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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis Nathan K. Kaiser, John P. Quinn, Greg T. Blakney NHMFL 9.4 T FT- species in petroleum crude oil and its products, extending to "heavy" crudes for unequivocal identification of sulfur-containing components in petroloeum heavy crude oils. Facilities: NHMFL 9

2

2-ft Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Flume Facility 2-ft Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 2-ft Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 61.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

3

1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ft Wave Flume Facility -ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

4

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 10-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

5

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

6

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

7

11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 77.4 Beam(m) 3.4 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

8

Echo?Ranging Device Used to Measure the Size of a Well at Camp Century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The echo?ranging device used to determine the size of a heat?sink well at Camp Century Greenland is briefly described. A rotating bariumtitanate narrow?beam transducer served as both transmitter and receiver. Short 500?kc/sec acoustic pulses were generated at the transducer by shock excitation. The device was designed to operate to a maximum range of 500 ft when suspended from a 1200?ft cable. A graphic recorder presented the echo time as a horizontal cross section of the well. The configuration of the well was determined by repeating the horizontal scan at successive depths. Tests at Camp Century revealed that the well was approximately 200 ft in diam with a water depth of approximately 100 ft. Good repeatability and an accuracy of less than 6 in. was demonstrated. The volume of the well was determined to be approximately 2 million cu ft. [Work supported by the U. S. Army.

O. Charles Mullineaux

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Flume Facility Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 6-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 105.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

10

Property:Depth(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Depth(m) Depth(m) Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Depth(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.9 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.5 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.8 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 1.8 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.9 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.5 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.8 + A Alden Large Flume + 3.0 + Alden Small Flume + 1.8 + Alden Tow Tank + 1.2 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.2 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.8 + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + 0.6 + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + 0.6 + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + 0.7 + Carderock Circulating Water Channel + 2.7 +

11

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Southern Walker Lake Basin, situated in the Walker Lake structural domain, consists of primarily E-W directed extension along N-NNW striking normal faults. Water well drilling on the eastern slopes of the Wassuk Range, west of the city of Hawthorne, Nevada showed elevated temperatures. Two recent drill holes reaching downhole depths of more than 4000 ft give some insight to the geologic picture, but more information

12

FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FT Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: FT Solutions LLC Place: South Jordan, Utah Zip: 84095 Product: JV between Headwaters Technology Innovation Group and Rentech to...

13

Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 2-Foot Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 17 Recirculating Yes

14

Sandia National Laboratories: SWiFT Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations SWiFT Operations wind-turbines The DOESNL SWiFT facility has three research-scale variable-speed variable-pitch modified wind turbines with full power conversion and an...

15

Property:Wave Period Range(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Period Range(s) Wave Period Range(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wave Period Range(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Wave Period Range(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 2.1 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 +

16

Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 0.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating with resorber, variable-speed, variable-pressure, two interchangeable circular test sections. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

17

UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Development Unit Facility February 2014 The facility is sized as a small-scale pilot CBTL plant that would produce research quantities of FT liquid fuels at...

18

Cosmological perturbations in f(T) gravity  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the cosmological perturbations in f(T) gravity. Examining the pure gravitational perturbations in the scalar sector using a diagonal vierbein, we extract the corresponding dispersion relation, which provides a constraint on the f(T) Ansaetze that lead to a theory free of instabilities. Additionally, upon inclusion of the matter perturbations, we derive the fully perturbed equations of motion, and we study the growth of matter overdensities. We show that f(T) gravity with f(T) constant coincides with General Relativity, both at the background as well as at the first-order perturbation level. Applying our formalism to the power-law model we find that on large subhorizon scales (O(100 Mpc) or larger), the evolution of matter overdensity will differ from {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Finally, examining the linear perturbations of the vector and tensor sectors, we find that (for the standard choice of vierbein) f(T) gravity is free of massive gravitons.

Chen, Shih-Hung; Dent, James B. [Department of Physics and School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1404 (United States); Dutta, Sourish [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

RICOH FT MODELS PRODUCT ASU STOCK # FT 3013/3213/3513/3713 TONER TYPE 320 CP502006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RICOH FT MODELS PRODUCT ASU STOCK # FT 3013/3213/3513/3713 TONER TYPE 320 CP502006 DEVELOPER TYPE 310 CP502027 FT 3113/3313 TONER TYPE 310 CP502005 DEVELOPER TYPE 310 CP502027 FT 3320 TONER TYPE 3300 CP502025 DEVELOPER TYPE 3300 CP502026 FT 4415/4418/4421/4220/4222/4215 TONER TYPE 410 CP502028

Rhoads, James

20

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgReservoirDepth AvgReservoirDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgReservoirDepth Property Type Quantity Description Average depth to reservoir Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "AvgReservoirDepth" Showing 24 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 213 m0.213 km 0.132 mi 698.819 ft 232.939 yd + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 850 m0.85 km

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Kerr geometry in f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Null tetrads are shown to be a valuable tool in teleparallel theories of modified gravity. We use them to prove that Kerr geometry remains a solution for a wide family of f(T) theories of gravity.

Cecilia Bejarano; Rafael Ferraro; María José Guzmán

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns  

SciTech Connect

Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

Hoffman, E.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Property:FirstWellDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FirstWellDepth FirstWellDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name FirstWellDepth Property Type Quantity Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "FirstWellDepth" Showing 5 pages using this property. B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + 672 m0.672 km 0.418 mi 2,204.724 ft 734.906 yd + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + 1,968 m1.968 km

24

FTIR and FT-PL spectroscopic analysis of TPV materials and devices  

SciTech Connect

Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopic techniques are useful in determining properties of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) materials and devices. The III-V TPV absorber materials have energy bandgaps that can be optimized for conversion of the near-infrared radiation emitted by thermal sources in the 1000{degree}{endash}1200&hthinsp;{degree}C temperature range. The bandgaps of these materials can be measured at room temperature using FT-photoluminescence spectroscopy, which can be done with a modified FT-Raman spectrophotometer operating in the near-infrared spectral region. The intensities and bandwidths of the FT-PL spectra also provide information on the extent of non-radiative recombination and the compositional uniformity of the materials. To achieve adequate operating efficiencies, TPV converters must return sub-bandgap radiation to the thermal source. The percent reflectance of the device in the mid-infrared spectral region is therefore an important operating parameter that can be accurately measured using FT-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with total reflectance optical accessories. In this paper, we discuss applications of these techniques to TPV materials and devices, and variations on these approaches, such as scanning micro-FT-PL spectroscopy, that enable microanalysis of TPV device structures at the 1{endash}100-{mu}m scale. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Webb, J.D.; Gedvilas, L.M.; Olson, M.R.; Wu, X.; Duda, A.; Wanlass, M.W.; Jones, K.M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

58 45 51 H Content (% mass) 13.6 14.5 15.5 14.3 15.1 Heat of Combust. (MJ/kg) 43.3 43.8 44.4 43.8 441 Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2 Feedstock Petroleum Petroleum & Natural Gas Natural Gas Petroleum & Coal Coal Sulfur (ppm by mass) 1148 699 19 658 22 Alkanes (% vol.) 50

Meskhidze, Nicholas

26

U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of...

27

Natural Disaster Survey Report Ft. Smith and Van Buren, Arkansas,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and conversations with volunteer amateur radio operators, members of the print and broadcast media in Ft. Smith to the U.S. Congress, to local government officials in Ft. Smith and Van Buren, and to the media on May 21Natural Disaster Survey Report Ft. Smith and Van Buren, Arkansas, Tornado of April 21, 1996 U

28

Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of f(T) modified teleparallel gravity. We consider a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the Hubble horizon. For two viable f(T) models containing $f(T)=T+\\mu_1{(-T)}^n$ and $f(T)=T-\\mu_2 T(1-e^{\\beta\\frac{T_0}{T}})$, we first calculate the effective equation of state and deceleration parameters. Then, we investigate the null and strong energy conditions and conclude that a sudden future singularity appears in both models. Furthermore, using a cosmographic analysis we check the viability of two models. Finally, we examine the validity of the GSL and find that for both models it is satisfied from the early times to the present epoch. But in the future, the GSL is violated for the special ranges of the torsion scalar T.

K. Karami; A. Abdolmaleki

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

U.S. Army- Ft. Carson, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"—a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and supplying the heated air to the building's central heating system. This collector system is especially advantageous for buildings that require large volumes of heated air.

30

Drilling/producing depths; Two records and a revision  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that record depths for natural gas or oil well drilling or producing continue to be rare occurrences, although one or two still come in each year. Records fell in Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) District 9 and in the California area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in 1990. Deep drilling and production has traditionally been defined as well depths greater than 15,000 ft. Smith Tool reported that 9.4% of all active rotary rigs were dedicated to targets below 15,000 ft at the beginning of 1991. Deep rigs had dropped to 8.1% by year-end 1991, but remained above the 1989 and 1990 levels of 8.4 and 7.6%, respectively. In 1988 about 11% of active rigs were drilling deep at any given time.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power...

