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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Variations in porosity with depth for marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30 y~O ~ 25 418 I5 20 AFRICA ~ 368 0 4 yO 20 CUBA 'IO 30 20 10 75 HI5PAMICL'A 70 65 Fig. 5--Sample location map. ' &SDP Leg 41, site SBS; DSDF eg 53, site 418B. s! na . =. ranae: ' ends from acproximr L~ lv 2=;:. c/cm to 2 max' r. "~'m... of Departmen t Member) Member December 1977 Kurt, '& o &ed mc'l& t". CL! ce?, . &e 1 v I 1 L!n cvec's' tv of !iansas C, , ?' Iman o Advisory Cor!mitt?e: LL . !ili. i . '1am R. )3r"ant porosity vers!is ci!?, i '. '. is ? und; mont?i or 1 nc! I&1 = ' n ti...

Katherman, Charles Edward

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Secondary porosity in sandstones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary porosity in sandstones is caused by dissolution and fracturing, and is common in the sedimentary record. Secondary porosity commonly develops in the deep subsurface and thus provides an opportunity to extend exploration to depths traditionally considered unsuitable for exploration. Two contrasting routes of diagenesis exist in nature: porosity reduction and porosity enhancement. Porosity reduction is commonly caused by compaction and cementation, whereas porosity enhancement is primarily caused by dissolution of carbonate minerals. Two basic types of primary pores (intergranular and intragranular) and four basic types of secondary pores (grain fractures, rock fractures, intergranular, and intragranular) can be differentiated on the basis of (1) position of pores, (2) timing of origin, and (3) processes of origin. The proposed classification system is useful in inferring reservoir quality. Various types of secondary porosity are recognized using a comprehensive set of 20 criteria. The various criteria are based on manner of breakage, pore geometry, grain geometry, products of dissolution, and sediment packing. New evidence suggests that silicate minerals, including quartz, dissolve more commonly than have been reported. The abundant occurrence of secondary porosity in reservoir sandstones emphasizes the importance of secondary porosity in evaluating deep reservoirs.

Shanmugam, G.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Porosity gradients in marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The objectives of this study are: 1. To use selected Hydraulic Piston Core, porosity versus depth data (collected by shipboard sciennsts from DSDP Leg 64 to ODP Leg 120) and group it according to the major sediment type (Fig. 1) and to develop a data base... sites from DSDP Leg 64 to ODP Leg 120 were studied in an effort to determine the primary factors controlling the change in pomsity with depth. Each porosity vs. depth profile was divided into "compositional slices" which were grouped into seven...

Mahmood, Khalid

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

Secondary porosity in sandstones: basic contributions of Chepikov and Savkevich  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of secondary porosity in sandstones - porosity caused primarly by dissolution - has gained considerable attention recently. The basic contributions made by Chepikov and Savkevich, however, have been ignored completely in North American publications. Chepikov et al not only developed the first set of criteria for recognizing secondary porosity, but also attributed the dissolution of cements to the arrival of oil. Savkevich was the first to illustrate the trend of increasing porosity at considerable depths. 1 figure, 1 table.

Shanmugam, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Secondary porosity in sandstones: basic contributions of Chepikov and Savkevich  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of secondary porosity in sandstones-porosity caused primarily by dissolution--has gained considerable attention recently. The basic contributions made by Chepikov and Savkevich, however, have been ignored completely in North American publications. Chepikov et al not only developed the first set of criteria for recognizing secondary porosity, but also attributed the dissolution of cements to the arrival of oil. Savkevich was the first to illustrate the trend of increasing porosity at considerable depths.

Shanmugam, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Microparticles with hierarchical porosity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure provides oxide microparticles with engineered hierarchical porosity and methods of manufacturing the same. Also described are structures that are formed by templating, impregnating, and/or precipitating the oxide microparticles and method for forming the same. Suitable applications include catalysts, electrocatalysts, electrocatalysts support materials, capacitors, drug delivery systems, sensors and chromatography.

Petsev, Dimiter N; Atanassov, Plamen; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Carroll, Nick; Olson, Tim

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

7

Porosity in polysilsesquioxane xerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polysilsesquioxanes, [RSiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n} are a class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials in which silicon atoms are linked with up to three siloxane bonds to other monomer units in the polymer and the organic group is a pendent functionality. Polysilsesquioxanes are prepared by the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrialkoxysilanes (Scheme l). Organotrialkoxysilanes RSi(OR{prime}){sub 3}, have been extensively used as coupling agents for composites or surface treatments for materials. Polysilsesquioxanes have become increasingly popular for generating specialty coatings such as low k dielectric materials for microelectronic applications. While there is extensive information on the formation of polysilsesquioxanes, there has not been a survey of the ability of organotrialkoxysilanes to form gels until recently. The formation of polysilsesquioxanes gels has been shown to be very sensitive to the nature of the organic group. Many monomers will only form soluble oligomers or polymers upon hydrolysis and condensation, even when the reaction is conducted solvent-free with neat monomer and aqueous catalyst. Furthermore, there is little information concerning the influence of the organic group, R, on the porosity of the polysilsesquioxanes gels that are formed. In this paper the authors describe the preparation of polysilsesquioxane gels where R = H, methyl, ethyl, cyanoethyl, vinyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, chloromethyl, and chloromethylphenyl, and the characterization of the porosity of the respective xerogels. Gels were prepared from the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrimethoxysilanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}, and organotriethoxy-silanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}.

LOY,DOUGLAS A.; SCHNEIDER,DUANE A.; BAUGHER,BRIGITTA M.; RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR

2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ultrasonic Porosity Estimation of Low-Porosity Ceramic Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on efforts to extend the applicability of an airborne ultrasonic pulse-reflection (UPR) method towards lower porosities. UPR is a method that has been used successfully to estimate porosity and tortuosity of high porosity foams. UPR measures acoustical reflectivity of a target surface at two or more incidence angles. We used ceramic samples to evaluate the feasibility of extending the UPR range into low porosities (<35%). The validity of UPR estimates depends on pore size distribution and probing frequency as predicted by the theoretical boundary conditions of the used equivalent fluid model under the high-frequency approximation.

Eskelinen, J.; Hoffren, H. [Electronics Research Unit, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64 FIN-00014 (Finland); Kohout, T.; Pesonen, L. J. [Division of Geophysics, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64 FIN-00014 (Finland); Haeggstroem, E. [Electronics Research Unit, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64 FIN-00014 (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, PO Box 64, FIN-00014 (Finland)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Porosity in Polysilsesquioxane Xerolgels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes is a convenient method for introducing organic functionality into hybrid organic-inorganic materials. However, not much is known about the effects of the organic substituent on the porosity of the resulting xerogels. In this study, we prepared a series of polysilsesquioxane xerogels from organotrialkoxysilanes, RSi(OR{sup 1}){sub 3}, with different organic groups (R = H, Me, Et dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, vinyl, chloromethyl, (p-chloromethyl) phenyl, cyanoethyl). Polymerizations of the monomers were carried out under a variety of conditions, varying monomer concentration, type of catalyst, and alkoxide substituent. The effect of the organic substituent on the sol-gel process was often dramatic. In many cases, gels were formed only at very high monomer concentration and/or with only one type of catalyst. All of the gels were processed as xerogels and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry to evaluate their pore structure.

Baugher, B.M.; Loy, D.A.; Rahimian, K.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

10

Processing and characterization of high porosity aerogel films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogels are highly porous solids having unique morphology among materials because both the pores and particles making up the material have sizes less than wavelengths of visible light. Such a unique morphology modifies the normal molecular transport mechanisms within the material, resulting in exceptional thermal, acoustical, mechanical, and electrical properties. For example, aerogels have the lowest measured thermal conductivity and dielectric constant for any solid material. Special methods are required to make aerogel films with high porosity. In this paper, we discuss the special conditions needed to fabricate aerogel films having porosities greater than 75% and we describe methods of processing inorganic aerogel films having controllable thicknesses in the range 0.5 to 200 micrometers. We report methods and results of characterizing the films including thickness, refractive index, density (porosity), and dielectric constant. We also discuss results of metallization and patterning on the aerogel films for applications involving microminiature electronics and thermal detectors.

Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermoelectric materials having porosity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

12

Appendix PORSURF: Porosity Surface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes LaboratoryAntonyaAppeals4 STANDARDN NEPA Disclosure

13

Electrochemical techniques for the evaluation of porosity and corrosion rate for electroless nickel deposits on steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of electrochemical techniques in assessing the porosity of electroless nickel deposits (1--24 {micro}m) on steel substrates from hypophosphite baths is considered. The corrosion rate of the coated samples immersed in 0.125M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 22 C was determined using Tafel extrapolation and was found to decrease with decreasing porosity. Analysis of anodic polarization curves and current-time data at fixed potentials gave a good indication of the extent of deposit porosity. The use of galvanic coupling experiments between a non-porous coating and test samples of varying deposit thickness was also examined. The shape of the porosity vs. coating thickness curve was similar for all the methods investigated, the porosity decreasing for thicker deposits.

Kerr, C.; Barker, D.; Walsh, F. [Univ. of Portsmouth (United Kingdom). School of Chemistry, Physics and Radiography

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Dual porosity gas evolving electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dual porosity electrode is described for use in thermoelectrochemical systems where simultaneous transport of gas and liquid into and/or out of the electrode is required. The electrode includes catalytic electrode particles having diameters ranging from about 25 to 100 angstroms. The catalytic electrode particles are anchored to a support network in clusters which have internal pores ranging in size from 25 to 100 angstroms. The pores between the clusters range in size from between about 1 to 20 microns. A method for making the dual porosity electrodes is also disclosed.

Townsend, C.W.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Core image analysis of matrix porosity in The Geysers reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption is potentially an important consideration when calculating reserves at The Geysers. Our investigations of the mineralogical relationships in core samples have shown matrix pore spaces to be largely associated with fractures. Dissolution of calcite from hydrothermal veins increases porosity in the graywacke reservoir. The high relative surface area of secondary alteration phases could promote adsorption. In order to quantify porosity distribution and surface area, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were analyzed using software developed for the interpretation of satellite imagery, This software classifies the images as either crystal or pore and then accumulates data on pore size, total porosity and surface area of the mineral-pore interface. Review of literature shows that data on thickness of adsorbed water layer does not exist for many of the mineral phases of interest in The Geysers. We have assumed thicknesses of 10, 100, and 5300 Angstroms for the adsorbed layer and calculated the relative proportions of adsorbed water. These calculations show 0.005%, 0.05%, and 2.5% of total water would be adsorbed using the above thicknesses.

Nielson, Dennis L.; Nash, Greg; Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Tripp, Alan C.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers.

Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Kucera, Eugenia H. (Downers Grove, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic is described which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers. 3 figures.

Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by the heavy rainfall, soil zones, lush vegetation, and accompanying voluminous production of organic and inorganic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution, causing a net gain in porosity near unconformities. Thus, porosity in sandstones tends to increase toward overlying unconformities. Such porosity trends have been observed in hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas. A common attribute of these reservoirs is that they were all subaerially exposed under heavy rainfall conditions. An empirical model has been developed for the Triassic and Jurassic sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian North Sea on the basis of the observed relationship that shows an increase in porosity in these reservoirs with increasing proximity to the overlying base of Cretaceous unconformity. An important practical attribute of this model is that it allows for the prediction of porosity in the neighboring undrilled areas by recognizing the base of Cretaceous unconformity in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps.

Shanmugam, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by heavy rainfall, lush vegetation, soil zones, and the voluminous production of inorganic and organic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution. Thus, porosity in sandstones commonly increases toward overlying unconformities. Empirical models have been developed on the basis of the observed relationship between erosional unconformities and porosity in the underlying sandstones in the North Sea (Middle Jurassic Brent Group) and in the Alaskan North Slope (Triassic Ivishak Formation). An important practical attribute of these models is that they allow for the prediction of porosity in frontier areas by recognizing erosional unconformities in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps for underlying sandstones. Hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas occur immediately beneath major erosional unconformities.

Shanmugam, G.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by heavy rainfall, lush vegetation, soil zones, and the voluminous production of inorganic and organic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution. Thus, porosity in sandstones commonly increases toward overlying unconformities. Empirical models have been developed on the basis of the observed relationship between erosional unconformities and porosity in the underlying sandstones in the North Sea (Middle Jurassic Brent Group) and in the Alaskan North Slope (Triassic Ivishak Formation). An important practical attribute of these models is that they allow for the prediction of porosity in frontier areas by recognizing erosional unconformities in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps for underlying sandstones. Hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas occur immediately beneath major erosional unconformities.

Shanmugam, G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Probing Porosity and Pore Interconnectivity in Crystalline Mesoporous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Porosity and Pore Interconnectivity in Crystalline Mesoporous TiO2 Using Hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR. Probing Porosity and Pore Interconnectivity in Crystalline Mesoporous TiO2 Using...

26

Calorific and porosity development in carbonized wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wood of four species (red oak, southern yellow pine, black cherry, and hybrid poplar) were carbonized in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere at an average heating rate of 3 degrees Centigrade/minute to selected final temperatures up to 700 degrees Centigrade. The effects of final carbonization temperature on selected properties of the char were obtained using an adiabatic oxygen bomb calorimeter to investigate heat of combustion and a mercury porosimeter to investigate total porosity, real density, apparent density, and pore size distribution. Pore characteristics of carbonized wood developed before 300 degrees Centigrade in southern yellow pine and before 400 degrees Centigrade in red oak, black cherry, and hybrid poplar. Statistical analysis established linear relationships between heat of combustion versus final carbonization temperature in the carbonization temperature ranges investigated. The results of this study will aid in understanding optimum pryrolysis conditions for the development of calorific and porosity values. (Refs. 22).

Baileys, R.T.; Blankenhorn, P.R.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

Synthesis of high porosity, monolithic alumina aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many non-silica aerogels are notably weak and fragile in monolithic form. Particularly, few monolithic aerogels with densities less than 50kg/m3 have any significant strength. It is especially difficult to prepare uncracked monoliths of pure alumina aerogels that are robust and moisture stable. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis of strong, stable, monolithic, high porosity (>98% porous) alumina aerogels, using a two-step sol-gel process. The alumina aerogels have a polycrystalline morphology that results in enhanced physical properties. Most of the measured physical properties of the alumina aerogels are superior to those for silica aerogels for equivalent densities.

Poco, J F; Satcher, J H; Hrubesh, L W

2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

Engineering Strength, Porosity, and Emission Intensity of Nanostructur...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the porosity, mechanical strength, and luminescence intensity of metal chalcogenide aerogels was probed by comparison of CdSe aerogels prepared from spherical and rod-shaped...

30

Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.?

Schwam, David [Case Western Reserve University] [Case Western Reserve University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

31

Analyzing Porosity using Petrographic Imaging Methods: Key for Petrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Recrystallization with the filling of void space and growth of calcite and dolomite crystals is also shown in numerous images. Images under Choquette and Pray’s carbonate porosity classification system are dominated by non-fabric selective vuggy porosity... Archie’s Equation ................................................................................................. 20 III RESULTS ............................................................................................................. 24...

Mcdaniel, Kathleen

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Significance of Secondary Porosity in Interpreting Sandstone Composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary porosity resulting from dissolution of unstable framework grains such as feldspar and rock fragments (including chert) is common in sandstones. Extensive dissolution of framework grains may result in misinterpreting the original composition of a sandstone and, hence, in misinterpreting its provenance. To avoid these problems, secondary porosity caused by grain dissolution must be recognized. Sandstone composition may be properly evaluated by including the dissolved portion of a framework grain as a grain, rather than as porosity, while point counting. This should be useful in interpreting original composition of sandstones and in paleogeographic reconstruction of prospect areas.

Shanmugam, G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders for ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet. We developed one of these using connectorized components and the other using radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs). Both...

Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T.

2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

section of the 0.6-Ma Lava Creek ash-flow tuff. In this core, the degree of welding appears to be responsible for most of the variations in porosity, matrix...

35

In Vivo Evaluation of the Presence of Bone Marrow in Cortical Porosity in Postmenopausal Osteopenic Women  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bone resorption in osteoporosis. Calcif. Tissue Int. Augat,Porosity in Women with Osteoporosis. Vienna, Austria:porosity in women with osteoporosis. J. Bone Miner. Res.

Goldenstein, Janet; Kazakia, Galateia; Majumdar, Sharmila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress all depended on the porosity content in bulk-sintered silver. The only investigated property that was independent of porosity in that range was coefficient of thermal expansion.

Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The thermal conductivity of sediments as a function of porosity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SEDIMENTS AS A FUNCTION OF POROSITY A Thesis by JAMES WARREN MILLER Approved as to style and content by: Louis J. hompson CE)(Chairman of Committee) Harry M. Coyle (CE)( ember...THE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SEDIMENTS AS A FUNCTION OF POROSITY A Thesis by JAMES WARREN MILLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...

Miller, James W

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Thick film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Slug Test Data Analysis in Reservoirs with Double Porosity Behaviour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure analysis for a slug test which corresponds to the flow period of a Drill Stem test is extended to wells in reservoirs with double-porosity behaviour. Solutions are obtained for either pseudo-steady state or transient interporosity flow. The distinctive specific features of both solutions are identified. Results presented are applicable to both naturally-fractured and layered reservoirs with the more permeable layer connecting to the wellbore. Type curves based on the pseudo-steady or transient interporosity flow are presented. These type curves are similar to the existing homogenous single layer type curve with addition of interporosity flow lines indicating double-porosity behaviour.

Mateen, Khalid; Ramey, Henry J. Jr.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Variable depth core sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Refining thick subcategory theorems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a $K$-theory recipe of Thomason to obtain classifications of triangulated subcategories via refining some standard thick subcategory theorems. We apply this recipe to the full subcategories of finite objects in the derived categories of rings and the stable homotopy category of spectra. This gives, in the derived categories, a complete classification of the triangulated subcategories of perfect complexes over some commutative rings. In the stable homotoy category of spectra we obtain only a partial classification of the triangulated subcategories of the finite $p$-local spectra. We use this partial classification to study the lattice of triangulated subcategories. This study gives some new evidence to a conjecture of Adams that the thick subcategory $\\C_2$ can be generated by iterated cofiberings of the Smith-Toda complex. We also discuss several consequences of these classification theorems.

Sunil K. Chebolu.

45

Development of a new graded-porosity FeAl alloy by elemental reactive synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new graded-porosity FeAl alloy can be fabricated through Fe and Al elemental reactive synthesis. FeAl alloy with large connecting open pores and permeability were used as porous supports. The coating was obtained by spraying slurries consisting of mixtures of Fe powder and Al powder with 3 5 m diameter onto porous FeAl support and then sintered at 1100 C. The performances of the coating were compared in terms of thickness, pore diameter and permeability. With an increase in the coating thickness up to 200 m, the changes of maximum pore size decreased from 23.6 m to 5.9 m and the permeability decreased from 184.2 m3m 2kPa 1h 1 to 76.2 m3m 2kPa 1h 1, respectively, for a sintering temperature equal to 1100 C. The composite membranes have potential application for excellent filters in severe environments.

Shen, P Z [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; He, Y H [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Gao, H Y [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Zou, J [School of Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, QLD; Xu, N P [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009, C; Jiang, Y [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Huang, B [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Lui, C T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in local policy debates about fracking. This In-depth Report from Science for Environment Policy explores

48

SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM K.D. Carlson1 , C: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Shrinkage Porosity, Hot Tears, Modeling Abstract Simulations are performed and hot tears in squeeze casting of magnesium alloys. Introduction Both shrinkage porosity and hot tears

Beckermann, Christoph

49

Radioactive waste disposal in thick unsaturated zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Portions of the Great Basin are undergoing crustal extension and have unsaturated zones as much as 600 meters thick. These areas contain multiple natural barriers capable of isolating solidified toxic wastes from the biosphere for tens of thousands to perhaps hundreds of thousands of years. An example of the potential utilization of such arid zone environments for toxic waste isolation is the burial of transuranic radioactive wastes at relatively shallow depths (15 to 100 meters) in Sedan Crater, Yucca Flat, Nevada. The volume of this man-made crater is several times that of the projected volume of such wastes to the year 2000. Disposal in Sedan Crater could be accomplished at a savings on the order of $0.5 billion, in comparison with current schemes for burial of such wastes in mined repositories at depths of 600 to 900 meters, and with an apparently equal likelihood of waste isolation from the biosphere. 4 figures.

Winograd, I.J.

1981-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

50

Slug test data analysis in reservoirs with double porosity behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure analysis for a slug test which corresponds to the flow period of a Drill Stem test is extended to wells in reservoirs with double porosity behavior. The modelling of fluid flow within the reservoir is achieved by considering reservoirs having homogeneously distributed regions of primary (matrix) and secondary (fissure) porosity. The matrix acts as a source and fissures connect with the well. The well conditions include wellbore storage and skin effect. Solutions were obtained for either pseudostate, or transient interporosity flow. The distinctive features of both solutions are identified. Results presented are applicable to both naturally fractured and layered reservoirs as long as only the high permeability layer conducts to the wellbore. An interpretation method based on type-curve matching is proposed. Type curves based on pseudosteady or transient interporosity flow are presented. These type curves are similar to existing single layer type curves with the addition of interporosity flow lines indicating double porosity behavior. Application of the type-curve matching technique can provide the interporosity flow parameter lambda, the storativity ratio, ..omega.., in addition to transmissivity kh/..mu.., and skin effect S. Ramey et al. presented type curves for a single homogeneous layer which required empirical correlation in terms of C /SUB D/ e /SUP 2s/ and t /SUB D/ /C /SUB D/. A formal solution showing wellbore pressure as a function of C /SUB D/ e /SUP 2s/ and t /SUB D/ /C /SUB D/ for a homogeneous reservoir is presented. This permits discussion of the approximation involved in Ramey et al. study.

Mateen, K.; Ramey, H.J.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Where fast weathering creates thin regolith and slow weathering creates thick regolith  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weathering disaggregates rock into regolith the fractured or granular earthmaterial that sustains life on the continental land surface. Here, we investigate what controls the depth of regolith formed on ridges of two rock compositions with similar initial porosities in Virginia (USA).A priori, we predicted that the regolith on diabasewould be thicker than on granite because the dominant mineral (feldspar) in the diabase weathers faster than its granitic counterpart. However, weathering advanced 20deeper into the granite than the diabase. The 20-thicker regolith is attributed mainly to connected micron-sized pores, microfractures formed around oxidizing biotite at 20m depth, and the lower iron (Fe) content in the felsic rock. Such porosity allows pervasive advection and deep oxidation in the granite. These observations may explainwhy regolithworldwide is thicker on felsic compared tomafic rock under similar conditions. To understand regolith formationwill require better understanding of such deep oxidation reactions and how they impact fluid flow during weathering.

Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Lebedeva, Marina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Pavich, Milan [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Parkinson, D. Y. [Advanced Light Source, LBNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

High-resolution SIMS depth profiling of nanolayers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the fundamental physical limits for depth resolution of secondary ion mass spectrometry are well understood in theory, the experimental work to achieve and demonstrate them is still ongoing. We report results of high-resolution TOF SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) depth profiling experiments on a nanolayered structure, a stack of 16 alternating MgO and ZnO {approx}5.5 nm layers grown on a Si substrate by atomic layer deposition. The measurements were performed using a newly developed approach implementing a low-energy direct current normally incident Ar{sup +} ion beam for ion milling (250 eV and 500 eV energy), in combination with a pulsed 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at 60{sup o} incidence for TOF SIMS analysis. By this optimized arrangement, a noticeably improved version of the dual-beam (DB) approach to TOF SIMS depth profiling is introduced, which can be dubbed gentleDB. The mixing-roughness-information model was applied to detailed analysis of experimental results. It revealed that the gentleDB approach allows ultimate depth resolution by confining the ion beam mixing length to about two monolayers. This corresponds to the escape depth of secondary ions, the fundamental depth resolution limitation in SIMS. Other parameters deduced from the measured depth profiles indicated that a single layer thickness is equal to 6 nm so that the 'flat' layer thickness d is 3 nm and the interfacial roughness {sigma} is 1.5 nm, thus yielding d + 2{sigma} = 6 nm. We have demonstrated that gentleDB TOF SIMS depth profiling with noble gas ion beams is capable of revealing the structural features of a stack of nanolayers, resolving its original surface and estimating the roughness of interlayer interfaces, information which is difficult to obtain by traditional approaches.

Baryshev, S. V.; Zinovev, A. V.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Peng, Q.; Elam, J. W.; Veryovkin, I. V. (Energy Systems); ( MSD)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

A dual-porosity reservoir model with a nonlinear coupling term  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since their introduction by Barenblatt et al. (1960), double-porosity models have been widely used for simulating flow in fractured reservoirs, such as geothermal reservoirs. In a dual-porosity system, the matrix blocks provide most of the storage of the reservoir, whereas the fractures provide the global transmissivity. Initially, most work on dual-porosity models emphasized the development of analytical solutions to idealized reservoir problems. Increasingly, the dual-porosity approach is being implemented by numerical reservoir simulators. Accurate numerical simulation of a dual-porosity problem often requires a prohibitively large number of computational cells in order to resolve the transient pressure gradients in the matrix blocks. We discuss a new dual-porosity model that utilizes a nonlinear differential equation to approximate the fracture/matrix interactions, When implemented into a numerical simulator, it eliminates the need to discretize the matrix blocks, and thereby allows more efficient simulation of reservoir problems.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Chen, G.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Composition, Mineralogy, and Porosity of Multiple Asteroid Systems from Visible and Near-infrared Spectral Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a taxonomic and compositional characterization of Multiple Asteroid Systems (MASs) located in the main belt (MB) using visible and near-infrared (0.45-2.5 um) spectral data of 42 MB MASs. The mineralogical analysis is applied to determine meteorite analogs for the MASs, which, in turn, are applied to the MAS density measurements of Marchis et al. (2012) to estimate the system porosity. The macroporosities are used to evaluate the primary MAS formation hypotheses. The visible observing campaign includes 25 MASs obtained using the SOAR telescope with the Goodman High Throughput Spectrometer. The infrared observing campaign includes 34 MASs obtained using the NASA IRTF with the SpeX spectragraph. The MASs are classified using the Bus-DeMeo taxonomic system. We perform a NIR spectral band parameter analysis using a new analysis routine, the Spectral Analysis Routine for Asteroids (SARA). The SARA routine determines band centers, areas, and depths by utilizing the diagnostic absorption features near 1- ...

Lindsay, Sean S; Emery, Joshua P; Enriquez, J Emilio; Assafin, Marcelo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Multiple-Porosity Model for A Single-Phase Flow Through ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 23, 2002 ... appropriate sites for the disposal of nuclear or chemical waste so that .... Law,. v = K rp: If denotes the porosity of the medium, conservation of ...

2002-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURE AND RESEARCH JOURNAL 32:3 (2008) 107–126 107 Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place MARGARET WICKENS PEARCE AND RENEE PUALANI LOUIS INTRODUCTION Indigenous communities have successfully used Western geospatial technolo- gies (GT... of geog- raphy at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Renee Pualani Louis is Hawaiian and recently completed her doctorate in geography at the University of Hawai‘i at MaŻnoa, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. Published as M. Pearce and R. Louis. Mapping Indigenous depth...

