $J$, more pronounced than in isotopes with moderate neutron-to-proton number ratios.

  18. Method for making thick and/or thin film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-02

    A method to make thick or thin films a very low cost. The method is generally similar to the conventional tape casting techniques while being more flexible and versatile. The invention involves preparing a slip (solution) of desired material and including solvents such as ethanol and an appropriate dispersant to prevent agglomeration. The slip is then sprayed on a substrate to be coated using an atomizer which spreads the slip in a fine mist. Upon hitting the substrate, the solvent evaporates, leaving a green tape containing the powder and other additives, whereafter the tape may be punctured, cut, and heated for the desired application. The tape thickness can vary from about 1 .mu.m upward.

  19. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  20. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  1. Analysis of Proper Depth for Gaining Seawater Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and seawater temperatures near the city. · It is impossible to get deep sea water for Busan area, since according to the season, while that of deep sea water is constant. Point 1 207 Area 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20 the maximum sea water depth around Busan is about 150m. · It will be a good option to use surface layer water

  2. A depth-derived Pleistocene age model: Uncertainty estimates, sedimentation variability, and nonlinear climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    A depth-derived Pleistocene age model: Uncertainty estimates, sedimentation variability. To avoid biasing this ``depth-derived'' age estimate, the depth scale is first corrected for the effects sediment accumulation rates are estimated and modeled as an autocorrelated stochastic process. Depth-derived

  3. Depth-dependent magnetism in epitaxial MnSb thin films: effects of surface passivation and cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldous J. D.; Sanchez-Hanke C.; Burrows, C.W.; Maskery, I.; Brewer, M.S.; Hase, T.P.A.; Duffy, J.A.; Lees, M. Rs; Decoster, T.; Theis, W.; Quesada, A.; Schmid, A.K.; Bell, G.R.

    2012-03-15

    Depth-dependent magnetism in MnSb(0001) epitaxial films has been studied by combining experimental methods with different surface specificities: polarized neutron reflectivity, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), x-ray resonant magnetic scattering and spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM). A native oxide {approx}4.5 nm thick covers air-exposed samples which increases the film's coercivity. HCl etching efficiently removes this oxide and in situ surface treatment of etched samples enables surface magnetic contrast to be observed in SPLEEM. A thin Sb capping layer prevents oxidation and preserves ferromagnetism throughout the MnSb film. The interpretation of Mn L{sub 3,2} edge XMCD data is discussed.

  4. Appendix PORSURF: Porosity Surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal Facility Agreement andMON-2014 WIPP for

  5. Stratigraphic and diagenetic controls on the occurrence of porosity in the Mississippian Mission Canyon Formation in the Billings Nose Area, North Dakota 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaber, Daniel Edward

    1989-01-01

    , intercrystalline and dissolution, were identified. Intercrystalline porosity formed as the result of partial dolomitization of the dominantly lime mud matrix. Dissolution preferentially removed the limestone grains. Depositional facies controlled... the distribution of grains and, therefore, the distribution of dissolution to some extent. Stratigraphic location controlled the degree of dolomitization. The stratigraphically higher A and B zones were in closer proximity to the dolomitizing fluids from...

  6. DYNAMIC DELAMINATION IN THROUGH-THICKNESS REINFORCED DCB SPECIMEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Bridged crack models using beam theory formulation have proved to be effective in the modeling of quasistatic delamination crack growth in through thickness reinforced structures. In this paper, we model dynamic crack propagation in these structures with the beam theory formulation. Steady state crack propagation characteristics unique to the dynamic case are first identified. Dynamic crack propagation and the energetics of steady state dynamic crack growth for a Double Cantilever beam (DCB) configuration loaded with a flying wedge is examined next. We find that steady state crack growth is attainable for this loading configuration provided certain conditions are satisfied.

  7. Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T. L.

    2001-12-27

    averaged over a distance covered by aircraft in 1 s (-130 m).) tt(X, g = -d) = Sice(t: T, x). (6) The value t = - can be interpreted as the time when S ice(t, x) represents the wave energy due to scattering specifically from depth d, as opposed... of the Greenland ice sheet produced by Mark Fahnestock (Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park) and Ron Kwok (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasa- dena). The helpful suggestions and comments of two...

  8. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas ReservesAlabamaAboutTotal Energy GlossaryDepth of Crude

  9. Mass gap for gravity localized on Weyl thick branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa-Cendejas, N.; Santos, M. A. Reyes; Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Schubert, C.

    2008-06-15

    We consider thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D space-time, a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory involving a geometric scalar field. Thus, the 5D theory describes gravity coupled to a self-interacting scalar field which gives rise to the structure of the thick branes. We continue the study of the properties of a previously found family of solutions which is smooth at the position of the brane but involves naked singularities in the fifth dimension. Analyzing their graviton spectrum, we find that a particularly interesting situation arises for a special case in which the 4D graviton is separated from the KK gravitons by a mass gap. The corresponding effective Schroedinger equation has a modified Poeschl-Teller potential and can be solved exactly. Apart from the massless 4D graviton, it contains one massive KK bound state, and the continuum spectrum of delocalized KK modes. We also discuss the mass hierarchy problem, and explicitly compute the corrections to Newton's law in the thin brane limit.

  10. Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

    1992-04-15

    A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

  11. Quantitative Depth Profiling of Biporous Nickel Electrodes by Frequency-Domain Laser-Induced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    for the long-term stability and high efficiency of electrochemical energy conversion in fuel cells manufactured for use in electrochemical energy conversion de- vices, such as fuel cells. Index Headings: Laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy; Variable electrode porosities; Frequency response; Quantitative analysis; Fuel cells

  12. Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prommapan, Plegchart

    2011-08-15

    A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

  13. Effects of Membrane- and Catalyst-layer-thickness Nonuniformities in Polymer-electrolyte Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2006-01-01

    from various parts of a PEFC, thickness distributions can beour previously developed PEFC models. 4,5 The simulations

  14. The effect of film thickness on the failure strain of polymer-supported metal films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    The effect of film thickness on the failure strain of polymer-supported metal films Nanshu Lu-supported copper films with a strong (1 1 1) fiber texture and with thicknesses varying from 50 nm to 1 lm. Films with thicknesses below 200 nm fail by intergranular fracture at elongations of only a few percent. Thicker films

  15. Thick Filament Length and Isoform Composition Determine Self-Organized Contractile Units in Actomyosin Bundles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardel, Margaret

    Thick Filament Length and Isoform Composition Determine Self-Organized Contractile Units motors are clustered into thick filaments. Although the role of mechanochemistry is well appreciated, the extent to which thick filament length regulates actomyosin contractility is unknown. Here, we study

  16. Bilayer thickness effects on nanoindentation behavior of Ag/Ni multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    by nanoindentation hardness and creep tests. The hardness increased with decreasing bilayer thickness, although of nanoindentation creep tests on Ag/Ni nanomultilayers with various bilayer thicknesses. Multilayered Ag/Ni films thickness. A nanoindentation creep test was used to study the creep behavior of nano- scale multilayers

  17. Effect of surface roughness on magnetic domain wall thickness, domain size, and coercivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 G. Palasantzas and J. Th. M. De Hosson Department nm thick deposited on plasma etched Si 100 substrates showed that, by increasing surface rough- ness nearly linearly with film thickness. Such an increase of the thickness fluctuations5 was attributed

  18. Test of CZT Detectors with Different Pixel Pitches and Thicknesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Li; Alfred III Garson; Ira Jung; Michael Groza; Paul Dowkontt; Richard Bose; Garry Simburger; Arnold Burger; Henric Krawczynski

    2007-12-08

    The Modified Horizontal Bridgman (MHB) process produces Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals with high yield and excellent homogeneity. Various groups,including our own, previously reported on the test of 2x2x0.5 cm3 MHB CZT detectors grown by the company Orbotech and read out with 8x8 pixels. In this contribution, we describe the optimization of the photolithographic process used for contacting the CZT detector with pixel contacts. The optimized process gives a high yield of good pixels down to pixel diameters/pitches of 50 microns. Furthermore, we discuss the performance of 0.5 cm and 0.75 cm thick detectors contacted with 64 and 225 pixel read out with the RENA-3 ASICs from the company NOVA R&D.

  19. Thick Pixelated CZT Detectors With Isolated Steering Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Jung; A. B. Garson; J. S. Perkins; H. Krawczynski; J. Matteson; R. T. Skelton; A. Burger; M. Groza

    2005-11-18

    We explore the possibility to improve the performance of 0.5 cm thick Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors with the help of steering grids on the anode side of the detectors. Steering grids can improve the energy resolution of CZT detectors by enhancing the small pixel effect; furthermore, they can increase their detection efficiency by steering electrons to the anode pixels which otherwise would drift to the area between pixels. Previously, the benefit of steering grids had been compromised by additional noise associated with currents between the steering grids and the anode pixels. We use thin film deposition techniques to isolate the steering grid from the CZT substrate by a 150 nm thick layer of the isolator Aluminiumoxide. While the thin layer does not affect the beneficial effect of the steering grid on the weighting potentials and the electric field inside the detector, it suppresses the currents between the steering grid and the anode pixels. In this contribution, we present first results from a 2 x 2 x 0.5 cm CZT detector with 8 x 8 pixels that we tested before and after deposition of an isolated steering grid. The steering grid improves the 662 keV energy resolution of the detector by a factor of 1.3 (from about 2% to about 1.5%), while not reducing the detection efficiency. To gain further insights into the detector response in the region between pixels, we measured energy spectra with a collimated Cs137 source. The collimator measurements can be used to enhance our understanding of energy spectra measured under flood illumination of the detectors.

  20. Fringe biasing: A variance reduction technique for optically thick meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedley-Stevenson, R. P.

    2013-07-01

    Fringe biasing is a stratified sampling scheme applicable to Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport codes. The thermal emission source in optically thick cells is partitioned into separate contributions from the cell interiors (where the likelihood of the particles escaping the cells is virtually zero) and the 'fringe' regions close to the cell boundaries. Thermal emission in the cell interiors can now be modelled with fewer particles, the remaining particles being concentrated in the fringes so that they are more likely to contribute to the energy exchange between cells. Unlike other techniques for improving the efficiency in optically thick regions (such as random walk and discrete diffusion treatments), fringe biasing has the benefit of simplicity, as the associated changes are restricted to the sourcing routines with the particle tracking routines being unaffected. This paper presents an analysis of the potential for variance reduction achieved from employing the fringe biasing technique. The aim of this analysis is to guide the implementation of this technique in Monte Carlo thermal radiation codes, specifically in order to aid the choice of the fringe width and the proportion of particles allocated to the fringe (which are interrelated) in multi-dimensional simulations, and to confirm that the significant levels of variance reduction achieved in simulations can be understood by studying the behaviour for simple test cases. The variance reduction properties are studied for a single cell in a slab geometry purely absorbing medium, investigating the accuracy of the scalar flux and current tallies on one of the interfaces with the surrounding medium. (authors)

  1. Vertically Loaded Anchor: Drag Coefficient, Fall Velocity, and Penetration Depth using Laboratory Measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cenac, William

    2011-08-08

    The offshore oilfield industry is continuously developing unique and break-through technologies and systems to extract hydrocarbons from ever increasing ocean depths. Due to the extreme depths being explored presently, large anchors are being...

  2. A Convex Hull Peeling Depth Approach to Nonparametric Massive Multivariate Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    A Convex Hull Peeling Depth Approach to Nonparametric Massive Multivariate Data Analysis) and Multivariate Data Analysis Definitions on CHP Data Depth (Ordering Multivariate Data) Quantiles and Density with CHP Multivariate Median Skewness and Kurtosis of a Multivariate Distribution Outlier Detection

  3. Seismic evidence for thermal runaway during intermediate-depth earthquake rupture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Sarah A.

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes occur at depths where temperatures and pressures exceed those at which brittle failure is expected. There are two leading candidates for the physical mechanism behind these earthquakes: ...

  4. Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband December 2011. [1] A Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) was developed and deployed) through an optically thin cloud (optical depth

  5. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  6. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  7. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  8. Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    by a blue light-emitting diode, the x and x depth profiles were reconstructed from photothermal radiometric

  9. Method and system using power modulation and velocity modulation producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Folta, James Allen (Livermore, CA); Walton, Christopher Charles (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-12-23

    A method and system for determining a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a selected thickness profile of a film to be deposited (e.g., with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) over a flat or curved substrate (such as concave or convex optics) by exposing the substrate to a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece held stationary while exposed to the source with the source operated at each of a number of different applied power levels), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of source flux modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a source flux modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal source flux modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. The method enables precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  10. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in orthorhombic velocity models with differently rotated tensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in orthorhombic velocity models with differently rotated tensors use the ray-based Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple with a differently rotated tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to single

  11. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy with simpler the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to the calculation of migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with different types of anisotropy

  12. Depth-domain processing of teleseismic receiver functions and generalized three-dimensional imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    by itself or as a part of depth migration, is usually used for noise suppression in teleseismic receiver generalize the pre-stack depth migration methodology by introducing numerous signal-enhancement schemes could be superior to record summation used in conventional depth migration. #12;3 Introduction

  13. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration Karel #20; Z#19;a#20;cek Department of Geophysics, Faculty depth migration. The main advantage of our method over the methods based on Gaussian beams is a direct. Thus, the Gaussian packet prestack depth migration is especially suitable for a target-oriented imaging

  14. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated images in simple anisotropic homogeneous velocity of the tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to correct single

  15. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without vertical gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without vertical gradients-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary The Kirchhoff prestack depth migration is used to calculate. The bottom layer is isotropic and homogeneous. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to both

  16. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate is limited to P-waves. Keywords 3-D Kirchhoff prestack depth migration, anisotropic velocity model, rotation

  17. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in triclinic velocity models with differently rotated tensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in triclinic velocity models with differently rotated tensors use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic rotations of the tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to single- layer

  18. Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration the Marmousi data Karel Zacek*, Department Geophysics, Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration the Marmousi data Karel Zacek*, Department Geophysics--stack depth migration. method on Marmousi data (Versteeg & 1991). advantage over methods Gaussian beams. Thus, Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration is especially suitable target--oriented imaging

  19. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 3: Simple 2-D models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 3: Simple 2-D models V#19;aclav Bucha Department Republic, E-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.m#11;.cuni.cz Summary Gaussian packet prestack depth migration is used. Keywords Gaussian packets, Gaussian beams, prestack depth migration, Gabor transform, 2-D velocity model

  20. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic is isotropic and homogeneous. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to both heterogeneous

  1. Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf-surface layer with mean daytime bottom depth of 43740 m (night: 61738 m), and a main migrating layer with mean bottom depth of 333776 m (night: 54727 m). Diel vertical migration rates for dusk ascents reached

  2. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY WENDY ANN BRAZENEC ENTITLED EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING

  3. PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL) STATIONS IN COLORADO AND WYOMING, UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL) STATIONS IN COLORADO Laituri Mazdak Arabi #12;ii ABSTRACT PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL. These stations measure snow depth (SD), snow water equivalent (SWE), air temperature and precipitation. To assess

  4. Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1 David G. Tarboton,1 June 2009; published 29 October 2009. [1] Soil depth is an important input parameter in hydrological and ecological modeling. Presently, the soil depth data available in national soil databases (STATSGO and SSURGO

  5. Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport COLM independent parameter- izations that use ocean color to estimate the penetration depth of shortwave radiation. This study offers a way to evaluate the changes in irradiance penetration depths in coupled ocean

  6. Apparatus and methods for determining gas saturation and porosity of a formation penetrated by a gas filled or liquid filled borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Robert D. (477 W. Scenic Dr., Grand Junction, CO 81503)

    2001-03-27

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for determining gas saturation, liquid saturation, porosity and density of earth formations penetrated by a well borehole. Determinations are made from measures of fast neutron and inelastic scatter gamma radiation induced by a pulsed, fast neutron source. The system preferably uses two detectors axially spaced from the neutron source. One detector is preferably a scintillation detector responsive to gamma radiation, and a second detector is preferably an organic scintillator responsive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The system can be operated in cased boreholes which are filled with either gas or liquid. Techniques for correcting all measurements for borehole conditions are disclosed.