32

New Cryogenic Apparatus for FT-IR Spectroscopic Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, being an effective technique in improving the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, is utilized in our group....

Kang, Ning; Xu, Yizhuang; Ferraro, J R; Li, Weihong; Weng, Shifu; Xu, Duanfu; Wu, Jinguang; Soloway, R D; Xu, Guangxian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Low-Cost Reflectance FT-IR Microscope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) microscope combines microscopy with infrared (IR) spectroscopic molecular characterization. IR microspectroscopy presents a...

Jansen, J A J; Van Der Maas, J H; Posthuma De Boer, A

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ft Bidwell Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ft. Bidwell, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

35

U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and supplying the heated air to the building's central heating system. This collector system is especially advantageous for buildings that require large volumes of heated air. The system cost $140,000 to design, build, and install. The unglazed collector consists of 7,800 ft.² of sheet metal dotted with tiny holes. It

36

Spherically symmetric static spacetimes in vacuum f(T) gravity  

SciTech Connect

We show that Schwarzschild geometry remains as a vacuum solution for those four-dimensional f(T) gravitational theories behaving as ultraviolet deformations of general relativity. In the gentler context of three-dimensional gravity, we also find that the infrared-deformed f(T) gravities, like the ones used to describe the late cosmic speed up of the Universe, have as the circularly symmetric vacuum solution a Deser-de Sitter or a Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli-like spacetime with an effective cosmological constant depending on the infrared scale present in the function f(T).

Ferraro, Rafael [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fiorini, Franco [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Variable depth core sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

Bourgeois, Peter M. (Hamburg, NY); Reger, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Variable depth core sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nonlinear Electrodynamics in $f(T)$ Gravity and Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the nonlinear electrodynamics in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity for FRW universe along with dust matter, magnetic and torsion contributions. We evaluate the equation of state and deceleration parameters to explore the accelerated expansion of the universe. The validity of generalized second law of thermodynamics for Hubble and event horizons is also investigated in this scenario. For this purpose, we assume pole-like and power-law forms of scale factor and construct $f(T)$ models. The graphical behavior of the cosmological parameters versus smaller values of redshift $z$ represent the accelerated expansion of the universe. It turns out that the generalized second law of thermodynamics holds for all values of $z$ with event horizon for power-law scale factor whereas it holds in a specific range of $z$ with Hubble horizon for power-law and both horizons in pole-like scale factors.

Sharif, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nonlinear Electrodynamics in $f(T)$ Gravity and Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the nonlinear electrodynamics in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity for FRW universe along with dust matter, magnetic and torsion contributions. We evaluate the equation of state and deceleration parameters to explore the accelerated expansion of the universe. The validity of generalized second law of thermodynamics for Hubble and event horizons is also investigated in this scenario. For this purpose, we assume pole-like and power-law forms of scale factor and construct $f(T)$ models. The graphical behavior of the cosmological parameters versus smaller values of redshift $z$ represent the accelerated expansion of the universe. It turns out that the generalized second law of thermodynamics holds for all values of $z$ with event horizon for power-law scale factor whereas it holds in a specific range of $z$ with Hubble horizon for power-law and both horizons in pole-like scale factors.

M. Sharif; Shamaila Rani

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Application of Printed Circuit Board Technology to FT-ICR MS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to FT-ICR MS Analyzer Cell Construction and Prototyping. Abstract: Although Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICRMS) remains themass spectrometry...

42

Advanced Mass Calibration and Visualization for FT-ICR Mass Spectromet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Mass spectrometry imaging by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) yields hundreds of unique peaks, many of which...

43

FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. Abstract: Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) remains the technique of...

44

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING by J.K. Shultis Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering College of Engineering Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas 66506 Dec. 2003 #12;Notes on Neutron Depth Profiling J. Kenneth Shultis December 2003 1 Introduction The purpose of neutron depth profiling

Shultis, J. Kenneth

45

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts  

SciTech Connect

A computer search of both the open and the patent literature was conducted in order to ascertain the current state of cobalt-based catalyst technology for F-T synthesis. Two series of literature searches were conducted, one dealing specifically with cobalt catalysts for F-T synthesis and the other focusing on the preparation and/or characterization of supported cobalt catalysts including those not used for F-T synthesis. An initial screening of the literature was carried out by examining the 942 abstracts obtained from these searches. The main objective of this initial screening was the selection of the most pertinent publications for this work. out of the 230 patent references obtained from the computer search, about 90 were found to be directly related the preparation of cobalt catalysts and their use in FT synthesis. Copies of patents (78 patents) not available within the group have been ordered but not yet received. Based on a preliminary analysis,of the abstracts of the most pertinent patents a distribution among the various patent assignees is given in Table 1. As can be seen in Table 1, most of the patents for Co FT catalysts have been assigned to very few companies, the first four, i.e. Exxon, Shell, Gulf, and Statoil representing the most relevant ones. This preliminary analysis of the patent literature permitted a selection of a number of benchmark catalysts the formulations of which will be based on the patents of these four companies.

Not Available

1993-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

46

Depth dependence of ambient noise in the northeastern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Omnidirectional ambient noise levels were measured at two deep?water locations in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.Hydrophones were positioned throughout the water column at depths ranging from about 200 m below the surface to about 150 m above the sea bottom. Analyses of the data over the frequencies from 15 to 800 Hz show that at low frequencies the noise levels decrease with increasing depth. The decrease with depth is greater below the critical depth than it is in the sound channel. These low?frequency noise levels and their depth dependence are independent of the wind speed. At higher frequencies the noise levels and the depth dependence are controlled by the wind?generated noise. At low wind speeds there is a decrease in levels below the critical depth but above this depth both increases and decreases in levels with depth were noted. At these high frequencies during high wind speeds the noise levels not only rise but also fill the water column to the extent that there is little decrease in level with increasing depth even for the region below the critical depth.

Gerald B. Morris

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Stratigraphic Units at Ft. Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stratigraphic Units at Ft. Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge Mrs. Flynn's Earth Science Class this formation are wind-blown volcanic ash. The climate may have been more arid than during the time Hills (continued) These were deposited by the wind. The climate was similar to the present day climate

Frank, Tracy D.

48

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

50

Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Army - Ft. U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies Project Planning & Implementation Project Assistance

52

Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) The 6-Tesla High-Field Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS), is a unique instrument...

53

Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURE AND RESEARCH JOURNAL 32:3 (2008) 107–126 107 Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place MARGARET WICKENS PEARCE AND RENEE PUALANI LOUIS INTRODUCTION Indigenous communities have successfully used Western geospatial technolo- gies (GT... of geog- raphy at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Renee Pualani Louis is Hawaiian and recently completed her doctorate in geography at the University of Hawai‘i at Ma¯noa, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. Published as M. Pearce and R. Louis. Mapping Indigenous depth...

Pearce, Margaret Wickens; Louis, Renee Pualani

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depth depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MPL : Micropulse Lidar MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NIMFR : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

55

ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

optical depth optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

56

Property:Current Velocity Range(m/s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Range(m/s) Velocity Range(m/s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Current Velocity Range(m/s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Current Velocity Range(m/s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 3.2 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 0.0 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 0.0 +

57

FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance  

SciTech Connect

When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A. [Spectra-Tech, Inc., Shelton, CT (United States); Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Schuster, George J. (Kennewick, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Anisotropic poststack depth migration, eastern Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

It is known that in areas with significant shale content, the isotropic assumption in depth migration is not correct, and this can lead to incorrect depth positioning if not properly accounted for. In this paper, we performed isotropic and anisotropic poststack depth migrations on a dataset from Eastern Venezuela to study the influence of anisotropy over the depth migration process. When interval velocities derived from surface seismic are compared with those velocities from check shots, significant differences are observed specially for depths associated with a thick sequence of shales identified in the area. These differences in interval velocities are used to obtain estimations of the anisotropic constants used in the anisotropic depth migration process. The anisotropic depth-migrated section allows to position correctly in depth known geological markers identified in well logs, while the results in the isotropic depth-migration show some mismatch with the depths obtained from well-log information.

Uzcategui, O.J.; Mujica, D.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sandia National Laboratories: New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Updated New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes Rotor Work More Efficient On January 22, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SWIFT,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers....

62

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers.

63

Author's personal copy Unexpected new phase detected in FT30 type reverse osmosis membranes using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy Unexpected new phase detected in FT30 type reverse osmosis membranes using Available online 13 July 2011 Keywords: Reverse osmosis membranes X-ray microscopy Poly phenylene diamine a b s t r a c t FT30 type thin film composite membranes used for reverse osmosis water purification

Hitchcock, Adam P.