Pearce, Margaret Wickens; Louis, Renee Pualani

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Modeling the Effect of Finite-Rate Hydrogen Diffusion on Porosity Formation in Aluminum Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling the Effect of Finite-Rate Hydrogen Diffusion on Porosity Formation in Aluminum Alloys KENT of hydrogen in the melt is developed to predict pore formation during the solidification of aluminum alloys by Lee et al.[3] Recent examples of porosity models for aluminum alloy castings, including the effect

Beckermann, Christoph

60

The development of MRI for the determination of porosity distribution in reservoir core samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sandstone appeared to be very isotropic while the Austin Chalk exhibited varying degrees of correlation in the directions considered. A comparison between the correlation of MRI derived core plug size porosity distributions and foot by foot whole core.... . Spatial Correlation of Porosity Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comparison with Foot by Foot Vertical Data. . Composite Sample Distribution. . Reproducibility. . 22 , 25 . . . . 30 . . . . . 4 2 . 44 . 47 CHAPTER V ? CONCLUSIONS...

Shivers, Jon Blake

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of porosity becomes especially critical. An integrated design process is emerging in which a casting process] It is anticipated that such a design process will also help guide and improve casting inspection procedures INHOMOGENEITIES due to porosity are currently not considered in the design of structural components made from

Beckermann, Christoph

62

Rotating drum variable depth sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

System for measuring film thickness  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for determining the thicknesses of thin films of materials exhibiting fluorescence in response to exposure to excitation energy from a suitable source of such energy. A section of film is illuminated with a fixed level of excitation energy from a source such as an argon ion laser emitting blue-green light. The amount of fluorescent light produced by the film over a limited area within the section so illuminated is then measured using a detector such as a photomultiplier tube. Since the amount of fluorescent light produced is a function of the thicknesses of thin films, the thickness of a specific film can be determined by comparing the intensity of fluorescent light produced by this film with the intensity of light produced by similar films of known thicknesses in response to the same amount of excitation energy. The preferred embodiment of the invention uses fiber optic probes in measuring the thicknesses of oil films on the operational components of machinery which are ordinarily obscured from view.

Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Kirihara, Leslie J. (Richland, WA); Peters, Timothy J. (Richland, WA); Rasmussen, Donald E. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Schuster, George J. (Kennewick, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control...

Yan, Bicheng

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Optimal Porosity Distribution for Minimized Ohmic Drop across a Porous Electrode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers the design of spatially varying porosity profiles in next-generation electrodes based on simultaneous optimization of a porous-electrode model. Model-based optimal design (not including the solid-phase ...

Braatz, Richard D.

67

Separate effects of surface roughness, wettability, and porosity on the boiling critical heat flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The separate effects of surface wettability, porosity, and roughness on the critical heat flux (CHF) of water were examined using engineered surfaces. Values explored were 0, 5, 10, and 15??m for Rz (roughness), <5°, ?75°, ...

O'Hanley, Harry

68

The development of magnetic resonance imaging for the determination of porosity in reservoir core samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR THE DETERMINATION OF POROSITY IN RESERVOIR CORE SAMPLES A Thesis by BYRON BLAKE SHERMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR THE DETERMINATION OF POROSITY IN RESERVOIR CORE SAMPLES A Thesis by BYRON BLAKE SHERMAN Approved...

Sherman, Byron Blake

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter estimates made.

B.M. Freifeild

2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, and permeability of saturated soils at various porosities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Ottawa Sand . 4. Thermal Conductivity Data Analysis 5. Thermal Conductivity of Reference Materials 6. DC Resistivity Data with Plate Electrode System for Kaolinite at Porosity of 49% PAGE 48 52 54 66 71 AC Resistivity Data for Kaolinite... THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY, ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY, AND PERMEABILITY OF SATURATED SOILS AT VARIOUS POROSITIES A Thesis by JAMES KEITH ENDERBY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Enderby, James Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Secondary porosity and permeability of coal vs. gas composition and pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have been investigating the sequestration of atmospheric pollutants by injection into coal seams while at the same time enhancing hydrocarbon productivity by displacement of methane with pollutants. We found that changing the composition of the gas sorbed into the coal changes the porosity and permeability of the coal natural-fracture system owing to gas-content changes, which cause matrix swelling or shrinkage due to relative adsorption of different gases. We collected sufficient information to develop a method for predicting the permeability and porosity of a coalbed as a function of the secondary porosity system (SPS) pressure and the gas content and composition of the primary porosity system (PPS). The method uses data from injection/falloff tests with water and/or a weaker adsorbing gas (WAG) than CH{sub 4} and a stronger adsorbing gas (SAG) than CH{sub 4}. Estimates of effective permeability to gas and water obtained from these tests are used with an iterative computation procedure subject to constraints to solve for equivalent SPS porosity and absolute permeability at atmospheric pressure. Once calibrated, the model can be used to predict a coalbed's permeability and porosity as a function of injection pressure and injected-fluid composition, which in turn are used to predict injection performance. The model is applicable to production forecasts to account for SPS permeability and porosity changes as reservoir pressure declines with changes in gas composition. This paper describes the new model and discusses well-test procedures to obtain the data required for model calibration. Also included are coal property estimates resulting from Alberta Medicine River (Manville) coal core and test data and an example model calibration.

Mavor, M.J,; Gunter, W.D. [Tesseract Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Determination of Granites' Mineral Specific Porosities by PMMA Method and FESEM/EDAX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over extended periods, long-lived radionuclides (RN) or activation products within geologic disposal sites may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. In the bedrock, contaminants will be transported along fractures by advection and retarded by sorption on mineral surfaces and by molecular diffusion into stagnant pore water in the matrix along a connected system of pores and micro-fissures. The objective of this paper was to determine the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities for three granite samples by {sup 14}C methyl-methacrylate ({sup 14}C-PMMA) autoradiography. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDAX) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the diffusion coefficients of RNs from previous experiments which determined apparent diffusion coefficients for the main minerals in three granite samples by the Rutherford Backscattering technique. The total porosity of the Grimsel granite (0.75%) was significantly higher than the porosities of the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites (0.3%). The porosities of the Grimsel granite feldspars were two to three times higher than the porosities of the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites feldspars. However, there was no significant difference between the porosities of the dark minerals. A clear difference was found between the various quartz grains. Quartz crystals were non-porous in the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites when measured by the PMMA method, but the quartz crystals in the Grimsel granite showed 0.5% intra granular porosity. The apparent diffusion coefficients calculated for uranium diffusion within Grimsel granite on different minerals were very similar (2.10{sup -13} {+-} 0.5 m{sup 2}/s), but differences within both Spanish granites were found from one mineral to another (9 {+-} 1.10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s in feldspars and 4.5 {+-} 0.5.10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s in quartz) - always presenting lower diffusion values than in the Grimsel granite. (authors)

Leskinen, A.; Penttinen, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki, FIN-00014 (Finland); Alanso, U.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Missana, T. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain); Patelli, Alessandro [Associazione CIVEN, Via delle Industrie 9, Venezia-Marghera, 30175 (Italy)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Self-Assembling Sup-porosity: The Effect On Fluid Flow And Seismic Wave Propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fractures and joints in the field often contain debris within the void spaces. Debris originates from many different mechanisms: organic and/or inorganic chemical reactions/mineralization, sediment transport, formation of a fracture, mechanical weathering or combinations of these processes. In many cases, the presence of debris forms a â??sub-porosityâ?ť within the fracture void space. This sub-porosity often is composed of material that differs from the fracture walls in mineralogy and morphology. The â??sub-porosityâ?ť may partially fill voids that are on the order of hundreds of microns and thereby reduce the local porosity to lengths scales on the order of sub-microns to tens of microns. It is quite clear that a sub-porosity affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. What is not known is how the existence/formation of a sub-porosity affects seismic wave propagation and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the formation or alteration of a sub-porosity. If seismic techniques are to be developed to monitor the injection and containment of phases in sequestration reservoirs or the propping of hydraulically induced fracture to enhance oil & gas production, it is important to understand how a sub-porosity within a fracture affects macroscopic seismic and hydraulic measurements. A sub-porosity will directly affect the interrelationship between the seismic and hydraulic properties of a fracture. This reports contains the results of the three main topics of research that were performed (1) to determine the effect of a sub-porosity composed of spherical grains on seismic wave propagation across fractures, (2) to determine the effect of biofilm growth in pores and between grains on seismic wave propagation in sediment, and (3) to determine the effect of the scale of observation (field-of-view) on monitoring alteration the pore space within a fracture caused by reactive flow. A brief summary of the results for each topic is contained in the report and the full details of the research and approach are contained in the publications found in the Attachment section of this report. A list of presentation and publications of all work associated with this grant is also provided.

Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J. [Purdue University

2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

74

New depths with mobile rig  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magee-Poole Drilling Company, a drilling contractor operating out of the south Texas drilling center of Alice, claims it operates the largest mobile drilling rig in the world. That is, it's the only wheel mounted portable rig that drills to 16,000 feet with 4 1/2-inch drill pipe - at least 3000 feet deeper than the previous mobile drilling rig ratings. The unit is designated the Ingersoll-Rand 1500 Series. What's more significant, according to co-owner Don Magee, is that the rig's portability gets the rotary table turning to the right sooner; it drills more footage per year. It rigs up in 1 1/2 days versus 3 to 4 days for a conventional skid type rig normally used at these depths. The unit's compact arrangement, with more components combined into single loads, makes possible its higher mobility. A conventional skid rig might require 25 to 30 truckloads to move the rig components, mud system, fuel and water tank, houses for utilities, storage and crew change, generators, and drill pipe. The new rig moves in anywhere from four to nine loads less. Further, the rig components weigh less without sacrificing durability.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Porosity enhancement from chert dissolution beneath Neocomian unconformity: Ivishak Formation, North Slope, Alaska: Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shanmugam and Higgins (1988) concluded that chert dissolution was the dominant control of porosity and permeability trends in the fluvial facies of the Ivishak Formation in the Prudhoe Bay field. Chert dissolution, in turn, was interpreted to be a function of proximity to the Lower Cretaceous unconformity. In their opinion, the data presented by Shanmugam and Higgins are not sufficient to justify their conclusions. The authors apparently neglected to consider the effects of fundamental geological parameters (grain size and sorting) and processes (burial history) on porosity and permeability. In this discussion, the authors specifically address the effects of grain size, sorting, and burial history on porosity and permeability, to provide an alternative explanation of reservoir quality trends in the Ivishak reservoir. 3 figs.

Bloch, S.; McGowen, J.H. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA)); Duncan, J.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Midland, TX (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Knudsen-Hydrodynamic Crossover in Liquid 3He in High Porosity Aerogel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the drag force acting on a high porosity aerogel immersed in liquid ${}^3$He and its effect on sound propagation. The drag force is characterized by the Knudsen number, which is defined as the ratio of the quasiparticle mean free path to the radius of an aerogel strand. Evidence of the Knudsen-hydrodynamic crossover is clearly demonstrated by a drastic change in the temperature dependence of ultrasound attenuation in 98% porosity aerogel. Our theoretical analysis shows that the frictional sound damping caused by the drag force is governed by distinct laws in the two regimes, providing excellent agreement with the experimental observation.

Takeuchi, H; Nagai, K; Choi, H C; Moon, B H; Masuhara, N; Meisel, M W; Lee, Y; Mulders, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nano-porosity in GaSb induced by swift heavy ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nano-porous structures form in GaSb after ion irradiation with 185 MeV Au ions. The porous layer formation is governed by the dominant electronic energy loss at this energy regime. The porous layer morphology differs significantly from that previously reported for low-energy, ion-irradiated GaSb. Prior to the onset of porosity, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy indicates the formation of small vacancy clusters in single ion impacts, while transmission electron microscopy reveals fragmentation of the GaSb into nanocrystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix. Following this fragmentation process, macroscopic porosity forms, presumably within the amorphous phase.

Kluth, P., E-mail: patrick.kluth@anu.edu.au; Schnohr, C. S.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Lei, W.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Afra, B.; Bierschenk, T.; Ridgway, M. C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Sullivan, J.; Weed, R. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, AMPL, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Li, W.; Ewing, R. C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1005 (United States)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

79

Optimal Porosity Distribution for Minimized Ohmic Drop across a Porous Electrode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA This paper considers the design of spatially varying porosity profiles-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA c Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology material, and additive loading; iii manufacturing convenience and cost; iv ideal expected thermal behavior

Subramanian, Venkat

80

Estimation of axisymmetric spatial distributions of permeability and porosity from pressure-transient data acquired with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to quantify the spatial resolution and reliability of in situ permanent pressure data to detecting hydrocarbonEstimation of axisymmetric spatial distributions of permeability and porosity from pressure-transient data acquired with in situ permanent sensors Faruk O. Alpak*, Carlos Torres-Verdi´n, Kamy Sepehrnoori

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Integration of Geology, Rock-Physics, Logs, and Pre-stack Seismic for Reservoir Porosity Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this paper is to obtain reservoir properties, such as porosity, both at the well locations and in the inter-well regions from seismic data and well logs. The seismic and well-log datasets are from an ...

Al Muhaidib, Abdulaziz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A dual approach to tuning the porosity of porous organic polymers: controlling the porogen size and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Consequently, the majority of POPs are interpenetrating networks with rela- tively low total pore volumesA dual approach to tuning the porosity of porous organic polymers: controlling the porogen size. Weston, Omar K. Farha,* Joseph T. Hupp* and SonBinh T. Nguyen* Porous organic polymers (POPs

83

Texture and porosity effects on the thermal radiative behavior of alumina ceramics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Texture and porosity effects on the thermal radiative behavior of alumina ceramics. O. Rozenbaum1 for the comprehension of the ceramics thermal properties. Keywords: ceramics, texture, emissivity spectra, infrared (2009) 580-590" DOI : 10.1007/s10765-008-0510-1 #12;2 Abstract Thermal and optical properties

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 455460 Breeder foam: an innovative low porosity solid breeder material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in pebble beds. Heat transfer between breeder and coolant walls can be enhanced in principal, by bonding materials would have an open cell structure consisting of a network of three-dimensional interconnected material, respectively. The large internal surface area and interconnected open porosity of pebble beds

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

85

Distributed Porosity as a Control Parameter for Oxide Thermal Barriers Made by Physical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anthony G. Evans* Materials Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 Thermal barrier and generating new thermal resistance solutions, as appropri- ate. A continuum heat flow analysis is usedDistributed Porosity as a Control Parameter for Oxide Thermal Barriers Made by Physical Vapor

Wadley, Haydn

86

Effect of Porosity on the Stiffness of Cast Steel RICHARD A. HARDIN and CHRISTOPH BECKERMANN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the location, amount, and size characteristics of micro- and macroporosity, an integrated design process service perfor- mance.[2] It is anticipated that such a design process will guide and improve inspection in cast metal due to porosity or inclusions are not considered directly in part design. Instead, ad

Beckermann, Christoph

87

X-ray microtomography characterization of porosity, permeability and reactive surface changes during dissolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray microtomography characterization of porosity, permeability and reactive surface changes from X-ray microtomography data obtained before and after a set of dissolution experiments of pure.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Reactive transport Carbon storage Permeability X-ray microtomography 1

Luquot, Linda

88

Thickness limitations in carbon nanotube reinforced silicon nitride coatings synthesized by vapor infiltration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor infiltration is a convenient method for synthesizing carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced ceramic coatings. The thickness over which infiltration is relatively uniform is limited by gas phase diffusion in the pore structure. These effects were investigated in two types of silicon nitride matrix composites. With CNTs that were distributed uniformly on the substrate surface dense coatings were limited to thicknesses of several microns. With dual structured CNT arrays produced by photolithography coatings up to 400 gm thick were obtained with minimal residual porosity. Gas transport into these dual structured materials was facilitated by creating micron sized channels between "CNT pillars" (i.e. each pillar consisted of a large number of individual CNTs). The experimental results are consistent with basic comparisons between the rates of gas diffusion and silicon nitride growth in porous structures. This analysis also provides a general insight into optimizing infiltration conditions during the fabrication of thick CNT-reinforced composite coatings. (C) 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Eres, Gyula [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale water O2interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in ourfield study.

Jin, Lixin [University of Texas at El Paso] [University of Texas at El Paso; Ryan, Mathur [Juniata College, Huntingdon] [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University; Alex, Carone [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale-water-O2 interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in our field study.

Jin, Lixin [ORNL; Mathur, Ryan [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University; Carone, Alex [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Brantley, Susan L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Influence of the macro-porosity and the meso-structure on the dynamic properties of concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of the macro-porosity and the meso-structure on the dynamic properties of concrete F-94235 Cachan, France ABSTRACT : Traditionally, the variability of concrete properties (in statics with an explicit representation of the macro-porosity on the dynamic properties of concrete like material

Boyer, Edmond

92

Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high velocity atmospheric entry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at ~{\\mu}m resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous) and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types, but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt, and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher ...

Kohout, T; Suuronen, J -P; Rochette, P; Hutzler, A; Gattacceca, J; Skála, D D Badjukov R; Böhmová, V; ?uda, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided.

Nguyen, Q.H.

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

94

Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed and tested using the results of the permeability experiments. The permeability model for flow parallel to the columnar dendrites predicted the experimental permeability results closely when the liquid volume fraction data from equilibrium calculations were used. The permeability gradient model was constructed in order to test the impact of interdendritic channel constriction on the flow of liquid through the mushy zone of a casting. The model examines two different regimes: (i) Dendritic solidification regime where the permeability is dominated by changes in liquid volume fraction and dendrite arm spacing, and (ii) Eutectic solidification regime where the permeability is dominated by changes in viscosity of eutectic mixture. It is assumed that the eutectic mixture behaves like a slurry whose viscosity increases with increasing solid fraction. It is envisioned that this model can be developed into a tool that can be very useful for metal casters.

Albany Research Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Porosity enhancement from chert dissolution beneath Neocomian unconformity: Ivishak Formation, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary porosity caused by chert dissolution is common in the hydrocarbon-producing fluvial facies of the Ivishak Formation (Triassic), North Slope, Alaska. Petrographic observations suggest that macroporosity caused by chert dissolution tends to increase toward the Neocomian unconformity. In the Prudhoe Bay field, a lateral increase in core porosity (from 15% at about 30 km from the unconformity to 30% near the unconformity) and in permeability (from 50 md at about 30 km from the unconformity to 800 md near the unconformity) is evident toward the unconformity. This increase occurs within the fluvial facies (zone 4) of nearly uniform grain size and framework composition (chert litharenite). Major chert dissolution probably took place during the Neocomian uplift when the Ivishak Formation was exposed to acidic meteoric waters in the near-surface environment. 16 figures, 3 tables.

Shanmugam, G.; Higgins, J.B.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Method for making surfactant-templated, high-porosity thin films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An evaporation-induced self-assembly method to prepare a surfactant-templated thin film by mixing a silica sol, a surfactant, and a hydrophobic polymer and then evaporating a portion of the solvent during coating onto a substrate and then heating to form a liquid-phase, thin film material with a porosity greater than approximately 50 percent. The high porosity thin films can have dielectric constants less than 2 to be suitable for applications requiring low-dielectric constants. An interstitial compound can be added to the mixture, with the interstitial compound either covalently bonded to the pores or physically entrapped within the porous structure. The selection of the interstitial compound provides a means for developing thin films for applications including membranes, sensors, low dielectric constant films, photonic materials and optical hosts.

Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Lu, Yunfeng (San Jose, CA); Fan, Hongyou (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Modeling added compressibility of porosity and the thermomechanical response of wet porous rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper concerned with modeling the response of a porous brittle solid whose pores may be dry or partially filled with fluid. A form for the Helmholtz free energy is proposed which incorporated known Mie-Grueneisen constitutive equations for the nonporous solid and for the fluid, and which uses an Eilnstein formulation with variable specific heat. In addition, a functional form for porosity is postulated which porous rock. Restrictions on constitutive assumptions for the composite of porous solid ad fluid are obtained which ensure thermodynamic consistency. Examples show that although the added compressibility of porosity is determined by fitting data for dry Mt. Helen Tuff, the predicted responses of saturated and partially saturated tuff agree well with experimental data.

Rubin, M.B.; Elata, D.; Attia, A.V.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The effect of velocity and porosity profiles on the performance of fixed bed reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reactors. The reaction systems chosen offered a variety of reaction situations, including highly exothermic reactions, multiple and complex reaction schemes. A comparison of the calculated results by the two dimensional plug flow mcdel and the results... to be independent of axial direction in a bed packed with uniform size cylindrical or spherical particles. Martin(1978), using this data proposed a model for the porosity profile. Catalytic reactors are usually packed by uniform size spherical or cylindrical...

Amin, Kaushik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Relationship between mineralogy and porosity in seals relevant to geologic CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porosity and permeability are key petrophysical variables that link the thermal, hydrological, geochemical, and geomechanical properties of subsurface formations. The size, shape, distribution, and connectivity of rock pores dictate how fluids migrate into and through micro- and nano-environments, then wet and react with accessible solids. Three representative samples of cap rock from the Eau Claire Formation, the prospective sealing unit that overlies the Mount Simon Sandstone, a potential CO 2 storage formation, were interrogated with an array of complementary methods. neutron scattering, backscattered-electron imaging, energydispersive spectroscopy, and mercury porosimetry. Results are presented that detail variations between lithologic types in total and connected nano- to microporosity across more than five orders of magnitude. Pore types are identified and then characterized according to presence in each rock type, relative abundance, and surface area of adjacent minerals, pore and pore-throat diameters, and degree of connectivity. We observe a bimodal distribution of porosity as a function of both pore diameter and pore-throat diameter. The contribution of pores at the nano- and microscales to the total and the connected porosity is a distinguishing feature of each lithology observed. Pore:pore-throat ratios at each of these two scales diverge markedly, being almost unity at the nanoscale regime (dominated by illitic clay and micas), and varying by one and a half orders of magnitude at the microscale within a clastic mudstone.

Swift, Alexander [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Sheets, Julia [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Cole, David R [ORNL] [ORNL; Welch, Susan P [ORNL] [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Determination of the Porosity Surfaces of the Disposal Room Containing Various Waste Inventories for WIPP PA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report develops a series of porosity surfaces for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The concept of a porosity surface was developed for performance assessment and comprises calculation of room closure as salt creep processes are mitigated by gas generation and back stress created by the waste packages within the rooms. The physical and mechanical characteristics of the waste packaging that has already been disposed--such as the pipe overpack--and new waste packaging--such as the advanced mixed waste compaction--are appreciably different than the waste form upon which the original compliance was based and approved. This report provides structural analyses of room closure with various waste inventories. All of the underlying assumptions pertaining to the original compliance certification including the same finite element code are implemented; only the material parameters describing the more robust waste packages are changed from the certified baseline. As modeled, the more rigid waste tends to hold open the rooms and create relatively more void space in the underground than identical calculations run on the standard waste packages, which underpin the compliance certification. The several porosity surfaces quantified within this report provide possible ranges of pressure and porosity for performance assessment analyses.3 Intentionally blank4 AcknowledgementsThis research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the U.S. Department of Energy. The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable contributions to this work provided by others. Dr. Joshua S. Stein helped explain the hand off between these finite element porosity surfaces and implementation in the performance calculations. Dr. Leo L. Van Sambeek of RESPEC Inc. helped us understand the concepts of room closure under the circumstances created by a rigid waste inventory. Dr. T. William Thompson and Tom W. Pfeifle provided technical review and Mario J. Chavez provided a Quality Assurance review. The paper has been improved by these individuals.Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94Al850005 Intentionally Blank6

Park, Byoung; Hansen, Francis D.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Magnetic vortices in a distributed Josephson junction with electrodes of finite thickness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A distributed Josephson junction with electrodes of finite thickness is considered in the case of high critical current density when the Josephson penetration depth {lambda}{sub {ital j}} is less than the London depth {lambda}{sub {ital L}}. A nonlinear nonlocal equation for steady-state distributions of phase difference {ital cphi} across the junction is derived. In the asymptotical case of thin electrodes an exact nonlinear solution for this equation which corresponds to an isolated at-rest Josephson vortex is found. A numerical investigation of the equation derived is carried out and some static and dynamic characteristics of vortices in such a Josephson junction are represented.

Alfimov, G.L.; Popkov, A.F. [F. V. Lukin`s Research Institute of Physicsl Problems, Zelenograd, Moscow, 103460 (Russian Federation)] [F. V. Lukin`s Research Institute of Physicsl Problems, Zelenograd, Moscow, 103460 (Russian Federation)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of Conasauga Group mudrock: Application, test and evaluation of petrophysical techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective porosity (specifically referring to the interconnected pore space) was recently recognized as being essential in determining the effectiveness and extent of matrix diffusion as a transport mechanism within fractured low-permeability rock formations. The research presented in this report was performed to test the applicability of several petrophysical techniques for the determination of effective porosity of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. In addition, the aim was to gather quantitative data on the effective porosity of Conasauga Group mudrock from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The quantitative data reported here include not only effective porosities based on diverse measurement techniques, but also data on the sizes of pore throats and their distribution, and specimen bulk and grain densities. The petrophysical techniques employed include the immersion-saturation method, mercury and helium porosimetry, and the radial diffusion-cell method.

Dorsch, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Katsube, T.J. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Mineral Resources Div.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dugan, B.E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Mineral Engineering; Tourkow, L.M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The depositional environments, diagenetic history, and porosity development of the Upper Smackover Member at Eustace Field, Henderson County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS, DIAGENETIC HISTORY, AND POROSITY DEVELOPMENT OF THE UPPER SMACKOVER MEMBER AT EUSTACE FIELD, HENDERSON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JOSE J. SEQUEIRA, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement, for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Geology THE DEPOSlTIONAL ENVIRONMENTS& DIAGENETIC HISTORY, AND POROSITY DEVELOPMENT OF THE UPPER SMACKOVER MEMBER AT EUSTACE FIELD, HENDERSON...

Sequeira, Jose J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

MonolayerThickness of Block Copolymer Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.47 · Index of ref. for PS-PEHMA 1.51 #12;Annealing the films · Tg 22nm 24nm Height Images #12;AFM 12-33 26nm 28nm 30nm Bi-continuous #12;12-33Area% 13.08 31.55 41 Area % Thickness (nm) Monolayer: 18.86nm Bilayer: 37.72nm #12;Monolayer thickness 12

Petta, Jason

106

Source depth for solar p-modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretically calculated power spectra are compares with observed solar p-mode velocity power spectra over a range of mode degree and frequency. The depth for the sources responsible for exciting p-modes of frequency 2.0 mHz is determined from the asymmetry of their power spectra and found to be about 800 km below the photosphere for quadrupole sources and 150 km if sources are dipole. The source depth for high frequency oscillations of frequency greater than about 6 mHz is 180 (50) km for quadrupole (dipole) sources.

Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Galactic porosity and a star formation threshold for the escape of ionising radiation from galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spatial distribution of star formation within galaxies strongly affects the resulting feedback processes. Previous work has considered the case of a single, concentrated nuclear starburst, and also that of distributed single supernovae (SNe). Here, we consider ISM structuring by SNe originating in spatially distributed clusters having a cluster membership spectrum given by the observed HII region luminosity function. We show that in this case, the volume of HI cleared per SN is considerably greater than in either of the two cases considered hitherto. We derive a simple relationship between the ``porosity'' of the ISM and the star formation rate (SFR), and deduce a critical SFR_crit, at which the ISM porosity is unity. This critical value describes the case in which the SN mechanical energy output over a timescale t_e is comparable with the ISM ``thermal'' energy contained in random motions; t_e is the duration of SN mechanical input per superbubble. This condition also defines a critical gas consumption timescale t_exh, which for a Salpeter IMF and random velocities of \\simeq 10 km s-1 is roughly 10e10 years. We draw a link between porosity and the escape of ionising radiation from galaxies, arguing that high escape fractions are expected if SFR >~ SFR_crit. The Lyman Break Galaxies, which are presumably subject to infall on a timescale < t_exh, meet this criterion, as is consistent with the significant leakage of ionising photons inferred in these systems. We suggest the utility of this simple parameterisation of escape fraction in terms of SFR for semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution and for modeling mechanical and chemical feedback effects.