  7. Assessment of Nuclear Fuels using Radiographic Thickness Measurement Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad Abir; Fahima Islam; Hyoung Koo Lee; Daniel Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The Convert branch of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) focuses on the development of high uranium density fuels for research and test reactors for nonproliferation. This fuel is aimed to convert low density high enriched uranium (HEU) based fuel to high density low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel for high performance research reactors (HPRR). There are five U.S. reactors that fall under the HPRR category, including: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR), the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR), the Missouri University Research Reactor (UMRR), the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). U-Mo alloy fuel phase in the form of either monolithic or dispersion foil type fuels, such as ATR Full-size In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR), are being designed for this purpose. The fabrication process1 of RERTR is susceptible to introducing a variety of fuel defects. A dependable quality control method is required during fabrication of RERTR miniplates to maintain the allowable design tolerances, therefore evaluating and analytically verifying the fabricated miniplates for maintaining quality standards as well as safety. The purpose of this work is to analyze the thickness of the fabricated RERTR-12 miniplates using non-destructive technique to meet the fuel plate specification for RERTR fuel to be used in the ATR.

  8. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, H.D.

    1992-09-15

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body. 5 figs.

  9. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Schenectady, NY)

    1992-01-01

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body.

  10. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. For thick layers of exterior insulation (more than 1.5 in.), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. Although the approach has proven effective, there is significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly.

  11. Super-spinning compact objects generated by thick accretion disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo, E-mail: zilongli@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn [Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2013-03-01

    If astrophysical black hole candidates are the Kerr black holes predicted by General Relativity, the value of their spin parameter must be subject to the theoretical bound |a{sub *}| ? 1. In this work, we consider the possibility that these objects are either non-Kerr black holes in an alternative theory of gravity or exotic compact objects in General Relativity. We study the accretion process when their accretion disk is geometrically thick with a simple version of the Polish doughnut model. The picture of the accretion process may be qualitatively different from the one around a Kerr black hole. The inner edge of the disk may not have the typical cusp on the equatorial plane any more, but there may be two cusps, respectively above and below the equatorial plane. We extend previous work on the evolution of the spin parameter and we estimate the maximum value of a{sub *} for the super-massive black hole candidates in galactic nuclei. Since measurements of the mean radiative efficiency of AGNs require ? > 0.15, we infer the ''observational'' bound |a{sub *}|?<1.3, which seems to be quite independent of the exact nature of these objects. Such a bound is only slightly weaker than |a{sub *}|?<1.2 found in previous work for thin disks.

  12. Digenetic Changes in Macro- to Nano-Scale Porosity in the St. Peter Sandstone:L An (Ultra) Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Backscattered Electron Imagining Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick [ORNL; Jackson, Andrew [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Littrell, Ken [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Small- and Ultra-Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS and USANS) provide powerful tools for quantitative analysis of porous rocks, yielding bulk statistical information over a wide range of length scales. This study utilized (U)SANS to characterize shallowly buried quartz arenites from the St. Peter Sandstone. Backscattered electron imaging was also used to extend the data to larger scales. These samples contain significant volumes of large-scale porosity, modified by quartz overgrowths, and neutron scattering results show significant sub-micron porosity. While previous scattering data from sandstones suggest scattering is dominated by surface fractal behavior over many orders of magnitude, careful analysis of our data shows both fractal and pseudo-fractal behavior. The scattering curves are composed of subtle steps, modeled as polydispersed assemblages of pores with log-normal distributions. However, in some samples an additional surface-fractal overprint is present, while in others there is no such structure, and scattering can be explained by summation of non-fractal structures. Combined with our work on other rock-types, these data suggest that microporosity is more prevalent, and may play a much more important role than previously thought in fluid/rock interactions.

  13. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and initial results are also presented along with a discussion of the preliminary findings. Comparative NDE of various defects in reinforced concrete specimens is a key component in identifying the most promising techniques and directing the research and development efforts needed to characterize concrete degradation in commercial NPPs. This requires access to the specimens for data collection using state-of-the-art technology. The construction of the specimen detailed in this report allows for an evaluation of how different NDE techniques may interact with the size and complexities of NPP concrete structures. These factors were taken into account when determining specimen size and features to ensure a realistic design. The lateral dimensions of the specimen were also chosen to mitigate unrealistic boundary effects that would not affect the results of field NPP concrete testing. Preliminary results show that, while the current methods are able to identify some of the deeper defects, improvements in data processing or hardware are necessary to be able to achieve the precision and reliability achieved in evaluating thinner and less heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  14. Thin-thick hydrogen target for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheller, J.-M.; Juster, F.-P.; Authelet, G. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SACM, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Vinyar, I. [PELIN Limited Liability Company 27 A, Gzhatskaya Str, office 103 St. Petersbourg 195220 (Russian Federation); Relland, J. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SIS, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Commeaux, C. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, campus Universitaire-Bat 103, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2014-01-29

    In spectroscopic studies of unstable nuclei, hydrogen targets are of key importance. The CHyMENE Project aims to provide to the nuclear physics community a thin and pure solid windowless hydrogen or deuterium target. CHyMENE project must respond to this request for the production of solid Hydrogen. The solid hydrogen target is produced in a continuous flow (1 cm/s) by an extrusion technique (developed with the PELIN laboratory) in a vacuum chamber. The shape of the target is determined by the design of the nozzle at the extrusion process. For the purpose, the choice is a rectangular shape with a width of 10 mm and a thickness in the range of 30-50 microns necessary for the physics objectives. The cryostat is equipped with a GM Cryocooler with sufficient power for the solidification of the hydrogen in the lower portion of the extruder. In the higher part of the cryostat, the hydrogen gas is first liquefied and partially solidified. It is then compressed at 100 bars in the cooled extruder before expulsion of the film through the nozzle at the center of the reaction vacuum chamber. After the previous step, the solid hydrogen ribbon falls by gravity into a dedicated chamber where it sublimes and the gas is pumped and evacuated in a exhaust line. This paper deals with the design of the cryostat with its equipment, with the sizing of the thermal bridge (Aluminum and copper), with the results regarding the contact resistance as well as with the vacuum computations of the reaction and recovery hydrogen gas chambers.

  15. SU-E-T-319: The Effect of Slice Thickness On IMRT Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, S; Das, I; Cheng, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of volume estimated of a treatment planning system is investigated in this study. In addition, the effect of slice thickness on IMRT planning is also studied. Methods: The accuracy in volume determination was investigated using a water phantom containing various objects with known volumes ranging from 1–100cm{sup 3}. The phantom was scanned with different slice thickness (1–10 mm). The CT data sets were sent to Eclipse TPS for contour delineation and volume calculation. The effect of slice thickness on IMRT planning was studied using a commercial phantom containing four different shaped objects. The phantom was scanned with different slice thickness (1–5 mm). IMRT plans were generated for the different CT datasets to calculate TCP, homogeneity (HI) and conformity indices (CI). Results: The variability of volumes with CT slice thickness was significant especially for small volume structures. The minimum and maximum error in the volume estimation is in the range of ?2.3% to 92%. On the other hand, with increasing slice thickness, the PTV mean dose and TCP values decreases. Maximum variation of ?5% was observed in mean dose and ?2% in TCP with slice thickness change from 1–5 mm. The relative decrease in target volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose is ?5% slice thickness change from 1–5 mm. HI increases up to 163% and CI decreases by 4% between 1–5 mm slice thickness change, producing highly inhomogeneous and least conformal plan. Conclusion: Accuracy of volume estimation is dependent on CT slice thickness and the contouring algorithm in a TPS. During TPS commissioning and for all clinical protocols, evaluation of volume should be included to provide the limit of accuracy in DVH calculation. A smaller slice thickness provides superior dosimetry with improved TCP values. Thus, the smallest possible slice thickness should be used for IMRT planning.

  16. Thick-Target Neutron Yield from the 19F(alpha,n) Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. B. Norman; T. E. Chupp; K. T. Lesko; G. L. Woodruff; P. J. Grant

    2015-01-10

    Thick-target neutron yields from the 19F(alpha,n) reaction are reported for E(alpha) = 3.5 - 10.0 MeV.

  17. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayr, Lukas; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon; Rameshan, Raffael; Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin ; Rameshan, Christoph; Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/BC/01, 1060 Vienna

    2014-05-15

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for “real” and “inverse” model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7°, “magic angle”) and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown.

  18. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2010-12-15

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  19. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  20. Weighted exponential regression for characterizing radionuclide concentrations in soil depth profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.P.Oertel; J.R.Giles

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles requires accurate evaluation of the depth distribution of the concentrations as measured by gamma emissions. An ongoing study based on 137Cs activity has shown that such concentration data generally follow an exponential trend when the fraction of radioactivity below depth is plotted against the depth. The slope of the exponential regression fit is defined as alpha/rho, the depth profile parameter. A weighted exponential regression procedure has been developed to compute a mean ??? for a group of related soil samples. Regression results from different areas or from different time periods can be used to compare representative radionuclide concentrations for the specified groupings.

  1. The depth of pseudotachylyte formation from detailed thermochronology and constraints on coseismic stress drop variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, James D.; Dobson, Kate J.; Brodsky, Emily E.; Mark, Darren F.; Shipton, Zoe K.

    2012-01-01

    Subnormal Cenozoic geothermal gradients in the extinctC. E. Manning (2003), Geothermal gradients in con- tinentalkm under typical geothermal gradients. At these depths, the

  2. The impact of remineralization depth on the air–sea carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, EY; Primeau, F; Sarmiento, JL

    2009-01-01

    on the air–sea carbon balance Eun Young Kwon 1 * , Françoistion depth—depends on the balance between particle sinkingfactors can affect this balance, including temperature 1 ,

  3. Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  4. Plant Water Use in Owens Valley, CA: Understanding the Influence of Climate and Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pataki, Diane E

    2008-01-01

    plant responses to water stress, plant chemical composition,Phreatophytes (Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1423).T. E. Dawson. 2006. Depth of water acquisition by invading

  5. Porosity and biocompatibility study of ceramic implants based on ZrO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinova, Larisa E-mail: vshupletsova@mail.ru Shupletsova, Valeria E-mail: vshupletsova@mail.ru Leitsin, Vladimir E-mail: vshupletsova@mail.ru; Vasyliev, Roman E-mail: zoubov77@yahoo.com; Zubov, Dmitry E-mail: zoubov77@yahoo.com; Buyakov, Ales E-mail: kulkov@ms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey E-mail: kulkov@ms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    The work studies ZrO{sub 2}(Me{sub x}O{sub y})-based porous ceramics produced from the powders consisting of hollow spherical particles. It was shown that the structure is represented by a cellular framework with bimodal porosity consisting of sphere-like large pores and pores that were not filled with the powder particles during the compaction. For such ceramics, the increase of pore volume is accompanied by the increased strain in an elastic area. It was also shown that the porous ZrO{sub 2} ceramics had no acute or chronic cytotoxicity. At the same time, ceramics possess the following osteoconductive properties: adhesion support, spreading, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs.

  6. Radiation and porosity effects on the magnetohydrodynamic flow near a vertical plate that applies shear stress to the fluid with mass diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Arshad; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan [Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2014-06-19

    This article studies the radiation and porosity effects on the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic free convection flow of an incompressible viscous fluid past an infinite vertical plate that applies a shear stress f(t) to the fluid. Conjugate phenomenon of heat and mass transfer is considered. General solutions of the dimensionless governing equations along with imposed initial and boundary conditions are determined using Laplace transform technique. The solution of velocity is presented as a sum of mechanical and non mechanical parts. These solutions satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and reduce to some known solutions from the literature as special cases. The results for embedded parameters are shown graphically. Numerical results for skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are computed and presented in tabular forms.

  7. Polyimide-Based Processes for the Fabrication of Thick Electroplated Microstructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polyimide-Based Processes for the Fabrication of Thick Electroplated Microstructures Mark G. Allen of polyimide as an electroplating mold for thick electroplated microstructures is discussed. Polyimide of the polyimide material can be performed in a conventional manner, and since the polyimide when cured

  8. DC WRRC Report No. 178 AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE OPTIMAL THICKNESS OF A SAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    FILTER WATER QUALITY STRUCTURE July 1994 D.C. Water Resources Research Center University of the District OF THE OPTIMAL THICKNESS OF A SAND LAYER IN A SAND FILTER WATER QUALITY STRUCTURE Submitted by: Farshad Amini THICKNESS OF A SAND LAYER IN A SAND FILTER WATER QUALITY STRUCTURE July 1994 D.C. Water Resources Research

  9. 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for Wind as wind blade size has increased. Typical blade joints use paste adhesives several millimeters thick aircraft, which are also of relevance to wind blades in many instances. The strengths of lap-shear and many

  10. Parabolic equation solution of seismo-acoustics problems involving variations in bathymetry and sediment thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sediment thickness Jon M. Collisa and William L. Siegmann Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute110 8th Street within elastic sediment layers. When these methods are implemented together, the parabolic equation method can be applied to problems involving variations in bathymetry and the thickness of sediment layers

  11. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project March 2012. [1] Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared and Assimilation System models. Citation: Johnson, M., et al. (2012), Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness

  12. Finite Ground Coplanar Lines on CMOS Grade Silicon with a Thick Embedded Silicon Oxide Layer Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Finite Ground Coplanar Lines on CMOS Grade Silicon with a Thick Embedded Silicon Oxide Layer Using grade silicon wafer (poxide layer have been developed using on a CMOS grade silicon substrate ( ~ 4 . 0 1Cl-cm) with an embedded thick silicon oxide layer using

  13. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to reduce climate change as photosynthesis-mediated carbon sequestration and carbonation serve to reduce sequestration and carbonation. Moreover the increase in the wall's thermal resistance with wall thickness atmospheric carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis is performed on three criteria: wall thickness, renewal

  14. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF LASER FORMING OF VARYING THICKNESS PLATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    of LF varying thickness plate are conducted in this paper. In this paper, the bending mechanism. An analytical model was proposed to predict the bending deformation. A strategy of LF process synthesis-aging the in-plane strain and bending strain. A thickness-dependent da- tabase is established to determine

  15. An Affordable Approach for Robust Design of Thick Laminated Composite Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    An Affordable Approach for Robust Design of Thick Laminated Composite Structure Wei Chen* Assistant, composite structure design, hip implant #12;3 1. Introduction With a thick laminated composite structure design freedom and the heterogeneous anisotropic nature of structures, composite structures are much more

  16. A modular process for integrating thick polysilicon MEMS devices with sub-micron CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshari, Ehsan

    A modular process for integrating thick polysilicon MEMS devices with sub-micron CMOS John-1774 ABSTRACT A new MEMS process module, called Mod MEMS, has been developed to monolithically integrate thick (5-10um), multilayer polysilicon MEMS structures with sub-micron CMOS. This process is particularly

  17. Coating of a stainless steel tube-wall catalytic reactor with thermally treated polysiloxane thick films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coating of a stainless steel tube-wall catalytic reactor with thermally treated polysiloxane thick stainless steel by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition process. Thicknesses up to 10µm were developed barrier. Key-words: PACVD, TDMS, stainless steel, surface passivity. 1. Introduction The use of tube

  18. Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M.