64

ARM - Evaluation Product - Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Site(s) PVC SGP General Description The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer Hemispheric (SASHE) is a ground-based instrument that measures both direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR)-an instrument that has been in the ARM Facility stable for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the SASHE provides hyperspectral measurements from about 350 nm to 1700 nm at a wavelength resolution from 1 to several nanometers, while the MFRSR only

65

Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

66

New depths with mobile rig  

SciTech Connect

Magee-Poole Drilling Company, a drilling contractor operating out of the south Texas drilling center of Alice, claims it operates the largest mobile drilling rig in the world. That is, it's the only wheel mounted portable rig that drills to 16,000 feet with 4 1/2-inch drill pipe - at least 3000 feet deeper than the previous mobile drilling rig ratings. The unit is designated the Ingersoll-Rand 1500 Series. What's more significant, according to co-owner Don Magee, is that the rig's portability gets the rotary table turning to the right sooner; it drills more footage per year. It rigs up in 1 1/2 days versus 3 to 4 days for a conventional skid type rig normally used at these depths. The unit's compact arrangement, with more components combined into single loads, makes possible its higher mobility. A conventional skid rig might require 25 to 30 truckloads to move the rig components, mud system, fuel and water tank, houses for utilities, storage and crew change, generators, and drill pipe. The new rig moves in anywhere from four to nine loads less. Further, the rig components weigh less without sacrificing durability.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Taphonomic Trends Along a Forereef Slope: Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas. I. Location and Water Depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contribution focuses on the influence of EOD and water depth. The dimension of time...locations were selected to be representative of EOD depth ranges. The location and transect...the influence of dissolution was much more EOD specific. Dissolution was highest in Codakia...

W. RUSSELL CALLENDER; GEORGE M. STAFF; KARLA M. PARSONS-HUBBARD; ERIC N. POWELL; GILBERT T. ROWE; SALLY E. WALKER; CARLTON E. BRETT; ANNE RAYMOND; DONNA D. CARLSON; SUZANNE WHITE; ELIZABETH A. HEISE

68

NOx Emissions of Alternative Diesel Fuels:? A Comparative Analysis of Biodiesel and FT Diesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the diesel injection and combustion processes in an effort to better understand the differences in NOx emissions between biodiesel, Fischer?Tropsch (FT) diesel, and their blends with a conventional diesel fuel. Emissions studies were ...

James P. Szybist; Stephen R. Kirby; André L. Boehman

2005-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

Wall effects in improved confinement modes in the FT-2 tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis is made of the transition to improved confinement (H-mode) observed in lower hybrid heating experiments in the FT-2 tokamak. Particular attention is paid to processes taking ... data are compared with...

V. N. Budnikov; V. V. D’yachenko; L. A. Esipov; E. R. Its…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

DE-AT26-99FT40267 | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Testing of Gas HydrateSediment Samples DE-AT26-99FT40267 Project Goal Develop understanding of the mechanical characteristics of hydrate-containing sediments....

71

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Catalytic Reforming of Biomass Raw Fuel Gas to Syngas for FT Liquid Fuels Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of biomass to obtain a syngas provides a competitive means for clean FT (Fischer-Tropsch) liquid fuels from renewable resources. The feasibility of the process depends on the upgrading of raw ...

Tiejun Wang; Chenguang Wang; Qi Zhang…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

FT-ICR studies of metal-carbon binary clusters for formation mechanism of endohedral fullerene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion Mass [amu] C60 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) LaC44 + LaC50 + LaC60 + Figure 2FT-ICR studies of metal-carbon binary clusters for formation mechanism of endohedral fullerene-wall carbon nanotube), i.e. La, Y, Sc, Gd, Ce, Ca, and Ni-Y. An example of FT-ICR mass spectra is shown

Maruyama, Shigeo

74

Implications of the UHECRs penetration depth measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simple interpretation of PAO's UHECRs' penetration depth measurements suggests a transition at the energy range $1.1 - 35 \\cdot 10^{18} $ eV from protons to heavier nuclei. A detailed comparison of this data with air shower simulations reveals strong restrictions on the amount of light nuclei (protons and He) in the observed flux. We find a robust upper bound on the observed proton fraction of the UHECRs flux and we rule out a composition dominated by protons and He. Acceleration and propagation effects lead to an observed composition that is different from the one at the source. Using a simple toy model that take into account these effects, we show that the observations requires an extreme metallicity at the sources with metals to protons mass ratio of 1:1, a ratio that is larger by a factor of a hundred than the solar abundance. This composition imposes an almost impossible constraint on all current astrophysical models for UHECRs accelerators. This may provide a first hint towards new physics that emerges at $\\sim 100$ TeV and leads to a larger proton cross section at these energies.

Nimrod Shaham; Tsvi Piran

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Recommended Practice: Defense-in-Depth  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report # INL/EXT-06-11478 Report # INL/EXT-06-11478 Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies May 2006 Prepared by Idaho National Laboratory Recommended Best Practice: Defense in Depth 2 Table of Contents Keywords............................................................................................................................. 3 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3 Background ......................................................................................................................... 3 Overview of Contemporary Control System Architectures................................................. 4 Security Challenges in Control Systems .............................................................................

76

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Compressed Gated Range Sensing Grigorios Tsagkatakisa, Arnaud Woiselleb, George Tzagkarakisc,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emitting diode (LED), and an imaging sensor in order to generate a 2D depth map of a scene. Time. INTRODUCTION Active Range Imaging systems employ an active illumination source, typically a laser or a light

Tsakalides, Panagiotis

78

Geodesic Deviation Equation in GR equivalent theory of $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we show that it is possible to study the GR equivalent notion of geodesic deviation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent of $f(T)$ gravity whose equations are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

Darabi, F; Atazadeh, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Geodesic Deviation Equation in GR equivalent theory of $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we show that it is possible to study the GR equivalent notion of geodesic deviation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent of $f(T)$ gravity whose equations are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

F. Darabi; M. Mousavi; K. Atazadeh

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of the detector at high energies by allowing event-based corrections for incomplete charge collection. Background rejection is also improved by allowing low energy events from the rear and sides of the detector to be rejected. We present experimental results of interaction depth sensing in a 5 mm thick pixellated Au-contact IMARAD CZT detector. The depth sensing was done by making simultaneous measurements of cathode and anode signals, where the interaction depth at a given energy is proportional to the ratio of cathode/anode signals. We demonstrate how a simple empirical formula describing the event distributions in the cathode/anode signal space can dramatically improve the energy resolution. We also estimate the energy and depth resolution of the detector as a function of the energy and the interaction depth. We also show a depth-sensing prototype system currently under development for EXIST in which cathode signals from 8, 16 or 32 crystals can be read-out by a small multi-channel ASIC board that is vertically edge-mounted on the cathode electrode along every second CZT crystal boundary. This allows CZT crystals to be tiled contiguously with minimum impact on throughput of incoming photons. The robust packaging is crucial in EXIST, which will employ very large area imaging CZT detector arrays.

J. Hong; E. C. Bellm; J. E. Grindlay; T. Narita

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler supplementary testing - AEAT doc 2926-2-002  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of cold testing, completed by AEAT, as part of the proof-of-principle testing for a proposed nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampling system. This sampling system will provide waste samples from the PHMC feed tank to support the privatization contract with BNFL. Proof-of-principle tests were completed with 2 wt% and 10 wt% sand/water and 25 wt% kaolin clay/water simulants with a test setup that spanned the 24 ft to 57 ft height required in the feed tank. The tests demonstrated that the system could pump and sample waste materials with low and with high solids content. In addition, the tests demonstrated a need for some design upgrades to the sampling system, as there was material loss when the sample bottle was removed from the sampling needle. These were complementary tests, completed as part of an EM-50 Tank Focus Area (TFA) to develop a sampling system for validating LAW and HLW waste batches for the Privatization Contract.

REICH, F.R.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

If*|lg1JEDIlls ,,ft-o-aS.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

»-H a3UW ·3USi «c« «"22"5"35» If*|lg1JEDIlls pV) 232 *2*& yuo = OW O5oc ,,ft-o-aS.2 F.O-a-- o :§>£ £1 2 (genetic code) Eukaryotes Sexual populations Animals, plants, fungi (cell differentiation) Colonies (non

84

Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b) SWIFTed (c) NO 1sChemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer S. Maruyama, M- fullerene and single walled carbon nanotubes are investigated through experimental studies of interaction

Maruyama, Shigeo

85

FT-ICR ,,,Carbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60 70 80 720 760 800 Ion Mass [amu] ScC60 + C64 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) ScC60FT-ICR ,�,æ,éCarbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters ·>Í­ì·³"¹1 ·C Masamichi Kohno1 , Tetsuya

Maruyama, Shigeo

86

Integration of microfluidics and FT-IR microscopy for label-free study of enzyme kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article we report on the integration of microfluidics with FT-IR microscopy for the label-free study of enzyme kinetics. The IR compatible microfluidic chip was fabricated by standard photolithography processes using a photopatternable PDMS and infrared transparent materials (Si and CaF2). Chip characterization was performed with an imaging focal plane array (FPA) detector. The enzymatic oxidation of glucose catalyzed by glucose oxidase, which served as a model system, was monitored on-chip in real time in a label-free manner using FT-IR microscopy. The reference FT-IR measurements were carried out using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) accessory. Michaelis–Menten parameters for glucose-oxidase were estimated from the spectral measurements both on-chip and off-chip. The proposed microfluidic approach for enzyme reaction monitoring serves as a novel strategy for FT-IR microscopy allowing for minimal reaction volumes, measurement automation and flexibility in terms of spatial, spectral and temporal data acquisition and offers new opportunities in kinetics studies of various bio(chemical) reactions.