C. J. Clarke; M. S. Oey

2002-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments Dan Chen School of Computer Science¨ur Theoretische Informatik Abstract A Monte Carlo approximation algorithm for the Tukey depth problem in high. Keywords: Tukey depth, computational geometry 1. Introduction Tukey depth is also known as location depth

Morin, Pat

109

Porosity in millimeter-scale welds of stainless steel : three-dimensional characterization.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of edge joints utilizing a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser have been produced and examined in a 304-L stainless steel to advance fundamental understanding of the linkage between processing and resultant microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Acquisition of three-dimensional reconstructions via micro-computed tomography combined with traditional metallography has allowed for qualitative and quantitative characterization of weld joints in a material system of wide use and broad applicability. The presence, variability and distribution of porosity, has been examined for average values, spatial distributions and morphology and then related back to fundamental processing parameters such as weld speed, weld power and laser focal length.

Aagesen, Larry K. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Madison, Jonathan D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Depth and Depth-Color Coding using Shape-Adaptive Wavelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-view autostereoscopic displays, 3D-TV is expected to be the next evolution of television after high definition. Three Abstract We present a novel depth and depth-color codec aimed at free-viewpoint 3D-TV. The proposed codec is implemented by shape-adaptive lifting, which enables fast computations and perfect reconstruction. We derive

Do, Minh N.

112

Africa Aerosol Optical Depth Obtained From MISR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OpticalDepth Central African Republic Chad Djibouti Egypt Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Mean Seasonal

Frank, Thomas D.

113

Collision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; compute distances between the obstacles and the robot; optionally project the results in the CartesianCollision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION When humans and robots share the same work space, safety is the primary issue of concern [8]. Secondary but not negligible is to prevent robot damages due

De Luca, Alessandro

114

Depth distribution of lithium in oxidized binary Al-Li alloys determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and neutron depth profiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation of binary Al-Li alloys during short exposures at 530 C and long exposures at 200 C was studied with regard to the Li distribution. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to obtain quantitative Li depth profiles across the surface oxide layer and the underlying alloy. The underlying alloy was depleted in Li as a result of oxidation at 530 and 200 C. The SIMS and NDP results showed good mutual agreement and were used to evaluate the oxide thickness, the Li concentration at the oxide-ally interface, and the mass balance between oxide and alloy. The Li depletion profiles in the alloy were also calculated using the interdiffusion coefficients reported in the literature and compared with the measured profiles; the two profiles differed at 530 C but showed good agreement at 200 C.

Soni, K.K. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)); Williams, D.B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)); Newbury, D.E.; Chi, P.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaza, G. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effect of firing conditions on thick film microstructure and solder joint strength for low-temperature, co-fired ceramic substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-temperature, co-fired ceramics (LTCC) are the substrate material-of-choice for a growing number of multi-chip module (MCM) applications. Unlike the longer-standing hybrid microcircuit technology based upon alumina substrates, the manufacturability and reliability of thick film solder joints on LTCC substrates have not been widely studied. An investigation was undertaken to fully characterize solder joints on these substrates. A surface mount test vehicle with Daisy chain electrical connections was designed and built with Dupont{trademark} 951 tape. The Dupont{trademark} 4569 thick film ink (Au76-Pt21-Pd3 wt.%) was used to establish the surface conductor pattern. The conductor pattern was fired onto the LTCC substrate in a matrix of processing conditions that included: (1) double versus triple prints, (2) dielectric window versus no window, and (3) three firing temperatures (800 C, 875 C and 950 C). Sn63-Pb37 solder paste with an RMA flux was screen printed onto the circuit boards. The appropriate packages, which included five sizes of chip capacitors and four sizes of leadless ceramic chip carriers, were placed on the circuit boards. The test vehicles were oven reflowed under a N{sub 2} atmosphere. Nonsoldered pads were removed from the test vehicles and the porosity of their thick film layers was measured using quantitative image analysis in both the transverse and short transverse directions. A significant dependence on firing temperature was recorded for porosity. The double printed substrates without a dielectric window revealed a thick film porosity of 31.2% at 800 C, 26.2% at 875 C and 20.4% at 950 C. In contrast, the thick film porosity of the triple printed substrates with a dielectric window is 24.1% at 800 C, 23.2% at 875 C and 17.6% at 950 C. These observations were compared with the shear strength of the as-fabricated chip capacitor solder joints to determine the effect of firing conditions on solder joint integrity. The denser films from the higher firing temperatures had correspondingly higher shear strengths. The 0805 chip capacitor had a shear strength of 12.6 {+-} 1.4 lbs. at 800 C, 13.3 {+-} 1.9 lbs. at 875 C and 13.6 {+-} 1.4 lbs. at 950 C for the triple printed substrates with a dielectric window. The trend was similar for the larger capacitors; the 1912's exhibiting shear strengths of 20.5 {+-} 4.8 lbs. at 800 C, 26.2 {+-} 1.7 lbs, at 875 C and 29.0 {+-} 0.2 lbs. at 950 C.

Hernandez, C.L.; Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

Bean, Keri Marie

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fracture-enhanced porosity and permeability trends in Bakken Formation, Williston basin, western North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fractures play a critical role in oil production from the Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. The Bakken Formation in the study area is known for its low matrix porosity and permeability, high organic content, thermal maturity, and relative lateral homogeneity. Core analysis has shown the effective porosity and permeability development within the Bakken Formation to be related primarily to fracturing. In theory, lineaments mapped on the surface reflect the geometry of basement blocks and the zones of fracturing propagated upward from them. Fracturing in the Williston basin is thought to have occurred along reactivated basement-block boundaries in response to varying tectonic stresses and crustal flexure throughout the Phanerozoic. Landsat-derived lineament maps were examined for the area between 47/degrees/ and 48/degrees/ north lat. and 103/degrees/ and 104/degrees/ west long. (northern Billings and Golden Valley Counties, and western McKenzie County, North Dakota) in an attempt to identify large-scale fracture trends. In the absence of major tectonic deformation in the craton, a subtle pattern of fracturing has propagated upward through the sedimentary cover and emerged as linear topographic features visible on these large-scale, remote-sensed images.

Freisatz, W.B.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (<2 nm) size distribution. Micropore and mesopore volumes correlate with organic matter content in the samples. Accessibility of pores in coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Rupp, John A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

1987-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Bergren, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in...

122

Systematic Evaluation of Jc Decrease in Thick Film Coated Conductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Address both thickness dependence of Jc, in thick film YBCO coated conductors through an application of a suite of new measurement techniques to thick film wire samples produced by commercially viable coated conductor technologies.

Alex Ignatiev; Dr. Amit Goyal

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Effect of Thickness on the Structure, Composition and Properties...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of Thickness on the Structure, Composition and Properties of Titanium Nitride Nano-Coatings. Effect of Thickness on the Structure, Composition and Properties of Titanium...

125

Free Energy of thick Center Vortices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The free energy of thick center vortices is calculated in continuum Yang-Mills theory in one-loop approximation using the proper time regularization. The vortices are represented by Abelian gauge field configurations on the torus which satisfy twisted boundary conditions.

Ch. Korn; H. Reinhardt; T. Tok

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

Thickness and drainage of perfluoropolyethers under compression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Surface Forces Apparatus was used to study the compression and drainage of perfluoropolyethers (PFPE) between two flat parallel mica surfaces. In the case of Zdols and Demnum-SA, the PFPE can be squeezed out during slow compression to a final residual film one gyration diameter in thickness. This thickness remained constant up to the highest applied pressure of (is similar to)10 MPa. The residual thickness for Demnum-SA, with one active end group, was found to be approximately 40% larger than that for Zdol of the same molecular weight, with two active end groups. In contrast, Z03, with no active end groups, could be displaced completely from the contact. The dynamics of expulsion were studied by monitoring the variation of the gap width as a function of time after fast (a few milliseconds) step increase in the compressive load. It was found that Zdol behaves as the bulk liquid down to gap widths of 4 equivalent gyration diameters. A viscosity increase of more than 10 times was observed when the gap width was between 4 and 2 gyration diameters. Finally, slow compression to the maximum achievable pressure (approximately 10 MPa) led to a residual layer one gyration diameter in thickness trapped between the mica surfaces.

Xu, Lei; Ogletree, D Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Tang, Huan; Gui, Jing

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Three-Dimensional Reconstruction and Microstructure Modeling of Porosity-Graded Cathode Using Focused Ion Beam and Homogenization Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, microstructure of a porosity-graded lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has been characterized using focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM) combined with image processing. Two-point correlation functions of the two-dimensional (2D) images taken along the direction of porosity gradient are used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) microstructure. The effective elastic modulus of the two-phase porosity-graded cathode is predicted using strong contrast (SC) and composite inclusion (CI) homogenization techniques. The effectiveness of the two methods in predicting the effective elastic properties of the porositygraded LSM cathode is investigated in comparison with the results obtained from the finite element model (FEM).

Hamedani, Amani; Baniassadi, Majid; Sheidaei, A.; Pourboghrat, F.; Remond, Y.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Garmestani, Hamid

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thin, thick and dark discs in LCDM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a LCDM cosmology, the Milky Way accretes satellites into the stellar disc. We use cosmological simulations to assess the frequency of near disc plane and higher inclination accretion events, and collisionless simulations of satellite mergers to quantify the final state of the accreted material and the effect on the thin disc. On average, a Milky Way-sized galaxy has 3 subhalos with vmax>80km/s; 7 with vmax>60km/s; and 15 with vmax>40km/s merge at redshift z>1. Assuming isotropic accretion, a third of these merge at an impact angle 20 degrees) are twice as likely as low inclination ones. These lead to structures that closely resemble the recently discovered inner/outer stellar halos. They also do more damage to the Milky Way stellar disc creating a more pronounced flare, and warp; both long-lived and consistent with current observations. The most massive mergers (vmax>80km/s) heat the thin disc enough to produce a thick disc. These heated thin disc stars are essential for obtaining a thick disc as massive as that seen in the Milky Way; they likely comprise some ~50-90% of the thick disc stars. The Milky Way thin disc must reform from fresh gas after z=1 [abridged].

J. I. Read; G. Lake; O. Agertz; Victor P. Debattista

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

In-depth analysis of CIGS film for solar cells, structural and optical characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements performed on gradient-etched CuIn$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$Se$_2$ (CIGS) solar cells provide information about stress and texture depth profiles in the absorber layer. An important parameter for CIGS layer growth dynamics, the absorber thickness-dependent stress in the molybdenum back contact is analyzed. Texturing of grains and quality of the polycrystalline absorber layer are correlated with the intentional composition gradients (band gap grading). Band gap gradient is determined by space-resolved photoluminescence measurements and correlated with composition and strain profiles.

Slobodskyy, A; ~Ulyanenkova, T; ~Doyle, S; Powalla, M; ~Baumbach, T; ~Lemmer, U

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Nanorod PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes with Controlled Porosity M. D. Gasda, G. A. Eisman,* and D. Gallz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanorod PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes with Controlled Porosity M. D. Gasda, G. A. Eisman,* and D. Gallz as cathode electrodes in proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells. Deposition on flat substrates yields February 4, 2010. Proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells are promising for future automotive applications

Gall, Daniel

132

Comparative Study for the Interpretation of Mineral Concentrations, Total Porosity, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well Logs Haryanto Adiguna, SPE, Anadarko Petroleum, and mineral composition is an integral part of unconventional shale reservoir formation evaluation. Porosity requirement for economically viable flow of gas in very-low permeability shales. Brittle shales are favorable

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

133

Accurate hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique to convert reflection elastic recoil detection analysis spectra to depth profiles, the channel-depth conversion, was introduced by Verda, et al [1]. But the channel-depth conversion does not correct for energy spread, the unwanted broadening in the energy of the spectra, which can lead to errors in depth profiling. A work in progress introduces a technique that corrects for energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, the energy spread correction [2]. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion comprise an accurate and convenient hydrogen depth profiling method.

Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,; Bower, R. W. (Robert W.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

136

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality…………… Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical noise directional density function versus depth. 93 Measured and acoustically estimated wind speeds.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Determination of thickness and composition of high-k dielectrics using high-energy electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the application of high-energy elastic electron backscattering to the analysis of thin (2–20 nm) HfO{sub 2} overlayers on oxidized Si substrates. The film composition and thickness are determined directly from elastic scattering peaks characteristic of each element. The stoichiometry of the films is determined with an accuracy of 5%–10%. The experimental results are corroborated by medium energy ions scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry measurements, and clearly demonstrate the applicability of the technique for thin-film analysis. Significantly, the presented technique opens new possibilities for nm depth profiling with high spatial resolution in scanning electron microscopes.

Grande, P. L. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia) [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vos, M. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Venkatachalam, D. K.; Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Nandi, S. K. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia) [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

138

Effect of Thick Film Firing Conditions on the Solderability and Structure of Au-Pt-Pd Conductor for Low-Temperature, Co-Fired Ceramic Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-temperature, co-fired ceramics (LTCC) are the substrate material-of-choice for a growing number of multi-chip module (MCM) applications. Unlike the longer-standing hybrid microcircuit technology based upon alumina substrates, the manufacturability and reliability of thick film solder joints on LTCC substrates have not been widely studied. An investigation was undertaken to fully characterize such solder joints. A surface mount test vehicle with Daisy chain electrical connections was designed and built with Dupont{trademark} 951 tape. The Dupont{trademark} 4569 thick film ink (Au76-Pt21 -Pd3 wt.%) was used to establish the surface conductor pattern. The conductor pattern was fired onto the LTCC substrate in a matrix of process conditions that included: (1) double versus triple prints, (2) dielectric frame versus no frame, and (3) three firing temperatures (800 C, 875 C and 950 C). Pads were examined from the test vehicles. The porosity of the thick film layers was measured using quantitative image analysis in both the transverse and short transverse directions. A significant dependence on firing temperature was recorded for porosity. Solder paste comprised of Sn63-Pb37 powder with an RMA flux was screen printed onto the circuit boards. The appropriate components, which included chip capacitors of sizes 0805 up to 2225 and 50 mil pitch, leadless ceramic chip carriers having sizes of 16 I/O to 68 I/O, were then placed on the circuit boards. The test vehicles were oven reflowed under a N{sub 2} atmosphere. The solderability of the thick film pads was also observed to be sensitive to the firing conditions. Solderability appeared to degrade by the added processing steps needed for the triple print and dielectric window depositions. However, the primary factor in solderability was the firing temperature. Solderability was poorer when the firing temperature was higher.

Hernandez, C.L; Vianco, P.T.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

139

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems David Bremner University of New de Bruxelles Pat Morin Carleton University Abstract The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p halfspace that contains p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions

Morin, Pat

140

Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An energy spread correction for ERDA hydrogen depth profiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique for hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis called the channel-depth conversion was introduced by Verda, et al.' However, the energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, which causes a broadening in the energy range and leads to errors in depth profiling, was not addressed by this technique. Here we introduce a technique to addresses this problem, called the energy spread correction. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion techniques comprise the depth profiling method presented in this work.

Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Some intriguing properties of Tukey's half-space depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For multivariate data, Tukey's half-space depth is one of the most popular depth functions available in the literature. It is conceptually simple and satisfies several desirable properties of depth functions. The Tukey median, the multivariate median associated with the half-space depth, is also a well-known measure of center for multivariate data with several interesting properties. In this article, we derive and investigate some interesting properties of half-space depth and its associated multivariate median. These properties, some of which are counterintuitive, have important statistical consequences in multivariate analysis. We also investigate a natural extension of Tukey's half-space depth and the related median for probability distributions on any Banach space (which may be finite- or infinite-dimensional) and prove some results that demonstrate anomalous behavior of half-space depth in infinite-dimensional spaces.

Dutta, Subhajit; Chaudhuri, Probal; 10.3150/10-BEJ322

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Global Sediment Thickness Dataset updated for the Australian-Antarctic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Sediment Thickness Dataset updated for the Australian-Antarctic Southern Ocean Joanne author: jo.whittaker@utas.edu.au Key Points - Global minimum sediment thickness compilation updated for Australia Antarctica - Sediment thicknesses computed from seismic reflection and refraction data - Sediment

MĂĽller, Dietmar

144

Mapping crustal thickness using marine gravity data: Methods and uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of petroleum systems within passive margins. However, direct measurements of crustal thickness are sparse geophysical data, to estimate crustal thickness. We evaluated alternative gravity inversion methodol- ogies, but economic considerations make gravity modeling a more practical approach for mapping crustal thickness over

Müller, Dietmar

145

Diagenetic history and the evolution of porosity in the Cotton Valley Limestone, Teague Townsite Field, Freestone County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotopes Environments of Diagenesis. CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES CITED APPENDIX I APPENDIX II APPENDIX III APPENDIX IV. 19 19 25 26 26 28 28 29 37 37 72 88 96 107 116 118 132 VITA 134 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Composition of modern... fine, intragranular porosity that is not detectable with the petrographic microscope. The "chalky" or pithy appearance of both the grains and cement can be seen under the SEM (Figs. 17 and 18). Inversion The transformation of aragonite to calcite...

Steffensen, Carl Kristian

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Expanded Prussian Blue Analogues Incorporating [Re6Se8(CN)6]3-/4-Clusters: Adjusting Porosity via Charge Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Expanded Prussian Blue Analogues Incorporating [Re6Se8(CN)6]3-/4- Clusters: Adjusting Porosity via of octahedral [M(CN)6]3-/4- complexes for the synthesis of microporous Prussian blue type solids with adjustable to be a direct expansion of Prussian blue (Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3,14H2O), with [Re6Se8(CN)6]4- clusters connected through

Shores, Matthew P.

147

A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fracture strength and elastic modulus as a function of porosity for hydroxyapatite and other brittle materials Part I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous brittle materials are used as filters, catalyst supports, solid oxide fuel cells and biomedical materials. However the literature on the Weibull modulus, m, versus volume fraction porosity, P, is extremely limited despite the importance of m as a gauge of mechanical reliability. In Part I of this study, m is determined for 441 sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) specimens fractured in biaxial flexure for 0.08 P 0.62. In this study, we analyze a combined data set collected from the literature that represents work from a total of 17 different research groups (including the present authors), eight different materials and more than 1560 oxide and non-oxide specimens, the m versus P plot is Ushaped with a wide band of m values for P < 0.1 (Region I) and P > 0.55 (Region III), and a narrower band of m values in the intermediate porosity region of 0.1 < P < 0.55 (Region II). The limited range of m ( 4 < m < 11) in Region II has important implications since Region II includes the P range for the majority of the applications of porous brittle materials. Part II of this study focuses on the P dependence of the mean fracture strength,< f >, and the Young s modulus E for the HA specimens tested in Part I along with literature data for other brittle materials. Both < f > and E are power law functions of the degree of densification, , where = 1 P/PG and PG is the green (unfired) porosity.

Fan, Xiaofeng [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Case, Eldon D [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Shu, Yutian [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Baumann, Melissa [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system uses an ultrasonic fsed beam probe for measuring thickness of an object, such as a wall of a tube, a computer for controlling movement of the probe in a scanning pattern within the tube and processing an analog signal produced by the probe which is proportional to the tube wall thickness in the scanning pattern, and a line scan recorder for producing a record of the tube wall thicknesses measured by the probe in the scanning pattern. The probe is moved in the scanning pattern to sequentially scan circumferentially the interior tube wall at spaced apart adjacent axial locations. The computer processes the analog signal by converting it to a digital signal and then quantifies the digital signal into a multiplicity of thickness points with each falling in one of a plurality of thickness ranges corresponding to one of a plurality of shades of grey. From the multiplicity of quantified thickness points, a line scan recorder connected to the computer generates a pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses with each quantified thickness point thus being obtained from a minute area, e.g. 0.010 inch by 0.010 inch, of tube wall and representing one pixel of the pictorial map. In the pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses, the pixels represent different wall thicknesses having different shades of grey.

Bylenok, Paul J. (Clifton Park, NY); Patmos, William M. (Schenectady, NY); Wagner, Thomas A. (Bronswick, NY); Martin, Francis H. (Melrose, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Separate effects of surface roughness, wettability and porosity on boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux and optimization of boiling surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The separate effects of surface wettability, porosity, and roughness on critical heat flux (CHF) and heat transfer coefficient (HTC) were examined using carefully-engineered surfaces. All test surfaces were prepared on ...

O'Hanley, Harrison Fagan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2015 start) Project Title: Authigenic mineral corrosion and the origins of secondary porosity in lacustrine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2015 start) Project Title: Authigenic mineral corrosion and the origins of secondary porosity in lacustrine carbonate reservoirs). Additionally, the project will assess late diagenetic corrosion by examining the pathways triggered by shallow

Henderson, Gideon

153

aes depth profile: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

California eScholarship Repository Summary: al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical...

154

Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

155

Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry? Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen...

156

The Galactic thick and thin disks: differences in evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations demonstrate that the thin and thick disks of the Galaxy have different chemical abundance trends and evolution timescales. The relative abundances of $\\alpha$-elements in the thick Galactic disk are increased relative to the thin disk. Our goal is to investigate the cause of such differences in thick and thin disk abundances. We investigate the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk in the framework of the open two-zone model with gas inflow. The Galactic abundance trends for $\\alpha$-elements (Mg, Si, O) and Fe are predicted for the thin and thick Galactic disks. The star formation histories of the thin and thick disks must have been different and the gas infall must have been more intense during the thick disk evolution that the thin disk evolution.

T. V. Nykytyuk; T. V. Mishenina

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

Project of Aerosol Optical Depth Change in South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Paraguay Uruguay #12;Statistics of Aerosol M ean D ec 01 to 06 Mean Month AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela

Frank, Thomas D.

158

Depth, and Motion inVision CMSC 436/636  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, perceived depth related #12;Head Motion Parallax Bruce and Green 90, p. 231. Kinetic Depth Effect Bruce displacement) #12;Structure from Motion Bruce and Green 90, pg. 328. #12;Image Segmentation Discontinuities Representation techniques parameters #12;Experimental Findings Control necessary for development Held

Rheingans, Penny

159

SEU sensitive depth in a submicron SRAM technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work determines experimentally and by simulation the SEU sensitive depth in a 0.6 {micro}m SRAM technology. A good correlation is obtained between the two studies in the case of heavy ions deposing energy close to the critical energy. Other simulation results complete the first investigation by studying the minimum sensitive depth for ions deposing higher energies (at greater LET).

Detcheverry, C.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J. [Univ. Montpellier II (France)] [Univ. Montpellier II (France); Ecoffet, R. [CNES, Toulouse (France)] [CNES, Toulouse (France); Duzellier, S. [DERTS, Toulouse (France)] [DERTS, Toulouse (France); Barak, J.; Lifshitz, Y. [Soreq NRC, Yahvne (Israel)] [Soreq NRC, Yahvne (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance Fabrizio Flacco Torsten Kr is presented for safe human-robot coexistence. The main contribution is a fast method to evaluate distances between the robot and possibly moving obstacles (including humans), based on the concept of depth space

De Luca, Alessandro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On depth and deep points: a calculus Ivan Mizera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Tukey's median) plays a fundamental role similar to that of linear functions in the mathematical (1929) and Chamberlin (1933). For multivariate location, the proposal of Tukey (1975) was developed halfspace or Tukey's depth; for other brands of depth in multivariate location see Liu, Parelius and Singh

Mizera, Ivan

162

Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed...

163

ag thick film: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

applied. Yagi, Kazuyuki 2006-01-01 23 In situ Simultaneous Measurement of Temperature and Thin Film Thickness with Ultrasonic Techniques Engineering Websites Summary: In situ...

164

artery wall thickness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(CCA-IMT) were measured using ultrasonography. Gait 22 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Physics Websites Summary: to reduce...

165

Can fusion coefficients be calculated from the depth rule ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The depth rule is a level truncation of tensor product coefficients expected to be sufficient for the evaluation of fusion coefficients. We reformulate the depth rule in a precise way, and show how, in principle, it can be used to calculate fusion coefficients. However, we argue that the computation of the depth itself, in terms of which the constraints on tensor product coefficients is formulated, is problematic. Indeed, the elements of the basis of states convenient for calculating tensor product coefficients do not have a well-defined depth! We proceed by showing how one can calculate the depth in an `approximate' way and derive accurate lower bounds for the minimum level at which a coupling appears. It turns out that this method yields exact results for $\\widehat{su}(3)$ and constitutes an efficient and simple algorithm for computing $\\widehat{su}(3)$ fusion coefficients.

A. N. Kirillov; P. Mathieu; D. Senechal; M. Walton

1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

Butcher, B.M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Scalable Thick-Film Magnetics: Nano Structured Scalable Thick-Film Magnetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADEPT Project: Magnetic components are typically the largest components in a power converter. To date, however, researchers haven't found an effective way to reduce their size without negatively impacting their performance. And, reducing the size of the converter's other components isn't usually an option because shrinking them can also diminish the effectiveness of the magnetic components. GE is developing smaller magnetic components for power converters that maintain high performance levels. The company is building smaller components with magnetic films. These films are created using the condensation of a vaporized form of the magnetic material. It's a purely physical process that involves no chemical reactions, so the film composition is uniform. This process makes it possible to create a millimeter-thick film deposition over a wide surface area fairly quickly, which would save on manufacturing costs. In fact, GE can produce 1-10 millimeter-thick films in hours. The magnetic components that GE is developing for this project could be used in a variety of applications, including solar inverters, electric vehicles, and lighting.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

M AERIAUXMAGNETIQUES POUR HYPERFREQUENCES THICK FERRITE FILMS BY CHEMICAL TRANSPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M AERIAUXMAGNETIQUES POUR HYPERFREQUENCES THICK FERRITE FILMS BY CHEMICAL TRANSPORT A. I. BRAGINSKI-Mn ferrite and ferrochrornite films by Chemical Transport Deposi- tion (CTD) [I, 21. This method properties obtained. CTD now appears to be a valuable tool in laboratory preparation of thick ferrite layers

Boyer, Edmond

170

A model for variable thickness superconducting thin lms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for variable thickness superconducting thin #12;lms S. J. Chapman #3; Mathematical for Applied Mathematics Virginia Tech Blacksburg VA 24061-0531, USA Abstract A model for superconductivity. When the #12;lm is of uniform thickness the model is identical to a model for superconducting cylinders

Chapman, Jon

171

Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Variations in microbial community composition through two soil depth profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

35% of the total quantity of microbial biomass found in the top 2 m of soil is found below a depth: Microbial diversity; Phospholipid fatty acid; Soil profile; Community composition; Microbial biomass 1

Fierer, Noah

173

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

174

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of silicon supersaturated with sulfur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the luminescence of Si supersaturated with S (Si:S) using depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy as the S concentration is varied over 2 orders of magnitude ...

Fabbri, Filippo

176

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

aerosol optical depths: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

179

aerosol optical depth: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

180

Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Burial depth and stratigraphic controls on shale diagenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- layer illite/smectite in Gulf Coast sediments at a shallow depth is a randomly-interstratified illite/smectite with proportions of 804 smectite and 20% illite (Perry and Hower, 1972). Many authors (Dunoyer de Segonzac, 1970; Perry and Hower, 1970..., 1972; Hower et al. , 1976; Foscolos and Kodama, 1974) have noted the increase in illite with concurrent decrease of smectite in the mixed-layer illite/smec- tite with increasing depth and temperature. The conversion of smectite into illite resulting...

Moore, David Wesley

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Prediction of sinkage depth of footings on soft marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREDICTION OF SINKAGE DEPTH OF FOOTINGS ON SOFT MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by SHIHCHIEH YEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PREDICTION OF SINKAGE DEPTH OF FOOTINGS ON SOFI' MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by Approved as to style and content by: ayne A. Dunla (Chair of Committee) Derek V. Morr (Member) William R. Bry nt (Member...