    2012-10-20

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

  19. An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in inconsistent proportions of metal and glassy phase particles present during the subsequent firing process. The consequences were subtle, intermittent changes to the thick film microstructure that gave rise to the reaction layer and, thus, the low pull strength phenomenon. A mitigation strategy would be the use of physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques to create thin film bond pads; this is multi-chip module, deposited (MCM-D) technology.

  20. Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films profiling of polymer films and multilayers using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Deuterium substitution has traditionally been used in depth profiling of polymers but can affect the phase behavior

  1. Full-wave-equation depth extrapolation for migration Kristian Sandberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beylkin, Gregory

    Full-wave-equation depth extrapolation for migration Kristian Sandberg1 and Gregory Beylkin2 ABSTRACT Most of the traditional approaches to migration by down- ward extrapolation suffer from laterally varying background. If the background veloci- ty is only depth dependent, then the spectral

  2. Prediction of end-depth ratio in open channels using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    for channels with other cross sections. This global expression not only outperforms other expressions) and can be used for channels with any cross-section and any flow regime. Key words | data modelling in the form of hc Ľ AheeB ffiffiffi S0 p is found for calculating the critical depth (hc) and end-depth ratio

  3. Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression airborne particles that both reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation and whose effect on the Earth the satellite measure- ments, the common objective is prediction of Aerosol Opti- cal Depth (AOD). An important

  4. SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW TELEMETRY STATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW TELEMETRY STATIONS Much of the Western United States relies heavily on spring snow melt runoff to meet its industrial, agricultural

  5. Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen H.

    Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

  6. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lijun

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G Handling Editor: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused

  7. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused by the viscous

  8. Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania A. Jardin1, F Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania -- The challenge of seismic exploration in fold and thrust belt settings compte plus importante des données géologiques. Abstract -- Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural

  9. Using the depth-velocity-size diagram to interpret equilibrium bed configurations in river flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, J.B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Data from flume studies that report equilibrium bed configuration as well as water temperature, flow depth, flow velocity, and sediment size were used to develop the best approximation to the relationships among the various bed phases (ripples, dunes, lower regime plane bed, upper regime plane bed, and antidunes) in a three-axis graph (depth-velocity-size diagram) with dimensionless measures of mean flow depth, mean flow velocity, and sediment size along the axis. Relationships are shown in a series of depth-velocity and velocity-size sections through the diagram. Boundaries between bed-phase stability fields are drawn as surfaces that minimize, misplacement of data points. A large subset of the data, for which reliable values of bed shear stress are reported, was also used to represent the stability relationships in a graph of dimensionless boundary shear stress against dimensionless sediment size, but with results less useful for fluvial flow interpretation. The diagram covers about one order of magnitude in flow depth. To be useful for river flows, the diagram must be extrapolated in flow depth by about one more order of magnitude, but this is not a serious problem for approximate work. The depth-velocity-size diagram permits prediction of equilibrium bed configuration in river flows when the approximate flow depth and mean flow velocity are known. Because the diagram is essentially dimensionless, the effect of water temperature (via the fluid viscosity) on the bed configuration is easily accounted for by use of the diagram.

  10. Two weight system for measuring depth and sediment in slurry-supported excavations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deming, P.; Good, D.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a two weight system using bar and flat shaped weights for measuring depth and detecting sediment at the bottom of slurry-supported excavations. Currently there are no standard depth measurement weights or methods for reliably identifying bottom sediment. Two weights and a procedural system for using the weights is described. Details suitable for manufacture are provided.

  11. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  12. Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements Seema C. Shah sediment load calculations on the basis of depth-integrated sediment concentration measurements for channels with significant sediment transport in suspension. The series expansion of the modified Einstein

  13. Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest of microbial consumption of mineral N were reduced relative to production. Overall, up to 60% of potential gross N mineralization and 100% of potential net N mineralization occurred below 15 cm depth

  14. Decollement depth versus accretionary prism dimension in the Apennines and the Barbados

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De´collement depth versus accretionary prism dimension in the Apennines and the Barbados Sabina] Along representative cross sections of the Apennines and the Northern Barbados accretionary prisms, we´collement than the oceanic sections of the Northern Barbados, 6­10 km depth and

  15. Realtime and Robust Hand Tracking from Depth Chen Qian1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgs, Christian

    Realtime and Robust Hand Tracking from Depth Chen Qian1,2 Xiao Sun1 Yichen Wei1 Xiaoou Tang2 Jian Sun1 1 Microsoft Research 2 Chinese University of Hong Kong {v-xiasun,yichenw,jiansun}@microsoft.com {qc012,xtang}@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract We present a realtime hand tracking system using a depth sensor

  16. Hydrochemical evidence of the depth of penetration of anthropogenic recharge in sandstone aquifers underlying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Hydrochemical evidence of the depth of penetration of anthropogenic recharge in sandstone aquifers of anthropogenic solutes (major ions, trace metals) in Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifers underlying two mature of anthropogenic solutes to depths of between 30 and 47 m below ground in the unconfined sandstone and confirm

  17. Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR Isaac Cho UNC Charlotte, USA but less for so volumetric data. Volumetric data is characterized by a heavy presence of transparency- ing perception of depth in volumetric data. Our study also suggests that familiarity with 3D games

  18. Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR Isaac Cho Wenwen Dou Zachary volumetric data. This poster present results of an initial formal experiment that examines the effectiveness of various display conditions on depth perception of volumetric data. There is an overall benefit

  19. An Evaluation of Depth Perception on Volumetric Displays Tovi Grossman, Ravin Balakrishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    An Evaluation of Depth Perception on Volumetric Displays Tovi Grossman, Ravin Balakrishnan.toronto.edu ABSTRACT We present an experiment that compares volumetric displays to existing 3D display techniques space, volumetric displays allow viewers to use their natural physiological mechanisms for depth

  20. Thermodynamic Depth of Causal States: When Paddling around in Occam's Pool Shallowness Is a Virtue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. Crutchfield; Cosma Rohilla Shalizi

    1998-08-13

    Thermodynamic depth is an appealing but flawed structural complexity measure. It depends on a set of macroscopic states for a system, but neither its original introduction by Lloyd and Pagels nor any follow-up work has considered how to select these states. Depth, therefore, is at root arbitrary. Computational mechanics, an alternative approach to structural complexity, provides a definition for a system's minimal, necessary causal states and a procedure for finding them. We show that the rate of increase in thermodynamic depth, or {\\it dive}, is the system's reverse-time Shannon entropy rate, and so depth only measures degrees of macroscopic randomness, not structure. To fix this we redefine the depth in terms of the causal state representation---$\\epsilon$-machines---and show that this representation gives the minimum dive consistent with accurate prediction. Thus, $\\epsilon$-machines are optimally shallow.

  1. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, D. Roquemore, A. L.; Jaworski, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Miller, J.; Creely, A.; Raman, P.; Ruzic, D.

    2014-11-15

    Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15??m thick. Using a 0.1?mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1?mg/cm{sup 2} thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

  2. Determining the covering factor of Compton-thick active galactic nuclei with NuSTAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brightman, M; Stern, D; Arevalo, P; Ballantyne, D R; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Craig, W W; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Fuerst, F; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Koss, M; LaMassa, S; Puccetti, S; Rivers, E; Vasudevan, R; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    The covering factor of Compton-thick obscuring material associated with the torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is at present best understood through the fraction of sources exhibiting Compton-thick absorption along the line of sight ($N_{H}>1.5\\times10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$) in the X-ray band, which reveals the average covering factor. Determining this Compton-thick fraction is difficult however, due to the extreme obscuration. With its spectral coverage at hard X-rays ($>$10 keV), NuSTAR is sensitive to the AGN covering factor since Compton scattering of X-rays off optically thick material dominates at these energies. We present a spectral analysis of 10 AGN observed with NuSTAR where the obscuring medium is optically thick to Compton scattering, so called Compton-thick (CT) AGN. We use the torus models of Brightman & Nandra which predict the X-ray spectrum from reprocessing in a torus and include the torus opening angle as a free parameter and aim to determine the covering factor of the Compton-thick gas i...

  3. PULSED EDDY CURRENT THICKNESS MEASUREMENT OF SELECTIVE PHASE CORROSION ON NICKEL ALUMINUM BRONZE VALVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, T. W.; Harlley, D.; Babbar, V. K.; Wannamaker, K. [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2010-02-22

    Nickel Aluminum Bronze (NAB) is a material with marine environment applications that under certain conditions can undergo selective phase corrosion (SPC). SPC involves the removal of minority elements while leaving behind a copper matrix. Pulsed eddy current (PEC) was evaluated for determination of SPC thickness on a NAB valve section with access from the surface corroded side. A primarily linear response of PEC amplitude, up to the maximum available SPC thickness of 4 mm was observed. The combination of reduced conductivity and permeability in the SPC phase relative to the base NAB was used to explain the observed sensitivity of PEC to SPC thickness variations.

  4. ORIGIN OF CHEMICAL AND DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    We adopt a scenario in which the Galactic thick disk was formed by minor merging between the first generation of the Galactic thin disk (FGTD) and a dwarf galaxy about {approx}9 Gyr ago and thereby investigate chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk. In this scenario, the dynamical properties of the thick disk have long been influenced both by the mass growth of the second generation of the Galactic thin disk (i.e., the present thin disk) and by its non-axisymmetric structures. On the other hand, the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the thin disk was influenced by the remaining gas of the thick disk. Based on N-body simulations and chemical evolution models, we investigate the radial metallicity gradient, structural and kinematical properties, and detailed chemical abundance patterns of the thick disk. Our numerical simulations show that the ancient minor merger event can significantly flatten the original radial metallicity gradient of the FGTD, in particular, in the outer part, and also can be responsible for migration of inner metal-rich stars into the outer part (R > 10 kpc). The simulations show that the central region of the thick disk can develop a bar due to dynamical effects of a separate bar in the thin disk. Whether or not rotational velocities (V{sub {phi}}) can correlate with metallicities ([Fe/H]) for the simulated thick disks depends on the initial metallicity gradients of the FGTDs. The simulated orbital eccentricity distributions in the thick disk for models with higher mass ratios ({approx}0.2) and lower orbital eccentricities ({approx}0.5) of minor mergers are in good agreement with the corresponding observations. The simulated V{sub {phi}}-|z| relation of the thick disk in models with low orbital inclination angles of mergers are also in good agreement with the latest observational results. The vertical metallicity gradient of the simulated thick disk is rather flat or very weakly negative in the solar neighborhood. Our Galactic chemical evolution models show that if we choose two distinctive timescales for star formation in the thin and thick disks, then the models can explain both the observed metallicity distribution functions and correlations between [Mg/Fe] and [Fe/H] for the two disks in a self-consistent manner. We discuss how the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the Galactic thin disk can be influenced by the pre-existing thick disk.

  5. Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

    2013-01-01

    The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

  6. Effective zero-thickness model for a conductive membrane driven by an electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    The behavior of a conductive membrane in a static (dc) electric field is investigated theoretically. An effective zero-thickness model is constructed based on a Robin-type boundary condition for the electric potential at ...

  7. On-Line Measurement of Lubricant Film Thickness Using Ultrasonic Reflection Coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drinkwater, B.W.; Dwyer-Joyce, R.S.; Harper, P.

    2004-02-26

    The ultrasonic reflectivity of a lubricant layer between two solid bodies depends on the ultrasonic frequency, the acoustic properties of the liquid and solid, and the layer thickness. In this paper, ultrasonic reflectivity measurements are used as a method for determining the thickness of lubricating films in bearing systems. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned on the outside of a bearing shell such that the wave is focused on the lubricant film layer. For a particular lubricant film the reflected pulse is processed to give a reflection coefficient spectrum. The lubricant film thickness is then obtained from either the layer stiffness or the resonant frequency. The method has been validated using static fluid wedges and the elastohydrodynamic film formed between a ball sliding on a flat. Film thickness values in the range 50-500 nm were recorded which agreed well with theoretical film formation predictions.

  8. The effect of lubrication film thickness on thermoelastic instability under fluid lubricating condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Yun-Bo

    The effect of lubrication film thickness on thermoelastic instability under fluid lubricating online 14 March 2013 Keywords: Thermoelastic instability Wet clutches Fluid lubrication Critical speed by a thin layer of lubricating fluid is developed to investigate thermoelastic instability with fluid

  9. Thickness of the crust of Mercury from geoid-to-topography ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padovan, S; Wieczorek, MA; Margot, JL; Tosi, N; Solomon, SC

    2015-01-01

    the support of planetary topography, J. Geophys. Res. , 86,thickness and support of topography on Venus, J. Geophys.expansion for the topography of Mercury, GTMES_120V02_SHA,

  10. Oxide thickness measurement technique for duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, R.G.; O'Leary, P.M. (Siemens Nuclear Power Corp., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) is investigating the use of duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 tubing to improve the waterside corrosion resistance of cladding for high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel designs. Standard SNP PWR cladding is typically 0.762-mm (0.030-in.)-thick Zircaloy-4. The SNP duplex cladding is nominally 0.660-mm (0.026-in.)-thick Zircalloy-4 with an [approximately]0.102-mm (0.004-in.) outer layer of another, more corrosion-resistant, zirconium-based alloy. It is common industry practice to monitor the in-reactor corrosion behavior of Zircaloy cladding by using an eddy-current lift-off' technique to measure the oxide thickness on the outer surface of the fuel cladding. The test program evaluated three different cladding samples, all with the same outer diameter and wall thickness: Zircaloy-4 and duplex clad types D2 and D4.