Evgeny Polshin; Bert Verbruggen; Daan Witters; Bert Sels; Dirk De Vos; Bart Nicolaï; Jeroen Lammertyn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments Dan Chen School of Computer Science¨ur Theoretische Informatik Abstract A Monte Carlo approximation algorithm for the Tukey depth problem in high. Keywords: Tukey depth, computational geometry 1. Introduction Tukey depth is also known as location depth

Morin, Pat

88

Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

Bean, Keri Marie

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

90

PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 maximum depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a video camera to complete installation of the world's first regional cabled ocean observatory. NEPTUNE- tion systems that--using power and the internet--provide continuous, long-term monitoring of oceanPublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 THE 2.7km maximum depth beneath the ocean surface of neptune

Pedersen, Tom

91

Technical and economic comparison of steam-injected versus combined- cycle retrofits on FT-4 engines  

SciTech Connect

The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation of the technical and economic aspects of converting the TPM FT4 simple cycle combustion turbines into either the steam injected gas turbine (SIGT) cycle or the combined cycle (CC). It describes the selection of the best retrofit alternatives through the evaluation and data analysis of a large number of sites and units at two utilities. Conceptual designs are performed on the best retrofit alternatives. Flow diagrams and general arrangement drawings are developed for various configurations utilizing drum type and once-through type multipressure heat recovery steam generators. Auxiliary power consumption and capital cost estimates are presented together with an economic evaluation and comparison of the retrofit alternatives. While the investigation is performed utilizing the FT4 combustion turbines, the steps presented in the report may be used as a guide for investigating the conversion of other gas turbines to either cycle at any utility site.

Silaghy, F.J. (Burns and Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fast neutron background measurements at shallow depths  

SciTech Connect

We report on measurements of the neutron backgrounds for neutrino experiments at shallow depth (such as the proposed San Onofre neutrino oscillation experiment). A detector capable of pulse-shape discrimination measured the flux of fast neutrons at 20 mwe depth in the Stanford Underground Facility to be (1.07 {+-} 0.30) X 10{sup -6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. An experiment, situated in the Tendon Gallery of the San Onofre Unit 2 reactor. studied spallation neutrons from muons traversing Pb and Cu. An underground experiment in the SUF, employing a detector filled with Gd-loaded liquid scintillator, is measuring the neutron production rate and multiplicity for muon spallation in low-A material (hydrocarbon-based liquid scintillator).

Chen, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Novikov, V. [Inst. of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dougherty, B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Trapped-ion cell with improved DC potential harmonicity for FT-ICR MS  

SciTech Connect

The trapped-ion cell is a key component critical for optimal performance in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS). We have upgraded our 12 Tesla FT-ICR instrument with a new open cylindrical cell that includes four additional cylindrical segments that serve as compensation electrodes. The DC potential on the additional segments can be set to specific pre-calculated values to suppress DC trapping field anharmonicity, in an effort to improve coherence of the ion cyclotron motion and minimize deviations from the calibration function of the ideal cell. Alternatively, the compensation potentials can be set equal to potentials of adjacent cell electrodes, which creates a DC potential distribution equivalent to that of a regular open cylindrical cell. The initial experimental characterization of both the compensated and open cell configurations was performed using ESI direct infusion of a peptide mixture. Operating the compensated cell at increased post-excitation radii resulted in improved mass measurement accuracy together with increased signal intensity, while the regular configuration exhibited peak splitting and reduced signal life time under these operating conditions. The observed improvement of the compensated cell performance was consistent with the expected behavior due to the improved DC potential harmonicity. These results confirm that the trapping DC potential harmonicity is significant for optimizing FT-ICR MS performance.

Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Robinson, Errol W.; Wu, Si; Kang, Hyuk; Lourette, Natacha M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler  

SciTech Connect

This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Computers: Honeywell's New Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE recent announcement by Honeywell of a new range of computers implies that the company's acquisition of the business ... software, maintenance and so on) is fully taken into account, the advantages of the Honeywell range could turn out to be much greater. The larger members of the new ...

1971-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Magnetic Flares and the Observed Optical Depth in Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We here consider the pressure equilibrium during an intense magnetic flare above the surface of a cold accretion disk. Under the assumption that the heating source for the plasma trapped within the flaring region is an influx of energy transported inwards with a group velocity close to $c$, e.g., by magnetohydrodynamic waves, this pressure equilibrium can constrain the Thomson optical depth $\\tau_T$ to be of order unity. We suggest that this may be the reason why $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ in Seyfert Galaxies. We also consider whether current data can distinguish between the spectrum produced by a single X-ray emitting region with $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ and that formed by many different flares spanning a range of $\\tau_T$. We find that the current observations do not yet have the required energy resolution to permit such a differentiation. Thus, it is possible that the entire X-ray/$\\gamma$-ray spectrum of Seyfert Galaxies is produced by many independent magnetic flares with an optical depth $0.5<\\tau_T<2$.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift 2010 Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift. While operating a JLG Aerial lift. LBNL best practices requirements for boom lift Operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift. January 14, 2009 OSHA Letter # 20070823-7896 - Whether a manufacturer stipulated minimum anchor point elevation of 18½ feet precludes the use of a shock absorbing lanyard in an aerial lift. (See attached Letter) An adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft will keep the operator from protected from being ejected out of the lift. If a non-adjustable 6ft lanyard is used for fall restraint it is required that fall distance from the anchor point must be at a height not under

98

Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Microspectroscopic Census of Single Starch Granules for Octenyl Succinate Ester Modification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy was used to investigate reaction homogeneity of octenyl succinic anhydride modification on waxy maize starch and detect uniformity of blends of modified and native starches. For the first time, the ...

Yanjie Bai; Yong-Cheng Shi; David L. Wetzel

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

99

PMo or PW heteropoly acids supported on MCM-41 silica nanoparticles: Characterisation and FT-IR study of the adsorption of 2-butanol  

SciTech Connect

Mesoporous silica, prepared in basic conditions, has been loaded (20% weight) with 12-molybdophosphoric (PMo) or 12-tungstophosphoric (PW) acid and calcined at different temperatures ranging between 250 and 550 deg. C. The samples have been characterised by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption at -196 deg. C, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-visible diffuse reflectance, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). The acidity and catalytic activity have been, respectively, examined by monitoring the adsorption of pyridine and 2-butanol by FT-IR spectroscopy. The results indicate that PW and PMo acids are highly dispersed on mesoporous silica MCM-41 spherical nanoparticles. While PMo retains its Keggin structure up to 550 deg. C, PW decomposes at this temperature into crystalline WO{sub 3} and phosphorous oxides. In both cases, the morphology, hexagonal symmetry and long-range order observed for the support are preserved with calcination up to 450 deg. C. The Broensted-type acid sites found in all samples, whose surface concentration decreases as the calcination temperature increases, are responsible for the selective formation of cis-butene detected upon adsorption of 2-butanol. The sample containing PW calcined at 450 deg. C also shows selectivity to methyl ethyl ketone. - Graphical abstract: Samples based in MCM-41 nanoparticles loaded with tungstophosphoric and molybdophosphoric acids have been synthesised. The uncalcined solids and that derived upon their calcination in the temperature range 250-550 deg. C have been characterised and evaluated in the decomposition of 2-butanol monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy.

Carriazo, Daniel [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain); Domingo, Concepcion [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C., Serrano, 123, 28006-Madrid (Spain); Martin, Cristina [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain); Rives, Vicente [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain)], E-mail: vrives@usal.es

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Characterization of the surface properties of xylan by FT-Raman spectroscopy and wicking technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using FT-Raman spectroscopy, column wicking technique and the equations of Washburn as well as van Oss et al., the surface properties of xylan, the main component in hemicelluloses, has been characterized and estimated. Raman spectrum showed that xylan has been structured by acetyl group and methyl-bonded glucurono group. Obtained results show that the surface free energy of xylan is higher in comparison with literature reported values for cellulose because the former has a larger Lifshitz–van der Waals component than the latter. However, xylan has been found to have very smaller polarity and orientation data than that of cellulose.