Yen, Shihchieh

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Non-monotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before it increases and saturates to a value which depends on the roughness of the sliding surface. We use an index-matched interstitial liquid to probe the internal motion of the grains with fluorescence imaging in a regime where the liquid has no significant effect on the measured friction. The shear profiles obtained as a function of depth show decrease in slip near the sliding surface as the layer thickness is increased. We propose that the friction depends on the degree of grain confinement relative to the sliding surfaces.

Saloome Siavoshi; Ashish V. Orpe; Arshad Kudrolli

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

185

Reactor physics assessment of thick silicon carbide clad PWR fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity make silicon carbide (SiC) a potential fuel cladding material that may improve the economics and safety of light water reactors (LWRs). "Thick" SiC ...

Bloore, David A. (David Allan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin [Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

SLUG TESTING IN WELLS WITH FINITE-THICKNESS SKIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the slug test in a well surrounded by an annulus of altered material, which is treated as a skin of finite thickness. By assuming the skin has a thickness, the storage capacity of the altered material is included in the analysis. The problem is solved in the Laplace domain. The solution is found in terms of well-bore storage and the thickness, hydraulic conductivity, and specific storage of the skin. Type curves are generated by numerical inversion of the Laplace transform solution. We find that standard methods of analysis, involving a skin of infinitesimal thickness, are adequate for open-well or drill-stem tests. However, for pressurized tests the response may differ markedly from standard slug-test solutions.

Moench, A.F.; Hsieh

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

airway wall thickness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Physics Websites Summary: to reduce...

189

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cone Depth and the Center Vertex Theorem Gary L. Miller Todd Phillips Don Sheehy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract We generalize the Tukey depth to use cones instead of halfspaces. We prove a generalization of the most enduring definitions of data depth is the Tukey depth, also known as the half-space depth. The Tukey depth of a point p relative to a point set S is defined as the minimum number of points on one

Miller, Gary L.

192

Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

193

7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and so risks of water shortage appear. The preservation of these resources is important because73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

Camara, Gilberto

194

Steady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-current interactions [29, 37] or flows generated by wind-shear [30] (see [6] for a comprehensive discussion than the mass-flux. It is important to note that fixing the mass-flux p0 does not fix the depth d

195

Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

196

Parameterised structured light imaging for depth edge detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, [amin, amax], from the projector/camera', `width of horizontal stripes, w', and `minimum detectable depth difference, rmin'. As can be seen in Fig. 1a, amax and rmin are given as the input parameters of [amin, amax] are guaranteed to be detected. However, awkwardly enough, amin is found at a later step

California at Santa Barbara, University of

197

WaveCurrent Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave­Current Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La (Longuet-Higgins 1969; Hasselmann 1971; Garrett and Smith 1976; and many others). In particular, Hassel) changes in wave momentum that absorb some of the radiation stress gradients. Garrett and Smith (1976

Smith, Jerome A.

198

Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Influence of compensator thickness, field size, and off-axis distance on the effective attenuation coefficient of a cerrobend compensator for intensity-modulated radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be performed by using compensators. To make a compensator for an IMRT practice, it is required to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient (?{sub eff}) of its material, which is affected by various factors. We studied the effect of the variation of the most important factors on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} of the cerrobend compensator for 6-MV photon beams, including the field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis distance. Experimental measurements were carried out at 100 cm source-to-surface distance and 10 cm depth for the 6-MV photon beams of an Elekta linac using various field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis settings. The field sizes investigated ranged from 4 × 4 to 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} and the cerrobend compensator thicknesses from 0.5–6 cm. For a fixed compensator thickness, variation of the ?{sub eff} with the field size ranged from 3.7–6.8%, with the highest value attributed to the largest compensator thickness. At the reference field size of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}, the ?{sub eff} varied by 16.5% when the compensator thickness was increased from 0.5–6 cm. However, the variation of the ?{sub eff} with the off-axis distance was only 0.99% at this field size, whereas for the largest field size, it was more significant. Our results indicated that the compensator thickness and field size have the most significant effect on the calculation of the compensator ?{sub eff} for the 6-MV photon beam. Therefore, it is recommended to consider these parameters when calculating the compensator thickness for an IMRT practice designed for these beams. The off-axis distance had a significant effect on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} only for the largest field size. Hence, it is recommended to consider the effect of this parameter only for field sizes larger than 25 × 25 cm{sup 2}.

Haghparast, Abbas [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Method and apparatus for thickness measurement using microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method for measuring the thickness of a material which transmits a detectable amount of microwave radiation includes irradiating the material with coherent microwave radiation tuned over a frequency range. Reflected microwave radiation is detected, the reflected radiation having maxima and minima over the frequency range as a result of coherent interference of microwaves reflected from reflecting surfaces of the material. The thickness of the material is determined from the period of the maxima and minima along with knowledge of the index of refraction of the material.

Woskov, Paul (Bedford, MA) [Bedford, MA; Lamar, David A. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

Perdieu, Louisa H. (Overland Park, KS)

2000-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

204

Acceptance testing of the eddy current probes for measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thickness on K West Basin fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a recent visual inspection campaign of fuel elements stored in the K West Basin, it was noted that fuel elements contained in sealed aluminum canisters had a heavy translucent type coating on their surfaces (Pitner 1997a). Subsequent sampling of this coating in a hot cell (Pitner 1997b) and analysis of the material identified it as aluminum hydroxide. Because of the relatively high water content of this material, safety related concerns are raised with respect to long term storage of this fuel in Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). A campaign in the basin is planned to demonstrate whether this coating can be removed by mechanical brushing (Bridges 1998). Part of this campaign involves before-and-after measurements of the coating thickness to determine the effectiveness of coating removal by the brushing machine. Measurements of the as-deposited coating thickness on multiple fuel elements are also expected to provide total coating inventory information needed for MCO safety evaluations. The measurement technique must be capable of measuring coating thicknesses on the order of several mils, with a measurement accuracy of 0.5 mil. Several different methods for quantitatively measuring these thin coatings were considered in selecting the most promising approach. Ultrasonic measurement was investigated, but it was determined that due to the thin coating depth and the high water content of the material, the signal would likely pass directly through to the cladding without ever sensing the coating surface. X-ray fluorescence was also identified as a candidate technique, but would not work because the high gamma background from the irradiated fuel would swamp out the low energy aluminum signal. Laser interferometry could possibly be applied, but considerable development would be required and it was considered to be high risk on a short term basis. The consensus reached was that standard eddy current techniques for coating thickness measurement had the best chance for success in this endeavor. If proper placement and alignment of the eddy current measurement probe on the coating could be achieved, the thickness of this non-conductive coating over the conductive fuel cladding (Zircaloy 2) should be measurable based on magnetic stand-off aspects. Eddy current devices are routinely used to measure paint coating thicknesses on metal surfaces in this regard. The purpose of this report is to document the development and acceptance testing of the eddy current system conducted to qualify its use for the measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thicknesses on fuel stored in the K West Basin.

Pitner, A.L.

1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method for depositing a uniform layer of particulate material on the surface of an article having interconnected porosity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method for depositing liquid-suspended particles on an immersed porous article characterized by interconnected porosity. In one form of the invention, coating is conducted in a vessel containing an organic liquid supporting a colloidal dispersion of graphite sized to lodge in surface pores of the article. The liquid comprises a first volatile component (e.g., acetone) and a second less-volatile component (e.g., toluene) containing a dissolved organic graphite-bonding agent. The liquid also contains an organic agent (e.g., cellulose gum) for maintaining the particles in suspension. A porous carbon article to be coated is immersed in the liquid so that it is permeated therewith. While the liquid is stirred to maintain a uniform blend, the vessel headspace is evacuated to effect flashing-off of the first component from the interior of the article. This causes particle-laden liquid exterior of the article to flow inwardly through its surface pores, lodging particles in these pores and forming a continuous graphite coating. The coated article is retrieved and heated to resin-bond the graphite. The method can be used to form a smooth, adherent, continuous coating of various materials on various porous articles. The method is rapid and reproducible.

Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Lewis, J. Jr.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Eight-year Climatology of Dust Optical Depth on Mars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have produced a multiannual climatology of airborne dust from Martian year 24 to 31 using multiple datasets of retrieved or estimated column optical depths. The datasets are based on observations of the Martian atmosphere from April 1999 to July 2013 made by different orbiting instruments: the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The procedure we have adopted consists of gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. Our gridding method calculates averages and uncertainties on a regularly spaced, but possibly incomplete, spatio-temporal grid, using an iterative procedure weighted in space, time, and retrieval uncertainty. In order to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the resulting gridded maps, we validat...

Montabone, L; Millour, E; Wilson, R J; Lewis, S R; Cantor, B A; Kass, D; Kleinboehl, A; Lemmon, M; Smith, M D; Wolff, M J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Drilling/producing depths; Two records and a revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that record depths for natural gas or oil well drilling or producing continue to be rare occurrences, although one or two still come in each year. Records fell in Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) District 9 and in the California area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in 1990. Deep drilling and production has traditionally been defined as well depths greater than 15,000 ft. Smith Tool reported that 9.4% of all active rotary rigs were dedicated to targets below 15,000 ft at the beginning of 1991. Deep rigs had dropped to 8.1% by year-end 1991, but remained above the 1989 and 1990 levels of 8.4 and 7.6%, respectively. In 1988 about 11% of active rigs were drilling deep at any given time.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

X-ray spectra transmitted through Compton-thick absorbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray spectra transmitted through matter which is optically thick to Compton scattering are computed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Applications to the BeppoSAX data of the Seyfert 2 galaxy in Circinus, and to the spectral modeling of the Cosmic X-ray Background, are discussed.

Giorgio Matt; Fulvio Pompilio; Fabio La Franca

1999-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

210

LBNL 59017 JArt 1 Improved Spatial Resolution in Thick, Fully-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL 59017 JArt 1 Improved Spatial Resolution in Thick, Fully- Depleted CCDs with Enhanced Red developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Because they can be over-depleted, the LBNL measure an rms diffusion of 3.7 ± 0.2 m. Lateral charge diffusion in LBNL CCDs will meet the SNAP

211

Thermally Induced Stresses in Functionally Graded Thick Tubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal barrier coating for high temperature applications, a discrete layer of ceramic material is bondedThermally Induced Stresses in Functionally Graded Thick Tubes Senthil S. Vel and Rajeev Baskiyar method to obtain the temperature, displacements and thermal stresses. In addition to the thermal

Vel, Senthil

212

Ecology of Plants and Light CAM plants have thick,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orientation to maximize light exposure. Species Adaptations-Sun Solar tracking by leaves increases light1 Ecology of Plants and Light CAM plants have thick, succulent tissues to allow for organic acid and Light Some CAM plants not obligated to just CAM Can use C3 photosynthesis during day if conditions

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

213

Sensing roller for in-process thickness measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for processing materials by sensing roller, in which the sensing roller has a plurality of conductive rings (electrodes) separated by rings of dielectric material. Sensing capacitances or impedances between the electrodes provides information on thicknesses of the materials being processed, location of wires therein, and other like characteristics of the materials. 6 figs.

Novak, J.L.

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

Thru-thickness bending stress distribution at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the plate??s thickness decreased when the fabrication process was carried out at elevated temperatures. When steel exceeds a strain of 10 to 16 percent during the fabrication process, the plate becomes susceptible to cracking. This strain limit was exceeded...

Christian, Lee Conner

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

215

Through-thickness ultrasonic characterization of wood and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the form of bark, wood chips, sawdust, cotton gin trash, rice hulls, and sugar ba- gasse (Kleit et al. 1994. It was found that the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) was positively related to particulate sizeThrough-thickness ultrasonic characterization of wood and agricultural fiber composites Ronnie Y

216

Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- try [1, 2]. As input for remote control systems, thickness information has to be supplied in realtime. Data acquisition has to be perfomed in a non-contact man- ner. Not only non-destructive and remote a periodical heat source on, respectively within, the sample then we waste a lot of information if only the #12

Louis, Alfred K.

217

The Museum Theorem: Thick Face-Paths and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Museum Theorem: Thick Face-Paths and Hamiltonian-Connectedness in Plane Graphs Xiaoyun Lu #12;Visiting a Museum The Problem: The entrance and exit of a museum are fixed. You insist on visiting room F. The pieces of what you skip should be somehow "small". #12;Visiting a Museum The Problem

West, Douglas B.

218

Depth Profile Analysis of New Materials in Hollow Cathode Discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this review the possibility of hollow cathode discharge for depth profile analysis is demonstrated for several new materials: planar optical waveguides fabricated by Ag+-Na+ ion exchange process in glasses, SnO2 thin films for gas sensors modified by hexamethildisilazane after rapid thermal annealing, W- and WC- CVD layers deposited on Co-metalloceramics and WO3- CVD thin films deposited on glass. The results are compared with different standard techniques.

Djulgerova, R.; Mihailov, V.; Gencheva, V.; Popova, L.; Panchev, B. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Michaylova, V. [Technical University of Sofia, 1797 Sofia (Bulgaria); Szytula, A.; Gondek, L.; Dohnalik, T.M. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics - Jagellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Petrovic, Z.Lj. [Institute of Physics, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Colour videos with depth : acquisition, processing and evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach is a sensor fusion system which combines data Time-of-flight sensor fusionfrom a noisy, low-resolution time-of-flight camera and a high-resolution colour video camera into a coherent, noise-free video with depth. The system consists of a three... of Computer Graphics International (Short Papers), May 2009 – Proteus – semi-automatic interactive structure-from-motion Malte Schwarzkopf and Christian Richardt Poster at the Vision, Modeling, and Visualization Workshop (VMV), November 2009 – Layered photo...

Richardt, Christian

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, Moscow, 117036 (Russian Federation); Baker Hughes, Inc, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX, 77073 (United States)

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis,Technologies Available Site

222

Abundances of metal-weak thick-disc candidates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High resolution spectra of 5 candidate metal-weak thick-disc stars suggested by Beers & Sommer-Larsen (1995) are analyzed to determine their chemical abundances. The low abundance of all the objects has been confirmed with metallicity reaching [Fe/H]=-2.9. However, for three objects, the astrometric data from the Hipparcos catalogue suggests they are true halo members. The remaining two, for which proper-motion data are not available, may have disc-like kinematics. It is therefore clear that it is useful to address properties of putative metal-weak thick-disc stars only if they possess full kinematic data. For CS 22894-19 the abundance pattern similar to those of typical halo stars is found, suggesting that chemical composition is not a useful discriminant between thick-disc and halo stars. CS 29529-12 is found to be C enhanced with [C/Fe]=+1.0; other chemical peculiarities involve the s process elements: [Sr/Fe]=-0.65 and [Ba/Fe]=+0.62, leading to a high [Ba/Sr] considerably larger than what is found in more metal-rich carbon-rich stars, but similar to LP 706-7 and LP 625-44 discussed by Norris et al (1997a). Hipparcos data have been used to calculate the space velocities of 25 candidate metal-weak thick-disc stars, thus allowing us to identify 3 bona fide members, which support the existence of a metal-poor tail of the thick-disc, at variance with a claim to the contrary by Ryan & Lambert (1995).

P. Bonifacio; M. Centurion; P. Molaro

1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

Auger and depth profile analysis of synthetic crystals for dispersion of soft x-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous samples have been fabricated and analyzed as part of a program to produce soft x-ray dispersion elements for various laboratory applications. The majority of this work has centered around the carbon/tungsten system, although several other low-Z/high-Z pairs have been investigated. This report describes the development of certain vacuum-deposition techniques for fabricating these dispersion elements, based upon results obtained from x-ray reflectivity measurements and Auger depth-profile analysis. The composition of the films is chiefly alternating layers of tungsten carbide and carbon. Excess carbon is introduced during the deposition of the tungsten to ensure that the carbide layer is fully stoichiometric. Layer thickness ranged from approx. 5 to 30 A for the carbide and from approx. 15 to 80 A for the carbon. The reflectivity measurements were made using Fe and Al K/sub ..cap alpha../ at grazing incidence. The emphasis in these studies is on the application of surface-analysis results in suggesting modifications to the fabrication process and in evaluating the results such modifications have on the layer stoichiometry, continuity, and periodicity of the dispersion elements so produced.

Rachocki, K.D.; Brown, D.R.; Springer, R.W.; Arendt, P.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan Abstract We present the first optimal algorithm to compute the maximum Tukey depth (also known as location or halfspace depth , the Tukey depth of a point q IRd is defined as: min{|P | : over all halfspaces containing q}. We

Chan, Timothy M.

225

A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING Lai-Man Po School of Peking University, Shenzhen, China ABSTRACT Depth-Image-Based Rendering (DIBR) is widely used synthesis with high-quality depth map. Index Terms - Depth-Image-Based-Rendering, DIBR, Hole

Po, Lai-Man

226

Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness: separating the spatial, annual, and1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decline in ice thickness from sub data 1 10/16/07 The decline in arctic sea-ice thickness/14/07 & 10/16/079 10 11 #12;Decline in ice thickness from sub data 2 10/16/07 Abstract11 Naval submarines have collected operational data of sea-ice draft (90% of thickness) in the12 Arctic Ocean since 1958

Percival, Don

227

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

228

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

229

Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

Carmignani, B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Depth-Profiling and Quantitative Characterization of the Size, Composition,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density, and Morphology of Fine Particles |

231

Erosion Rate Variations during XPS Sputter Depth Profiling of Nanoporous  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 ton Stanat rolling millEricErnestErnieFilms. |

232

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthor Jump to: navigation,AvgReservoirDepth Jump

233

Property:AvgWellDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthor Jump to: navigation,AvgReservoirDepth

234

Property:FirstWellDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProcedures Jump to: navigation,JumpFirstWellDepth Jump to:

235

Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of a MolecularAssemblythe

236

Terahertz inline wall thickness monitoring system for plastic pipe extrusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional and commercially available inline wall thickness monitoring systems for pipe extrusion are usually based on ultrasonic or x-ray technology. Disadvantages of ultrasonic systems are the usual need of water as a coupling media and the high damping in thick walled or foamed pipes. For x-ray systems special safety requirements have to be taken into account because of the ionizing radiation. The terahertz (THz) technology offers a novel approach to solve these problems. THz waves have many properties which are suitable for the non-destructive testing of plastics. The absorption of electrical isolators is typically very low and the radiation is non-ionizing in comparison to x-rays. Through the electromagnetic origin of the THz waves they can be used for contact free measurements. Foams show a much lower absorption in contrast to acoustic waves. The developed system uses THz pulses which are generated by stimulating photoconductive switches with femtosecond laser pulses. The time of flight of THz pulses can be determined with a resolution in the magnitude of several ten femtoseconds. Hence the thickness of an object like plastic pipes can be determined with a high accuracy by measuring the time delay between two reflections on materials interfaces e.g. at the pipe's inner and outer surface, similar to the ultrasonic technique. Knowing the refractive index of the sample the absolute layer thickness from the transit time difference can be calculated easily. This method in principle also allows the measurement of multilayer systems and the characterization of foamed pipes.

Hauck, J., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de; Stich, D., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de; Heidemeyer, P., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de; Bastian, M., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de; Hochrein, T., E-mail: j.hauck@skz.de, E-mail: d.stich@skz.de, E-mail: p.heidemeyer@skz.de, E-mail: m.bastian@skz.de, E-mail: t.hochrein@skz.de [SKZ - German Plastics Center, Wuerzburg (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

Marra, John J

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

Magnetic Flares and the Observed Optical Depth in Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We here consider the pressure equilibrium during an intense magnetic flare above the surface of a cold accretion disk. Under the assumption that the heating source for the plasma trapped within the flaring region is an influx of energy transported inwards with a group velocity close to $c$, e.g., by magnetohydrodynamic waves, this pressure equilibrium can constrain the Thomson optical depth $\\tau_T$ to be of order unity. We suggest that this may be the reason why $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ in Seyfert Galaxies. We also consider whether current data can distinguish between the spectrum produced by a single X-ray emitting region with $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ and that formed by many different flares spanning a range of $\\tau_T$. We find that the current observations do not yet have the required energy resolution to permit such a differentiation. Thus, it is possible that the entire X-ray/$\\gamma$-ray spectrum of Seyfert Galaxies is produced by many independent magnetic flares with an optical depth $0.5<\\tau_T<2$.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

Effect of Aerosol Humidification on the Column Aerosol Optical Thickness  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYear 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Depth to bedrock using gravimetry in the Reno and Carson City, Nevada, basins Robert E. Abbott and John N. Louie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geothermal wells, and one wildcat oil well. Depths in Carson City are consistent with depths from existing

242

Shared Communications: Volume 2. In-Depth Systems Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second of two documents that examine the literature for actual examples of organizations and agencies that share communications resources. While the primary emphasis is on rural, intelligent transportation system (ITS) communications involving transit, examples will not be limited to rural activities, nor to ITS implementation, nor even to transit. In addition, the term ''communication'' will be broadly applied to include all information resources. The first document of this series, ''Shared Communications: Volume I. A Summary and Literature Review'', defines the meaning of the term ''shared communication resources'' and provides many examples of agencies that share resources. This document, ''Shared Communications: Volume II. In-Depth Systems Research'', reviews attributes that contributed to successful applications of the sharing communication resources concept. A few examples of each type of communication sharing are provided. Based on the issues and best practice realworld examples, recommendations for potential usage and recommended approaches for field operational tests are provided.

Truett, LF

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

Mark Fabro

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Vibration of circular plates, of several thicknesses, with three supports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ o ~ ~ i Prccedure and DeeoriPt'alen Of APPSXat'aua ~ ~ e ~ a ~ 0 ~ ~ i EmPirioal Ccrrelabicn Of Dataa ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ 01 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i Kathemat, ical Theory of Thin Plates ~ a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ a ~ ~ ~ Heeultaa ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ a... (cps) e M = symmetric mode, ie. 1, 2, 3, and 4. h= thickness of circular plate, in, Vhen there are mox'e than-thoro variables involved in the x esult, s of an experimental research, an empirical xelat, ionsh1p concerning the several variables may...

Ballentine, John Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Thick brane models in generalized theories of gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work deals with thick braneworld models, in an environment where the Ricci scalar is changed to accommodate the addition of two extra terms, one depending on the Ricci scalar itself, and the other, which takes into account the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of the scalar field that sources the braneworld scenario. We suppose that the scalar field engenders standard kinematics, and we show explicitly that the gravity sector of this new braneworld scenario is linearly stable. We illustrate the general results investigating two distinct models, focusing on how the brane profile is changed in the modified theories.

Bazeia, D; Menezes, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A comparison of thick film and thin film traffic stripes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Striys. . . Pigmented Bitusmn Stripes . Asphalt %uilt-Upa Striye vith Pigmented Portland Cement Mortar Cover Course 38 . ~ 41 Thin Film Stripes Used for Comparison Results of Comparing Thick Film Stripes and Thin Film Paint Stripes . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 43... was aspbaltio oonorets. The pavement in Test Areas 2y 3p and 4 vas portland cesmnh ooncrete, Two test areas (3 and 4) vere located in such manner as to provide uninterrupted flow of traffic over tbs entire length of the test area. The other two test areas (1...

Keese, Charles J

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effect of Thickness on the Structure, Composition and Properties of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYearEffect ofReactions: A CaseTitanium

249

The fragmentation of expanding shells II: Thickness matters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study analytically the development of gravitational instability in an expanding shell having finite thickness. We consider three models for the radial density profile of the shell: (i) an analytic uniform-density model, (ii) a semi-analytic model obtained by numerical solution of the hydrostatic equilibrium equation, and (iii) a 3D hydrodynamic simulation. We show that all three profiles are in close agreement, and this allows us to use the first model to describe fragments in the radial direction of the shell. We then use non-linear equations describing the time-evolution of a uniform oblate spheroid to derive the growth rates of shell fragments having different sizes. This yields a dispersion relation which depends on the shell thickness, and hence on the pressure confining the shell. We compare this dispersion relation with the dispersion relation obtained using the standard thin-shell analysis, and show that, if the confining pressure is low, only large fragments are unstable. On the other hand, if the...

Wunsch, Richard; Palous, Jan; Whitworth, Anthony P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

DEPTH OF PLEATED SURFACES IN TOROIDAL CUSPS OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPTH OF PLEATED SURFACES IN TOROIDAL CUSPS OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS Ying-Qing Wu1 Abstract. Let F 0203394 1 #12;2 YING-QING WU The following theorem gives an estimation of the depth of closed essential

Wu, Ying-Qing

252

Numerical simulation of the flow over a coastal structure in depth-limited conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of detailed measurements of irregular wave transformation in front of the structure in depth-limited conditions. The second data set consists of several test runs to study the irregular wave reflection and runup on the coastal structure in depth...

Ginting, Victor Eralingga

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Apparatus and methods for determining gas saturation and porosity of a formation penetrated by a gas filled or liquid filled borehole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are disclosed for determining gas saturation, liquid saturation, porosity and density of earth formations penetrated by a well borehole. Determinations are made from measures of fast neutron and inelastic scatter gamma radiation induced by a pulsed, fast neutron source. The system preferably uses two detectors axially spaced from the neutron source. One detector is preferably a scintillation detector responsive to gamma radiation, and a second detector is preferably an organic scintillator responsive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The system can be operated in cased boreholes which are filled with either gas or liquid. Techniques for correcting all measurements for borehole conditions are disclosed.

Wilson, Robert D. (477 W. Scenic Dr., Grand Junction, CO 81503)

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutrino and proton decay experiments, as well as dark matter searches even though often at greater depth for cold dark matter 3 , and is presently at shallow depth; muon-induced neutrons repre- sent a major at a shallow depth of 32 meters of water equivalent has been measured. The Palo Verde neutrino detector

Piepke, Andreas G.

255

Primal--Dual Algorithms for Data Depth David Bremner, Komei Fukuda, and Vera Rosta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the generalization of the median of S by Tukey. The computation of the halfspace depth of a point is equivalent as multivariate generalizations of ranks to complement classical multivariate analysis, by Tukey (1974), Oja (1983 out that the halfspace depth of Tukey and the regression depth of Rousseeuw and Hu­ bert have all

Bremner, David

256

The Spectral Signature of Dust Scattering and Polarization in the Near IR to Far UV. I. Optical Depth and Geometry Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectropolarimetry from the near IR to the far UV of light scattered by dust provides a valuable diagnostic of the dust composition, grain size distribution and spatial distribution. To facilitate the use of this diagnostic, we present detailed calculations of the intensity and polarization spectral signature of light scattered by optically thin and optically thick dust in various geometries. The polarized light radiative transfer calculations are carried out using the adding-doubling method for a plane-parallel slab, and are extended to an optically thick sphere by integrating over its surface. The calculations are for the Mathis, Rumple & Nordsieck Galactic dust model, and cover the range from 1 $\\mu m$ to 500 \\AA. We find that the wavelength dependence of the scattered light intensity provides a sensitive probe of the optical depth of the scattering medium, while the polarization wavelength dependence provides a probe of the grain scattering properties, which is practically independent of optical depth. We provide a detailed set of predictions, including polarization maps, which can be used to probe the properties of dust through imaging spectropolarimetry in the near IR to far UV of various Galactic and extragalactic objects. In a following paper we use the codes developed here to provide predictions for the dependence of the intensity and polarization on grain size distribution and composition.