  11. A determination of the effective thickness of a liquid deuterium target for a quasielastic scattering experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkewitz, Jared Ripley

    2010-01-01

    The effective thickness of a liquid deuterium target was determined by measuring the yield of the neutron-deuteron elastic scattering cross section. The flux of incident neutrons was determined by a fission ionization ...

  12. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fretwell, P.; Pritchard, H. D.; Vaughan, D. G.; Bamber, J. L.; Barrand, N. E.; Bell, R.; Bianchi, C.; Bingham, R. G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Casassa, G.; Catania, G.; Callens, D.; Conway, H.; Cook, A. J.; Corr, H. F. J.; Damaske, D.; Damm, V.; Ferraccioli, F.; Forsberg, R.; Fujita, S.; Gim, Y.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Griggs, J. A.; Hindmarsh, R.; Holmlund, P.; Holt, J. W.; Jacobel, R. W.; Jenkins, A.; Jokat, W.; Jordan, T.; King, E. C.; Kohler, J.; Krabill, W.; Riger-Kusk, M.; Langley, K. A.; Leitchenkov, G.; Leuschen, Carl; Lyendyk, B. P.; Matsuoka, K.; Mouginot, J.; Nitsche, F. O.; Nogi, Y.; Nost, O. A.; Popov, S. V.; Rignot, E.; Rippin, D. M.; Rivera, A.; Roberts, J.; Roberts, J.; Ross, N.; Siegert, M. J.; Smith, A. M.; Steinhage, D.; Studinger, M.; Sun, B.; Tinto, B. K.; Welch, B. C.; Wilson, D.; Young, D. A.; Xiangbin, C.; Zirizzotti, A.

    2013-02-28

    We present Bedmap2, a new suite of gridded products describing surface elevation, ice-thickness and the seafloor and subglacial bed elevation of the Antarctic south of 60° S. We derived these products using data from a ...

  13. Analysis of Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness: A Newly Created Database for 2000-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Benjamin Patrick

    2012-10-19

    Observations of Antarctic sea ice thickness are sporadic in space and time, hindering knowledge of its variability. A proxy based on stage of development data from the National Ice Center (NIC) weekly operational charts is used to create a high...

  14. Thickness Measurement of Fracture Fluid Gel Filter Cake after Static Build Up and Shear Erosion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ben

    2011-08-08

    . Despite proven economic benefit, the hydraulic fracture fluid damages the producing formation and the propped fracture. To analyze the gel damage effect quantitatively, the filter cake thickness is used as a parameter that has not been measured before...

  15. In-situ Measurement of Low-Z Material Coating Thickness on High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: In-situ Measurement of Low-Z Material Coating Thickness on High Z Substrate for Tokamaks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In-situ Measurement of Low-Z...

  16. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In situ measurement of low-Z material coating...

  17. Searching for the metal-weak thick disc in the solar neighbourhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacham E. Reddy; David L. Lambert

    2008-09-05

    An abundance analysis is presented of 60 metal-poor stars drawn from catalogues of nearby stars provided by Ariyanto et al. (2005) and Schuster et al. (2006). In an attempt to isolate a sample of metal-weak thick disc stars, we applied the kinematic criteria $V_{\\rm rot} \\geq 100$ km s$^{-1}$, $|U_{LSR}| \\leq 140$ km s$^{-1}$, and $|W_{LSR}| \\leq 100$ km s$^{-1}$. Fourteen stars satisfying these criteria and having [Fe/H] $\\leq -1.0$ are included in the sample of 60 stars. Eight of the 14 have [Fe/H] $\\geq -1.3$ and may be simply thick disc stars of slightly lower than average [Fe/H]. The other six have [Fe/H] from -1.3 to -2.3 and are either metal-weak thick disc stars or halo stars with kinematics mimicking those of the thick disc. The sample of 60 stars is completed by eight thick disc stars, 20 stars of a hybrid nature (halo or thick disc stars), and 18 stars with kinematics distinctive of the halo.

  18. LOW ALLOY STEELS FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS Yearly Report for Period Oct. 1, 1976 to Sept. 30, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS R. M, Horn, E. R. Parker,FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS Yearly Report f o r PeriodManufacture Pressure Vessel Fabrication Under ASME Code

  19. Invertebrate muscles: Thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooper, Scott

    Invertebrate muscles: Thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 2.1. Vertebrate thin and thick filament structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 2.2. Cross-bridge driven filament sliding underlies force production

  20. Measurement of porosity in a composite high explosive as a function of pressing conditions by ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mang, Joseph Thomas; Hjelm, Rex P; Francois, Elizabeth G

    2009-01-01

    We have used ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) with contrast variation to measure the porosity (voids and binder-filled regions) in a composite high explosive, PBX 9501, formulated with a deuterated binder. Little is known about the microstructure of pressed PBX 9501 parts and thus how it is affected by processing. Here, we explore the effect of varying the pressing intensity on the PBX 9501 microstructure. Disk-shaped samples of PBX 9501 were die-pressed with applied pressures ranging between 10,000 and 29,000 psi at 90 C. Five samples were prepared at each pressure that differed in the fraction of deuterated binder, facilitating variation of the neutron scattering length density contrast ({Delta}{rho}) and thus, the resolution of microstructural details. The sample composition was determined by calculation of the Porod Invariant as a function of {Delta}{rho} and compared with compositional estimates obtained from the bulk sample density. Structural modeling of the USANS data, at different levels of contrast, assuming both spherical and cylindrical morphologies, allowed the mean size and size distribution of voids and binder-filled regions to be determined. A decrease in the mean diameter of binder-filled regions was found with increasing pressing intensity, while the mean void diameter showed no significant change.

  1. Learning Predictive Models of a Depth Camera & Manipulator from Raw Execution Traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guestrin, Carlos

    can accurately predict future depth camera observations in response to sequences of motor commands. I. We approach this difficult problem from a machine learn- ing perspective. We dispense with problem

  2. High-Resolution Depth for Binocular Image-Based Modelling David Blumenthal-Barby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisert, Peter

    applications like image-based modelling, photo relighting, or the fabrication of physical mod- els with 3D printing require detailed surface geometry rather than depth layering of cluttered scenes. Surface meshes

  3. The Visual Word Recognition and Orthography Depth in Second Language Acquisition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Yunchun

    2011-10-01

    The study investigated whether the orthographic depth of first language (L1) affects the word recognition in second language (L2) learning. Fifteen native Chinese speakers and fifteen Greek native speakers were recruited to test their English naming...

  4. ORNL/TM-2014/218 In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    ORNL/TM-2014/218 In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE's Roof or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2014/218 Energy

  5. Uranium-series isotope and thermal constraints on the rate and depth of silicic magma genesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Uranium-series isotope and thermal constraints on the rate and depth of silicic magma genesis A Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK Abstract: Uranium-series isotopes provide

  6. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16

    Factors related to operations of a well that impact drilling uncertainties in the shallow water region of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) can be directly linked to the site specific issues; such as water depth and local geological ...

  7. Constraining water table depth simulations in a land surface model using estimated baseflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, MH; Yeh, PJF; Famiglietti, JS

    2008-01-01

    northeastern Kansas. Adv Water Resour 2002;25:221–38. [68]ing between runoff and soil water storage and differentcycles of base?ow and water table depth show signif- icant

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

  9. Development of a bioengineered tissue model and its application in the investigation of the depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Development of a bioengineered tissue model and its application in the investigation of the depth the development of a bioengineered connective tissue model fabricated by the combination of scaffolding and cross

  10. On the Emissivity of Silver Coated Panels, Effect of Long Term Stability and Effect of Coating Thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Emissivity of Silver Coated Panels, Effect of Long Term Stability and Effect of Coating Thickness

  11. A simplified mechanistic rut depth prediction procedure for low-volume roads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapa, Kashyapa A.S.

    1988-01-01

    A SIMPLIFIED MECHANISTIC RUT DEPTH PREDICTION PROCEDURE FOR LOW-UOLUME ROADS A Thesis by KASHYAPA ABEYSIRIWARDHANA SENARATH YAPA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... rt L. Lytt ( an of Committee) D as . Li tie ( ember) Walter L. Bradley (Member) Ja T. . Yao (Head of De tment) December 1988 ABSTRACT A Simplified Mechanistic Rut Depth Prediction Procedure for Low-volume Roads. (December 1988) Kashyapa...

  12. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  13. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  14. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  15. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  16. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  17. 1O.-ON THE INFLUENCE OF LIGHT ON THE PERIODICAL DEPTH-MIGRATIONS OF PELAGIC ANIMAIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1O.-ON THE INFLUENCE OF LIGHT ON THE PERIODICAL DEPTH- MIGRATIONS OF PELAGIC ANIMAIS BY JACQUES it certain that this periodical depth migration of sea animals is determitied to a certain extent at least and of freshawater lakes is confined chiefly to two regions, one extending from the surface of the sea to a depth

  18. Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Praha 2, Czech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration Karel #20; Z#19;a#20;cek Department of Geophysics method | the Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration. The advantages over the methods based on Gaussian pre{stack depth migration is especially suitable for a target{oriented imaging. Key words Gaussian

  19. DENOISING OF VOLUMETRIC DEPTH CONFIDENCE FOR VIEW Srinivas Parthasarathy, Akul Chopra, Emilie Baudin, Pravin Kumar Rana, and Markus Flierl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flierl, Markus

    DENOISING OF VOLUMETRIC DEPTH CONFIDENCE FOR VIEW RENDERING Srinivas Parthasarathy, Akul Chopra of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden ABSTRACT In this paper, we define volumetric depth confidence and pro- pose- perposition principle, we define a volumetric depth confidence de- scription of the underlying geometry

  20. Stereo and Motion Cues Effect on Depth Perception in Volumetric Data (Technical Report: CVC-UNCC-13-12,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Stereo and Motion Cues Effect on Depth Perception in Volumetric Data (Technical Report: CVC-UNCC-13 cues effect on depth judgment of volumetric data," Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXV (SD&A2014 on Depth Perception of Volumetric Data Isaac Cho, Zachary Wartell, Wenwen Dou, Xiaoyu Wang and William

  1. Uniqueness of RS2 type thick branes supported by a scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. T. Abdyrakhmanov; K. A. Bronnikov; B. E. Meierovich

    2005-03-13

    We study thick brane world models as Z_2-symmetric domain walls supported by a scalar field with an arbitrary potential V(\\phi) in 5D general relativity. Under the global regularity requirement, such configurations (i) have always an AdS asymptotic far from the brane, (ii) are only possible if V(\\phi) has an alternating sign and (iii) V(\\phi) should satisfy a certain fine-tuning type equality. Thus a thick brane with any admissible V(\\phi) is a regularized version of the RS2 brane immersed in the AdS_5 bulk. The thin brane limit is realized in a universal manner by including an arbitrary thick brane model in a one-parameter family, where the parameter "a" is associated with brane thickness; the asymptotic value of V(\\phi) (related to \\Lambda_5, the effective cosmological constant) remains a-independent. The problem of ordinary matter confinement on the brane is discussed for a test scalar field. Its stress-energy tensor is found to diverge at the AdS horizon for both thin and thick branes, making a serious problem for this class of brane world models.

  2. Thick adherent dielectric films on plastic substrates and method for depositing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickboldt, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Fremont, CA); Theiss, Steven D. (Woodbury, MN); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Thick adherent dielectric films deposited on plastic substrates for use as a thermal barrier layer to protect the plastic substrates from high temperatures which, for example, occur during laser annealing of layers subsequently deposited on the dielectric films. It is desirable that the barrier layer has properties including: a thickness of 1 .mu.m or greater, adheres to a plastic substrate, does not lift-off when cycled in temperature, has few or no cracks and does not crack when subjected to bending, resistant to lift-off when submersed in fluids, electrically insulating and preferably transparent. The thick barrier layer may be composed, for example, of a variety of dielectrics and certain metal oxides, and may be deposited on a variety of plastic substrates by various known deposition techniques. The key to the method of forming the thick barrier layer on the plastic substrate is maintaining the substrate cool during deposition of the barrier layer. Cooling of the substrate maybe accomplished by the use of a cooling chuck on which the plastic substrate is positioned, and by directing cooling gas, such as He, Ar and N.sub.2, between the plastic substrate and the cooling chucks. Thick adherent dielectric films up to about 5 .mu.m have been deposited on plastic substrates which include the above-referenced properties, and which enable the plastic substrates to withstand laser processing temperatures applied to materials deposited on the dielectric films.

  3. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic characterization through the thickness direction of a moving web

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Theodore (Atlanta, GA); Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the caliper and/or the ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web of material using ultrasonic pulses generated by a rotatable wheel ultrasound apparatus. The apparatus includes a first liquid-filled tire and either a second liquid-filled tire forming a nip or a rotatable cylinder that supports a thin moving web of material such as a moving web of paper and forms a nip with the first liquid-filled tire. The components of ultrasonic transit time through the tires and fluid held within the tires may be resolved and separately employed to determine the separate contributions of the two tire thicknesses and the two fluid paths to the total path length that lies between two ultrasonic transducer surfaces contained within the tires in support of caliper measurements. The present invention provides the benefit of obtaining a transit time and caliper measurement at any point in time as a specimen passes through the nip of rotating tires and eliminates inaccuracies arising from nonuniform tire circumferential thickness by accurately retaining point-to-point specimen transit time and caliper variation information, rather than an average obtained through one or more tire rotations. Morever, ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web may be determined independent of small variations in the wheel axle spacing, tire thickness, and liquid and tire temperatures.

  4. Origin of chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We adopt a scenario in which the Galactic thick disk was formed by minor merging between the first generation of the Galactic thin disk (FGTD) and a dwarf galaxy about 9 Gyr ago and thereby investigate chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk. In this scenario, the dynamical properties of the thick disk have long been influenced both by the mass growth of the second generation of the Galactic thin disk (i.e., the present thin disk) and by its non-axisymmetric structures. On the other hand, the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the thin disk was influenced by the remaining gas of the thick disk. Based on N-body simulations and chemical evolution models, we investigate the radial metallicity gradient, structural and kinematical properties, and detailed chemical abundance patterns of the thick disk. Our numerical simulations show that the ancient minor merger event can significantly flatten the original radial metallicity gradient of the FGTD, in particular, in the outer ...