Qing Shen; Lei Zhong; Jian-Feng Hu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Characterization of Irradiated Starches by Using FT-Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Degradation of starch polymers resulting in decreased viscosity and increased water solubility, and increased acidity with increasing radiation doses are potential changes observed in irradiated starches. ... FT-Raman spectra were obtained using a Nicolet 870 spectrometer with the Raman module 32B (Madison, WI) and Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a maximum power of 2 W. The system was equipped with an InGaAs (Indium?Gallium Arsenide) detector, XT-KBr beam-splitter with 180° reflective optics, and a fully motorized sample position adjustment feature. ...

Ramazan Kizil; Joseph Irudayaraj; Koushik Seetharaman

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Weak-Field Spherically Symmetric Solutions in $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study weak-field solutions having spherical symmetry in $f(T)$ gravity; to this end, we solve the field equations for a non diagonal tetrad, starting from Lagrangian in the form $f(T)=T+\\alpha T^{n}$, where $\\alpha$ is a small constant, parameterizing the departure of the theory from GR. We show that the classical spherically symmetric solutions of GR, i.e. the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter solutions, are perturbed by terms in the form $\\propto r^{2-2n}$ and discuss the impact of these perturbations in observational tests.

Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

RangeTables.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(MeVcmmg) LET vs. Range in Si for 25 MeV SEE Beams (low LET) 4 He 14 N 0 0.5 1 1.5 0 600 1200 1800 2400 3000 3600 4 He 14 N 22 Ne 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 0 100 200 300 400 500...

104

Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam.

Grün, Rebecca [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany) [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)] [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality…………… Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical noise directional density function versus depth. 93 Measured and acoustically estimated wind speeds.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Notices This document is intended for the exclusive use of elements of the Department of Energy (DOE), to include the National Nuclear Security Administration, their contractors, and other government agencies/individuals authorized to use DOE facilities. DOE disclaims any and all liability for personal injury or property damage due to use of this document in any context by any organization, group, or individual, other than during official government activities. Local DOE management is responsible for the proper execution of firearms-related programs for

107

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems David Bremner University of New de Bruxelles Pat Morin Carleton University Abstract The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p halfspace that contains p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions

Morin, Pat

108

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights  

SciTech Connect

4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

Range imaging laser radar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

Scott, Marion W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y ~L.ho-I . Y ~L.ho-I . I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286 : This dooumetlt consists 0.f 3 pages E end p. t' &ures. No. a of &copies. a Seriee A. 7 Novembar 6, 1944 Subject: Visit to Fansteel Netallurgical Corporaticn, North Chicago, Novembar 4, 1944 - AwAlabilityof~lnmbium!kkl Chapin, Simmons end I discussed witb~. C. N. B&e (ResearchDirector) . end LIr. F.L.Hunter (Chief&ineer, TanteInmDivision) availability, purity, and @co of columbiwn,metel. columbium metal is of particular interest to the Project because tuballoy-columbium alloys containing about 4$ or more of columbium are remarkably corrosion resistant. An 'order has &ready been &.ced for 30 lbs. of columbium metal, end it is cerW that large qutnititicsof them&al willbeneededin order that

112

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca  

SciTech Connect

Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

Manglos, Stephen H. (East Syracuse, NY)

1989-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Signal Fluctuations in the BIFI Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short?term and long?term fluctuation studies have been made in the BIFI Shallow X Water Acoustic Range which is 37 kyd in length. It is shown how time?smear analysis may be used to predict the extent of short?term signal fluctuation by taking into account the energy content of the “front” and “tail” of the received signal. The method is applied to an actual received signal with good results. Long?term fluctuation such as that due to tide is considered in terms of normal mode theory using the results of the time smear analysis to provide an estimate of the relative strengths of the modes. When applied to the BIFI range this method predicts that tidal effects will cause negligible fluctuations in the received signal due to the absence of modes other than the fundamental at this large range. This prediction was verified by experiment. At shorter ranges the interaction of several modes will cause relatively large fluctuations in the signal as the water depth changes during the tidal cycle.

W. G. Kanabis; B. Sussman

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Recovery of SIMS depth profiles with account for nonstationary effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work we consider a method of accounting for the nonstationary effects in recovery of SIMS depth profiles. The depth resolution function (DRF) is described by Hofmann's nonstationary MRI (mixing-roughness-information depth) model using the depth-dependent parameters. The effects in question include the nonstationary atomic mixing and development of surface roughness. A mathematical description of the nonstationary depth profiling process by the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is proposed. The inverse problem is solved using an algorithm based on the Tikhonov regularization method. The proposed nonstationary recovery method is tested on both model and real structures. The development of surface roughness in SIMS depth profiling of the real structure was observed. Grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (XRR) technique was used to verify the results of SIMS profiles restoration for periodic structure containing thin Ge layers in the Si matrix. The advantages of the proposed recovery algorithm to allow for the nonstationary effects are shown.

Pavel Andreevich Yunin; Yurii Nikolaevich Drozdov; Mikhail Nikolaevich Drozdov; Dmitry Vladimirovich Yurasov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

is implemented using a defense-in-depth approach taking into account the combination of natural and engineered barriers, performance objectives, long-term risk assessments,...

118

Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation Meeting vss031rask2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab...

119

Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry? Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen...

120

Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies More Documents &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

BOUDREAU, BERNARD P. Mean mixed depth of sediments: The ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

bioturbation. Bioturbation is the mixing of surficial sediments as a re- sult of the activity .... that the mixed depth is limited by the increasing energy costs of deeper

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

Effect of Ion Skin Depth on Relaxation of Merging Spheromaks to a Field-Reversed Configuration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of ion skin depth on the relaxation of merging spheromaks to a field-reversed configuration (FRC) is studied experimentally for a wide range of size parameter S* (ratio of minor radius to ion skin depth) from 1 to 7. The two merging spheromaks are observed to relax to an FRC or a new spheromak depending on whether the initial poloidal eigenvalue is smaller or larger than a threshold value. The bifurcation value is found to increase with decreasing size parameter S*, indicating that the low-S* condition provides a wide bifurcated range of relaxation to an FRC. The FRC-style relaxation under the low-S* conditions was accompanied by the suppression of the low-n modes (n is the toroidal mode number) activity. The fast rotations of the modes were followed by suppression of the low-n modes.

Eiichirou Kawamori and Yasushi Ono

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

Flexible Solar-Energy Harvesting System on Plastic with Thin-film LC Oscillators Operating Above ft for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flexible Solar-Energy Harvesting System on Plastic with Thin-film LC Oscillators Operating Above ft- This paper presents an energy-harvesting system consisting of amorphous-silicon (a-Si) solar cells and thin of the energy-harvesting system. The solar module consists of solar cells in series operating at an output

124

Novel Syngas Production Techniques for GTL-FT Synthesis of Gasoline Using Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel Syngas Production Techniques for GTL-FT Synthesis of Gasoline Using Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactors ... Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO, or also CPOX) is different from noncatalytic partial oxidation (POX) in that chemical conversion takes place over a catalyst bed, but it does not use a burner. ...

C. Dillerop; H. van den Berg; A. G. J. van der Ham

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 14, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low ( < 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. No. 13  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

127

FINLANDFINANCIAL TIMES SPECIAL REPORT | Wednesday May 30 2012 www.ft.com/finland-2012 | twitter.com/ftreports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FINLANDFINANCIAL TIMES SPECIAL REPORT | Wednesday May 30 2012 www.ft.com/finland-2012 | twitter." Like Greece, Portugal and Ire- land, Finland is on the geo- graphical periphery of the euro- zone in the past two years. Richer, happier and better educated than the OECD rich nations' club average, Finland

Kaski, Samuel

128

SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in the Dynamics of Coupled Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Research conducted at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility (SWiFT) in Lubbock, Texas, drew a lot of interest from attendees at the International Modal Analysis Conference held in Orlando, Florida, last February. According to a presentation given by DOE's Sandia National Laboratories, a large quantity of unique data was collected during the facility’s construction and characterization tests.