Victor G. Zubko; Ari Laor

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

257

Galactic Bulge Microlensing Optical Depth from EROS-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new EROS-2 measurement of the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic Bulge. Light curves of $5.6\\times 10^{6}$ clump-giant stars distributed over $66 \\deg^2$ of the Bulge were monitored during seven Bulge seasons. 120 events were found with apparent amplifications greater than 1.6 and Einstein radius crossing times in the range $5 {\\rm d}

C. Hamadache; L. Le Guillou; P. Tisserand; C. Afonso; J. N. Albert; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; E. Aubourg; P. Bareyre; J. P. Beaulieu; X. Charlot; C. Coutures; R. Ferlet; P. Fouqué; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Gould; D. Graff; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; J. de Kat; E. Lesquoy; C. Loup; C. Magneville; J. B. Marquette; E. Maurice; A. Maury; A. Milsztajn; M. Moniez; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; Y. R. Rahal; J. Rich; M. Spiro; A. Vidal-Madjar; L. Vigroux; S. Zylberajch

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

258

Digital in-line holography in thick optical systems: application to visualization in pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digital in-line holography in thick optical systems: application to visualization in pipes N@coria.fr In this paper we apply digital in-line holography to image opaque objects through a thick plano-concave pipe to deal with various pipe shape and thickness and compensates for the lack of versatility of classical DIH

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

259

Sea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-azimuth angles. The parameterization, that includes finding the best modeled ice thickness, is performed by usingSea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell David Marsana) ISTerre, CNRS propagating in the Arctic sea ice cover is exploited in order to locally measure the ice thickness

260

Application of FLake for the prediction of ice thickness for inland waters in the Netherlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of FLake for the prediction of ice thickness for inland waters in the Netherlands Cisco in the Netherlands. In cold spells numerous ditches, canals and lakes get frozen and many people go out for ice in the Netherlands. in ice thickness predictions. KNMI issues ice thickness predictions, based on a model of De Bruin

Stoffelen, Ad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Optically Thick Outflows of Supercritical Accretion Discs: Radiative Diffusion Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly supercritical accretion discs are probable sources of dense optically thick axisymmetric winds. We introduce a new approach based on diffusion approximation radiative transfer in a funnel geometry and obtain an analytical solution for the energy density distribution inside the wind assuming that all the mass, momentum and energy are injected well inside the spherization radius. This allows to derive the spectrum of emergent emission for various inclination angles. We show that self-irradiation effects play an important role altering the temperature of the outcoming radiation by about 20% and the apparent X-ray luminosity by a factor of 2-3. The model has been successfully applied to two ULXs. The basic properties of the high ionization HII-regions found around some ULXs are also easily reproduced in our assumptions.

P. Abolmasov; S. Karpov; Taro Kotani

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fracture toughness of thick section dissimilar electron beam weld joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural investigations as well as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness test based on elastic-plastic fracture mechanics were performed on single pass, full penetration similar and dissimilar electron beam (EB) welds of 40 mm thick 316L type austenitic steel and high alloyed fine tempered martensitic 9Cr 1Mo Nb V (P91 -ASTM A213) steel. The latter modified steel has been developed to fill up the gap between 12Cr steel and austenitic stainless steels with respect to the high temperature properties and better weldability. Furthermore, it shows a small thermal expansion coefficient and is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking like the austenitic steel. The weldment properties were evaluated by microstructural analysis, microhardness, Charpy V- notch impact, and by newly developed flat microtensile specimens (0.5 mm thick). The dissimilar EB weld metal and HAZ of P91 steel has been shown to be microstructurally and mechanically distinct from both austenitic and martenistic parent metals. The use of microsized rectangular tensile specimens provides unique solution to the problem of the mechanical property determination of the narrow EB weld joint. The HAZ of the 9Cr1Mo steel exhibits extremely poor CTOD toughness properties in as-welded condition at room temperature. The CTOD values obtained were believed to be represent the intrinsic property of this zone, since the distance of the crack tip to the austenitic steel part was too large to receive a stress relaxation effect from low strength side on the crack tip (by accommodating the applied strains in the high toughness, lower strength 316L plate).

Kocak, M.; Junghans, E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Thick Pixelated CZT Detectors With Isolated Steering Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the possibility to improve the performance of 0.5 cm thick Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors with the help of steering grids on the anode side of the detectors. Steering grids can improve the energy resolution of CZT detectors by enhancing the small pixel effect; furthermore, they can increase their detection efficiency by steering electrons to the anode pixels which otherwise would drift to the area between pixels. Previously, the benefit of steering grids had been compromised by additional noise associated with currents between the steering grids and the anode pixels. We use thin film deposition techniques to isolate the steering grid from the CZT substrate by a 150 nm thick layer of the isolator Aluminiumoxide. While the thin layer does not affect the beneficial effect of the steering grid on the weighting potentials and the electric field inside the detector, it suppresses the currents between the steering grid and the anode pixels. In this contribution, we present first results from a 2 x 2 x 0.5 cm CZT detector with 8 x 8 pixels that we tested before and after deposition of an isolated steering grid. The steering grid improves the 662 keV energy resolution of the detector by a factor of 1.3 (from about 2% to about 1.5%), while not reducing the detection efficiency. To gain further insights into the detector response in the region between pixels, we measured energy spectra with a collimated Cs137 source. The collimator measurements can be used to enhance our understanding of energy spectra measured under flood illumination of the detectors.

I. Jung; A. B. Garson; J. S. Perkins; H. Krawczynski; J. Matteson; R. T. Skelton; A. Burger; M. Groza

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fringe biasing: A variance reduction technique for optically thick meshes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fringe biasing is a stratified sampling scheme applicable to Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport codes. The thermal emission source in optically thick cells is partitioned into separate contributions from the cell interiors (where the likelihood of the particles escaping the cells is virtually zero) and the 'fringe' regions close to the cell boundaries. Thermal emission in the cell interiors can now be modelled with fewer particles, the remaining particles being concentrated in the fringes so that they are more likely to contribute to the energy exchange between cells. Unlike other techniques for improving the efficiency in optically thick regions (such as random walk and discrete diffusion treatments), fringe biasing has the benefit of simplicity, as the associated changes are restricted to the sourcing routines with the particle tracking routines being unaffected. This paper presents an analysis of the potential for variance reduction achieved from employing the fringe biasing technique. The aim of this analysis is to guide the implementation of this technique in Monte Carlo thermal radiation codes, specifically in order to aid the choice of the fringe width and the proportion of particles allocated to the fringe (which are interrelated) in multi-dimensional simulations, and to confirm that the significant levels of variance reduction achieved in simulations can be understood by studying the behaviour for simple test cases. The variance reduction properties are studied for a single cell in a slab geometry purely absorbing medium, investigating the accuracy of the scalar flux and current tallies on one of the interfaces with the surrounding medium. (authors)

Smedley-Stevenson, R. P. [AWE PLC, Aldermaston Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Influence of beam parameters on percentage depth dose in electron arc therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence of rotational or arc electron beam percentage depth doses on the depth of isocenter di and nominal beam field width w is presented. A characteristic angle beta, which uniquely depends on w and di, is defined and the dependence of the radial percentage depth doses on angle beta discussed. It is shown that the characteristic angle beta concept can be used in clinical situations to predict the shape of the percentage depth dose curve when w and di are known, or, more importantly, it can be used to determine the appropriate w when di and the percentage depth dose characteristics are known.

Pla, M.; Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Digenetic Changes in Macro- to Nano-Scale Porosity in the St. Peter Sandstone:L An (Ultra) Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Backscattered Electron Imagining Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small- and Ultra-Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS and USANS) provide powerful tools for quantitative analysis of porous rocks, yielding bulk statistical information over a wide range of length scales. This study utilized (U)SANS to characterize shallowly buried quartz arenites from the St. Peter Sandstone. Backscattered electron imaging was also used to extend the data to larger scales. These samples contain significant volumes of large-scale porosity, modified by quartz overgrowths, and neutron scattering results show significant sub-micron porosity. While previous scattering data from sandstones suggest scattering is dominated by surface fractal behavior over many orders of magnitude, careful analysis of our data shows both fractal and pseudo-fractal behavior. The scattering curves are composed of subtle steps, modeled as polydispersed assemblages of pores with log-normal distributions. However, in some samples an additional surface-fractal overprint is present, while in others there is no such structure, and scattering can be explained by summation of non-fractal structures. Combined with our work on other rock-types, these data suggest that microporosity is more prevalent, and may play a much more important role than previously thought in fluid/rock interactions.

Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick [ORNL; Jackson, Andrew [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Littrell, Ken [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

EHL OIL FILM THICKNESS UNDER ROLLING-SLIDING CONTACT 2 W  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil film Abstract: The Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) minimum oil film thickness is theoretically investigated under rolling with sliding contact. The effects of contact pressure, rolling speed and slip ratio on the EHL minimum oil film thickness are calculated numerically. It is found that for a range of contact pressure from 0.5 to 3.5 GPa, the minimum oil film thickness gradually decreases with the increase in contact pressure. As the rolling speed increases from 3500 to 4500 rpm, oil film thickness is increased. It is also found that the oil film thickness is not much influenced by the slip ratio. 1

D. M. Nuruzzaman; M. A. A. Sheikh

268

Lithium in very metal poor thick disk stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for lithium is performed on seven metal poor dwarfs with metallicities ranging from [Fe/H]=-1.5 down to [Fe/H]=-3.0 but showing disk-like kinematics. These stars belong to the metal poor tail of the Galactic thick disk and they may be also the result of an accretion event (Beers and Sommer-Larsen 1995). The Li 6707.8 A line is present in all the seven dwarfs. The weighted average of the Li abundance for the stars is A(Li)=2.20 (+/-0.06) and is consistent within the errors with the plateau Li abundance of A(Li)=2.24(+/- 0.012) found in genuine halo stars in the same range of metallicities (Bonifacio and Molaro 1997). One of the stars, CS 22182-24, shows somewhat lower Li abundance (A(Li)=1.6(+/-0.40)) and is a candidate to being a Li-poor star. Whether this group of stars belongs to the oldest stars in the disk or to the old population of an external galaxy accreted by the Milky Way, the present observations provide support to the universality of a pre-Galactic Li abundance as is observed in the Galactic halo stars.

P. Molaro; P. Bonifacio; L. Pasquini

1997-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. For thick layers of exterior insulation (more than 1.5 in.), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. Although the approach has proven effective, there is significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body. 5 figs.

Nachbar, H.D.

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Computing a Maximal Depth Point in the Plane Stefan Langerman # William Steiger +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], [7],[10],[11]. One of the more familiar ones was proposed by John Tukey [12], a natural extension to d > 1 of the notion in (1). Given a set S = {P 1 , . . . , Pn} of n points in R d , the Tukey depth is a point µ of maximal depth, and we write # # = #(S) for the Tukey depth of a median. For integer k > 0 let

Langerman, Stefan

272

High-energy x-ray diffractometer for nondestructive strain depth profile measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a lab-based high-energy x-ray diffraction system and a new approach to nondestructively measuring strain profiles in polycrystalline samples. This technique utilizes the tungsten K{sub ?1} characteristic radiation from a standard industrial x-ray tube. We introduce a simulation model that is used to determine strain values from data collected with this system. Examples of depth profiling are shown for shot peened aluminum and titanium samples. Profiles to 1 mm depth in aluminum and 300 ?m depth in titanium with a depth resolution of 20 ?m are presented.

Al-Shorman, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan); Jensen, T. C.; Gray, J. N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustable penetration depth Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MgB2 single crystals CATALIN MARTIN, MATTHEW VAN... , Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland -- Magnetic penetration depth was studied... on ns, thus on...

274

A depth-16 circuit for the AES S-box joan@imada.sdu.dk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metric (gate count, depth, energy consumption, etc.). In practice, no known techniques can reliably find. Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Southern Denmark. Partially sup- ported

275

Thin-thick hydrogen target for nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spectroscopic studies of unstable nuclei, hydrogen targets are of key importance. The CHyMENE Project aims to provide to the nuclear physics community a thin and pure solid windowless hydrogen or deuterium target. CHyMENE project must respond to this request for the production of solid Hydrogen. The solid hydrogen target is produced in a continuous flow (1 cm/s) by an extrusion technique (developed with the PELIN laboratory) in a vacuum chamber. The shape of the target is determined by the design of the nozzle at the extrusion process. For the purpose, the choice is a rectangular shape with a width of 10 mm and a thickness in the range of 30-50 microns necessary for the physics objectives. The cryostat is equipped with a GM Cryocooler with sufficient power for the solidification of the hydrogen in the lower portion of the extruder. In the higher part of the cryostat, the hydrogen gas is first liquefied and partially solidified. It is then compressed at 100 bars in the cooled extruder before expulsion of the film through the nozzle at the center of the reaction vacuum chamber. After the previous step, the solid hydrogen ribbon falls by gravity into a dedicated chamber where it sublimes and the gas is pumped and evacuated in a exhaust line. This paper deals with the design of the cryostat with its equipment, with the sizing of the thermal bridge (Aluminum and copper), with the results regarding the contact resistance as well as with the vacuum computations of the reaction and recovery hydrogen gas chambers.

Gheller, J.-M.; Juster, F.-P.; Authelet, G. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SACM, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Vinyar, I. [PELIN Limited Liability Company 27 A, Gzhatskaya Str, office 103 St. Petersbourg 195220 (Russian Federation); Relland, J. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SIS, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Commeaux, C. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, campus Universitaire-Bat 103, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Porosity, permeability, and petroleum: Determining the three P's by integrating mud logs with wireline logs and drill-stem tests in central and western Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mud logging has long been a part of the complete formation evaluation picture in most oil and gas producing provinces of the US. In Kansas, however, mud logging has often been omitted from this picture. Typically, a well in central and western Kansas is drill-stem tested and then logged. Although this technique is often successful, there are also times when drill-stem tests and logs conflict with one another. Mud-logging techniques, especially hydrocarbon ratio analysis, could provide this necessary third aspect of formation evaluation to be integrated with drill-stem tests and wireline logs. Generally, the most important characteristics of a reservoir are porosity, permeability, and petroleum saturation. All three styles of formation evaluation (mud logs, wireline logs, and drill-stem tests) can determine most of these characteristics either qualitatively or quantitatively. The mud log, through hydrocarbon ratio analysis in conjunction with the drilling time log, can contribute at least ballpark estimates on porosity, permeability, and type of reservoir fluid. Wireline logs and drill-stem tests provide the more direct or quantitative measure of these formation characteristics. The central/western Kansas wells chosen for this study show that no single formation evaluation method is more important than the others. Each method must be weighed or calibrated to each specific study area as to its particular track record in that area. The difficulty in answering the question, Should I set pipe therefore can be minimized by integrating the mud log, the wireline log, and drill-stem test information.

Deboer, D.A. (Oil Production Systems, Inc., Cushing, OK (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Coating thickness measurement by XRF in vacuum strip steel metallizing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devised for use in vacuum equipment of PVD strip steel coaters is a multichannel counting technique for the continuous XRF measurement of the coating thickness. This XRF coating thickness gage is used in a batch-type strip steel coater. It measures the thickness of single-side, double-side and alloy coatings (element contents included). The new XRF method operates without etalons. It is also possible to measure adjacent elements in the periodic law of chemical elements without difficulty. With only minor deviations from the nominal value the new XRF measuring system allows to keep the coating thickness practically constant.

Wenzel, D. [Von Ardenne Anlagentechnik GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Esche, H.J.; Pilz, J. [Amtec AnalysenmeBtechnik GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Thick-Target Neutron Yield from the 19F(alpha,n) Reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thick-target neutron yields from the 19F(alpha,n) reaction are reported for E(alpha) = 3.5 - 10.0 MeV.

E. B. Norman; T. E. Chupp; K. T. Lesko; G. L. Woodruff; P. J. Grant

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antarctica (MOA) image map: Digital media, National Snow andmodel of Antarctica: Digital media, National Snow and IceThickness, 2009–2011: Digital media, NASA Distributed Active

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Application of a generalized methodology for quantitative thermal diffusivity depth profile reconstruction in manufactured inhomogeneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of a generalized methodology for quantitative thermal diffusivity depth profile of the thermal diffusivity of inhomogeneous solids. In the depth profile reconstruction algorithm three channels Institute of Physics. S0021-8979 98 04305-9 I. INTRODUCTION Thermal diffusivity which depends

Mandelis, Andreas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal radiometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal-thermal model to evaluate the use of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for depth profiling of port wine the desired effect. A diagnostic measurement of the distribution of laser energy deposition and ensuing

Choi, Bernard

282

On the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In nite Depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

function which satis#12;ed the correct kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions for water waves of steady water waves on ows with #12;nite depth. The inde- pendent variable was a periodic functionOn the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In#12;nite Depth J.F. Toland 1 Background

Bath, University of

283

Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements Seema C. Shah sediment load calculations on the basis of depth-integrated sediment concentration measurements for channels with significant sediment transport in suspension. The series expansion of the modified Einstein

Julien, Pierre Y.

284

Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1002, U.S.A. ABSTRACT. A lightweight, portable drilling system for coring up to 500 m depths has been developed and field-tested. The drilling system includes four major components

Howat, Ian M.

285

Spectroscopic photothermal radiometry as a deep subsurface depth profilometric technique in semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspects for three-dimensional infrared PTR for a strongly absorbed incident radiation have been optical penetration depth is presented. Numerical simulations of the PTR response to the electronic transport parameters and the optical penetration depth of the excitation source are presented. Intensity

Mandelis, Andreas

286

Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-surface structures and damage in materials, well beyond the optical penetration depth of illu- mination sources, iLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail and Manufacturing Ontario, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ont, Canada M5S 3G8 Abstract Laser Infrared Photothermal

Mandelis, Andreas

287

Discussion of "Location-Scale Depth" by I. Mizera and C. H. Muller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the distance from zi (or any monotonic function of the distance) recovers the classical no- tion of Tukey depth to Tukey depth in hyperbolic space School of Information & Computer Science, Univ. of California, Irvine. By standard techniques for modeling hyperbolic space in Euclidean spaces, all the previous machinery of Tukey

Eppstein, David

288

Ecient computation of location depth contours by methods of computational geometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the center of the deepest contour is called the Tukey median. The only available implemented algorithms for the depth contours and the Tukey median are slow, which limits their usefulness. In this paper we describe practice. Keywords: Bagplot, Bivariate Median, Graphical Display, Robust Estimation, Tukey Depth 1

Souvaine, Diane

289

A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

Kulp, Mark

290

Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district] Peat deposits contain on the order of 1/6 of the Earth's terrestrial fixed carbon (C), but uncertainty in peat depth precludes precise estimates of peat C storage. To assess peat C in the Northern Highlands

Turner, Monica G.

291

Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

Ashworth, Stephen H.

292

Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface mobility-Hames, and Thomas P. Quinn Abstract: Bed scour, egg pocket depths, and alteration of stream-bed surfaces by spawning chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) were measured in two Pacific Northwest gravel-bedded streams. Close

Montgomery, David R.

293

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

294

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Smoluchowski Coagulation Models Of Sea Ice Thickness1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with thickness. This tail characterises the range of ice thickness produced4 by mechanical redistribution of ice Of Sea Ice Thickness1 Distribution Dynamics2 D. Godlovitch,1 R. Illner,2 and A. Monahan,1 D. Godlovitch ICE Abstract. Sea ice thickness distributions display a ubiquitous exponential de-3 crease

Illner, Reinhard

295

High-resolution estimates of lithospheric thickness from Missouri to Massachusetts, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional (3-D) model, NA00, of the S-velocity of the upper mantle beneath North America. The model differs. The seismic lithosphere is 180 km thick below Missouri and Illinois, 200 km thick below Indiana, Ohio by fitting the waveforms of broadband seismic S and surface waves recorded by the MOMA array and inverting

van der Lee, Suzan

296

Parabolic equation solution of seismo-acoustics problems involving variations in bathymetry and sediment thickness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sediment thickness Jon M. Collisa and William L. Siegmann Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute110 8th Street within elastic sediment layers. When these methods are implemented together, the parabolic equation method can be applied to problems involving variations in bathymetry and the thickness of sediment layers

297

Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness Jacqueline A the Ice Mass Balance buoy (IMB) in response to the need for monitoring changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover. The IMB is an autonomous, ice-based system. IMB buoys provide a time series of ice

Geiger, Cathleen

298

Ultrasonic thickness measurements on corroded steel members: a statistical analysis of error  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with measuring the wall thickness of a corroded tubular member and 2) determining how the strength calculations are affected by an error in a wall thickness measurement. This thesis is based on the first phase of a research project funded by Mineral Management...

Konen, Keith Forman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

UTL CONSOLIDATION AND OUT-OF-AUTOCLAVE CURING OF THICK COMPOSITE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 M00-022 UTL CONSOLIDATION AND OUT-OF-AUTOCLAVE CURING OF THICK COMPOSITE STRUCTURES John Player fabrication of complex composite structures, but significant thickness reduction may occur during cure due fiber/Hexcel 8552 thermoset prepreg. KEY WORDS: Composite Structures, Cure Modeling, Ultrasonics

Roylance, David

300

An Affordable Approach for Robust Design of Thick Laminated Composite Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Affordable Approach for Robust Design of Thick Laminated Composite Structure Wei Chen* Assistant of thick laminated composite structures. Our approach integrates the principles of the Robust Concept-level optimization procedure for managing the complexity of composite structure optimization. Foundational

Chen, Wei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coating of a stainless steel tube-wall catalytic reactor with thermally treated polysiloxane thick films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coating of a stainless steel tube-wall catalytic reactor with thermally treated polysiloxane thick stainless steel by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition process. Thicknesses up to 10µm were developed glass-like silicon oxide but cannot be related to an amorphous silica structure. At 1273K the steel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

302

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before

Kudrolli, Arshad

303

Optimal phosphor thickness for portal imaging Jean-Pierre Bissonnette 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal phosphor thickness for portal imaging Jean-Pierre Bissonnette 1 a), 2 b) London Regional this approach to determine which of eight phosphor screen thicknesses ranging between 67 and 947 mg/cm2 modest improvements in the indices of image quality for phosphor screens thicker than 350­400 mg/cm2

Cunningham, Ian

304

2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for Wind as wind blade size has increased. Typical blade joints use paste adhesives several millimeters thick aircraft, which are also of relevance to wind blades in many instances. The strengths of lap-shear and many

305

Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M. [Departament d'Estructura i Conastituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano , Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Katedra Fizyki Teoretycznej, Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skodowskiej ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

FLUORESCENCE AND FIBER-OPTICS BASED REAL-TIME THICKNESS SENSOR FOR DYNAMIC LIQUID FILMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/analyzed the incident reflected waves to identify and measure the total transit time of the sound wave (of known wave-speed1 FLUORESCENCE AND FIBER-OPTICS BASED REAL-TIME THICKNESS SENSOR FOR DYNAMIC LIQUID FILMS T. W. Ng/disadvantages of many known liquid film thickness sensing devices (viz. conductivity probes, reflectance based fiber

Narain, Amitabh

307

On the effective plate thickness of monolayer graphene from flexural wave propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the effective plate thickness of monolayer graphene from flexural wave propagation Sung Youb Kim utilize classical molecular dynamics to study flexural, or transverse wave propagation in monolayer) mode of wave propagation in a thin plate with plate thickness of h ÂĽ 0:104 nm. Finally, we find

Lin, Xi

308

A Method for Quantitative Mapping of Thick Oil Spills Using Imaging Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................................................................14 Figures 1. Image of oil emulsion from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico offA Method for Quantitative Mapping of Thick Oil Spills Using Imaging Spectroscopy By Roger N. Clark (AVIRIS) Team, 2010, A method for quantitative mapping of thick oil spills using imaging spectroscopy: U

Torgersen, Christian

309

Effective elastic thickness of South America and its implications for intracontinental deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective elastic thickness of South America and its implications for intracontinental deformation. Within cratonic South America, Te variations are observed at regional scale: relatively lower Te occurs.y. Components: 13,516 words, 8 figures. Keywords: elastic thickness; South America; lithospheric structure

Watts, A. B. "Tony"

310

Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover is an important environmental factor affecting physical and biological processes in the coastal region of the Great Lakes. However, computerized ice thickness data along the shores of the Great

311

MCM LTER METADATA FILE TITLE: Lake ice thickness in the McMurdo Dry Valleys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MCM LTER METADATA FILE TITLE: Lake ice thickness in the McMurdo Dry Valleys ABSTRACT: Ice thickness was measured from the bottom of the ice cover to the piezometric water level and to the top of the ice cover-2360 achiuchiolo@montana.edu VARIABLES: Location Name, Location Code, Limno Run, Collection Date, z-water, z-ice, z

Priscu, John C.

312

An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in inconsistent proportions of metal and glassy phase particles present during the subsequent firing process. The consequences were subtle, intermittent changes to the thick film microstructure that gave rise to the reaction layer and, thus, the low pull strength phenomenon. A mitigation strategy would be the use of physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques to create thin film bond pads; this is multi-chip module, deposited (MCM-D) technology.

Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Agreement Between Local and Global Measurements of the London Penetration Depth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements of the superconducting penetration depth in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} appeared to disagree on the magnitude and curvature of {delta}{lambda}{sub ab}(T), even near optimal doping. These measurements were carried out on different samples grown by different groups. To understand the discrepancy, we use scanning SQUID susceptometry and a tunnel diode resonator to measure the penetration depth in a single sample. The penetration depth observed by the two techniques is identical with no adjustments. We conclude that any discrepancies arise from differences between samples, either in growth or crystal preparation.

Lippman, Thomas M.; Kalisky, Beena; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Moler, Kathryn A.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartmentDepartmentalDeploymentDepthDepth

316

Potential-well depth at amorphous-LaAlO{sub 3}/crystalline-SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces measured by optical second harmonic generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By a combination of optical second harmonic generation and transport measurements, we have investigated interfaces formed by either crystalline or amorphous thin films of LaAlO{sub 3} grown on TiO{sub 2}-terminated SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates. Our approach aims at disentangling the relative role of intrinsic and extrinsic doping mechanisms in the formation of the two-dimensional electron gas. The different nature of the two mechanisms is revealed when comparing the sample response variation as a function of temperature during annealing in air. However, before the thermal treatment, the two types of interfaces show almost the same intensity of the second harmonic signal, provided the overlayer thickness is the same. As we will show, the second harmonic signal is proportional to the depth of the potential well confining the charges at the interface. Therefore, our result demonstrates that this depth is about the same for the two different material systems. This conclusion supports the idea that the electronic properties of the two-dimensional electron gas are almost independent of the doping mechanism of the quantum well.

De Luca, Gabriele; Rubano, Andrea; Gennaro, Emiliano di; Khare, Amit; Granozio, Fabio Miletto; Uccio, Umberto Scotti di; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Paparo, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.paparo@spin.cnr.it [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŕ di Napoli “Federico II,” Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, v. Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15??m thick. Using a 0.1?mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1?mg/cm{sup 2} thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

Mueller, D., E-mail: dmueller@pppl.gov; Roquemore, A. L.; Jaworski, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Miller, J.; Creely, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Raman, P.; Ruzic, D. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, Center for Plasma Material Interaction, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development of a dual-porosity model for vapor-dominated fractured geothermal reservoirs using a semi-analytical fracture/matrix interaction term  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of dual-porosity model is being developed to simulate two-phase flow processes in fractured geothermal reservoirs. At this time it is assumed that the liquid phase in the matrix blocks remains immobile. By utilizing the effective compressibility of a two-phase water/steam mixture in a porous rock, flow within the matrix blocks can be modeled by a single diffusion equation. This equation in turn is replaced by a non-linear ordinary differential equation that utilizes the mean pressure and mean saturation in the matrix blocks to calculate the rate of fluid flow between the matrix blocks and fractures. This equation has been incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH to serve as a source/sink term for computational gridblocks that represent the fracture system. The new method has been compared with solutions obtained using fully-discretized matrix blocks, on a problem involving a three-dimensional vapor-dominated reservoir containing an injection and a production well, and has been found to be quite accurate.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid...