  5. Jeans analysis of the Galactic thick disk and the local dark matter density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F J; de Diego, J A

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical estimates of the mass surface density at the solar radius can be made up to a height of 4 kpc using thick disk stars as tracers of the potential. We investigate why different Jeans estimators of the local surface density lead to puzzling and conflicting results. Using the Jeans equations, we compute the vertical (F_z) and radial (F_R) components of the gravitational force, as well as Gamma(z), defined as the radial derivative of V_c^2, with V_c^{2}= -RF_R. If we assume that the thick disk does not flare and that all the components of the velocity dispersion tensor of the thick disk have a uniform radial scalelength of 3.5 kpc, Gamma takes implausibly large negative values, when using the currently available kinematical data of the thick disk. This implies that the input parameters or the model assumptions must be revised. We have explored, using a simulated thick disk, the impact of the assumption that the scale lengths of the density and velocity dispersions do not depend on the vertical height z a...

  6. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  7. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: catalog of bituminous coals and site selection. Appendix A. National coal resource data system: Ecoal, Wcoal, and Bmalyt. Final report, Phase I. [Bituminous coal; by state; coal seam depth and thickness; identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-31

    Appendix A is a catalog of the bituminous coal in 29 states of the contiguous United States which contain identified bituminous coal resources.

  8. Tuning the thickness of electrochemically grafted layers in large area molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluteau, T.; Bessis, C.; Barraud, C. Della Rocca, M. L.; Lafarge, P.; Martin, P.; Lacroix, J.-C.

    2014-09-21

    We have investigated the thickness, the surface roughness, and the transport properties of oligo(1-(2-bisthienyl)benzene) (BTB) thin films grafted on evaporated Au electrodes, thanks to a diazonium-based electro-reduction process. The thickness of the organic film is tuned by varying the number of electrochemical cycles during the growth process. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the evolution of the thickness in the range of 2–27 nm. Its variation displays a linear dependence with the number of cycles followed by a saturation attributed to the insulating behavior of the organic films. Both ultrathin (2 nm) and thin (12 and 27 nm) large area BTB-based junctions have then been fabricated using standard CMOS processes and finally electrically characterized. The electronic responses are fully consistent with a tunneling barrier in case of ultrathin BTB film whereas a pronounced rectifying behavior is reported for thicker molecular films.

  9. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO? ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li., Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variablemore »range hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.« less

  10. Limits on thickness and efficiency of Polish Doughnuts in application to the ULX sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wielgus, Maciek; Lasota, Jean-Pierre; Abramowicz, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Polish Doughnuts (PDs) are geometrically thick disks which rotate with super-Keplerian velocities in their innermost parts, and whose long and narrow funnels along rotation axes collimate the emerging radiation into beams. In this paper we construct extremal family of PDs that maximize both geometrical thickness and radiative efficiency. We then derive upper limits for these quantities and subsequently for the related ability to collimate radiation. PDs with such extreme properties may explain the observed properties of the ULX sources with no need for the black hole masses exceeding ~ 10 solar masses. However, we show that strong advective cooling, which is expected to be one of the dominant cooling mechanisms in accretion flows with super-Eddington accretion rates, tends to reduce geometrical thickness and luminosity of PDs substantially. We also show that the beamed radiation emerging from the PDs' funnels corresponds to "isotropic" luminosities that linearly scale with the mass accretion rate, and do not ...

  11. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO3 ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variablemore »range hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. As a result, magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.« less

  12. Thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} film without substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jae-Wung; Park, Chee-Sung; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hyoun-Ee [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-13

    In order to fabricate thick PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (PZT) films for microelectromechanical system applications, the authors introduce a concept of freestanding film without a substrate. PZT films with a thickness of up to 20 {mu}m were deposited on a very thin Pt layer without a substrate by the rf-magnetron sputtering method using a single oxide target. The Pt layer (thickness <1 {mu}m) was obtained by sputtering the Pt on a Si substrate with a carbon layer between them, and subsequently removing the carbon layer by oxidation in air at 400 deg. C. Piezoelectric properties of the film were comparable to those of bulk PZT as a result of the removal of clamping effect of the substrate.

  13. Investigation of damage behavior of thermally sprayed coatings depending on coating thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crostack, H.A.; Beller, U.

    1995-12-31

    In order to increase the lifetime of components used for diesel engines or gas turbines surfaces are coated by ceramics. In recent years it succeeded in spraying thermal barrier coatings based on zirconia up to a thickness of a few millimeters. A comparison of the damage behavior between yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings with different thickness will be presented. The coatings are produced by atmospheric plasma spraying. The thickness is varied from 0.5 mm up to 2 mm. In order to characterize the mechanical as well as the damage processes different methods of destructive testing (tensile, bending, and loading test) are applied. Additionally, non-destructive testing methods were used to investigate the damage processes on micro structural level. The results will be discussed according to the microstructure.

  14. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO? ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan [Nanjing Univ. (China); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Qiu, Xiangbiao [Nanjing Univ. (China); Su, Dong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhou, Shengqiang [Inst. of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Li., Aidong [Nanjing Univ. (China); Wu, Di [Nanjing Univ. (China)

    2015-01-07

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variable range hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.

  15. Physicochemical controls on absorbed water film thickness in unsaturated geological media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokunaga, T.

    2011-06-14

    Adsorbed water films commonly coat mineral surfaces in unsaturated soils and rocks, reducing flow and transport rates. Therefore, it is important to understand how adsorbed film thickness depends on matric potential, surface chemistry, and solution chemistry. Here, the problem of adsorbed water film thickness is examined through combining capillary scaling with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Novel aspects of this analysis include determining capillary influences on film thicknesses, and incorporating solution chemistry-dependent electrostatic potential at air-water interfaces. Capillary analysis of monodisperse packings of spherical grains provided estimated ranges of matric potentials where adsorbed films are stable, and showed that pendular rings within drained porous media retain most of the 'residual' water except under very low matric potentials. Within drained pores, capillary contributions to thinning of adsorbed films on spherical grains are shown to be small, such that DLVO calculations for flat surfaces are suitable approximations. Hamaker constants of common soil minerals were obtained to determine ranges of the dispersion component to matric potential-dependent film thickness. The pressure component associated with electrical double layer forces was estimated using the compression and linear superposition approximations. The pH-dependent electrical double layer pressure component is the dominant contribution to film thicknesses at intermediate values of matric potential, especially in lower ionic strength solutions (< 10 mol m{sup -3}) on surfaces with higher magnitude electrostatic potentials (more negative than - 50 mV). Adsorbed water films are predicted to usually range in thickness from 1 to 20 nm in drained pores and fractures of unsaturated environments.

  16. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick Beryllium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alba; M. Barbagallo; P. Boccaccio; A. Celentano; N. Colonna; G. Cosentino; A. Del Zoppo; A. Di Pietro; J. Esposito; P. Figuera; P. Finocchiaro; A. Kostyukov; C. Maiolino; M. Osipenko; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; C. M. Viberti; D. Santonocito; M. Schillaci

    2012-08-08

    In the framework of research on IVth generation reactors and high intensity neutron sources a low-power prototype neutron amplifier was recently proposed by INFN. It is based on a low-energy, high current proton cyclotron, whose beam, impinging on a thick Beryllium converter, produces a fast neutron spectrum. The world database on the neutron yield from thick Beryllium target in the 70 MeV proton energy domain is rather scarce. The new measurement was performed at LNS, covering a wide angular range from 0 to 150 degrees and an almost complete neutron energy interval. In this contribution the preliminary data are discussed together with the proposed ADS facility.

  17. Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of minute hollow spherical shells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinman, D.A.

    1980-05-30

    Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of hollow microspheres or shells wherein terminal velocities of shells traveling in fluid-filled conduits of differing diameters are measured. A wall-effect factor is determined as a ratio of the terminal velocities, and shell outside diameter may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of wall-effect factor. For shells of known outside diameter, wall thickness may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of terminal velocity in either conduit.

  18. Depth profiling analysis of solar wind helium collected in diamond-like carbon film from Genesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bajo, Ken-ichi; Olinger, Chad T.; Jurewicz, Amy J.G.; Burnett, Donald S.; Sakaguchi, Isao; Suzuki, Taku; Itose, Satoru; Ishihara, Morio; Uchino, Kiichiro; Wieler, Rainer; et al

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of solar-wind ions in Genesis mission collectors, as determined by depth profiling analysis, constrains the physics of ion solid interactions involving the solar wind. Thus, they provide an experimental basis for revealing ancient solar activities represented by solar-wind implants in natural samples. We measured the first depth profile of ?He in a collector; the shallow implantation (peaking at more »is consistent with TRIM simulations using the observed ?He velocity distribution during the Genesis mission. It is therefore likely that all solar-wind elements heavier than H are completely intact in this Genesis collector and, consequently, the solar particle energy distributions for each element can be calculated from their depth profiles. Ancient solar activities and space weathering of solar system objects could be quantitatively reproduced by solar particle implantation profiles.« less

  19. LINKING Ly? AND LOW-IONIZATION TRANSITIONS AT LOW OPTICAL DEPTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-08-20

    We suggest that low optical depth in the Lyman continuum (LyC) may relate the Ly? emission, C II and Si II absorption, and C II* and Si II* emission seen in high-redshift galaxies. We base this analysis on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectra of four Green Pea (GP) galaxies, which may be analogs of z > 2 Ly? emitters (LAEs). In the two GPs with the strongest Ly? emission, the Ly? line profiles show reduced signs of resonant scattering. Instead, the Ly? profiles resemble the H? line profiles of evolved star ejecta, suggesting that the Ly? emission originates from a low column density and similar outflow geometry. The weak C II absorption and presence of non-resonant C II* emission in these GPs support this interpretation and imply a low LyC optical depth along the line of sight. In two additional GPs, weak Ly? emission and strong C II absorption suggest a higher optical depth. These two GPs differ in their Ly? profile shapes and C II* emission strengths, however, indicating different inclinations of the outflows to our line of sight. With these four GPs as examples, we explain the observed trends linking Ly?, C II, and C II* in stacked LAE spectra, in the context of optical depth and geometric effects. Specifically, in some galaxies with strong Ly? emission, a low LyC optical depth may allow Ly? to escape with reduced scattering. Furthermore, C II absorption, C II* emission, and Ly? profile shape can reveal the optical depth, constrain the orientation of neutral outflows in LAEs, and identify candidate LyC emitters.

  20. ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2014-11-01

    Dual beam depth profiling strategy has been widely adopted in ToF-SIMS depth profiling, in which two basic operation modes, interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode, are commonly used. Generally, interlaced mode is recommended for conductive or semi-conductive samples, whereas non-interlaced mode is recommended for insulating samples, where charge compensation can be an issue. Recent publications, however, show that the interlaced mode can be used effectively for glass depth profiling, despite the fact that glass is an insulator. In this study, we provide a simple guide for choosing between interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode for insulator depth profiling. Two representative cases are presented: (1) depth profiling of a leached glass sample, and (2) depth profiling of a single crystal MgO sample. In brief, the interlaced mode should be attempted first, because (1) it may provide reasonable-quality data, and (2) it is time-saving for most cases, and (3) it introduces low H/C/O background. If data quality is the top priority and measurement time is flexible, non-interlaced mode is recommended because interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity and poor mass resolution. A big challenge is tracking trace H/C/O in a highly insulating sample (e.g., MgO), because non-interlaced mode may introduce strong H/C/O background but interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity. Meanwhile, a C or Au coating is found to be very effective to improve the signal intensity. Surprisingly, the best analyzing location is not on the C or Au coating, but at the edge (outside) of the coating.

  1. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  2. Depth Profiling Of Small Molecule Ingress Into Planar and Cylindrical Materials Using NRA and PIXE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Richard W.; Massingham, Gary; Clough, Anthony S. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-26

    The use of a 3He ion micro-beam technique to study the ingress/diffusion of water into a planar fibre optic grade glass and a cylindrical drug-release polymer is described. One-dimensional concentration profiles showing the depth of water ingress were produced. The depth of penetration of water into the glass was measured by fitting a gaussian function to the concentration profile. The ingress of water into the drug-release polymer was found to be Fickian and a cylindrical diffusion model used to obtain a diffusion coefficient.

  3. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting | Department|DepartmentalDay 49, 2010DepthDepth

  4. Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Donita Lynn

    2009-05-15

    .4 Effect of Planting Depth on Total Chlorophyll Concentration (A), Net Photosynthetic (Pn) Activity (B), and Pre-dawn Stem Water Potential (C) of Lacebark Elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.) after 200 d in 10.8 L Containers... Depth on Pre-dawn Stem Water Potential in Lacebark Elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.) When Initially Transplanted (10.8 L) 5 cm Above Soil Grade (A), at Soil Grade (B), or 5 cm Below Soil Grade (C) . 85 4.10 Effect of Date on Relative Growth Rate...

  5. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  6. Influence of wall thickness on the stability of the resistive wall mode in tokamak Richard Fitzpatrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    Influence of wall thickness on the stability of the resistive wall mode in tokamak plasmas Richard.1063/1.2446041 Nonlinear evolution of resistive wall mode in a cylindrical tokamak with poloidal rotation Phys. Plasmas 13); 10.1063/1.1943347 Control of resistive wall modes in a cylindrical tokamak with radial and poloidal

  7. Micro-fabrication of high-thickness spiral inductors for the remote powering of implantable biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    biosensors Jacopo Olivo , Sandro Carrara, Giovanni De Micheli Integrated Circuits Laboratory, EPFL ­ École Keywords: High-thickness inductors Inductive link Remote powering Implantable biosensors Ordyl a b s t r for the remote power- ing of implantable biosensors through inductive link. The process is suitable for different

  8. INFLUENCE OF HYDRIDE MICROSTRUCTURE ON THROUGH-THICKNESS CRACK GROWTH IN ZIRCALOY-4 SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    1 INFLUENCE OF HYDRIDE MICROSTRUCTURE ON THROUGH-THICKNESS CRACK GROWTH IN ZIRCALOY-4 SHEET P. A and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 2 Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 3 Southwest Research

  9. Estimation of the optical constants and the thickness of thin lms using unconstrained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martínez, José Mario

    Estimation of the optical constants and the thickness of thin #12;lms using unconstrained, spectral gradient method, optical constants, thin #12;lms. 1 #12; Proposed running head: Estimation of optical constants of thin #12;lms using SGM Corresponding author: Jos#19;e Mario Mart#19;#16;nez

  10. Created 12/8/05 Nanospec / AFT Film Thickness Measurement System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    objective and refocus. d. Critical Focus required for film thickness suspected to be Control knob until the Photo Intensity Meter reads between 65.0 and 67.0. a. Gain Control knob located in the open back of the cover. DO NOT ADJUST "ZERO", located to the left of GAIN. b. Photo Intensity Meter

  11. The imprints of the Galactic bar on the thick disk with RAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoja, T; Helmi, A; Bienaymé, O; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Famaey, B; Gibson, B K; Grebel, E K; Kordopatis, G; Munari, U; Navarro, J; Parker, Q; Reid, W A; Seabroke, G; Steinmetz, M; Zwitter, T

    2015-01-01

    We study the kinematics of a local sample of stars, located within a cylinder of 500 pc radius centered on the Sun, in the RAVE dataset. We find clear asymmetries in the $v_R$-$v_\\phi$ velocity distributions of thin and thick disk stars: here are more stars moving radially outwards for low azimuthal velocities and more radially inwards for high azimuthal velocities. Such asymmetries have been previously reported for the thin disk as being due to the Galactic bar, but this is the first time that the same type of structures are seen in the thick disk. Our findings imply that the velocities of thick disk stars should no longer be described by Schwarzschild's, multivariate Gaussian or purely axisymmetric distributions. Furthermore, the nature of previously reported substructures in the thick disk needs to be revisited as these could be associated with dynamical resonances rather than to accretion events. It is clear that dynamical models of the Galaxy must fit the 3D velocity distributions of the disks, rather th...