129

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

130

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported Co catalysts with desired activity, selectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Accomplishments for this quarter are: Four new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3 and five more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat; The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued; Seven new catalysts have been tested for their F-T synthesis performance; An investigation of the effect of pre-treatment (i.e. calcination in static air versus flowing air, direct reduction without prior calcination) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chemical Depth Profiling from Neutron Reflectometry  

SciTech Connect

The material profile of a thin film can be analyzed by placing the film on a substrate and by sending a neutron beam onto it at various angles of incidence. Technically, the scattering length density of the film needs to be determined as a function of depth. A reflectometer is used to measure the amount of reflection (reflectivity) as a function of the angle of incidence. Mathematically, this is equivalent to sending the neutron beam onto the film at every energy but at a fixed angle of incidence. The film profile needs to be recovered from the measured reflectivity data. Unfortunately, the unique recovery is impossible, and many distinct unrelated profiles may correspond to the same reflectivity data. In our DOE/EPSCoR sponsored research, we have developed an analytical method to uniquely recover the profile of a thin film from the measured reflectivity data. We have shown that by taking reflectivity measurements with two different substrates, one can uniquely determine the film profile. Previously, it was known that one could uniquely recover the profile by taking reflectivity measurements with three different substrates, and our findings indicate that the same goal can be accomplished by using fewer measurements. At Mississippi State University we started an informal weekly seminar (called ''the reflectometry meeting'') at to attract various undergraduate and graduate students into the field. There were about 3 undergraduate students, 6 graduate students, and 2 faculty members attending these seminars. The PI has collaborated with Dr. Norm Berk at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on various aspects of neutron reflectometry, from which various interesting problems of theoretical and practical importance have arisen. One of these problems is closely related to the important mathematical problem known as analytic extrapolation. Under appropriate conditions (known to hold in neutron reflectometry), the reflection data taken in a finite interval of neutron energies uniquely determines the data at all energies. Even though the uniqueness is assured mathematically, there are currently no available methods for analytic extrapolation. Currently, we are working on this problem as it arises in neutron reflectometry and looking for mathematical and numerical methods to extrapolate reflection data to higher and lower neutron energies. A solution to this problem is expected to have a big impact not only in neutron reflectometry, but in many areas of physics and engineering. The PI has collaborated with Prof. Paul Sacks of Iowa State University, Prof. Daniil Sarkissian of Mississippi State University, and Prof. Levon Babadzanjanz of St. Petersburg State University, Russia on mathematical and numerical aspects of neutron reflectometry. These researchers jointly worked with the PI towards the preparation of numerical routines to extract the film profile from the reflection data. We have prepared a Mathematica interface running Fortran 95 algorithms to produce reflection data from a given profile. These Fortran 95 algorithms have been prepared by updating and modifying Prof. Sacks' Fortran 77 routine and by updating Dr. Gian Felcher's (of Argonne National Laboratory) Fortran 77 routine. We are also preparing similar algorithms written in Mathematica so that they can be used without needing Fortran. We are also working towards preparing algorithms in Fortran 95 and in Mathematica to produce the film profile from the given sets of reflectivity data.

Tuncay Aktosun

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

IMPROVED BOUSSINESQ-TYPE EQUATIONS FOR HIGHLY-VARIABLE DEPTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPROVED BOUSSINESQ-TYPE EQUATIONS FOR HIGHLY-VARIABLE DEPTH JUAN CARLOS MU~NOZ GRAJALES AND ANDR´E NACHBIN Abstract. Intermediate depth, Boussinesq-type modeling is used to generalize previously known are extended from the analysis of KdV-type models to include the improved Boussinesq systems in contrast

Nachbin, André

133

Depth, and Motion inVision CMSC 436/636  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, perceived depth related #12;Head Motion Parallax Bruce and Green 90, p. 231. Kinetic Depth Effect Bruce displacement) #12;Structure from Motion Bruce and Green 90, pg. 328. #12;Image Segmentation Discontinuities Representation techniques parameters #12;Experimental Findings Control necessary for development Held

Rheingans, Penny

134

Project of Aerosol Optical Depth Change in South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Paraguay Uruguay #12;Statistics of Aerosol M ean D ec 01 to 06 Mean Month AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela

Frank, Thomas D.

135

SEU sensitive depth in a submicron SRAM technology  

SciTech Connect

This work determines experimentally and by simulation the SEU sensitive depth in a 0.6 {micro}m SRAM technology. A good correlation is obtained between the two studies in the case of heavy ions deposing energy close to the critical energy. Other simulation results complete the first investigation by studying the minimum sensitive depth for ions deposing higher energies (at greater LET).

Detcheverry, C.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J. [Univ. Montpellier II (France)] [Univ. Montpellier II (France); Ecoffet, R. [CNES, Toulouse (France)] [CNES, Toulouse (France); Duzellier, S. [DERTS, Toulouse (France)] [DERTS, Toulouse (France); Barak, J.; Lifshitz, Y. [Soreq NRC, Yahvne (Israel)] [Soreq NRC, Yahvne (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

On depth and deep points: a calculus Ivan Mizera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tukey's median) plays a fundamental role similar to that of linear functions in the mathematical (1929) and Chamberlin (1933). For multivariate location, the proposal of Tukey (1975) was developed halfspace or Tukey's depth; for other brands of depth in multivariate location see Liu, Parelius and Singh

Mizera, Ivan

137

Bifurcation and Global Dynamical Behavior of the $f(T)$ Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usually, in order to investigate the evolution of a theory, one may find the critical points of the system and then perform perturbations around these critical points to see whether they are stable or not. This local method is very useful when the initial values of the dynamical variables are not far away from the critical points. Essentially, the nonlinear effects are totally neglected in such kind of approach. Therefore, one can not tell whether the dynamical system will evolute to the stable critical points or not when the initial values of the variables do not close enough to these critical points. Furthermore, when there are two or more stable critical points in the system, local analysis can not provide the informations that which one the system will finally evolute to. In this paper, we have further developed the nullcline method to study the bifurcation phenomenon and global dynamical behaviour of the $f(T)$ theory. We overcome the shortcoming of local analysis. And it is very clear to see the evolution of the system under any initial conditions.

Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li; Li-Yan Liu

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

Analysis of historical seismograms—root mean square Lg magnitudes, yields and depths of explosions at the Semipalatinsk Test Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Geology of NRDC Seismic Station Sites in Eastern Kazakhstan, USSR US...1986b. Yield estimates of Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic...I9Xhb. Yield estimates o l Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic......

Hans Israelsson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Compressional Velocity Distribution Beneath Central and Eastern North America in the Depth Range 450–800 km  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......by nuclear explosions in Southern Nevada were used to investigate the compressional...by nuclear explosions in Southern Nevada were used to investigate the compressional...explosionswere detonated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The short-period recordingswere......

Robert P. Massé

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Generalized second law of thermodynamics in the emergent universe for some viable models of f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study is motivated by the study of reference [1], where the generalized second law of thermodynamics has been investigated for a flat FRW universe for two viable models of $f(T)$ gravity. In the present work, we have considered a non-flat universe and accordingly studied the behaviors of equation of state parameter and deceleration parameter. Subsequently, using the first law of thermodynamics we derived the expressions for the time derivative of the total entropy of a universe enveloped by apparent horizon. In the next phase, with the choice of scale factor pertaining to an emergent universe we have investigated the sign of the time derivatives of total entropy for three viable models of $f(T)$ gravity.

Rahul Ghosh; Antonio Pasqua; Surajit Chattopadhyay

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation Procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported CO catalysts with desired activity, sleectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Seven new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3. Two more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat. The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued. Fixed-bed reactor testing of the catalysts was continued. Six new catalysts were tested for their F-T synthesis performance. An investigation of the effect of pretreatment in various atmospheres (calcination in air or nitrogen prior to reduction in hydrogen, direct reduction without prior calcination, and reductiono)ddation-reduction (ROR)) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period. Under subtask 2.2 during this reporting period a total of 11 runs were made in the two slurry bubble column reactors with eleven catalysts, including five on alumina, two from Calsicat, one WGS blend, and three on silica support. Four high CO conversion runs were made. Data were compiled to compare the CO conversions and product selectivities of the-methane reduction catalysts.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially-viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. The major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. The project consists of five major tasks: catalyst development; catalyst testing; catalyst reproducibility tests; catalyst aging tests; and preliminary design and cost estimate for a demonstrate scale catalyst production facility. Technical accomplishments during this reporting period include the following. It appears that the higher activity obtained for the catalysts prepared using an organic solution and reduced directly without prior calcination was the result of higher dispersions obtained under such pretreatment. A Ru-promoted Co catalyst on alumina with 30% Co loading exhibited a 4-fold increase in dispersion and a 2-fold increase in activity in the fixed-bed reactor from that obtained with the non-promoted catalyst. Several reactor runs have again focused on pushing conversion to higher levels. The maximum conversion obtained has been 49.7% with 26g catalyst. Further investigations of the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis were started using a low activity catalyst and one of the most active catalysts. The three 1 kg catalyst batches prepared by Calsicat for the reproducibility and aging studies were tested in both the fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors under the standard reaction conditions. The effects of adding various promoters to some cobalt catalysts have also been addressed. Results are presented and discussed.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Extended depth secondary recovery: more coal for the 80's  

SciTech Connect

There are a variety of surface mining techniques presently in use which are physically or economically unable to recover all of the coal available. A new technique known as extended depth secondary recovery is presently available in the form of the Thin Seam Miner, which is able to recover 80-85% of this otherwise lost coal, to depths of 220 feet. Extended depth secondary recovery began with the auger, which has enjoyed moderate success, despite major drawbacks. Punch mining, longwall and shortwall technologies and the push-button miner all attempted to economically remine areas, with very little success. The Thin Seam Miner, on the other hand, not only recovers 80-85% of the coal in place to depths of 220 feet, but is environmentally sound, economically feasible, safe, and adapted to mine under all the seam conditions and grades of coal found in Appalachia.