320

Depth inversion for nonlinear waves shoaling over a barred-beach 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and calibrated for mild slopes are applied to the barred-beach. Expectedly, errors on depth prediction occur techniques such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), are still quite problematic under the current state

Grilli, Stéphan T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

322

Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 2. Prediction of bioluminescent source depth from spectral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a passive method (as opposed to active methods such as RADAR or LIDAR) to identify hostile ships, submarines this relative importance [Nealson, 1993]. Therefore the depth distribution of bioluminescent organisms is of eco

Moline, Mark

323

Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and productivity (sustainability) of trees within terrestrial ecosystems. Tree planting depth, i.e. location of the root collar relative to soil grade, is of particular concern for tree growth, development, and performance in the landscape. A series of model...

Bryan, Donita Lynn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Shear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table earthquake site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 6 Summary of seismic refraction/reflection methodsShear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table ­ earthquake site response measurements for Valley County, Idaho Lee M. Liberty and Gabriel M. Gribler, Boise State University Center

Barrash, Warren

325

Partnering: an in-depth comparison of its elements to quality improvement principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIIrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Approved as to style and content by: Donald A...

Lozada, Anthony David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

ORIGIN OF CHEMICAL AND DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We adopt a scenario in which the Galactic thick disk was formed by minor merging between the first generation of the Galactic thin disk (FGTD) and a dwarf galaxy about {approx}9 Gyr ago and thereby investigate chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk. In this scenario, the dynamical properties of the thick disk have long been influenced both by the mass growth of the second generation of the Galactic thin disk (i.e., the present thin disk) and by its non-axisymmetric structures. On the other hand, the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the thin disk was influenced by the remaining gas of the thick disk. Based on N-body simulations and chemical evolution models, we investigate the radial metallicity gradient, structural and kinematical properties, and detailed chemical abundance patterns of the thick disk. Our numerical simulations show that the ancient minor merger event can significantly flatten the original radial metallicity gradient of the FGTD, in particular, in the outer part, and also can be responsible for migration of inner metal-rich stars into the outer part (R > 10 kpc). The simulations show that the central region of the thick disk can develop a bar due to dynamical effects of a separate bar in the thin disk. Whether or not rotational velocities (V{sub {phi}}) can correlate with metallicities ([Fe/H]) for the simulated thick disks depends on the initial metallicity gradients of the FGTDs. The simulated orbital eccentricity distributions in the thick disk for models with higher mass ratios ({approx}0.2) and lower orbital eccentricities ({approx}0.5) of minor mergers are in good agreement with the corresponding observations. The simulated V{sub {phi}}-|z| relation of the thick disk in models with low orbital inclination angles of mergers are also in good agreement with the latest observational results. The vertical metallicity gradient of the simulated thick disk is rather flat or very weakly negative in the solar neighborhood. Our Galactic chemical evolution models show that if we choose two distinctive timescales for star formation in the thin and thick disks, then the models can explain both the observed metallicity distribution functions and correlations between [Mg/Fe] and [Fe/H] for the two disks in a self-consistent manner. We discuss how the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the Galactic thin disk can be influenced by the pre-existing thick disk.

Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Measuring Tail Thickness under GARCH and an Application to Extremal Exchange Rate Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relations and Extremes of a GARCH(1,1) Process, Annals ofMeasuring Tail Thickness under GARCH And an Application todistribution functions including GARCH and propose a model-

Wagner, Niklas; Marsh, Terry A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Thickness Measurement of Fracture Fluid Gel Filter Cake after Static Build Up and Shear Erosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Despite proven economic benefit, the hydraulic fracture fluid damages the producing formation and the propped fracture. To analyze the gel damage effect quantitatively, the filter cake thickness is used as a parameter that has not been measured before...

Xu, Ben

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Analysis of Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness: A Newly Created Database for 2000-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of Antarctic sea ice thickness are sporadic in space and time, hindering knowledge of its variability. A proxy based on stage of development data from the National Ice Center (NIC) weekly operational charts is used to create a high...

Morgan, Benjamin Patrick

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

331

Coextruded Polyethylene and Wood-Flour Composite: Effect of Shell Thickness, Wood Loading, and Core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coextruded Polyethylene and Wood-Flour Composite: Effect of Shell Thickness, Wood Loading, and Core recycled polyethylene and wood-flour composites with core­shell structure were manufactured using a pilot

332

A determination of the effective thickness of a liquid deuterium target for a quasielastic scattering experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effective thickness of a liquid deuterium target was determined by measuring the yield of the neutron-deuteron elastic scattering cross section. The flux of incident neutrons was determined by a fission ionization ...

Turkewitz, Jared Ripley

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum alloy thick Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aluminum alloy thick Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Introduction Within the course of the last two years...

334

Thick and Thin Film Polymer CNT Nanocomposites for Thermoelectric Energy Conversion and Transparent Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thick and Thin Film Polymer ­ CNT Nanocomposites for Thermoelectric Energy Conversion gradient. Thermoelectric materials harvest electricity from waste heat or any temperature gradient]. The PDDA/(SWNT+DOC) system produced transparent (> 82% visible light transmittance) and electrically

Fisher, Frank

335

Infrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth profilometry, and scanning imaging of deep subsurface electronic defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sorption of the incident beam and nonradiative heating. The PCR theory is presented as infrared depthInfrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth May 2003 Laser-induced infrared photocarrier radiometry PCR is introduced theoretically

Mandelis, Andreas

336

Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters, J

Strathclyde, University of

337

Thickness estimation of subsurface layers in asphalt pavement using monstatic ground penetrating radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THICKNESS ESTIMATION OF SUBSURFACE LAYERS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT USING MONSTATIC GROUND PENETRATING RADAR A Thesis CHUN LOK LAU Approved as to style and content by... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. LIST OF FIGURES. . CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. 1. 1 Importance of pavement profile data. 1. 2 Principle of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) . . . 1. 3 Subsurface layer thickness measurement method. . . . . . II GPR ANTENNA AND SYSTEM CALIBRATION...

Lau, Chun Lok

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

Hoffman, E.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ceramic thick film humidity sensor based on MgTiO{sub 3} + LiF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The fabricated sensor based on MgTiO{sub 3} + LiF materials used the spin coating technology. • The response time is 70 s to detect variation between 5 and 95% relative humidity. • The addition of Scleroglucan controls the viscosity and decreases the roughness of thick film surface. • This humidity sensor is a promising, low-cost, high-quality, reliable ceramic films, that is highly sensitive to humidity. - Abstract: The feasibility of humidity sensor, consisting of a thick layer of MgTiO{sub 3}/LiF materials on alumina substrate, was studied. The thermal analysis TGA-DTGA and dilatometric analysis worked out to confirm the sintering temperature. An experimental plan was applied to describe the effects of different parameters in the development of the thick film sensor. Structural and microstructural characterizations of the developed thick film were made. Rheological study with different amounts of a thickener (scleroglucan “sclg”), showing the behavior variation, as a function of sclg weight % was illustrated and rapprochement with the results of thickness variation as a function of angular velocity applied in the spin coater. The electrical and dielectric measurements confirmed the sensitivity of the elaborated thick film against moisture, along with low response time.

Kassas, Ahmad, E-mail: a.kassas.mcema@ul.edu.lb [Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Materials, Catalysis, Environment and Analytical Methods (MCEMA), Faculty of Sciences and Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology (EDST), Lebanese University, Hariri Campus, Hadath, Beirut (Lebanon); Laboratoire Universitaire des Sciences Appliquées de Cherbourg (LUSAC), 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Bernard, Jérôme; Leličvre, Céline; Besq, Anthony; Guhel, Yannick; Houivet, David; Boudart, Bertrand [Laboratoire Universitaire des Sciences Appliquées de Cherbourg (LUSAC), 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Lakiss, Hassan [Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Materials, Catalysis, Environment and Analytical Methods (MCEMA), Faculty of Sciences and Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology (EDST), Lebanese University, Hariri Campus, Hadath, Beirut (Lebanon); Faculty of Engineering, Section III, Hariri Campus, Hadath, Beirut (Lebanon); Hamieh, Tayssir [Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Materials, Catalysis, Environment and Analytical Methods (MCEMA), Faculty of Sciences and Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology (EDST), Lebanese University, Hariri Campus, Hadath, Beirut (Lebanon)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sandia National Laboratories: controlled porosity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Releasehy-drogenmaterial elements Combiningcontrolled

342

Porosity, single-phase permeability, and capillary pressure data from preliminary laboratory experiments on selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 3 of 3: Appendices C, D, E, and F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the mineralogy, porosity, and permeability results from the Marker Bed 139 anhydrite specimens evaluated by TerraTek, Inc. for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This volume also documents the brine recipe used by RE/SPEC, Inc., the parameter package submitted to Performance Assessment based on all the data, and a memo on the mixed Brooks and Corey two-phase characteristic curves.

Howarth, S.M.; Christian-Frear, T.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

OUTPUT-SENSITIVE ALGORITHMS FOR TUKEY DEPTH AND RELATED PROBLEMS David Bremner Dan Chen John Iacono Stefan Langerman Pat Morin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OUTPUT-SENSITIVE ALGORITHMS FOR TUKEY DEPTH AND RELATED PROBLEMS David Bremner Dan Chen John Iacono Stefan Langerman Pat Morin ABSTRACT. The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p with respect to a finite p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions are considered

Bremner, David

344

Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

Allison, L.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Quantification of depth of anesthesia by nonlinear time series analysis of brain electrical activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate several quantifiers of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal with respect to their ability to indicate depth of anesthesia. For 17 patients anesthetized with Sevoflurane, three established measures (two spectral and one based on the bispectrum), as well as a phase space based nonlinear correlation index were computed from consecutive EEG epochs. In absence of an independent way to determine anesthesia depth, the standard was derived from measured blood plasma concentrations of the anesthetic via a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for the estimated effective brain concentration of Sevoflurane. In most patients, the highest correlation is observed for the nonlinear correlation index D*. In contrast to spectral measures, D* is found to decrease monotonically with increasing (estimated) depth of anesthesia, even when a "burst-suppression" pattern occurs in the EEG. The findings show the potential for applications of concepts derived from the theory of nonlinear dynamics, even if little can be assumed about the process under investigation.

G. Widman; T. Schreiber; B. Rehberg; A. Hoeft; C. E. Elger

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

Master1RservoirsGologiquesDynamiquedesBassins-MichelSranne Post-depositional evolution of sedimentary basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) with increasing compaction => fabric Bennet, 1981 Compaction => porosity loss with depth increasingcompaction

Demouchy, Sylvie

349

Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

350

Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartmentDepartmentalDeployment ofDepth

352

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartmentDepartmentalDeploymentDepth

353

Instruments and Methods Intermediate-depth ice coring of high-altitude and polar glaciers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an electromechanical drill (EMD) and an ethanol thermal electric drill (ETED). The EMD permitted an average ice in cold and temperate ice and in clean and particle-laden ice. The influence of the ethanol drilling fluid- arctica, 2000) and an ethanol thermal electric drill (ETED; Zagorodnov and others, 1998)). Ice thicknesses

Howat, Ian M.

354

Extraplanar Dust: a Tracer of Cold Dense Gas in the Thick Disks of Spiral Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interstellar thick disks of galaxies contain not only gas, but significant quantities of dust. Most of our knowledge of extraplanar dust in disk galaxies comes from direct broadband optical imaging of these systems, wherein the dust is identified due to the irregular extinction it produces against the thick disk and bulge stars. This observational technique is sensitive to only the most dense material, and we argue much of the material identified in this way traces a cold phase of the interstellar thick disks in galaxies. The presence of a cold, dense phase likely implies the interstellar pressures in the thick disks of spiral galaxies can be quite high. This dense phase of the interstellar medium may also fueling thick disk star formation, and H-alpha observations are now revealing H II regions around newly-formed OB stars associations in several galaxies. We argue that the large quantities of dust and the morphologies of the structures traced by the dust imply that much of the extraplanar material in disk galaxies must have been expelled from the underlying thin disk.

J. Christopher Howk

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Thick adherent dielectric films on plastic substrates and method for depositing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thick adherent dielectric films deposited on plastic substrates for use as a thermal barrier layer to protect the plastic substrates from high temperatures which, for example, occur during laser annealing of layers subsequently deposited on the dielectric films. It is desirable that the barrier layer has properties including: a thickness of 1 .mu.m or greater, adheres to a plastic substrate, does not lift-off when cycled in temperature, has few or no cracks and does not crack when subjected to bending, resistant to lift-off when submersed in fluids, electrically insulating and preferably transparent. The thick barrier layer may be composed, for example, of a variety of dielectrics and certain metal oxides, and may be deposited on a variety of plastic substrates by various known deposition techniques. The key to the method of forming the thick barrier layer on the plastic substrate is maintaining the substrate cool during deposition of the barrier layer. Cooling of the substrate maybe accomplished by the use of a cooling chuck on which the plastic substrate is positioned, and by directing cooling gas, such as He, Ar and N.sub.2, between the plastic substrate and the cooling chucks. Thick adherent dielectric films up to about 5 .mu.m have been deposited on plastic substrates which include the above-referenced properties, and which enable the plastic substrates to withstand laser processing temperatures applied to materials deposited on the dielectric films.

Wickboldt, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Fremont, CA); Theiss, Steven D. (Woodbury, MN); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Thickness measurement system for transparent plates using dual digital versatile disc (DVD) pickups  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low-cost high-precision thickness measurement system for transparent plates that uses dual digital versatile disc (DVD) pickups is proposed. The two DVD pickups are used as the transmitter and the receiver in the measurement system, respectively. One of the DVD pickups emits a laser to the other DVD pickup (receiver) and projects on the photodiode integrated circuit of the receiver. The transparent plate is placed in the optical path to change the focused point that will affect the focusing error signal (FES) of the receiver. Using the FES, a mathematical model for thickness measurement based on the geometric optical method is developed. The experimental results show that the accuracy is 1.5 {mu}m, and the uncertainty is estimated to be {+-}1.37 {mu}m for the measured thickness of 150{mu}m.

Liu, Chien-Hung; Yeh, Shien-Chang; Huang, Hsueh-Liang

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Permeability-thickness determination from transient production response at the southeast geysers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fetkovich production decline curve analysis method was extended for application to vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs for the purpose of estimating the permeability-thickness product (kh) from the transient production response. The analytic dimensionless terms for pressure, production rate, decline rate, and decline time were derived for saturated steam using the real gas potential and customary geothermal production units of pounds-mass per hour. The derived terms were numerically validating using ``Geysers-line`` reservoir properties at initial water saturation of 0 and at permeabilities of 1, 10, and 100 mD. The production data for 48 wells in the Southeast Geysers were analyzed and the permeability-thickness products determined from the transient production response using the Fetkovich production decline type curve. The kh results were in very good agreement with the published range at the Southeast Geysers and show regions of high permeability-thickness.

Faulder, D.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral Carlos of the candelabrum coral Eunicea flexuosa across the Caribbean. Eunicea is endemic to the Caribbean and all sister: How can new marine species emerge without obvious geographic isolation? Caribbean coral reefs

Hellberg, Michael E.

359

Journal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of superconductivity is the diamagnetic response of a superconductor below its transition temperature To. The abilityJournal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in Cuprate Superconductors Steven M. AnlageI and Dong-Ho Wut Received 16 April 1992 We examine recent results

Anlage, Steven

360

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SHORE-BASED LOG PROCESSING Bottom felt: 4494 mbrf (used for depth shift to seafloor)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accurate compressional and shear veloc- ities. Quality Control During the processing, quality control to seafloor) Total penetration: 664 mbsf (drilled during DSDP Leg 45) Total core recovered: 106 m (18 old (reference curve) and new (match curve) shift depths. The total gamma-ray curve (SGR or HSGR) from

362

The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

363

Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations with a [ iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.1±0.0. Noat all depths with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0. Thiswith ethyl nitrate with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0.

Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed crust northeast China USArray a b s t r a c t We observe a clear seismic arrival at $35­45 s after

Niu, Fenglin

365

Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed February 2013 Keywords: S to P converted wave mid-mantle reflectors subducted oceanic crust northeast China

Niu, Fenglin

366

{sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Depth and controls of Ca-rhodochrosite precipitation in bioturbated sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depth and controls of Ca-rhodochrosite precipitation in bioturbated sediments of the Eastern Road, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9647, USA ABSTRACT The occurrence of early diagenetic Ca-rhodochrosite [(Mn,Ca)CO3] is reported in association with `griotte'-type nodular limestones from basinal settings

Gilli, Adrian

368

Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

Smith, K. Shafer

370

The E-utilities In-Depth: Parameters, Syntax and More Eric Sayers, PhD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The E-utilities In-Depth: Parameters, Syntax and More Eric Sayers, PhD NCBI sayers@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Introduction This chapter serves as a reference for all supported parameters for the E-utilities, along with accepted values and usage guidelines. This information is provided for each E-utility in sections below

Levin, Judith G.

371

Intermediate-depth Circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomous Floats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intermediate-depth Circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomous Floats of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, 306 autonomous floats were deployed in the tropical and South autonomous floats that are not acoustically tracked, but rather surface at regular intervals to be located by

Davis, Russ

372

Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems Omer. Motivated by database search problems such as partial match or nearest neighbor, we present secure between k poly log(s) parties who all know C, we obtain a secure protocol for evaluating C(x) using O

Shpilka, Amir

373

Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems ? Omer. Motivated by database search problems such as partial match or nearest neighbor, we present secure distributed between k #21; poly log(s) parties who all know C, we obtain a secure protocol for evaluating C

Ishai, Yuval

374

Probabilistic models and reliability analysis of scour depth around bridge piers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters suggest that the maximum sour depth predicted by the deterministic HEC-18 Sand and HEC-18 Clay models tend to be conservative. Evidence is also found that the applicability of the HEC-18 Clay method is not limited to clay but can also be used...

Bolduc, Laura Christine

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

3D MODEL RETRIEVAL BASED ON DEPTH LINE DESCRIPTOR Mohamed Chaouch and Anne Verroust-Blondet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D MODEL RETRIEVAL BASED ON DEPTH LINE DESCRIPTOR Mohamed Chaouch and Anne Verroust-Blondet INRIA.verroust}@inria.fr. ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose a novel 2D/3D approach for 3D model matching and retrieving. Each model information provides a more accurate description of 3D shape boundaries than using other 2D shape descriptors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

3D VIDEO QUALITY EVALUATION WITH DEPTH QUALITY VARIATIONS Gustavo Leon, Hari Kalva, and Borko Furht  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D VIDEO QUALITY EVALUATION WITH DEPTH QUALITY VARIATIONS Gustavo Leon, Hari Kalva, and Borko Furht on 3D video perception on autostereoscopic displays. This study was done using objective as well image quality and compression on the perceived 3D experience. Another objective is to evaluate the use

Kalva, Hari

377

Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison of time and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 5 King's College induced in light-absorbing materials can be observed either as a transient signal in time domain

Mandelis, Andreas

378

Integrating Kinect Depth Data with a Stochastic Object Classification Framework for Forestry Robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Kinect Depth Data with a Stochastic Object Classification Framework for Forestry Robots camera for a stochastic classification system for forestry robots. The images are classified as bush- ject classification system that uses only RGB camera. The system is aimed for a forestry robot

Hellström, Thomas

379

Energy-Based 6-DOF Penetration Depth Computation for Penalty-Based Haptic Rendering Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Based 6-DOF Penetration Depth Computation for Penalty-Based Haptic Rendering Algorithms Maxim Kolesnikov and Milos Zefran Abstract-- Existing penalty-based haptic rendering ap- proaches of rigid-body motions SE(3). We propose a penalty-based six-degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) haptic rendering

Zefran, Milo?

380

IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mexico 2 Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Center for Advanced Diffusion experimental data.8­13 Some of those methods in- volve a judiciously structured functional form, several algorithms to invert the depth pro- files have been applied, using an inverse procedure to find

Mandelis, Andreas

382

CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH are used for the transport of drinking water. However, disinfectants in water seem to have a strong impact for the distribution of drinking water. HDPE pipes are exposed to an internal pressure due to water flow. Furthermore

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

383

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

Southampton, University of

384

Estimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-independent estimate of the total heat output of Cenozoic seafloor is 18.6 to 20.5 TW, which leads to a global output: Oceanic heat flow; Global heat budget; Subsidence rate 1. Introduction The total heat output of the EarthEstimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data Meng Wei , David

Sandwell, David T.

385

Vertically Loaded Anchor: Drag Coefficient, Fall Velocity, and Penetration Depth using Laboratory Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anchor point. Values such as drag coefficient and terminal velocity are vital in predicting embedment depth to obtain the mooring capacity required by the floating facility. Two scaled models of the Mark I OMNI-Max anchor were subjected to a series...

Cenac, William

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

Henderson, Gideon

387

The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 Ă? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

Battisti, David

388

Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean´veloppement, La Paz, Bolivia Received 24 April 2002; revised 6 June 2002; accepted 6 June 2002; published 10 the equilibrium line of the Zongo glacier (2.4 km2 ), Bolivia (16°S). Study of the influence of wind, air

Berthier, Etienne

389

Physicochemical controls on absorbed water film thickness in unsaturated geological media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorbed water films commonly coat mineral surfaces in unsaturated soils and rocks, reducing flow and transport rates. Therefore, it is important to understand how adsorbed film thickness depends on matric potential, surface chemistry, and solution chemistry. Here, the problem of adsorbed water film thickness is examined through combining capillary scaling with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Novel aspects of this analysis include determining capillary influences on film thicknesses, and incorporating solution chemistry-dependent electrostatic potential at air-water interfaces. Capillary analysis of monodisperse packings of spherical grains provided estimated ranges of matric potentials where adsorbed films are stable, and showed that pendular rings within drained porous media retain most of the 'residual' water except under very low matric potentials. Within drained pores, capillary contributions to thinning of adsorbed films on spherical grains are shown to be small, such that DLVO calculations for flat surfaces are suitable approximations. Hamaker constants of common soil minerals were obtained to determine ranges of the dispersion component to matric potential-dependent film thickness. The pressure component associated with electrical double layer forces was estimated using the compression and linear superposition approximations. The pH-dependent electrical double layer pressure component is the dominant contribution to film thicknesses at intermediate values of matric potential, especially in lower ionic strength solutions (< 10 mol m{sup -3}) on surfaces with higher magnitude electrostatic potentials (more negative than - 50 mV). Adsorbed water films are predicted to usually range in thickness from 1 to 20 nm in drained pores and fractures of unsaturated environments.

Tokunaga, T.

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Engineering guides for estimating cover material thickness and volume for uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five nomographs have been prepared that facilitate the estimation of cover thickness and cover material volume for the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action Program. Key parameters determined include the cover thickness with either a surface radon flux or a boundary radon air concentration criterion and the total volume of cover material required for two different treatments of the edge slopes. Also included in the engineering guide are descriptions and representative values for the radon source term, the diffusion coefficients and the key meteorological parameters. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Merrell, G.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thickness dependent exchange bias in martensitic epitaxial Ni-Mn-Sn thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thickness dependent exchange bias in the low temperature martensitic state of epitaxial Ni-Mn-Sn thin films is found. The effect can be retained down to very small thicknesses. For a Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 32}Sn{sub 18} thin film, which does not undergo a martensitic transformation, no exchange bias is observed. Our results suggest that a significant interplay between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic regions, which is the origin for exchange bias, is only present in the martensite. The finding is supported by ab initio calculations showing that the antiferromagnetic order is stabilized in the phase.

Behler, Anna [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany) [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics, Institute for Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Teichert, Niclas; Auge, Alexander; Hütten, Andreas [Department of Physics, Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Bielefeld University, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)] [Department of Physics, Thin Films and Physics of Nanostructures, Bielefeld University, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Dutta, Biswanath; Hickel, Tilmann [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Waske, Anja [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany)] [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany) [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Materials Science, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of minute hollow spherical shells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of hollow microspheres or shells wherein terminal velocities of shells traveling in fluid-filled conduits of differing diameters are measured. A wall-effect factor is determined as a ratio of the terminal velocities, and shell outside diameter may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of wall-effect factor. For shells of known outside diameter, wall thickness may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of terminal velocity in either conduit.

Steinman, D.A.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Is cartilage thickness different in young subjects with and without patellofemoral pain?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stanford, CA, USA { Rehabilitation R&D Center, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA Summary factor in the development of pain in the female population. ÂŞ 2006 OsteoArthritis Research Society in the osteoarthritic population21,24e26 . Cartilage thickness may also play a role in patellofemoral pain because

Delp, Scott

394

Processing Effects for Integrated PZT: Residual Stress, Thickness, and Dielectric Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing Effects for Integrated PZT: Residual Stress, Thickness, and Dielectric Properties Ryan J (PZT) films integrated onto Pt/Ti/SiO2//Si substrates are reported. Sol­gel synthesis and deposition orientation (nominally (111) fiber tex- tured), and measured residual stress. The Stoney method, using laser

Sottos, Nancy R.

395

Variation in hominoid molar enamel thickness Tanya M. Smith a,*, Anthony J. Olejniczak a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variation in hominoid molar enamel thickness Tanya M. Smith a,*, Anthony J. Olejniczak a , Lawrence; fax: C49 341 35 50 399. E-mail addresses: tsmith@eva.mpg.de (T.M. Smith), aolejnic@ic.sunysb.edu (A has been commonly assessed as a linear measurement of enamel visible in worn or naturally fractured

Smith, Tanya M.

396

Radar Measurements of Ice Sheet Thickness of Outlet Glaciers in Greenland D. Braaten+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radar Measurements of Ice Sheet Thickness of Outlet Glaciers in Greenland D. Braaten+ and S of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045 U.S.A. Abstract ­ We have conducted airborne measurements over the Greenland the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet, the University of Kansas has been operating an airborne radio

Kansas, University of

397

Evaluation of the Quality of Thick Fibre Composites Using Immersion and Air-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the Quality of Thick Fibre Composites Using Immersion and Air- Coupled Ultrasonic. Two ultrasonic through-transmission techniques were evaluated: immersion and air-coupled technique. The immersion system was used for frequencies from 1 MHz to 10 MHz. The frequency range for the air

398

Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250{degrees}C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250[degrees]C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Influence of Specimen Thickness on the High Temperature Corrosion Behavior of CMSX-4 during  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In order to quantify these effects, thin-walled specimens of different thickness (t = 100Ă?500 lm) were used for gas turbine blades due to its excellent mechanical properties combined with high-temperature oxidation resistance. In service, particular in the case of aero engines, the blades are exposed to thermal

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Terahertz Sensor for Non-Contact Thickness and Quality Measurement of Automobile Paints of Varying Complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to resolve coating layers down to a thickness of 18 $mu{hbox{m}}$ and was validated for both single- and multi-layer automobile paint samples. Results of the terahertz measurements were benchmarked against other techniques that are currently used for non...

Su, Ke; Shen, Yao-Chun; Zeitler, J. Axel

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

THE MOTION OF SUPERCONDUCTING VORTICES IN THIN FILMS OF VARYING THICKNESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with superconductor/vacuum interfaces is considered. A vortex is #12;rst shown to intersect such an interface normallyTHE MOTION OF SUPERCONDUCTING VORTICES IN THIN FILMS OF VARYING THICKNESS S.J. CHAPMAN #3; D.R. HERON y MATHEMATICAL INSTITUTE OXFORD OX1 3LB UK Abstract. The interaction of superconducting vortices

Chapman, Jon

403

Commercialization of thick film solar cell. Final technical report, 9/15/79-9/14/80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Films of cadmium sulfide and cadmium telluride have been produced by screen printing and sintering. Cadmium sulfide films ten microns thick had a resistivity in the 10 ohm-cm range. A technique was developed for forming a cadmium telluride layer on top of a cadmium sulfide layer. Process control and device preparation are areas requiring further study.