  12. Characterization of thick 4H-SiC hot-wall CVD layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.J.; Irvine, K.G.; Kordina, O.; Singh, R.; Palmour, J.W.; Carter, C.H. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Epitaxial 4H-SiC layers suitable for high power devices have been grown in a hot-wall chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) system. These layers were subsequently characterized for many parameters important in device development and production. The uniformity of both thickness and doping is presented. Doping trends vs. temperature and growth rate is shown for the p-type dopant used. The n-type dopant drops in concentration with increasing temperature or increasing growth rate. In contrast, the p-type dopant increases in concentration with decreasing temperature or increasing growth rate. A simple descriptive model for this behavior is presented. The outcome from capacitance-voltage and SIMS measurements demonstrate that transitions from n to n{sup {minus}}, or p to p{sup {minus}}, and even n to p levels can be made quickly without adjustment to growth conditions. The ability to produce sharp transitions without process changes avoids degrading the resulting surface morphology or repeatability of the process. Avoiding process changes is particularly important in growth of thick layers since surface roughness tends to increase with layer thickness. Device results from diodes producing two different blocking voltages in excess of 5 kV is also shown. The higher voltage diodes exhibited a breakdown behavior which was near the theoretical limit for the epitaxial layer thickness and doping level grown.

  13. Measuring Thickness Changes in Thin Films Due to Chemical Reaction by Monitoring the Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutenberg, Andrew

    to the study of lithium-ion batteries. Recently metallic alloys M ~M Si, Sn, Al, etc.! have been proposed force microscope, expansion and contraction, Li-ion battery, surface roughness, thin film thickness as possible negative electrode materials for lithium-ion bat- teries ~Yang et al., 1996; Idota et al., 1997

  14. Static and fatigue bending behavior of pultruded GFRP sandwich panels with through-thickness fiber insertions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Static and fatigue bending behavior of pultruded GFRP sandwich panels with through-thickness fiber testing a b s t r a c t This paper presents the findings of a research program that was undertaken to evaluate the effective elastic modulus, shear modulus and degree of composite interaction of the panels

  15. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

  16. Study of Dislocation Densities Through the Thickness of 7050 Aluminum Cory Parker, David Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Study of Dislocation Densities Through the Thickness of 7050 Aluminum Cory Parker, David Field WSU number DMR-1062898. Introduction 7050 Aluminum is a lightweight, yet strong, alloy primarily used rather difficult due to the presence of a wide range of particles in the substrate. 7050 goes through

  17. 18 m THICK HIGH FREQUENCY CAPACITIVE HARPSS RESONATORS WITH REDUCED MOTIONAL RESISTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    thermal oxide layer is first grown on the low resistivity SOI substrate. The oxide is patterned and kept be as large as a few tens of microns. Trench sidewalls are coated with a thin sacrificial LPCVD oxide layer. The thickness of the deposited sacrificial oxide layer determines the capacitive gap size in between the SCS

  18. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250[degrees]C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  19. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-04-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250{degrees}C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  20. Altering Anode Thickness To Improve Power Production in Microbial Fuel Cells with Different Electrode Distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altering Anode Thickness To Improve Power Production in Microbial Fuel Cells with Different ABSTRACT: A better understanding of how anode and separator physical properties affect power production is needed to improve energy and power production by microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Oxygen crossover from

  1. Embedding metal electrodes in thick active layers for ITO-free plasmonic organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    Embedding metal electrodes in thick active layers for ITO-free plasmonic organic solar cells%) in optical absorption over both a conventional ITO organic solar cell and a conventional plasmonic organic solar cell with top-loaded metallic grating is predicted in the proposed structure. Optimal positioning

  2. 15.7% Efficient 10-?m-Thick Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using Periodic Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branham, Matthew Sanders

    Only ten micrometer thick crystalline silicon solar cells deliver a short-circuit current of 34.5 mA cm[superscript ?2] and power conversion efficiency of 15.7%. The record performance for a crystalline silicon solar cell ...

  3. Growth Termination of Carbon Nanotubes at Millimeter Thickness Due to Structural Change in Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Growth Termination of Carbon Nanotubes at Millimeter Thickness Due to Structural Change in Catalyst, it is reported that "supergrowth" rate decreases with reaction time and finally the growth terminates [2]. Our group recently reproduced "supergrowth" [3] and observed similar "supergrowth" termination within a few

  4. Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain% paraformaldehyde. The organ is then sliced into 1 mm sections and optically cleared, or made transparent, using FocusClear, a proprietary optical clearing agent. After optical clearing, the DiI-labeled tissue

  5. Aperture Synthesis Observations of the Nearby Spiral NGC 6503: Modeling the Thin and Thick HI Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greisen, Eric

    Aperture Synthesis Observations of the Nearby Spiral NGC 6503: Modeling the Thin and Thick HI Disks aperture synthesis observations of the nearby, late­type spiral galaxy NGC 6503, and produce HI maps field, while remarkably regular, contains clear evidence for irregularities. The HI is distributed over

  6. Aperture Synthesis Observations of the Nearby Spiral NGC 6503: Modeling the Thin and Thick HI Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greisen, Eric

    Aperture Synthesis Observations of the Nearby Spiral NGC 6503: Modeling the Thin and Thick HI Disks aperture synthesis observations of the nearby, late-type spiral galaxy NGC 6503, and produce HI maps field, while remarkably regular, contains clear evidence for irregularities. The HI is distributed over

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Nonlinear Thickness-shear Vibrations of AT-cut Quartz Crystal Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ji

    Finite Element Analysis of Nonlinear Thickness-shear Vibrations of AT-cut Quartz Crystal Plates Ji, dujianke}@nbu.edu.cn Abstract--The nonlinear finite element analysis is performed with the nonlinear a smaller size in comparison with the 3D approach. General procedure of nonlinear finite element analysis

  8. Reprocessed emission line profiles from dense clouds in geometrically thick accretion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hartnoll; Eric G. Blackman

    2000-09-19

    The central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGN) contain cold, dense material as well as hot X-ray emitting gas. The standard paradigm for the engine geometry is a cold thin disc sandwiched between hot X-ray coronae. Strong support for this geometry in Seyferts comes from the study of fluorescent iron line profiles, although the evidence is not ubiquitously air tight. The thin disc model of line profiles in AGN and in X-ray binaries should be bench marked against other plausible possibilities. One proposed alternative is an engine consisting of dense clouds embedded in an optically thin, geometrically thick X-ray emitting engine. This model is further motivated by studies of geometrically thick engines such as advection dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). Here we compute the reprocessed iron line profiles from dense clouds embedded in geometrically thick, optically thin X-ray emitting discs near a Schwarzchild black hole. We consider a range of cloud distributions and disc solutions, including ADAFs, pure radial infall, and bipolar outflows. We find that such models can reproduce line profiles similar to those from geometrically thin, optically thick discs and might help alleviate some of the problems encountered from the latter.

  9. Light Trapping Textures Designed by Electromagnetic Optimization for Sub-Wavelength Thick Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    the surface of the solar cell, where n is the material refractive index. This ray-optics absorption enhancement limit only holds when the thickness of the solar cell is much greater than the optical wavelength limit of 4n2 50. Introduction Texturing of solar cell surfaces allows for absorption enhancement, owing

  10. Research Paper Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Research Paper Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore Distribution in Coated Small Particles F. L. Laksmana,1,3,5 L. J. Van Vliet,2 P. J. A. Hartman Kok,3 H. Vromans method for coating structure based on image analysis, which is particularly promising for the rational

  11. A 3D Volumetric Laplace-Beltrami Operator based Cortical Thickness Estimation Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yalin

    A 3D Volumetric Laplace-Beltrami Operator based Cortical Thickness Estimation Method Gang Wanga the cortical tetrahedral mesh, we adopt the heat kernel [1] based on volumetric Laplace-Beltrami operator can construct the discrete volumetric Laplace-Beltrami operator under the Dirichlet boundary condition

  12. Modelling volumetric growth in a thick walled fibre reinforced artery T.S.E. Erikssona,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaoyu

    Modelling volumetric growth in a thick walled fibre reinforced artery T.S.E. Erikssona, , P a combination of both AID and CID to simulate volumetric G&R for a tissue comprised of several different arterial biology. For simulating the volumetric changes that occur during aneurysm enlargement, we observe

  13. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

    2010-01-01

    of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining...

  14. Simulation studies of hadron energy resolution as a function of iron plate thickness at INO-ICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmi S. Mohan; Anushree Ghosh; Moon Moon Devi; Daljeet Kaur; Sandhya Choubey; Amol Dighe; D. Indumathi; M. V. N. Murthy; Md. Naimuddin

    2015-03-11

    We report on a detailed simulation study of the hadron energy resolution as a function of the thickness of the absorber plates for the proposed Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We compare the hadron resolutions obtained with absorber thicknesses in the range 1.5--8 cm for neutrino interactions in the energy range 2--15 GeV, which is relevant to hadron production in atmospheric neutrino interactions. We find that at lower energies, the thickness dependence of energy resolution is steeper than at higher energies, however there is a thickness-independent contribution that dominates at the lower thicknesses discussed in this work. As a result, the gain in hadron energy resolution with decreasing plate thickness is marginal. We present the results in the form of fits to a function with energy-dependent exponent.

  15. Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged flooding, University of New Hampshire, USA. 2 Numerical Methods Lab., Dartmouth College, USA. 3 Ocean Process Analysis Lab., University of New Hampshire, USA. Abstract Current, sea level and bed load transport

  16. A Depth Controlling Strategy for Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Claire J. Kennedy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    A Depth Controlling Strategy for Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Claire J. Kennedy Department of Computer Science University of Bristol Bristol BS8 1UB, U.K. kennedy@cs.bris.ac.uk Christophe is that of STEPS - Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Sys- tem (Kennedy and Giraud-Carrier 1999). STEPS

  17. Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    -scattering or in the transmission mode using a variety of sensor probes. In this work we used the infrared (IR) photothermal radioLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation A. Mandelis*, M. Munidasa, L. Nicolaides Photothermal and Optoelectronic Diagnostics

  18. Efficient Regression of General-Activity Human Poses from Depth Images Ross Girshick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohli, Pushmeet

    Efficient Regression of General-Activity Human Poses from Depth Images Ross Girshick Jamie Shotton of several decision-tree training ob- jectives. Key aspects of our work include: regression di- rectly from the regression-based ap- proaches that have been a staple of monocular 2D human pose estimation [1, 19, 10, 15

  19. REAL-TIME DEPTH BOUNDARY OPTIMIZATION FOR LOCAL AREA-BASED STEREO David Gallup1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    a snake-like energy optimized with a dynamic programming method. This clean-up step requires only O(#pixels) time and space, making it well-suited for real-time where local area-based stereo is often used. Our depth estimates are needed immediately, or for processing large amounts of data as in urban

  20. Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

  1. Journal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    of superconductivity is the diamagnetic response of a superconductor below its transition temperature To. The abilityJournal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in Cuprate Superconductors Steven M. AnlageI and Dong-Ho Wut Received 16 April 1992 We examine recent results

  2. Determination of aerosol optical depth using a Micro Total Ozone Spectrometer II (MICROTOPS II) sunphotometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy, the Office of Educational Program, the National Science Foundation and the Louis Stokes Alliances solar radiation. These effects are quantified by the aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is the exponential decrease in solar radiation, due to the presence of aerosols. We performed the retrievals of AOD

  3. Plumbing the Depths: Testing Natural Tracers of Subsurface CO2 Origin and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilfillan, Stuart

    to be added to the CO2 at the time of injec- tion. This will marginally increase the cost of storagePlumbing the Depths: Testing Natural Tracers of Subsurface CO2 Origin and Migration, Utah Mark storage of fluid CO2 in porous subsurface rock will re- quire the ability to track, and identify

  4. Seepage from a special class of a curved channel with drainage layer at shallow depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    solution corresponding to the water table below the top of the drainage layer has also been deduced from is below the top of the drainage layer then the seepage is much more than that in homogeneous medium with drainage layer at shallow depth, Water Resour. Res., 45, W09423, doi:10.1029/2009WR007899. 1. Introduction

  5. Changes in auditory sensitivity with depth in a free-diving California sea lion (Zalophus californianus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichmuth, Colleen

    of sound energy, because of the air­ water barrier at the tympanic membrane, where theoretically, almost tanks, and may not accurately represent the auditory functioning of free-ranging animals, especially if hearing sensitivity changes with water depth. Underwater auditory thresholds were determined

  6. Photoacoustic frequency-domain depth profilometry of surface-layer inhomogeneities: Application to laser processed steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    (laser or electron beam), modulated at a certain frequency is focused onto the sample surface and Optodmronic Diagnostics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Uniuerxity of Toronto, Toronto with a variable depth range, compared to conventional tech- niques. In this family of methods a beam of energy

  7. hlternatiomd Journal of Thermophysics. Vol. 15, No. 6. 1994 Depth Profilometry of Near-Surface Inhomogeneities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    (laser or electron beam) modulated at a certain frequency is focused onto the sample surface and obtaining arbitrary diffusivity depth profiles from the laser beam-intensity modulation frequency dependence Properties, June 19-24, 1994, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A. 2Photothermal and Optoelectronic Diagnostics

  8. Sea Depth Measurement with Restricted Floating Sensors Zheng Yang, Mo Li, and Yunhao Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yunhao

    the harbor for several days. Monitoring sea depth costs this harbor more than 18 million US dollars per year. The amount of silta- tion in H. H. Harbor is affected by many factors, among which tide and wind blow variable nature of wind brings more incidental and intensive effects. For example, records show that strong

  9. A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, K. Shafer

    A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

  10. Effects of induced flow on the depths of active back-arc basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlins, Robynn Lee

    1993-01-01

    The depth of active back-arc basins, younger than 10 Ma is correlated to the angle of subduction, in that the deepest basins are associated with steep angles of subduction, and the shallowest to small angles of subduction. A two-dimensional comer...