Shearer, L.K.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

146

Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of silicon supersaturated with sulfur  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the luminescence of Si supersaturated with S (Si:S) using depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy as the S concentration is varied over 2 orders of magnitude ...

Fabbri, Filippo

147

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Molecular Depth Profiling of Sucrose Films: A Comparative Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cs and O Ions. Abstract: Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling of sucrose thin films were investigated using 10 keV C60+, 20 keV...

149

Effects of soil quality and depth on seed germination and seedling survival at the Nevada test site  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended in 1987, directs the US Department of Energy (DOE) to study Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, as a potential site for long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. DOE policy mandates the restoration of all lands disturbed by site characterization activities and DOE has developed an environmental program that is to be implemented during site characterization activities at Yucca.Mountain. DOE is currently conducting reclamation feasibility trials as part of this environmental program. No topsoil was saved on disturbances during early site investigation and minimal soil remains at existing disturbances on Yucca Mountain. A study was developed to test the effects of soil quality and depth on seedling emergence and survival. A series of plots was established and two treatments were tested. The first treatment compared native topsoil to subsoil imported from a borrow pit. The second treatment compared four different depth ranges of both soil types. All plots received identical seeding treatments. Seedling density was measured after emergence. Overall seedling densities were low, averaging 10.3 {plus_minus} 8.8 (SD) plants/m{sup 2}. Statistical analysis revealed a significant interaction between the two treatment factors. The subsoil had increasing densities from the deep soil depths to the shallow depths while the topsoil had increasing densities from the shallow soil depths to the deep depths. The cause of this interaction may have resulted from the bedrock being close to the soil surface of the shallow plots.

Blomquist, K.W.; Lyon, G.E.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The investigation of the effect of certain promoters (Fe, Pd, and Ru) on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis was continued during this reporting period. All catalysts were tested first at 220{degrees}C, then at higher temperatures from 240 to 280{degrees}C, while monitoring their deactivation. The choice of these promoters was based on their intrinsic ability to enhance the hydrogenation reactions while slowing down the Boudouard reaction under the conditions used in F-T synthesis. Olefin hydrogenation and CO dissociation reactions were used individually to investigate further the nature of the deactivation process of these catalyst during F-T synthesis. Hydrogenation of isobutene (IB) was carried out in the presence of CO between 120 and 180{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure. CO dissociation activities of the catalysts were measured using a pulse technique at 2.5 atm and at temperatures between 180 and 280{degrees}C with intermittent H{sub 2} bracketing at 350{degrees}C. Promotion with high loadings of Fe or Pd resulted in catalysts with relatively lower activity and higher methane selectivity. The deactivation process and rate for catalysts containing Pd or Fe were similar to those of the non-promoted or Ru-promoted alumina-supported Co catalysts tested previously. The only exception was Co.068 with 1% Pd which had adequate activity and selectivity as well as lower deactivation rate at the various temperatures tested.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Prediction of sinkage depth of footings on soft marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instability on the side walls of the cavity. Footing size and sinkage depth of prototype footings are expected to have a significant effect on side- wall instability. (6) Tests in a geotechnical centrifuge are recommended as one means of studying gravity... instability on the side walls of the cavity. Footing size and sinkage depth of prototype footings are expected to have a significant effect on side- wall instability. (6) Tests in a geotechnical centrifuge are recommended as one means of studying gravity...

Yen, Shihchieh

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps  

SciTech Connect

An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon PropyleneHydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IRSpectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Propylene hydrogenation over Pt nanoparticles supported onmesoporous silica type SBA-15 was monitored by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy at 23 ms resolution using short propylene gas pulses thatjoined a continuous flow of hydrogen in N2 (1 atm total pressure).Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 323-413 K. Propanewas formed within 100 milliseconds or faster. The CH stretching regionrevealed distinct bands for propane molecules emerging inside thenanoscale channels of the silica support. Spectral analysis gave thedistribution of the propane product between support and surrounding gasphase as function of time. Kinetic analysis showed that the escape ofpropane molecules from the channels occurred within hundreds ofmilliseconds (3.1 + 0.4 s-1 at 383 K). A steady state distribution ofpropane between gas phase and mesoporous support is established as theproduct is swept from the catalyst zone by the continuous flow ofhydrogen co-reactant. This is the first direct spectroscopic observationof emerging products of heterogeneous catalysis on nanoporous supportsunder reaction conditions.

Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Extended range chemical sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U. Cut it about 2 feet long. Cut a slot 1 inch wide by and 1 foot long along the long axis of the pipe

Navara, Kristen

156

The Application of FT-MIR Spectroscopy for the Evaluation of Energy Value, Fat Content, and Fatty Acid Composition in Selected Organic Oat Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy was investigated as a rapid and non-destructive method for the determination of selected quality parameters of oat flakes and cakes. The spec...

Magdalena Reder; Piotr Koczo?; Magdalena Wirkowska…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Cone Depth and the Center Vertex Theorem Gary L. Miller Todd Phillips Don Sheehy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We generalize the Tukey depth to use cones instead of halfspaces. We prove a generalization of the most enduring definitions of data depth is the Tukey depth, also known as the half-space depth. The Tukey depth of a point p relative to a point set S is defined as the minimum number of points on one

Miller, Gary L.

159

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM Fed) has long been one of the Nation's principal sources of proved reserves. At the end of 2009, the GOM Fed accounted for close to one-fifth of oil proved reserves (second only to Texas) and just over four percent of natural gas proved reserves (the country's seventh largest reporting region). 1 Natural gas proved reserves from the GOM Fed have gradually diminished, both volumetrically and as a percentage of overall U.S. proved reserves. The latter is especially true in recent years as onshore additions (particularly those associated with shale gas activity) have increased considerably. Proved oil reserves from

160

Heat Flow At Standard Depth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Heat Flow At Standard Depth Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow At Standard Depth Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Secular and long-term periodic changes in surface temperature cause perturbations to the geothermal gradient which may be significant to depths of at least 1000 m, and major corrections are required to determine absolute values of heat flow from the Earth's interior. However, detailed climatic models remain contentious and estimates of error in geothermal gradients differ widely. Consequently, regions of anomalous heat flow which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shutdown Planning Shutdown Planning Planning Templates Shutdown Planning Schedules: Current Shutdown Schedule Archives: 2006 - 2013 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule: 2014 Archives: 2013 | 2012 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 APS Long-Range Operations Schedule (Fiscal Year 2014) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2013-3 2014-1 2014-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

162

IPA Extensions Range: 025002AF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IPA Extensions Range: 0250­02AF This file contains an excerpt from the character code tables 0268IPA Extensions0250 025B LATIN SMALL LETTER OPEN E = LATIN SMALL LETTER EPSILON · lower-mid front

Erjavec, TomaÂ?

163

Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Isotopic effect study in the LHCD and LHH experiments in hydrogen/deuterium plasmas of the FT-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Results of comparative experimental studies of the efficiency of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and lower hybrid heating (LHH) in the FT-2 tokamak in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas are presented. In the new comparative experimental runs in deuterium/hydrogen plasmas suppression of the LHCD and beginning of the interaction of LH waves with ions is controlled by the plasma density rise. Role of parametric instabilities in CD switch-off is considered. In order to analyze the experimentally observed effect of LHCD the GRILL3D and FRTC codes has been used.

Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Dyachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Saveliev, A. N. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shatalin, S. V. [St. Petersburg State Polytekhnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stepanov, A. Yu. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

An Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS. An Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS. Abstract: Hydrogen depth distributions in silicon, zinc oxide...

166

Does footprint depth correlate with foot motion and pressure?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...correlations found across the foot by Hatala et al. [11], D'Aout...and in the heel and mid-foot, when depth was compared with...difference in the predictive power of peak pressure and the PT...applied by the trackmaker's foot during print formation is the...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Steady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-current interactions [29, 37] or flows generated by wind-shear [30] (see [6] for a comprehensive discussion than the mass-flux. It is important to note that fixing the mass-flux p0 does not fix the depth d

169

Human Activities Recognition with RGB-Depth Camera using HMM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In this paper, we propose a method to detect fall using a system made up of RGB-Depth cameras. The major benefit. An evaluation has been conducted within a real smart environment with 26 subjects which were performing any]), Gaussian Mixture Model [6], least median of squares [1], occupancy grid [5]. Then the second stage

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

Parameterised structured light imaging for depth edge detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, [amin, amax], from the projector/camera', `width of horizontal stripes, w', and `minimum detectable depth difference, rmin'. As can be seen in Fig. 1a, amax and rmin are given as the input parameters of [amin, amax] are guaranteed to be detected. However, awkwardly enough, amin is found at a later step

California at Santa Barbara, University of

171

WaveCurrent Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave­Current Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La (Longuet-Higgins 1969; Hasselmann 1971; Garrett and Smith 1976; and many others). In particular, Hassel) changes in wave momentum that absorb some of the radiation stress gradients. Garrett and Smith (1976

Smith, Jerome A.