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Embedding metal electrodes in thick active layers for ITO-free plasmonic organic solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embedding metal electrodes in thick active layers for ITO-free plasmonic organic solar cells%) in optical absorption over both a conventional ITO organic solar cell and a conventional plasmonic organic solar cell with top-loaded metallic grating is predicted in the proposed structure. Optimal positioning

Park, Namkyoo

406

Effects of nanoscale thickness and elastic nonlinearity on measured mechanical properties of polymeric films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of polymeric films B. Oommen, K.J. Van Vliet Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts the mechanical properties of nanoscale, compliant material volumes such as polymeric films and bio materials of semi-infinite thickness fails to accurately predict the nominal elastic modulus E for polymeric

Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

407

INVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

routinely produced weekly ice charts since the 1970's. From the period of 1995 to 2000, classificationINVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg P1.23 1. INTRODUCTION A number of studies suggest a connections between sea-ice variability

Geiger, Cathleen

408

Light Trapping Textures Designed by Electromagnetic Optimization for Sub-Wavelength Thick Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light Trapping Textures Designed by Electromagnetic Optimization for Sub-Wavelength Thick Solar Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July 23, 2013 Abstract Light trapping in solar the surface of the solar cell, where n is the material refractive index. This ray-optics absorption

California at Irvine, University of

409

Characterization of thick 4H-SiC hot-wall CVD layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epitaxial 4H-SiC layers suitable for high power devices have been grown in a hot-wall chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) system. These layers were subsequently characterized for many parameters important in device development and production. The uniformity of both thickness and doping is presented. Doping trends vs. temperature and growth rate is shown for the p-type dopant used. The n-type dopant drops in concentration with increasing temperature or increasing growth rate. In contrast, the p-type dopant increases in concentration with decreasing temperature or increasing growth rate. A simple descriptive model for this behavior is presented. The outcome from capacitance-voltage and SIMS measurements demonstrate that transitions from n to n{sup {minus}}, or p to p{sup {minus}}, and even n to p levels can be made quickly without adjustment to growth conditions. The ability to produce sharp transitions without process changes avoids degrading the resulting surface morphology or repeatability of the process. Avoiding process changes is particularly important in growth of thick layers since surface roughness tends to increase with layer thickness. Device results from diodes producing two different blocking voltages in excess of 5 kV is also shown. The higher voltage diodes exhibited a breakdown behavior which was near the theoretical limit for the epitaxial layer thickness and doping level grown.

Paisley, M.J.; Irvine, K.G.; Kordina, O.; Singh, R.; Palmour, J.W.; Carter, C.H. Jr.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Sylvie PRETOT, this study concerns the LCA of an environmentally friendly material used for building construction, hemp construction materials, hemp concrete has a low impact on environment. Moreover, hemp concrete contributes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

411

Lanthanum silicate gate dielectric stacks with subnanometer equivalent oxide thickness utilizing an interfacial silica consumption reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lanthanum silicate gate dielectric stacks with subnanometer equivalent oxide thickness utilizing-8087 Received 13 April 2005; accepted 6 June 2005; published online 26 July 2005 A silicate reaction between process route to interface elimination, while producing a silicate dielectric with a higher temperature

Garfunkel, Eric

412

Improvement of radar ice-thickness measurements of Greenland outlet glaciers using SAR processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extensive aircraft-based radar ice-thickness measurements over the interior and outlet-glacier regions of the Greenland ice sheet have been obtained by the University of Kansas since 1993, with the latest airborne surveys conducted in May 2001...

Braaten, David A.; Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Namburi, Saikiran; Paden, John; Gurumoorthy, Krishna K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

1 Microscopic and environmental controls on the spacing and thickness of segregated 2 ice lenses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water, and ice conspire with the prevailing environmental conditions 52 to produce macroscopic ice by Henry (2000). The first comprehensive and tractable model 57 for ice lens growth was produced by O1 Microscopic and environmental controls on the spacing and thickness of segregated 2 ice lenses 3

Rempel, Alan W.

414

FLOW CONDITIONING DESIGN IN THICK LIQUID PROTECTION S.G. Durbin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

issuing downwards from nozzles of thickness (small dimension) = 1 cm into ambient air for Reynolds conditioner was studied. As the flow conditioning element immediately upstream of the nozzle inlet, fine, and that free-surface fluctuations are strongly affected by changes in flow conditioner design, even in the near

California at San Diego, University of

415

Forensic Anthropology Population Data Facial reconstruction: Soft tissue thickness values for South African black females  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forensic Anthropology Population Data Facial reconstruction: Soft tissue thickness values for South African black females D. Cavanagh, M. Steyn * Forensic Anthropology Research Centre, Department of Anatomy, University of Pretoria, P.O. Box 2034, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 1. Introduction Forensic facial

Frey, Pascal

416

Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Measurement of atmospheric production depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is possible to reconstruct a muon production depth distribution. We characterize the goodness of this reconstruction for zenith angles around 60 deg. and different energies of the primary particle. From these distributions we define X(mu)max as the depth along the shower axis where the production of muons reaches maximum. We explore the potentiality of X(mu)max as a useful observable to infer the mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Likewise, we assess its ability to constrain hadronic interaction models.

Pierre Auger Collaboration

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

417

Report on Analysis of Forest Floor Bulk Density and Depth at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forest floor data from the Savannah River Site consists of two layers, the litter layer and the duff layer. The purpose for the study was to determine bulk density conversion factors to convert litter and duff depth values in inches to forest floor fuel values in tons per acre. The primary objective was to collect litter and duff samples to adequately characterize forest floor depth and bulk density for combinations of 4 common forest types (loblolly/slash pine, longleaf pine, pine and hardwood mix, upland hardwood), 3 age classes (5-20, 20-40, 40+ years old) and 3 categories of burning history (0-3, 3-10, 10+ years since last burn).

Bernard R. Parresol

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files

420

Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damping of magnetic fields via ambipolar diffusion and decay of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in the post decoupling era heats the intergalactic medium (IGM). Collisional ionization weakly ionizes the IGM, producing an optical depth to scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The optical depth generated at $z\\gg 10$ does not affect the "reionization bump" of the CMB polarization power spectrum at low multipoles, but affects the temperature and polarization power spectra at high multipoles. Using the Planck 2013 temperature and lensing data together with the WMAP 9-year polarization data, we constrain the present-day field strength, $B_0$, smoothed over the damping length at the decoupling epoch as a function of the spectral index, $n_B$. We find the 95% upper bounds of $B_0<0.56$, 0.31, and 0.14 nG for $n_B=-2.9$, $-2.5$, and $-1.5$, respectively. For these spectral indices, the optical depth is dominated by dissipation of the decaying MHD turbulence that occurs shortly after the decou...

Kunze, Kerstin E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-4 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,132 m (3,713 ft bgs) below ground surface (bgs). The screened section of the well consists of alternating sections of slotted well screen and blank casing from 948 to 1,132 m bgs (3,111 to 3,713 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus in the well casing likely causes the calculated borehole flow rates being highly nonrepresentative of inflow from the formation. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

Phil L. Oberlander; Charles E. Russell

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Probing the electronic structure of graphene sheets with various thicknesses by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure of an aggregation of graphene sheets with various thicknesses was probed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. A uniform oxidation of the graphene sheets in the flat area was observed regardless of the thickness, while in the folded area the result could be strongly affected by the geometry. Moreover, thick parts of the aggregation showed strong angle-dependence to the incident X-ray, while thin parts showed less angle-dependence, which might be related to the surface wrinkles and ripples. The electronic structure differences due to the geometry and thickness suggest a complicated situation in the aggregation of graphene sheets.

Bai, Lili; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xuhui, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn; Zhong, Jun, E-mail: xhsun@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)] [Soochow University-Western University Centre for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

MAPPING THE STELLAR STRUCTURE OF THE MILKY WAY THICK DISK AND HALO USING SEGUE PHOTOMETRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We map the stellar structure of the Galactic thick disk and halo by applying color-magnitude diagram (CMD) fitting to photometric data from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) survey. The SEGUE imaging scans allow, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of Milky Way structure at both high and low latitudes using uniform Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry. Incorporating photometry of all relevant stars simultaneously, CMD fitting bypasses the need to choose single tracer populations. Using old stellar populations of differing metallicities as templates, we obtain a sparse three-dimensional map of the stellar mass distribution at |Z|>1 kpc. Fitting a smooth Milky Way model comprising exponential thin and thick disks and an axisymmetric power-law halo allows us to constrain the structural parameters of the thick disk and halo. The thick-disk scale height and length are well constrained at 0.75 {+-} 0.07 kpc and 4.1 {+-} 0.4 kpc, respectively. We find a stellar halo flattening within {approx}25 kpc of c/a = 0.88 {+-} 0.03 and a power-law index of 2.75 {+-} 0.07 (for 7 kpc {approx_lt}R{sub GC} {approx_lt} 30 kpc). The model fits yield thick-disk and stellar halo densities at the solar location of {rho}{sub thick,sun} = 10{sup -2.3{+-}0.1} M{sub sun} pc{sup -3} and {rho}{sub halo,sun} = 10{sup -4.20{+-}0.05} M{sub sun} pc{sup -3}, averaging over any substructures. Our analysis provides the first clear in situ evidence for a radial metallicity gradient in the Milky Way's stellar halo: within R {approx_lt} 15 kpc the stellar halo has a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] {approx_equal} -1.6, which shifts to [Fe/H] {approx_equal} -2.2 at larger radii, in line with the two-component halo deduced by Carollo et al. from a local kinematic analysis. Subtraction of the best-fit smooth and symmetric model from the overall density maps reveals a wealth of substructures at all latitudes, some attributable to known streams and overdensities, and some new. A simple warp cannot account for the low latitude substructure, as overdensities occur simultaneously above and below the Galactic plane.

De Jong, Jelte T. A.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Martin, Nicolas F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Yanny, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Beers, Timothy C., E-mail: dejong@mpia.d [Department of Physics and Astronomy and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan wetland complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Accepted 17 April 2009 Keywords: Wetlands Boreal region Synthetic aperture radar Water level SoilEffects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan was negatively correlated to water depth in all open (non-forested) wetlands when water table levels were more

Turetsky, Merritt

429

IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson, Mike Brookes and Pier Luigi Dragotti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson London Exhibition Road, SW7 2AZ, London, United Kingdom. ABSTRACT Image based rendering is a technique of traditional color images with depth images. This combination promises to improve the rendering quality

Dragotti, Pier Luigi

430

American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine, and Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine warming has been happening · What might have caused global warming · Whether global warming

Ford, Andrew

431

Ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite thick films for energy storage applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have successfully fabricated large area free standing polyvinylidene fluoride -Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} (PVDF-PZT) ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite (wt% 80–20, respectively) thick films with an average diameter (d) ?0.1 meter and thickness (t) ?50 ?m. Inclusion of PZT in PVDF matrix significantly enhanced dielectric constant (from 10 to 25 at 5 kHz) and energy storage capacity (from 11 to 14 J/cm{sup 3}, using polarization loops), respectively, and almost similar leakage current and mechanical strength. Microstructural analysis revealed the presence of ? and ? crystalline phases and homogeneous distribution of PZT crystals in PVDF matrix. It was also found that apart from the microcrystals, well defined naturally developed PZT nanocrystals were embedded in PVDF matrix. The observed energy density indicates immense potential in PVDF-PZT composites for possible applications as green energy and power density electronic elements.

Singh, Paritosh; Borkar, Hitesh; Singh, B. P.; Singh, V. N.; Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: ashok553@nplindia.org [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fermion resonances on a thick brane with a piecewise warp factor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we mainly investigate the problems of resonances of massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) fermions on a single scalar constructed thick brane with a piecewise warp factor matching smoothly. The distance between two boundaries and the other parameters are determined by one free parameter through three junction conditions. For the generalized Yukawa coupling {eta}{Psi}{phi}{sup k{Psi}} with odd k=1,3,5,..., the mass eigenvalue m, width {Gamma}, lifetime {tau}, and maximal probability P{sub max} of fermion resonances are obtained. Our numerical calculations show that the brane without internal structure also favors the appearance of resonant states for both left- and right-handed fermions. The scalar-fermion coupling and the thickness of the brane influence the resonant behaviors of the massive KK fermions.

Li Haitao; Liu Yuxiao; Zhao Zhenhua; Guo Heng [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Standard guide for mutual inductance bridge applications for wall thickness determinations in boiler tubing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide describes a procedure for obtaining relative wall thickness indications in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic steels using the mutual inductance bridge method. The procedure is intended for use with instruments capable of inducing two substantially identical magnetic fields and noting the change in inductance resulting from differing amounts of steel. It is used to distinguish acceptable wall thickness conditions from those which could place tubular vessels or piping at risk of bursting under high temperature and pressure conditions. 1.2 This guide is intended to satisfy two general needs for users of industrial Mutual Inductance Bridge (MIB) equipment: (1) the need for a tutorial guide addressing the general principles of Mutual Inductance Bridges as they apply to industrial piping; and (2) the need for a consistent set of MIB performance parameter definitions, including how these performance parameters relate to MIB system specifications. Potential users and buyers, as well as experienced M...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30?MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ?10{sup 21} W cm{sup ?2} was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for ?m-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500?nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

Green, J. S., E-mail: james.green@stfc.ac.uk; Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dance, R. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Murphy, C. D. [SUPA, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

435

Method for rapid, controllable growth and thickness, of epitaxial silicon films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing epitaxial silicon films on a c-Si wafer substrate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition by controlling the rate of silicon deposition in a temperature range that spans the transition from a monohydride to a hydrogen free silicon surface in a vacuum, to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness is disclosed. The method includes placing a c-Si substrate in a HWCVD reactor chamber. The method also includes supplying a gas containing silicon at a sufficient rate into the reaction chamber to interact with the substrate to deposit a layer containing silicon thereon at a predefined growth rate to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness.

Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Stradins, Paul (Golden, CO); Teplin, Charles (Boulder, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

436

Tunneling density of states as a function of thickness in superconductor/ strong ferromagnet bilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made an experimental study of the tunneling density of states (DOS) in strong ferromagnetic thin films (CoFe) in proximity with a thick superconducting film (Nb) as a function of d{sub F}, the ferromagnetic thickness. Remarkably, we find that as d{sub F} increases, the superconducting DOS exhibits a scaling behavior in which the deviations from the normal-state conductance have a universal shape that decreases exponentially in amplitude with characteristic length d* {approx} 0.4 nm. We do not see oscillations in the DOS as a function of d{sub F}, as expected from predictions based on the Usadel equations, although an oscillation in T{sub c}(d{sub F}) has been seen in the same materials.

Reymond, S.

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A. [Inst. of Nucl. Res. of the Hungarian Acad. of Sci. (ATOMKI), H-4001 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); and others

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100?°C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.11–0.13?nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of ±2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76?ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1?m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5?mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD.

Yersak, Alexander S.; Lee, Yung C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1045 Regent Drive, 422 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0422 (United States); Spencer, Joseph A.; Groner, Markus D., E-mail: mgroner@aldnanosolutions.com [ALD NanoSolutions, Inc., 580 Burbank Street, Unit 100, Broomfield, Colorado 80020 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Post-cast EDM method for reducing the thickness of a turbine nozzle wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A post-cast EDM process is used to remove material from the interior surface of a nozzle vane cavity of a turbine. A thin electrode is passed through the cavity between opposite ends of the nozzle vane and displaced along the interior nozzle wall to remove the material along a predetermined path, thus reducing the thickness of the wall between the cavity and the external surface of the nozzle. In another form, an EDM process employing a profile as an electrode is disposed in the cavity and advanced against the wall to remove material from the wall until the final wall thickness is achieved, with the interior wall surface being complementary to the profile surface.

Jones, Raymond Joseph (Duanesburg, NY); Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy (Schenectady, NY); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (Galway, NY); Schotsch, Margaret Jones (Clifton Park, NY); Rajan, Rajiv (Guilderland, NY); Wei, Bin (Mechanicville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thickness measurement of aluminum, titanium, titanium silicide, and tungsten silicide films by x-ray fluorescence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has received a great deal of attention in the last few years as a quantitative means of determining both the stoichiometry and thickness of many different kinds of films. Examples include Ag and Cu films on mica substrates, Sn-Pb alloys on steel substrates, Al-Ti multilayers on Cu substrates and oxide films on silicon substrates. In XRF the sample is irradiated with x-rays which in turn cause x-rays to be given off by the sample. These x-rays that are given off by the sample can then be analyzed both for energy and intensity. The energy of the x-rays is characteristic of the elemental makeup of the sample and the intensity of the x-rays is dependent on how much of the particular element is present. The intensity then can be related to the thickness of a film if the stoichiometry of the film can be assumed constant. With the increased interest in silicides and more recently, the self-aligned silicide (salicide) process (8-10) for VLSI applications, in-line process monitoring of silicide film thickness has become important to integrated circuit manufacturing. In this study, the number of x-ray photons given of by Al, Ti, titanium silicide, and tungsten silicide films on silicon-based substrates was quantified so that a film thickness for an unknown sample could then be determined easily. In addition, XRF is a more accurate technique, limited principally by the accuracy technique, limited principally by the accuracy of the reference used and the amount of time the x-ray photons are counted.

Ernst, S.; Lee, C.O.; Lee, J.J. (Motorola, Inc., Advanced Products Research and Development Lab., Austin, TX (US))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Infrared Imaging of the Nanometer-Thick Accumulation Layer in Organic Field-Effect Transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on infrared (IR) spectro-microscopy of the electronic excitations in nanometer-thick accumulation layers in FET devices based on poly(3-hexylthiophene). IR data allows us to explore the charge injection landscape and uncovers the critical role of the gate insulator in defining relevant length scales. This work demonstrates the unique potential of IR spectroscopy for the investigation of physical phenomena at the nanoscale occurring at the semiconductor-insulator interface in FET devices.

Z. Q. Li; G. M. Wang; N. Sai; D. Moses; M. C. Martin; M. Di Ventra; A. J. Heeger; D. N. Basov

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

442

Unique Challenges Accompany Thick-Shell CdSe/nCdS (n > 10) Nanocrystal Synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thick-shell CdSe/nCdS (n {ge} 10) nanocrystals were recently reported that show remarkably suppressed fluorescence intermittency or 'blinking' at the single-particle level as well as slow rates of Auger decay. Unfortunately, whereas CdSe/nCdS nanocrystal synthesis is well-developed up to n {le} 6 CdS monolayers (MLs), reproducible syntheses for n {ge} 10 MLs are less understood. Known procedures sometimes result in homogeneous CdS nucleation instead of heterogeneous, epitaxial CdS nucleation on CdSe, leading to broad and multimodal particle size distributions. Critically, obtained core/shell sizes are often below those desired. This article describes synthetic conditions specific to thick-shell growth (n {ge} 10 and n {ge} 20 MLs) on both small (sub2 nm) and large (>4.5 nm) CdSe cores. We find added secondary amine and low concentration of CdSe cores and molecular precursors give desired core/shell sizes. Amine-induced, partial etching of CdSe cores results in apparent shell-thicknesses slightly beyond those desired, especially for very-thick shells (n {ge} 20 MLs). Thermal ripening and fast precursor injection lead to undesired homogeneous CdS nucleation and incomplete shell growth. Core/shells derived from small CdSe (1.9 nm) have longer PL lifetimes and more pronounced blinking at single-particle level compared with those derived from large CdSe (4.7 nm). We expect our new synthetic approach will lead to a larger throughput of these materials, increasing their availability for fundamental studies and applications.

Guo, Y; Marchuk, K; Abraham, R; Sampat, S; Abraham, R.; Fang, N; Malko, AV; Vela, J

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

443

A reliable control system for measurement on film thickness in copper chemical mechanical planarization system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, a variety of film thickness measurement techniques for copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) are subsequently proposed. In this paper, the eddy-current technique is used. In the control system of the CMP tool developed in the State Key Laboratory of Tribology, there are in situ module and off-line module for measurement subsystem. The in situ module can get the thickness of copper film on wafer surface in real time, and accurately judge when the CMP process should stop. This is called end-point detection. The off-line module is used for multi-points measurement after CMP process, in order to know the thickness of remained copper film. The whole control system is structured with two levels, and the physical connection between the upper and the lower is achieved by the industrial Ethernet. The process flow includes calibration and measurement, and there are different algorithms for two modules. In the process of software development, C++ is chosen as the programming language, in combination with Qt OpenSource to design two modules’ GUI and OPC technology to implement the communication between the two levels. In addition, the drawing function is developed relying on Matlab, enriching the software functions of the off-line module. The result shows that the control system is running stably after repeated tests and practical operations for a long time.

Li, Hongkai; Qu, Zilian; Zhao, Qian; Tian, Fangxin; Zhao, Dewen; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Thickness-based adaptive mesh refinement methods for multi-phase flow simulations with thin regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In numerical simulations of multi-scale, multi-phase flows, grid refinement is required to resolve regions with small scales. A notable example is liquid-jet atomization and subsequent droplet dynamics. It is essential to characterize the detailed flow physics with variable length scales with high fidelity, in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, two thickness-based mesh refinement schemes are developed based on distance- and topology-oriented criteria for thin regions with confining wall/plane of symmetry and in any situation, respectively. Both techniques are implemented in a general framework with a volume-of-fluid formulation and an adaptive-mesh-refinement capability. The distance-oriented technique compares against a critical value, the ratio of an interfacial cell size to the distance between the mass center of the cell and a reference plane. The topology-oriented technique is developed from digital topology theories to handle more general conditions. The requirement for interfacial mesh refinement can be detected swiftly, without the need of thickness information, equation solving, variable averaging or mesh repairing. The mesh refinement level increases smoothly on demand in thin regions. The schemes have been verified and validated against several benchmark cases to demonstrate their effectiveness and robustness. These include the dynamics of colliding droplets, droplet motions in a microchannel, and atomization of liquid impinging jets. Overall, the thickness-based refinement technique provides highly adaptive meshes for problems with thin regions in an efficient and fully automatic manner.

Chen, Xiaodong [The State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Vigor, E-mail: vigor.yang@aerospace.gatech.edu [School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0150 (United States)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Effect of Substrate Thickness on Oxide Scale Spallation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of the ferritic substrate's thickness on the delamination/spallation of the oxide scale was investigated experimentally and numerically. At the high-temperature oxidation environment of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a combination of growth stress with thermal stresses may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during SOFC stack cooling, even leading to serious degradation of cell performance. The growth stress is induced by the growth of the oxide scale on the scale/substrate interface, and thermal stress is induced by a mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide scale and the substrate. The numerical results show that the interfacial shear stresses, which are the driving force of scale delamination between the oxide scale and the ferritic substrate, increase with the growth of the oxide scale and also with the thickness of the ferritic substrate; i.e., the thick ferritic substrate can easily lead to scale delamination and spallation. Experimental observation confirmed the predicted results of the delamination and spallation of the oxide scale on the ferritic substrate.

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.

Figus, Cristiana, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Quochi, Francesco, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Artizzu, Flavia, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Saba, Michele, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Marongiu, Daniela, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica - University of Cagliari, S.P. Km 0.7, I-09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia [Dipartimento di Fisica - University of Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (PV) (Italy); Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea [Plasmore S.r.l. -Via Grazia Deledda 4, I-21020 Ranco (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

447

The effect of mix on capsule yields as a function of shell thickness and gas fill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of direct drive capsules with different shell thicknesses and gas fills was conducted to examine the amount of shock induced (Richtmyer-Meshkov) mix versus Rayleigh-Taylor mix from deceleration of the implosion. The RAGE (Eulerian) code with a turbulent mix model was used to model these capsules for neutron yields along with time-dependent mix amounts. The amount of Richtmyer-Meshkov induced mix from the shock breaking out of the shell is about 0.1??g (0.15??m of shell material), while the Rayleigh-Taylor mix is of order 1??g and determines the mixed simulation yield. The simulations were able to calculate a yield over mix (YOM) ratio (experiment/mix simulation) between 0.5 and 1.0 for capsules with shell thicknesses ranging from 7.5 to 20??m and with gas fills between 3.8 and 20?atm of D{sub 2} or DT. The simulated burn averaged T{sub ion} values typically lie with 0.5?keV of the data, which is within the measurement error. For capsules with shell thicknesses >25??m, the YOM values drop to 0.10?±?0.05, suggesting that some unmodeled effect needs to be accounted for in the thickest capsules.

Bradley, P. A., E-mail: pbradley@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Localization and mass spectra of fermions on symmetric and asymmetric thick branes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-parameter (positive odd integer s, thickness factor {lambda}, and asymmetry factor a) family of asymmetric thick brane solutions in five dimensions were constructed from a two-parameter (s and {lambda}) family of symmetric ones in by R. Guerrero, R. O. Rodriguez, and R. Torrealba in [Phys. Rev. D 72, 124012 (2005).]. The values s=1 and s{>=}3 correspond to single branes and double branes, respectively. These branes have very rich inner structure. In this paper, by presenting the mass-independent potentials of Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes in the corresponding Schroedinger equations, we investigate the localization and mass spectra of fermions on the symmetric and asymmetric thick branes in an anti-de Sitter background. In order to analyze the effect of gravity-fermion interaction (i.e., the effect of the inner structure of the branes) and scalar-fermion interaction to the spectrum of fermion KK modes, we consider three kinds of typical kink-fermion couplings. The spectra of left chiral fermions for these couplings consist of a bound zero mode and a series of gapless continuous massive KK modes, some discrete bound KK modes including zero mode (exist mass gaps), and a series of continuous massive KK modes, infinite discrete bound KK modes, respectively. The structures of the spectra are investigated in detail.

Liu Yuxiao; Fu, C.-E; Zhao Li; Duan Yishi [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Analysis Procedures for Double-Shell Target Concentricity and Wall Thickness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LLNL Target Fabrication Team (TFT) asked the Center for Non-Destructive Characterization (CNDC) to use CNDC's KCAT or Xradia's Micro computed tomography (CT) system to collect three-dimensional (3D) tomographic data of a set of double-shell targets and determine, among other items, the following: (1) the concentricity of the outer surface of the inner shell with respect to the inner surface of the outer shell with an accuracy of 1-2 micrometers, and (2) the wall thickness uniformity of the outer shell with an accuracy of 1-2 micrometers. The CNDC used Xradia's Micro CT system to collect the data. Bill Brown performed the concentricity analysis, and John Sain performed the wall thickness uniformity analysis. Harry Martz provided theoretical guidance, and Dan Schneberk contributed technical (software) support. This document outlines the analysis procedures used in each case. The double-shell targets, as shown in Figures 1 and 2, consist of an inner shell (or capsule), a two-piece spherical aerogel intermediary shell, and a two-piece spherical outer shell. The three elements are designed and fabricated to be concentric--with the aerogel shell acting as a spacer between the inner shell and outer shell--with no to minimum air gaps in the final assembly. The outer diameters of the aerogel and outer shells are 444 and 550 micrometers, respectively, so the wall thickness of the outer shell is 53 micrometers.