  11. An in-depth study of forest products industries in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An in-depth study of forest products industries in the Pacific Northwest Tendayi Mhlanga, World. · Current state of the forest products industry. · Production outlook. #12;· The PNW refers to the forested% of US energy needs. · Sources of biomass are; round-wood, mill residues, logging or woods residue, urban

  12. RESEARCH PAPER Focal depths and mechanisms of Tohoku-Oki aftershocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    RESEARCH PAPER Focal depths and mechanisms of Tohoku-Oki aftershocks from teleseismic P wave mechanisms Á Coseismic stress change 1 Introduction The Japan Trench is one of the great earthquake generating regions in the world. Due to the fast convergence between the Pacific and Eurasian plates (De

  13. 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd both depth and time. So they directly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    © 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd both depth and time. So they directly observe the evolution of both­238 (1996). 8. Rose-Petruck, C. et al. Nature 398, 310­312 (1999). 9. Maris, H. Sci. Am. 278, 86­89 (1998|VOL398|25MARCH1999|www.nature.com 285 Olfaction Good reception in fruitfly antennae Yitzhak Pilpel

  14. Control of pore fluid pressure on depth of emplacement of magmatic sills: An experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    Control of pore fluid pressure on depth of emplacement of magmatic sills: An experimental approach Available online 24 March 2010 Keywords: Sill emplacement Hydraulic fracturing Pore fluid pressure Physical pressure. We first theoretically show that, in anisotropic media, the higher the pore fluid pressure

  15. Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G Received 23 June 2000; published 12 October 2000 The yield of neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons of one and two neutron captures was determined. Modeling the neutron capture efficiency allowed us

  16. Calculated and Mapped Depths of Closure Along the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Calculated and Mapped Depths of Closure Along the U.S. Coastlines Using WIS Hindcast Data Katherine the seaward extent of sediment transport Tool will aid coastal planners and engineers in designing coastal using wave tank and field data Inner DOC · Marks seaward extent of the littoral zone, which

  17. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Bernstein; Mary Bishai; Edward Blucher; David B. Cline; Milind V. Diwan; Bonnie Fleming; Maury Goodman; Zbigniew J. Hladysz; Richard Kadel; Edward Kearns; Joshua Klein; Kenneth Lande; Francesco Lanni; David Lissauer; Steve Marks; Robert McKeown; William Morse; Regina Rameika; William M. Roggenthen; Kate Scholberg; Michael Smy; Henry Sobel; James Stewart; Gregory Sullivan; Robert Svoboda; Mark Vagins; Brett Viren; Christopher Walter; Robert Zwaska

    2009-08-09

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass in the mega-ton scale will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. In addition to the physics justification there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake, and the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. The depth requirements associated with the various physics processes are reported for water Cherenkov and liquid argon detector technologies. While some of these physics processes can be adequately studied at shallower depths, none of them require a depth greater than 4300 mwe which corresponds to the 4850 ft level at Homestake. It is very important to note that the scale of the planned detector is such that even for accelerator neutrino detection (which allows one to use the accelerator duty factor to eliminate cosmics) a minimum depth is needed to reduce risk of contamination from cosmic rays. After consideration of the science and the practical issues regarding the Homestake site, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850ft level in a timely manner.

  18. Water wave packets over variable depth R. H. J. Grimshaw and S. Y. Annenkov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water wave packets over variable depth R. H. J. Grimshaw and S. Y. Annenkov Department to describe how a water wave packet will deform and eventually be destroyed as it propagates shoreward from deep to shallow water. It is well-known that in the framework of the usual nonlinear Schrodinger

  19. The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh, we examine the interannual variability of the monsoon rains of Bangladesh, an area greatly affected of Bengal storm surge. For the twentieth century, we found Bangladesh monsoon rainfall (BMR

  20. Stress evolution of the San Andreas fault system: Recurrence interval versus locking depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    Stress evolution of the San Andreas fault system: Recurrence interval versus locking depth Bridget by stress that has accumulated in the upper locked portion of the crust. The present-day stress accumulation rate on any given fault segment is fairly well resolved by current geodetic measurements. Model stress

  1. High-Level Fusion of Depth and Intensity for Pedestrian Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrila, Dariu M.

    High-Level Fusion of Depth and Intensity for Pedestrian Classification Marcus Rohrbach1,3 , Markus. This paper presents a novel approach to pedestrian classi- fication which involves a high-level fusion pedestrians and non-pedestrians. We refrain from the construction of a joint feature space, but instead employ

  2. Logic depth and power consumption in self-timed circuits: A case-study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boemo, Eduardo

    Logic depth and power consumption in self-timed circuits: A case-study Eduardo Boemo J. Herrera to two-phase self- timed pipelines; and second, the increment of data path power consumption://www.etsit.upm.es Abstract.- In this paper the non-linear relationship between power consumption and throughput in two

  3. Remote sensing of breaking wave phase speeds with application to non-linear depth inversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    Remote sensing of breaking wave phase speeds with application to non-linear depth inversions high-resolution remote sensing video and surface elevation records from fixed, in-situ wave gages. Wave phase speeds are extracted from the remote sensing data using a feature tracking technique, and local

  4. Depth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    to significantly enhance our ability to locate geothermal systems and monitor active volcanoes. © 2010 Elsevier BDepth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet studies, the depth of the hydrothermal system is always required, but rarely known via traditional

  5. The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

  6. Wave runup and reflection from coastal structures in depth-limited conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Joel Robert

    1998-01-01

    An experimental hydrodynamic study was undertaken to phics. investigate the effects of depth-limited conditions on wave sunup and reflection from coastal structures. The tests were carried out in a two-dimensional wave flume with a mild 1 235 slope...

  7. Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

  8. CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BY NOL RING TESTS UNDER CREEP LOADING C. Devilliers 1), 2), 3) , L. Laiarinandrasana 1) , B. Fayolle 2. KEYWORDS HDPE pipes, Nol Ring creep test, ageing effects, fracture mechanism, crack depth ratio, aged layer loading than a monotonic tensile loading. It is to be noticed that the Nol Ring test subjected to a creep

  9. Aerosol control on depth of warm rain in convective clouds Mahen Konwar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Aerosol control on depth of warm rain in convective clouds Mahen Konwar,1 R. S. Maheskumar,1 J. R effective radius (re) increased with distance above cloud base (D). Warm rain became detectable, i.e., rain water content >0.01 g/Kg, at the tops of growing convective clouds when re exceeded 12 mm. The re

  10. An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5732E An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings Author(s), Hung Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH than 7 trillion Joules of site energy annually [USDOE]. Analyzing building space heating performance

  11. Characterization of late Campanian and Maastrichtian planktonic foraminiferal depth habitats and vital activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and vital activities based on stable isotopes Sigal Abramovich a;Ă , Gerta Keller a , Doris Stu«ben b the deeper thermocline layer during cool climatic intervals. Two distinct types of `vital effect' mechanisms reserved. Keywords: late Cretaceous; planktonic foraminifera; stable isotopes; depth habitats; vital e

  12. Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow energy regime to be reliable indicators of facies type when considered in isolation. Consid- ered

  13. Making the Most of Using Depth Reasoning to Label Line Drawings of Engineering Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    the automated production of solid models from line drawings which show the visible edges of polyhedral objectsMaking the Most of Using Depth Reasoning to Label Line Drawings of Engineering Objects P. A. C freehand sketches would benefit designers. A subgoal is to take a single line drawing (with hidden lines

  14. Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean effect produces precipitation at midday in the Andean valleys and in the afternoon in the high mountains the main source of melting energy. INDEX TERMS: 3354 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Precipitation

  15. Thickness independent reduced forming voltage in oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2} based resistive switching memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharath, S. U. Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Hildebrandt, E.; Alff, L.; Bertaud, T.; Walczyk, C.; Calka, P.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-08-18

    The conducting filament forming voltage of stoichiometric hafnium oxide based resistive switching layers increases linearly with layer thickness. Using strongly reduced oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films grown on polycrystalline TiN/Si(001) substrates, the thickness dependence of the forming voltage is strongly suppressed. Instead, an almost constant forming voltage of about 3?V is observed up to 200?nm layer thickness. This effect suggests that filament formation and switching occurs for all samples in an oxidized HfO{sub 2} surface layer of a few nanometer thickness while the highly oxygen deficient thin film itself merely serves as a oxygen vacancy reservoir.

  16. SU-E-I-53: Variation in Measurements of Breast Skin Thickness Obtained Using Different Imaging Modalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, U; Kumaraswamy, N; Markey, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate variation in measurements of breast skin thickness obtained using different imaging modalities, including mammography, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Breast skin thicknesses as measured by mammography, CT, ultrasound, and MRI were compared. Mammographic measurements of skin thickness were obtained from published studies that utilized standard positioning (upright) and compression. CT measurements of skin thickness were obtained from a published study of a prototype breast CT scanner in which the women were in the prone position and the breast was uncompressed. Dermatological ultrasound exams of the breast skin were conducted at our institution, with the subjects in the upright position and the breast uncompressed. Breast skin thickness was calculated from breast MRI exams at our institution, with the patient in the prone position and the breast uncompressed. Results: T tests for independent samples demonstrated significant differences in the mean breast skin thickness as measured by different imaging modalities. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences in breast skin thickness across different quadrants of the breast for some modalities. Conclusion: The measurement of breast skin thickness is significantly different across different imaging modalities. Differences in the amount of compression and differences in patient positioning are possible reasons why measurements of breast skin thickness vary by modality.

  17. Post-cast EDM method for reducing the thickness of a turbine nozzle wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Raymond Joseph (Duanesburg, NY); Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy (Schenectady, NY); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (Galway, NY); Schotsch, Margaret Jones (Clifton Park, NY); Rajan, Rajiv (Guilderland, NY); Wei, Bin (Mechanicville, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A post-cast EDM process is used to remove material from the interior surface of a nozzle vane cavity of a turbine. A thin electrode is passed through the cavity between opposite ends of the nozzle vane and displaced along the interior nozzle wall to remove the material along a predetermined path, thus reducing the thickness of the wall between the cavity and the external surface of the nozzle. In another form, an EDM process employing a profile as an electrode is disposed in the cavity and advanced against the wall to remove material from the wall until the final wall thickness is achieved, with the interior wall surface being complementary to the profile surface.

  18. A Thickness of Stellar Disks of Edge-on Galaxies and Position of Their Truncation Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Zasov; D. V. Bizyaev

    2002-12-13

    The relationship between the geometrical properties of stellar disks (a flatness and truncation radius) and the disk kinematics are considered for edge-on galaxies. It is shown that the observed thickness of the disks and the approximate constancy of their thickness along the radius well agrees with the condition of their marginal local gravitational stability. As a consequence, those galaxies whose disks are thinner should harbor more massive dark haloes. The correlation between the de-projeced central brightness of the disks and their flatness is found (the low surface brightness disks tend to be the thinniest ones). We also show that positions of observed photometrically determined truncation radii $R_{cut}$ for the stellar disks support the idea of marginal local gravitational stability of gaseous protodisks at $R =R_{cut}$, and hence the steepening of photometric profiles may be a result of too inefficient star formation beyond $R_{cut}$.

  19. Thick, low-stress films, and coated substrates formed therefrom, and methods for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Kennewick, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Menomonee Falls, WI)

    1992-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation, and the damage resulting therefrom, increases with film thickness. The overcoming of excessive stress by the use of the Si-Al-N film material of the present invention, permits the formation of thick films that are necessary for certain of the above described applications. The most likely use for the subject film materials, other than their specialized views as an optical film, is for microelectronic packaging of components on silicon substrates. In general, the subject films have excellent adherence to the underlying substrate, a high degree of hardness and durability, and are excellent insulators. Prior art elevated temperature deposition processes cannot meet the microelectronic packaging temperature formation constraints. The process of the present invention is conducted under non-elevated temperature conditions, typically 500.degree. C. or less.

  20. Fabrication and Test of Pixelated CZT Detectors with Different Pixel Pitches and Thicknesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Li; A. Garson; P. Dowkontt; J. Martin; M. Beilicke; I. Jung; M. Groza; A. Burger; G. De Geronimo; H. Krawczynski; .; .; .; .

    2008-11-19

    The main methods grown Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals with high yield and excellent homogeneity are Modified Horizontal Bridgman (MHB) and High Pressure Bridgman (HPB) processes, respectively. In this contribution, the readout system based on two 32-channel NCI-ASICs for pixellated CZT detector arrays has been developed and tested. The CZT detectors supplied by Orbotech (MHB) and eV products (HPB) are tested by NCI-ASIC readout system. The CZT detectors have an array of 8x8 or 11x11 pixel anodes fabricated on the anode surface with the area up to 2 cm x2 cm and the thickness of CZT detectors ranges from 0.5 cm to 1 cm. Energy spectra resolution and electron mobility-lifetime products of 8x8 pixels CZT detector with different thicknesses have been investigated.

  1. Standard guide for mutual inductance bridge applications for wall thickness determinations in boiler tubing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes a procedure for obtaining relative wall thickness indications in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic steels using the mutual inductance bridge method. The procedure is intended for use with instruments capable of inducing two substantially identical magnetic fields and noting the change in inductance resulting from differing amounts of steel. It is used to distinguish acceptable wall thickness conditions from those which could place tubular vessels or piping at risk of bursting under high temperature and pressure conditions. 1.2 This guide is intended to satisfy two general needs for users of industrial Mutual Inductance Bridge (MIB) equipment: (1) the need for a tutorial guide addressing the general principles of Mutual Inductance Bridges as they apply to industrial piping; and (2) the need for a consistent set of MIB performance parameter definitions, including how these performance parameters relate to MIB system specifications. Potential users and buyers, as well as experienced M...

  2. Ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite thick films for energy storage applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Paritosh; Borkar, Hitesh; Singh, B. P.; Singh, V. N.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-08-15

    We have successfully fabricated large area free standing polyvinylidene fluoride -Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} (PVDF-PZT) ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite (wt% 80–20, respectively) thick films with an average diameter (d) ?0.1 meter and thickness (t) ?50 ?m. Inclusion of PZT in PVDF matrix significantly enhanced dielectric constant (from 10 to 25 at 5 kHz) and energy storage capacity (from 11 to 14 J/cm{sup 3}, using polarization loops), respectively, and almost similar leakage current and mechanical strength. Microstructural analysis revealed the presence of ? and ? crystalline phases and homogeneous distribution of PZT crystals in PVDF matrix. It was also found that apart from the microcrystals, well defined naturally developed PZT nanocrystals were embedded in PVDF matrix. The observed energy density indicates immense potential in PVDF-PZT composites for possible applications as green energy and power density electronic elements.

  3. Plasmonic finite-thickness metal-semiconductor-metal waveguide as ultra-compact modulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    We propose a plasmonic modulator with semiconductor gain material for optoelectronic integrated circuits. We analyze properties of a finite-thickness metal-semiconductor-metal (F-MSM) waveguide to be utilized as an ultra-compact and fast plasmonic modulator. The InP-based semiconductor core allows electrical control of signal propagation. By pumping the core we can vary the gain level and thus the transmittance of the whole system. The study of the device was made using both analytical approaches for planar two-dimensional case as well as numerical simulations for finite-width waveguides. We analyze the eigenmodes of the F-MSM waveguide, propagation constant, confinement factor, Purcell factor, absorption coefficient, and extinction ratio of the structure. We show that using thin metal layers instead of thick ones we can obtain higher extinction ratio of the device.