Sain, J D; Brown, W D; Martz, H E; Schneberk, D J

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

450

Thickness monitoring of graphene on SiC using low-energy electron diffraction P. J. Fisher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Thickness monitoring of graphene on SiC using low-energy electron diffraction P. J. Fisher IBM T of epitaxial graphene on SiC is monitored in-situ using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The possibility of using LEED as an in-situ thickness monitor of the graphene is examined. The ratio of primary diffraction

Feenstra, Randall

451

Thickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV-and PF-based polymer light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the thickness-dependent optical properties of single layer polymer light emitting diodes for two materials, poly the electronic and optical properties of these materials in light emitting diode LED structures.2 OurThickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV- and PF-based polymer light emitting

Carter, Sue

452

Thickness of the rim of an expanding lamella near the splash threshold Jolet de Ruiter,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and agricultural applications including spray coating and cooling,1 ink-jet printing,2,3 fuel combustion,4 viscosity of the liquid and t is the time after impact.8­12 This same idea has also been used for film thickness after impact on a thin liquid film.13 A functional form for the lamella thickness is also

Koehl, Mimi

453

Semi-empirical model for depth dose distributions of megavoltage x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dose distribution due to absorption of photon energy fluence in a homogeneous water phantom irradiated by megavoltage x-ray beams has been analyzed with a semiempirical model. The method generalizes an analytical formalism for the scattering component of dose within a water phantom which was developed recently for monoenergetic photon beams. Contributions to dose via Compton interaction and pair creation form the essential structure of the secondary component formula. Both the central-axis percent depth dose and off-central-axis ratios can be determined for beams of different sizes, used at any value of source to surface distance. The input data include the values of linear attenuation and energy-absorption coefficients in water at energies between 10 keV and the equivalent energy of the beam. Predicted values of the central-axis percent depth dose and the off-central-axis ratios are compared with the measured data for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 20, 35, 45, and 70 MVp x-ray beams. For the central-axis percent depth dose, agreement is within 3% for fields of sizes between 5 x 5 and 20 x 20 cm/sup 2/, and 5% for larger fields, for beams of MVp up to 20. For higher energy beams, comparison was made only for the 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ fields and the discrepancies were within 3%. For the off-central-axis ratios, agreement between the predicted and measured values is within 5% over the umbra region but worsens in the penumbra region and geometrical shadow. This formalism requires large computer storage for generating data for all realistic beams irradiating normal-size phantoms.

Ahuja, S.D.; Stroup, S.L.; Bolin, M.G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

{sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter variability due to depth of anesthesia in the anesthetized canine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of {open_quotes}depth of anesthesia{close_quotes} on {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter estimates in the myocardium was tested in a series of replicated studies on six dogs using the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph. A single lateral slice through the myocardium was imaged following each of four successive injections of {sup 82}Rb. For three of the injections the animals were lightly anesthetized (mean blood pressure about 90 mmHg). For the second injection, the amount of anesthetic was increased until blood pressure dipped to about 70 mHg. The fourth injection was preceded by an infusion of dipyridamole to induce a stress-state. The entire sequence was repeated at least twice with each of the six animals. A two compartment model with parameters k{sub 1} (uptake rate), k{sub 2} (wash-out rate), and f{sub v} (vascular fraction) was fit to the data. There was a consistent finding of a 20% to 30% decrease in k{sub 1} during the deeply anesthetized state compared with the two lightly anesthetized rest states. Analysis of variance showed that the difference observed is significant, though small in comparison with the difference between the rest and stress states (60% to 160% increase). The difference between the two lightly anesthetized states was not significant. Kinetic PET studies using dogs are routinely carried out with the animal anesthetized. Depth of anesthesia has been suspected as as source of variability in parameter estimates, but this conjecture has not previously been systematically investigated. These studies at extremes in the depth of anesthesia show a small but predictable effect on the uptake k{sub 1} of {sup 82}Rb.

Coxson, P.G.; Brennan, K.M.; Yang, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices controlled by the thickness of paraelectric layer in a wide temperature range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As functions of the paraelectric layer thickness, misfit strain and temperature, the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices are investigated using a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau thermodynamic model. Ferroelectric phase transition driven by the relative thickness of the superlattice is found to dramatically impact the electrocaloric response. Near the phase transition temperature, the magnitude of the electrocaloric effect is maximized and shifted to lower temperatures by increasing the relative thickness of paraelectric layer. Theoretical calculations also imply that the electrocaloric effect of the superlattices depends not only on the relative thickness of paraelectric layer but also on misfit strain. Furthermore, control of the relative thickness of paraelectric layer and the misfit strain can change availably both the magnitude and the temperature sensitivity of the electrocaloric effect, which suggests that ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices may be promising candidates for use in cooling devices in a wide temperature range.

Ma, D. C.; Lin, S. P. [Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Micro and Nano Physics and Mechanics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue, E-mail: zhengy35@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Xiong, W. M. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Micro and Nano Physics and Mechanics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wang, Biao, E-mail: wangbiao@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Molecular Depth Profiling of Sucrose Films: A Comparative Study of Cn Ions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification and Application ofof a Coflowand Traditional Cs

458

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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459

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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460

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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462

Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department ofAn|OilAnalysisfor the RSS

463

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and MODIS Comparison of Cloud

464

An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Device and method for the measurement of depth of interaction using co-planar electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for measuring a depth of interaction of an ionizing event and improving resolution of a co-planar grid sensor (CPG) are provided. A time-of-occurrence is measured using a comparator to time the leading edge of the event pulse from the non-collecting or collecting grid. A difference signal between the grid signals obtained with a differential amplifier includes a pulse with a leading edge occurring at the time-of-detection, measured with another comparator. A timing difference between comparator outputs corresponds to the depth of interaction, calculated using a processor, which in turn weights the difference grid signal to improve spectral resolution of a CPG sensor. The device, which includes channels for grid inputs, may be integrated into an Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The combination of the device and sensor is included. An improved high-resolution CPG is provided, e.g., a gamma-ray Cadmium Zinc Telluride CPG sensor operating at room temperature.

DeGeronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

466

Test plan for evaluating the operational performance of the prototype nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHMC will provide Low Activity Wastes (LAW) tank wastes for final treatment by a privatization contractor from two double-shell feed tanks, 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Concerns about the inability of the baseline ''grab'' sampling to provide large volume samples within time constraints has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. This sampling system will provide large volume, representative samples without the environmental, radiation exposure, and sample volume impacts of the current base-line ''grab'' sampling method. A plan has been developed for the cold testing of this nested, fixed-depth sampling system with simulant materials. The sampling system will fill the 500-ml bottles and provide inner packaging to interface with the Hanford Sites cask shipping systems (PAS-1 and/or ''safe-send''). The sampling system will provide a waste stream that will be used for on-line, real-time measurements with an at-tank analysis system. The cold tests evaluate the performance and ability to provide samples that are representative of the tanks' content within a 95 percent confidence interval, to sample while mixing pumps are operating, to provide large sample volumes (1-15 liters) within a short time interval, to sample supernatant wastes with over 25 wt% solids content, to recover from precipitation- and settling-based plugging, and the potential to operate over the 20-year expected time span of the privatization contract.

REICH, F.R.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

467

Constraints from Moho geometry and crustal thickness on the geodynamic origin of the Vrancea Seismogenic Zone (Romania)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismogenic Zone (Romania) Dana M. Mucuta , Camelia C. Knapp, James H. Knapp Department of Geological Sciences of Romania provides important new constraints on geodynamic models for the origin of the intermediate depth of the SE Carpathians of Romania is the significant concentration of intermediate depth (down to 220km

Knapp, Camelia Cristina

468

In-situ Measurement of Low-Z Material Coating Thickness on High Z Substrate for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rutherford backscattering (RBS) of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15 ?m thick. Using a 0.1 mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 hours of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1 mg/cm^2 thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

Mueller, D [PPPL; Roquemore, A L [PPPL; Jaworski, M [PPPL; Skinner, C H [PPPL; Miller, J [PPPL; Creely, A [PPPL; Raman, P [2University of Illinois, Champaign, IL, USA; Ruzic, D [2University of Illinois, Champaign, IL, USA

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Carbon, nitrogen and $\\alpha$-element abundances determine the formation sequence of the Galactic thick and thin disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the DR12 public release of APOGEE data, we show that thin and thick disk separate very well in the space defined by [$\\alpha$/Fe], [Fe/H] and [C/N]. Thick disk giants have both higher [C/N] and higher [$\\alpha$/Fe] than do thin disk stars with similar [Fe/H]. We deduce that the thick disk is composed of lower mass stars than the thin disk. Considering the fact that at a given metallicity there is a one-to-one relation between stellar mass and age, we are then able to infer the chronology of disk formation. Both the thick and the thin disks - defined by [$\\alpha$/Fe] -- converge in their dependance on [C/N] and [C+N/Fe] at [Fe/H]$\\approx$-0.7. We conclude that 1) the majority of thick disk stars formed earlier than did the thin disk stars 2) the formation histories of the thin and thick disks diverged early on, even when the [Fe/H] abundances are similar 3) that the star formation rate in the thin disk has been lower than in the thick disk, at all metallicities. Although these general conclusions remain ...

Masseron, T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

HST SPECTRAL MAPPING OF L/T TRANSITION BROWN DWARFS REVEALS CLOUD THICKNESS VARIATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most directly imaged giant exoplanets are fainter than brown dwarfs with similar spectra. To explain their relative underluminosity, unusually cloudy atmospheres have been proposed. However, with multiple parameters varying between any two objects, it remained difficult to observationally test this idea. We present a new method, sensitive time-resolved Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared spectroscopy, to study two rotating L/T transition brown dwarfs (2M2139 and SIMP0136). The observations provide spatially and spectrally resolved mapping of the cloud decks of the brown dwarfs. The data allow the study of cloud structure variations while other parameters are unchanged. We find that both brown dwarfs display variations of identical nature: J- and H-band brightness variations with minimal color and spectral changes. Our light curve models show that even the simplest surface brightness distributions require at least three elliptical spots. We show that for each source the spectral changes can be reproduced with a linear combination of only two different spectra, i.e., the entire surface is covered by two distinct types of regions. Modeling the color changes and spectral variations together reveal patchy cloud covers consisting of a spatially heterogeneous mix of low-brightness, low-temperature thick clouds and brighter, thin, and warm clouds. We show that the same thick cloud patches seen in our varying brown dwarf targets, if extended to the entire photosphere, predict near-infrared colors/magnitudes matching the range occupied by the directly imaged exoplanets that are cooler and less luminous than brown dwarfs with similar spectral types. This supports the models in which thick clouds are responsible for the near-infrared properties of these ''underluminous'' exoplanets.

Apai, Daniel [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Radigan, Jacqueline; Jayawardhana, Ray [Department of Astronomy, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H4 (Canada); Buenzli, Esther [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, 105 Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Reid, Iain Neill, E-mail: apai@as.arizona.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21212 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

471

Harmonic QPOs and Thick Accretion Disk Oscillations in BL Lac Object AO 0235+164  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodic outbursts are observed in many AGNs and usually explained with a supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) scenario. However, multiple periods are observed in some AGNs and cannot be explained with it. Here we analyze the periodicity of the radio light curves of AO 0235+164 at multi-frequencies and report the discovery of six QPOs in integer ratio 1:2:3:4:5:6 of QPO frequencies, of which the second with period $P_2 = (5.46 \\pm 0.47) {\\rm yr}$ is the strongest. We fit the radio light curves and show that the initial phases of six QPOs have zero or $\\pi$ differences relative to each other. We suggest a harmonic relationship of QPOs. The centroid frequency, relative strength, harmonic relationship and relative initial phases of QPOs are independent of radio frequency. The harmonic QPOs are likely due to the quasi-periodic injection of plasma from an oscillating accretion disk into the jet. We estimate the supermassive black hole mass $M_{\\rm BH} \\simeq (4.72\\pm 2.04) \\times 10^8 M_\\odot$ and the accretion rate $\\dot{m}\\simeq 0.007$. With the knowledge of accretion disk, it implies that the inner region of accretion disk of AO 0235+164 is a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The oscillation accretion is due to the p-mode oscillation of the thick disk probably excited by a SMBHB. The theoretical predications of fundamental oscillation frequency and the harmonics are well consistent with the observations. Harmonic QPOs would be absent when the thick disk becomes geometrically thin due to the increase of accretion rate. We discuss the observations of AO 0235+164 basing on the SMBHB-thick disk oscillation scenario.

F. K. Liu; G. Zhao; Xue-Bing Wu

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

472

Coal-bench architecture as a means of understanding regional changes in coal thickness and quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the Fire Creek (Westphalian B), Pond Creek (lower Westphalian B), and Stockton (Westphalian B) coals, three of the most heavily mined coals in the Central Appalachian Basin, shows that all have a similar multiple-bench architecture of at least two benches split by a regional clastic parting or durain. Coal benches beneath regionally extensive partings are generally less continuous, thinner, more palynologically variable, higher in ash yield, and higher in sulfur content than coal benches above regional partings in all three coals. Where thick, benches above regional partings tend to exhibit temporal palynological changes from lycopod- to fern-dominant. Where inertinite-rich/fern-dominant benches are overlain by additional benches, the upper benches are limited in extent, variable in thickness, high in sulfur content and ash yield, and split away from the coal. The multiple-bench architecture exhibited by these coals is interpreted to represent a cyclic mire succession that was common in the Middle Pennsylvanian. Peats began as planar mires infilling an irregular topography during rising base level. When the topography was infilled, unconfined flooding was possible and resulted in widespread partings. Ponding above these clay-rich flood deposits led to re-establishment of new planar mires with greater continuity than the underlying mires. The extent of these mires provided buffers to clastic influx and, in many cases, allowed domed conditions to develop. Doming resulted in thick, high-quality coal benches. In some cases, a third stage of planar peats, with similar characteristics to the planar peats at the base of the beds, developed on the unevenly distributed clastics that buried underlying mires during continued base-level rise.

Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F. [Kentucy Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States); Hower, J.C. [Center for Applied Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Constraining the symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of Tin isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. Using this correlation analysis to existing data on the neutron skin thickness of Sn isotopes, we find important constraints on the value E_{sym}(rho_0) and density slope L of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density. Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and double neutron/proton ratio in heavy ion collisions leads to a value of L=58\\pm 18 MeV approximately independent of E_{sym}(\\rho_0).

Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Jun Xu; Bao-An Li

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

474

Monitoring Morphological Changes in 2D Monolayer Semiconductors Using Atom-Thick Plasmonic Nanocavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coupled modes. One weaker mode corresponds to transverse dipolar charge oscillations inside the NP alone (𝑇𝑇).7,9–11 However, the dominant modes shift to the red due to longitudinal coupling between the NP and its image in the mirror surface, forming... -ion-beam milling, mounted on a TEM grid using a nanomanipulator and polished down to a thickness of ~100nm. DF-STEM imaging was performed in a Hitachi S-5500 SEM at 30kV acceleration voltage. Theory simulations: Exact simulations are carried out using...

Sigle, Daniel O.; Mertens, Jan; Herrmann, Lars O.; Bowman, Richard W.; Ithurria, Sandrine; Dubertret, Benoit; Shi, Yumeng; Yang, Hui Ying; Tserkezis, Christos; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

475

The characterization of Lamb and Rayleigh waves in plates with ramp-like changes in thickness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-up 12 FIG. 2. 4. Sample pulse duration of Q-switched Nd: YAG laser 14 FIG. 2, 5. Acoustic wave detection set-up . FIG. 2. 6. A standard Fizeau interferometer 17 18 FIG. 2. 8. A typical bandpass filter . 23 FIG. 2. 9. The complete TAP-NDE... I INTRODUCTION In recent years, significant advances have been made in the area of non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Much of this progress involves interrogation techniques utilizing Rayleigh waves in thick structures, and Lamb waves in thin...

Uzzell, Christopher Tinsley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

476

Sensitivity of the electric dipole polarizability to the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The static dipole polarizability, {alpha}{sub D}, in {sup 208}Pb has been recently measured with highresolution via proton inelastic scattering at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) [1]. This observable is thought to be intimately connected with the neutron skin thickness, r{sub skin}, of the same nucleus and, more fundamentally, it is believed to be associated with the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of r{sub skin} on {alpha}{sub D} in {sup 208}Pb is investigated and discussed on the basis of a large and representative set of relativistic and non-relativistic nuclear energy density functionals (EDF) [2].

Roca-Maza, X.; Agrawal, B. K.; Colo, G.; Nazarewicz, W.; Paar, N.; Piekarewicz, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Vretenar, D. [INFN, sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

477

The effect of stratum thickness ratio on crossflow in a stratified petroleum reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the effect of stratum thickness ratio and viscosity ratio on crossflow were studied. REVIEW OF LITERATURE The possible importance of permeability stratification in a reservoir being waterflooded was first mentioned in a paper by 1 . Lester C. Uren in f... States, API (1950) p. 160-174. 4, Dyes, A. B. and Braun, P. H. : "Sweepout Patterns in De- pleted and Stratified Reservoirs, " Producers Monthl (1954) 19, No. 2, p, 24-30. 5. Gaucher, D. H. and Lindley, D. C. : "Waterflood Performance in a Stratified...

Kereluk, Michael Joseph

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms andmodeling and experimental capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For thick liquid wall concepts, it is important to understand the different mechanisms affecting the chamber dynamics and the state of the chamber prior to each shot a compared with requirements from the driver and target. These include ablation mechanisms, vapor transport and control, possible aerosol formation, as well as protective jet behavior. This paper was motivated by a town meeting on this subject which helped identify the major issues, assess the latest results, review the capabilities of existing modeling and experimental facilities with respect to addressing remaining issues, and helping guide future analysis and R&D efforts; the paper covers these exact points.

Raffray, A.R.; Meier, W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Bonazza, R.; Calderoni, P.; Debonnel, C.S.; Dragojlovic, Z.; El-Guebaly, L.; Haynes,D.; Latkowski, J.; Olson, C.; Peterson, P.F.; Reyes, S.; Sharpe, P.; Tillack, M.S.; Zaghloul, M.

2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

479

Formation of Thick, Large-Area Nanoparticle Superlatices in Lithographically Defined Geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superlattices of colloidal nanocrystals hold the promise of new nanomaterials with tunable properties. The positioning and size of these structures are often poorly controlled after self-assembly from the solution phase, making studies of their properties difficult. We report the fabrication of {approx}100 layer thick, three-dimensional superlattices on a substrate with controlled lateral placement. This novel fabrication technique generates long-range order over the micrometer scale and controlled placement by employing lithographic patterning and microfluidic flow. Keywords: Nanoparticles; superlattice; self assembly; microfluidics; ordered array.

Akey, A.; Yang, L.; Lu, C.; Herman, I.P.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth thickness porosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination that are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination as radiopurity testing facilities, capable of measuring the radioactivity levels of materials to be used

482

A study on the evolution of dielectric function of ZnO thin films with decreasing film thickness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dielectric function, band gap, and exciton binding energies of ultrathin ZnO films as a function of film thickness have been obtained with spectroscopic ellipsometry. As the film thickness decreases, both real (?{sub 1}) and imaginary (?{sub 2}) parts of the dielectric function decrease significantly, and ?{sub 2} shows a blue shift. The film thickness dependence of the dielectric function is shown related to the changes in the interband absorption, discrete-exciton absorption, and continuum-exciton absorption, which can be attributed to the quantum confinement effect on both the band gap and exciton binding energies.

Li, X. D.; Chen, T. P., E-mail: echentp@ntu.edu.sg; Liu, P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Liu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology, Chengdu 610054 (China); Liu, Z. [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Leong, K. C. [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore Pte Ltd, 738406 Singapore (Singapore)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

483

Two-dimensional spectral/statistical analysis of Marine magnetic data: implications for depth-to-magnetic source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T'A'0-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL/STATISTICAL ANAI. YSIS OF MARINE MAGNETIC DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEPTH-TO-MAGNETIC SOURCE A Thesis by JEFFREY LEE SCHRULL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Geophysics TWO-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL/STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF MARINE MAGNETIC DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEPTH-TO-MAGNETIC SOURCE A Thesis JEFFREY LEE SCHRULL Approved as to style...

Schrull, Jeffrey Lee

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Porosity, single-phase permeability, and capillary pressure data from preliminary laboratory experiments on selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1 of 3: Main report, appendix A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three groups of core samples from Marker Bed 139 of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were analyzed to provide data to support the development of numerical models used to predict the long-term hydrologic and structural response of the WIPP repository. These laboratory experiments, part of the FY93 Experimental Scoping Activities of the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program, were designed to (1) generate WIPP-specific porosity and single-phase permeability data, (2) provide information needed to design and implement planned tests to measure two-phase flow properties, including threshold pressure, capillary pressure, and relative permeability, and (3) evaluate the suitability of using analog correlations for the Salado Formation to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. This report contains a description of the boreholes core samples, the core preparation techniques used, sample sizes, testing procedures, test conditions, and results of porosity and single-phase permeability tests performed at three laboratories: TerraTek, Inc. (Salt Lake City, UT), RE/SPEC, Inc. (Rapid City, SD), and Core Laboratories-Special Core Analysis Laboratory (Carrollton, TX) for Rock Physics Associates. In addition, this report contains the only WIPP-specific two-phase-flow capillary-pressure data for twelve core samples. The WIPP-specific data generated in this laboratory study and in WIPP field-test programs and information from suitable analogs will form the basis for specification of single- and two-phase flow parameters for anhydrite markers beds for WIPP performance assessment calculations.

Howarth, S.M.; Christian-Frear, T.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Towards III-V solar cells on Si: Improvement in the crystalline quality of Ge-on-Si virtual substrates through low porosity porous silicon buffer layer and annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison between the crystalline quality of Ge grown on bulk Si and on a low porosity porous Si (pSi) buffer layer using low energy plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is reported. Omega/2Theta coupled scans around the Ge and Si (004) diffraction peaks show a reduction of the Ge full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of 22.4% in presence of the pSi buffer layer, indicating it is effective in improving the epilayer crystalline quality. At the same time atomic force microscopy analysis shows an increase in root means square roughness for Ge grown on pSi from 38.5 nm to 48.0 nm, as a consequence of the larger surface roughness of pSi compared to bulk Si. The effect of 20 minutes vacuum annealing at 580°C is also investigated. The annealing leads to a FWHM reduction of 23% for Ge grown on Si and of 36.5% for Ge on pSi, resulting in a FWHM of 101 arcsec in the latter case. At the same time, the RMS roughness is reduced of 8.8% and of 46.5% for Ge grown on bulk Si and on pSi, respectively. The biggest improvement in the crystalline quality of Ge grown on pSi with respect to Ge grown on bulk Si observed after annealing is a consequence of the simultaneous reorganization of the Ge epilayer and the buffer layer driven by energy minimization. A low porosity buffer layer can thus be used for the growth of low defect density Ge on Si virtual substrates for the successive integration of III-V multijunction solar cells on Si. The suggested approach is simple and fast –thus allowing for high throughput-, moreover is cost effective and fully compatible with subsequent wafer processing. Finally it does not introduce new chemicals in the solar cell fabrication process and can be scaled to large area silicon wafers.

Calabrese, Gabriele; Baricordi, Stefano; Bernardoni, Paolo; Fin, Samuele; Guidi, Vincenzo; Vincenzi, Donato [University of Ferrara - Physics and Earth Science Department, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy)

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

486

Effect of equatorial line nodes on the upper critical field and London penetration depth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The upper critical field Hc2 and its anisotropy are calculated for order parameters with line nodes at the equators, kz=0, of the Fermi surface of uniaxial superconductors. It is shown that characteristic features found in Fe-based materials (a nearly linear Hc2(T) in a broad T domain, a low and increasing on warming anisotropy ?H=Hc2,ab/Hc2,c) can be caused by competing effects of the equatorial nodes and of the Fermi surface anisotropy. For certain material parameters, ?H(T)?1 may change sign upon warming, in agreement with the recorded behavior of FeTeS systems. It is also shown that the anisotropy of the penetration depth ??=?c/?ab decreases upon warming to reach ?H at Tc, in agreement with data available. For some materials ??(T) may change upon warming, from ??>1 at low Ts to ??<1 at high Ts.

Kogan, V G [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, R [Ames Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Complex Faraday depth structure of Active Galactic Nuclei as revealed by broadband radio polarimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed study of the Faraday depth structure of four bright (> 1 Jy), strongly polarized, unresolved, radio-loud quasars. The Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) was used to observe these sources with 2 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth from 1.1 to 3.1 GHz. This allowed us to spectrally resolve the polarization structure of spatially unresolved radio sources, and by fitting various Faraday rotation models to the data, we conclusively demonstrate that two of the sources cannot be described by a simple rotation measure (RM) component modified by depolarization from a foreground Faraday screen. Our results have important implications for using background extragalactic radio sources as probes of the galactic and intergalactic magneto-ionic media as we show how RM estimations from narrow-bandwidth observations can give erroneous results in the presence of multiple interfering Faraday components. We postulate that the additional RM components arise from polarized structure in the compact inner regio...

O'Sullivan, S P; Robishaw, T; Schnitzeler, D H F M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Feain, I J; Taylor, A R; Gaensler, B M; Landecker, T L; Harvey-Smith, L; Carretti, E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Improving resolution and depth of astronomical observations via modern mathematical methods for image analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Pilo, Stefano; Falcone, Maurizio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Superconducting coherence length and magnetic penetration depth of a p-wave holographic superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in (3+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in (2+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconducting coherence length {xi} of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we make a perturbative study of the gravity theory analytically. The superconducting coherence length {xi} is found to be proportional to (1-T/T{sub c}){sup -1/2} near the critical temperature T{sub c}. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth {lambda}{proportional_to}(T{sub c}-T){sup 1/2} by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

Zeng Huabi; Fan Zheyong [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zong Hongshi [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

Superconducting Coherence Length and Magnetic Penetration Depth of a p-wave Holographic Superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in 3+1 dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in 2+1 dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we study the perturbation of the gravity theory analytically. The superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ is found to be proportional to $(1-T/T_c)^{-1/2}$ near the critical temperature $T_c$. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth $\\lambda\\propto(T_c-T)^{1/2}$ by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

Hua-Bi Zeng; Zhe-Yong Fan; Hong-Shi Zong

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Aubrey, A.D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Kieft, T L [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology] [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Silver, B J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Heerden, E. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Opperman, D. J. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Bada, J L. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,] [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Interaction of D2O with a Thick BaO Film: Formation of and Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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493

Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fields as diverse as biological imaging and telecommunications utilize the unique photophysical and electronic properties of nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs). The development of new NQD compositions promises material properties optimized for specific applications, while addressing material toxicity. Indium phosphide (InP) offers a 'green' alternative to the traditional cadmium-based NQDs, but suffers from extreme susceptibility to oxidation. Coating InP cores with more stable shell materials significantly improves nanocrystal resistance to oxidation and photostability. We have investigated several new InP-based core-shell compositions, correlating our results with theoretical predictions of their optical and electronic properties. Specifically, we can tailor the InP core-shell QDs to a type-I, quasi-type-II, or type-II bandgap structure with emission wavelengths ranging from 500-1300 nm depending on the shell material used (ZnS, ZnSe, CdS, or CdSe) and the thickness of the shell. Single molecule microscopy assessments of photobleaching and blinking are used to correlate NQD properties with shell thickness.

Dennis, Allison M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mangum, Benjamin D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Piryatinski, Andrei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Young-Shin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

494

The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements has been measured in the energy range 5.6 MeV {le} E{sub {alpha}} {le} 10 MeV. The {gamma}-ray yield for > 2.1 MeV from thick targets of beryllium, boron nitride, sodium fluoride, magnesium, aluminum and silicon were measured using the {alpha}-particle beam from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories 88 in. cyclotron. The elemental yields from this experiment were used to construct the {alpha}-induced direct production {gamma}-ray spectrum from materials in the SNO detector, a large volume ultra-low background neutrino detector located in the Creighton mine near Sudbury, Canada. This background source was an order of magnitude lower than predicted by previous calculations. These measurements are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this spectrum based on a statistical nuclear model of the reaction, with the gross high energy spectrum structure being reproduced to within a factor of two. Detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical excitation population distribution of several residual nuclei indicate the same level of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

Heaton, R.K. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Constraints on neutron skin thickness in 208Pb and density-dependent symmetry energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate knowledge about the neutron skin thickness $\\Delta R_{np}$ in $^{208}$Pb has far-reaching implications for different communities of nuclear physics and astrophysics. Y