  4. Effects of catalyst film thickness on plasma-enhanced carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, S.; Cantoro, M.; Kleinsorge, B.; Casiraghi, C.; Parvez, A.; Robertson, J.; Ducati, C.

    2005-08-01

    A systematic study is presented of the influence of catalyst film thickness on carbon nanostructures grown by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition from acetylene and ammonia mixtures. We show that reducing the Fe/Co catalyst film thickness below 3 nm causes a transition from larger diameter (>40 nm), bamboolike carbon nanofibers to small diameter ({approx}5 nm) multiwalled nanotubes with two to five walls. This is accompanied by a more than 50 times faster growth rate and a faster catalyst poisoning. Thin Ni catalyst films only trigger such a growth transition when pretreated with an ammonia plasma. We observe a limited correlation between this growth transition and the coarsening of the catalyst film before deposition. For a growth temperature of {<=}550 deg. C, all catalysts showed mainly a tip growth regime and a similar activity on untreated silicon, oxidized silicon, and silicon nitride support.

  5. Development of low frequencies, insulating thick diaphragms for power MEMS applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formosa, Fabien; Favreličre, Hugues; 10.1016/j.sna.2012.09.018

    2013-01-01

    Major challenges of micro thermal machines are the thermal insulation and mechanical tolerance in the case of sliding piston. Switching from piston to membrane in microengines can alleviate the latest and lead to planar architectures. However, the thermal isolation would call for very thick structures which are associated to too high resonant frequencies which are detrimental to the engine performances. A thermal and mechanical compromise is to be made. On the contrary, based on fluid structure interaction, using an incompressible fluid contained in a cavity sealed by deformable diaphragm it would be possible to design a thick, low frequency insulating diaphragm. The design involves a simple planar geometry that is easy to manufacture with standard microelectronics methods. An analytical fluid structure model is proposed and theoretically validated. Experimental structures are realized and tested. The model is in agreement with the experimental results. A dimensionless model is proposed to design hybrid fluid...

  6. Has a thick neutron skin in ${}^{208}$Pb been ruled out?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattoyev, F J

    2013-01-01

    The Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) has provided the first model-independent evidence in favor of a neutron-rich skin in ${}^{208}$Pb. Although the error bars are large, the reported large central value of 0.33\\,fm is particularly intriguing. To test whether such a thick neutron-skin in ${}^{208}$Pb is already incompatible with laboratory experiments or astrophysical observations, we employ relativistic models with neutron-skin thickness in ${}^{208}$Pb ranging from 0.16 to 0.33 fm to compute ground state properties of finite nuclei, their collective monopole and dipole response, and mass-{\\sl vs}-radius relations for neutron stars. No compelling reason was found to rule out models with large neutron skins in ${}^{208}$Pb from the set of observables considered in this work.

  7. Method for rapid, controllable growth and thickness, of epitaxial silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Stradins, Paul (Golden, CO); Teplin, Charles (Boulder, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2009-10-13

    A method of producing epitaxial silicon films on a c-Si wafer substrate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition by controlling the rate of silicon deposition in a temperature range that spans the transition from a monohydride to a hydrogen free silicon surface in a vacuum, to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness is disclosed. The method includes placing a c-Si substrate in a HWCVD reactor chamber. The method also includes supplying a gas containing silicon at a sufficient rate into the reaction chamber to interact with the substrate to deposit a layer containing silicon thereon at a predefined growth rate to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness.

  8. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  9. Thickness effects on the plastic collapse of perforated plates with triangular penetration patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J.L.; Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

    2000-03-01

    This paper investigates the effects of plate thickness on the accuracy of limit load solutions obtained using an elastic-perfectly plastic [EPP] equivalent solid [EQS] procedure for flat perforated plates with a triangular array of penetrations. The EQS approach for limit loads is based on an EQS collapse surface that is valid for generalized plane strain. This assumption is applicable for very thick plates but is known to be less reasonable for very thin plates where plane stress may be a better assumption. The limits of applicability of the generalized plane strain assumption are investigated by obtaining limit load solutions for perforated plates of various thicknesses that are subjected to in-plane and bending loads. Plastic limit load solutions obtained using three-dimensional EPP finite element analysis [FEA] of models which include each penetration explicitly are compared with solutions obtained using the EQS approximation. The penetration pattern chosen for this study has a ligament efficiency (ligament width-to-pitch ratio, h/P) of 0.32. For plates thicker than the pitch, the limit load calculated using the EQS method for both in-plane and bending loads is shown to be very accurate (within 4%) of the limit load calculated for the explicit model. On the other hand, for thin plates (t/P< 2), the EQS limit load is 5% greater than the explicit limit load for bending and 8% greater than the explicit limit load for in-plane loads. For thinner plates, the collapse surface is tied to the local geometry deformation and, hence, an equivalent solid plate representation of plastic collapse is a function of deformation mode and thickness.

  10. Unique Challenges Accompany Thick-Shell CdSe/nCdS (n > 10) Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y; Marchuk, K; Abraham, R; Sampat, S; Abraham, R.; Fang, N; Malko, AV; Vela, J

    2011-12-23

    Thick-shell CdSe/nCdS (n {ge} 10) nanocrystals were recently reported that show remarkably suppressed fluorescence intermittency or 'blinking' at the single-particle level as well as slow rates of Auger decay. Unfortunately, whereas CdSe/nCdS nanocrystal synthesis is well-developed up to n {le} 6 CdS monolayers (MLs), reproducible syntheses for n {ge} 10 MLs are less understood. Known procedures sometimes result in homogeneous CdS nucleation instead of heterogeneous, epitaxial CdS nucleation on CdSe, leading to broad and multimodal particle size distributions. Critically, obtained core/shell sizes are often below those desired. This article describes synthetic conditions specific to thick-shell growth (n {ge} 10 and n {ge} 20 MLs) on both small (sub2 nm) and large (>4.5 nm) CdSe cores. We find added secondary amine and low concentration of CdSe cores and molecular precursors give desired core/shell sizes. Amine-induced, partial etching of CdSe cores results in apparent shell-thicknesses slightly beyond those desired, especially for very-thick shells (n {ge} 20 MLs). Thermal ripening and fast precursor injection lead to undesired homogeneous CdS nucleation and incomplete shell growth. Core/shells derived from small CdSe (1.9 nm) have longer PL lifetimes and more pronounced blinking at single-particle level compared with those derived from large CdSe (4.7 nm). We expect our new synthetic approach will lead to a larger throughput of these materials, increasing their availability for fundamental studies and applications.

  11. Depth-gradient analysis of the Colony Creek Cycle (late Pennsylvanian) of north Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Noel Lynne

    1986-01-01

    Chairman of Advisory Coamittee: Dr. Thomas E. Yancey Late Pennsylvanian depositional cycles consisting of transgres- sive and regressive sequences, and containing thin limestones overlain by thick shales which are in turn overlain by sandstones and... and the Colorado River valley, and has a similar vertical stratigra- phic succession of lithologies in both areas. This succession consists of 1) a thin transgressive limestone, 2) phosphatic dark shale, 3) gray shales with abundant fossils, 4) mixed shale...

  12. Using seismic refraction to assess geothermal potential: an updated view of crustal thickness in the Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , heat flow can be higher, and the potential for geothermal energy may be greater. In addition, crustalUsing seismic refraction to assess geothermal potential: an updated view of crustal thickness, Great Basin, crustal thickness, geothermal potential, Battle Mountain, Walker Lane, Nevada, geophysics

  13. Thickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV-and PF-based polymer light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Sue

    the thickness-dependent optical properties of single layer polymer light emitting diodes for two materials, poly the electronic and optical properties of these materials in light emitting diode LED structures.2 OurThickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV- and PF-based polymer light emitting

  14. Abstract--In this paper, the propagation characteristics of an enhanced-thickness magnetic nanoparticle thin film are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    nanoparticle thin film are investigated on high resistivity silicon substrate (10,000 ohm-cm) for the first time up to 60 GHz. Contrary to other thin films, this nanoparticle thin film can achieve a thickness up to several hundred nanometers, even to micron. The enhanced thickness of this thin film is achieved

  15. A reliable control system for measurement on film thickness in copper chemical mechanical planarization system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongkai; Qu, Zilian; Zhao, Qian; Tian, Fangxin; Zhao, Dewen; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-15

    In recent years, a variety of film thickness measurement techniques for copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) are subsequently proposed. In this paper, the eddy-current technique is used. In the control system of the CMP tool developed in the State Key Laboratory of Tribology, there are in situ module and off-line module for measurement subsystem. The in situ module can get the thickness of copper film on wafer surface in real time, and accurately judge when the CMP process should stop. This is called end-point detection. The off-line module is used for multi-points measurement after CMP process, in order to know the thickness of remained copper film. The whole control system is structured with two levels, and the physical connection between the upper and the lower is achieved by the industrial Ethernet. The process flow includes calibration and measurement, and there are different algorithms for two modules. In the process of software development, C++ is chosen as the programming language, in combination with Qt OpenSource to design two modules’ GUI and OPC technology to implement the communication between the two levels. In addition, the drawing function is developed relying on Matlab, enriching the software functions of the off-line module. The result shows that the control system is running stably after repeated tests and practical operations for a long time.

  16. The effect of mix on capsule yields as a function of shell thickness and gas fill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, P. A.

    2014-06-15

    An investigation of direct drive capsules with different shell thicknesses and gas fills was conducted to examine the amount of shock induced (Richtmyer-Meshkov) mix versus Rayleigh-Taylor mix from deceleration of the implosion. The RAGE (Eulerian) code with a turbulent mix model was used to model these capsules for neutron yields along with time-dependent mix amounts. The amount of Richtmyer-Meshkov induced mix from the shock breaking out of the shell is about 0.1??g (0.15??m of shell material), while the Rayleigh-Taylor mix is of order 1??g and determines the mixed simulation yield. The simulations were able to calculate a yield over mix (YOM) ratio (experiment/mix simulation) between 0.5 and 1.0 for capsules with shell thicknesses ranging from 7.5 to 20??m and with gas fills between 3.8 and 20?atm of D{sub 2} or DT. The simulated burn averaged T{sub ion} values typically lie with 0.5?keV of the data, which is within the measurement error. For capsules with shell thicknesses >25??m, the YOM values drop to 0.10?±?0.05, suggesting that some unmodeled effect needs to be accounted for in the thickest capsules.

  17. Improved gas sensing and dielectric properties of Fe doped hydroxyapatite thick films: Effect of molar concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mene, Ravindra U. [PDEA's, Annasaheb Waghire College of Science, Arts and Commerce, Otur 412409, M.S. (India); School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India); Mahabole, Megha P. [School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India); Mohite, K.C. [Haribhai. V. Desai College, Pune 411002, M.S. (India); Khairnar, Rajendra S., E-mail: rskhairnarsps@gmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • We report improved gas sensing and dielectric characteristics of Fe ion exchanged HAp films. • Fe doped HAp film shows maximum gas response at relatively lower temperature. • Response and gas uptake capacity of sensors is improved for appropriate amount of Fe ions in HAp matrix. • Fe-HAp films exhibit remarkable improvement in dielectric properties compared to pure HAp. • Fe doped HAp films show significant improvement in gas sensing as well as in dielectric properties. - Abstract: In the present work Fe doped hydroxyapatite (Fe-HAp) thick films has been successfully utilized to improve the gas sensing as well as its dielectric properties. Initially, HAp nano powder is synthesized by chemical precipitation process and later on Fe ions are doped in HAp by ion exchange process. Structural and morphological modifications are observed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The sensing parameters such as operating temperature, response/recovery time and gas uptake capacity are experimentally determined. The Fe-HAp (0.05 M) film shows improved CO and CO{sub 2} gas sensing capacity at lower operating temperature compared to pure HAp. Moreover, variation of dielectric constant and dielectric loss for pure and Fe-HAp thick films are studied as a function of frequency in the range of 10 Hz–1 MHz. The study reveals that Fe doped HAp thick films improve the sensing and dielectric characteristics as compared to pure HAp.

  18. The existence of warm and optically thick dissipative coronae above accretion disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozanska, A; Belmont, R; Czerny, B; Petrucci, P -O

    2015-01-01

    In the past years, several observations of AGN and X-ray binaries have suggested the existence of a warm T around 0.5-1 keV and optically thick, \\tau ~ 10-20, corona covering the inner parts of the accretion disk. These properties are directly derived from spectral fitting in UV to soft-X-rays using Comptonization models. However, whether such a medium can be both in radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium with an accretion disk is still uncertain. We investigate the properties of such warm, optically thick coronae and put constraints on their existence. We solve the radiative transfer equation for grey atmosphere analytically in a pure scattering medium, including local dissipation as an additional heating term in the warm corona. The temperature profile of the warm corona is calculated assuming it is cooled by Compton scattering, with the underlying dissipative disk providing photons to the corona. Our analytic calculations show that a dissipative thick, (\\tau_{cor} ~ 10-12) corona on the top of a standard ac...

  19. Thickness effect on the structural and electrical properties of poly-SiGe films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asafa, T.B., E-mail: asafa@kfupm.edu.sa [KACST-Intel Consortium Center of Excellence in Nano-manufacturing Applications, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Witvrouw, A. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schneider, D. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstrasse 28, Dresden (Germany); Moussa, A. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tabet, N.; Said, S.A.M. [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Stress and Young's modulus of poly-SiGe film are linked to the grain columnar structure. • The above properties remain unchanged for poly-SiGe films thicker than 40 nm. • The point of transition is close to the electron mean free path for SiGe. • Both the resistivity and Hall mobility follow a similar trend. - Abstract: As lateral dimensions of electromechanical devices are scaled down to length scales comparable to electron mean free paths, the influence of thickness effect on their properties becomes sine qua non. This paper presents a detailed study of thickness effect on the Young's modulus, residual stress, resistivity and Hall mobility of ultrathin poly-Si{sub 11}Ge{sub 89} films deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition. The Young's moduli for the films thicker than ?40 nm are close to the bulk value (135 GPa) while those of the thinner films are much lower. The reduction in resistivity and subsequent improved Hall mobility as thickness increases are discussed in light of surface morphology which is evident from atomic microscopy images. The near constant values of Young's modulus, resistivity and Hall mobility for the films thicker than ?40 nm are attributed to the columnar grain structure as confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy images.

  20. Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figus, Cristiana Quochi, Francesco Artizzu, Flavia Saba, Michele Marongiu, Daniela Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia; Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea

    2014-10-21

    Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.