172

Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”  

SciTech Connect

In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

175

Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass  

SciTech Connect

This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Range Condition: Key to Sustained Ranch Productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range condition, or a rangeland's "state of health," is an ecological measurement of the current condition of a range. Range condition is evaluated by the plant species composition. This leaflet explains the importance of range condition, how range...

McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Donald, Philip M. 1973. Cutting a young-growth, mixed-conifer stand to California Forest Practice Act StandardsPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 Cutting a Young-Growth, Mixed-Conifer Stand to California

Standiford, Richard B.

178

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. Hathaway, both of the Black Hills National Forest, Custer, South Dakota, provided the necessaryPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range FOREST SERVICE U. S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 Experiment Station USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 96 /1973 #12;CONTENTS

Standiford, Richard B.

179

Energy conditions in $f(T)$ gravity with non-minimal torsion-matter coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper examines the validity of energy bounds in a modified theory of gravity involving non-minimal coupling of torsion scalar and perfect fluid matter. In this respect, we formulate the general inequalities of energy conditions by assuming the flat FRW universe. For the application of these bounds, we particularly focus on two specific models that are recently proposed in literature and also choose the power law cosmology. We find the feasible constraints on the involved free parameters and evaluate their possible ranges graphically for the consistency of these energy bounds.

Zubair, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Radiative Impact of Clouds of the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth W. O'Hirok and P. Ricchiazzi Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California C. Gautier Department of Geography and Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Analysis from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) reveals that the global mean cloud optical depth is surprisingly low (i.e., τ = 3.8). While this value is probably dominated by extensive fields of cirrus, the average for liquid water clouds is also likely smaller than expected. It is in this regime (τ <10) where remote measurements of cloud optical thickness or liquid water path (LWP)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Eight-year Climatology of Dust Optical Depth on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have produced a multiannual climatology of airborne dust from Martian year 24 to 31 using multiple datasets of retrieved or estimated column optical depths. The datasets are based on observations of the Martian atmosphere from April 1999 to July 2013 made by different orbiting instruments: the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The procedure we have adopted consists of gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. Our gridding method calculates averages and uncertainties on a regularly spaced, but possibly incomplete, spatio-temporal grid, using an iterative procedure weighted in space, time, and retrieval uncertainty. In order to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the resulting gridded maps, we validat...

Montabone, L; Millour, E; Wilson, R J; Lewis, S R; Cantor, B A; Kass, D; Kleinboehl, A; Lemmon, M; Smith, M D; Wolff, M J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Joint Depth Estimation and Camera Shake Removal from Single Blurry Image Ming-Hsuan Yang1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. While depth information is critical in blur removal, the blur im- age provides an additional cueJoint Depth Estimation and Camera Shake Removal from Single Blurry Image Zhe Hu1 Li Xu2 Ming contain depth information which can be exploited. We propose to jointly estimate scene depth and remove

Yang, Ming-Hsuan

183

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan Abstract We present the first optimal algorithm to compute the maximum Tukey depth (also known as location or halfspace depth , the Tukey depth of a point q IRd is defined as: min{|P | : over all halfspaces containing q}. We

Chan, Timothy M.

184

Range Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Range Fuels Name Range Fuels Address 11101 W. 120th Avenue Place Broomfield, Colorado Zip 80021 Sector Biomass Product Uses a thermochemical process to turn biomass into synthetic gas and then fuel Website http://www.rangefuels.com/ Coordinates 39.915572°, -105.122053° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.915572,"lon":-105.122053,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

Conceptual design report for the project to install leak detection in FAST-FT-534/548/549  

SciTech Connect

This report provides conceptual designs and design recommendations for installing secondary containment and leak detection systems for three sumps at the Fluorinel and Storage Facility (FAST), CPP-666. The FAST facility is located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The three sumps receive various materials from the FAST water treatment process. This project involves sump upgrades to meet appropriate environmental requirements. The steps include: providing sump modifications or designs for the installation of leak chases and/or leakage accumulation, coating the sump concrete with a chemical resistant sealant (except for sump VES-FT-534 which is already lined with stainless steel) to act as secondary containment, lining the sumps with a primary containment system, and providing a means to detect and remove primary containment leakage that may occur.

Galloway, K.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Biological tissue imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry has seen rapid development with the commercial availability of polyatomic primary ion sources. Endogenous lipids and other small bio-molecules can now be routinely mapped on the micrometer scale. Such experiments are typically performed on time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high sensitivity and high repetition rate imaging. However, such mass analyzers lack the mass resolving power to ensure separation of isobaric ions and the mass accuracy for exact mass elemental formula assignment. We have recently reported a secondary ion mass spectrometer with the combination of a C60 primary ion gun with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) for high mass resolving power, high mass measurement accuracy and tandem mass spectrometry capabilities. In this work, high specificity and high sensitivity secondary ion FT-ICR MS was applied to chemical imaging of biological tissue. An entire rat brain tissue was measured with 150 ?m spatial resolution (75 ?m primary ion spot size) with mass resolving power (m/?m50%) of 67,500 (at m/z 750) and root-mean-square measurement accuracy less than two parts-per-million for intact phospholipids, small molecules and fragments. For the first time, ultra-high mass resolving power SIMS has been demonstrated, with m/?m50% > 3,000,000. Higher spatial resolution capabilities of the platform were tested at a spatial resolution of 20 ?m. The results represent order of magnitude improvements in mass resolving power and mass measurement accuracy for SIMS imaging and the promise of the platform for ultra-high mass resolving power and high spatial resolution imaging.

Smith, Donald F.; Kiss, Andras; Leach, Franklin E.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Date: Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow Rate: "fa" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. The given value was not understood. Flow Test...

188

Migration error in transversely isotropic media with linear velocity variation in depth  

SciTech Connect

Given the sensitivity of imaging accuracy to the velocity used in migration, migration founded (as in practice) on the erroneous assumption that a medium is isotropic can be expected to be inaccurate for steep reflectors. Here, we estimate errors in interpreted reflection time and lateral position as a function of reflector dip for transversely isotropic models in which the axis of symmetry is vertical and the medium velocity varies linearly with depth. We limit consideration to media in which ratios of the various elastic moduli are independent of depth. Tests with reflector dips up to 120 degrees on a variety of anisotropic media show errors that axe tens of wavelengths for dips beyond 90 degrees when the medium (unrealistically) is homogeneous. For a given anisotropy, the errors are smaller for inhomogeneous media; the larger the velocity gradient, the smaller the errors. For gradients that are representative of the subsurface, lateral-position errors tend to be minor for dips less than about 60 degrees, growing to two to five wavelengths as dip passes beyond 90 degrees. These errors depend on reflector depth and average velocity to the reflector only through their ratio, i.e., migrated reflection time. Migration error, which is found to be unrelated to the ratio of horizontal to vertical velocity, is such that reflections with later migrated reflection times tend to be more severely over-migrated than are those with earlier ones. Over a large range of dips, migration errors that arise when anisotropy is ignored but inhomogeneity is honored tend to be considerably smaller than those encountered when inhomogeneity is ignored in migrating data from isotropic, inhomogeneous media.

Larner, K.; Cohen, J.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Migration error in transversely isotropic media with linear velocity variation in depth  

SciTech Connect

Given the sensitivity of imaging accuracy to the velocity used in migration, migration founded (as in practice) on the erroneous assumption that a medium is isotropic can be expected to be inaccurate for steep reflectors. Here, we estimate errors in interpreted reflection time and lateral position as a function of reflector dip for transversely isotropic models in which the axis of symmetry is vertical and the medium velocity varies linearly with depth. We limit consideration to media in which ratios of the various elastic moduli are independent of depth. Tests with reflector dips up to 120 degrees on a variety of anisotropic media show errors that axe tens of wavelengths for dips beyond 90 degrees when the medium (unrealistically) is homogeneous. For a given anisotropy, the errors are smaller for inhomogeneous media; the larger the velocity gradient, the smaller the errors. For gradients that are representative of the subsurface, lateral-position errors tend to be minor for dips less than about 60 degrees, growing to two to five wavelengths as dip passes beyond 90 degrees. These errors depend on reflector depth and average velocity to the reflector only through their ratio, i.e., migrated reflection time. Migration error, which is found to be unrelated to the ratio of horizontal to vertical velocity, is such that reflections with later migrated reflection times tend to be more severely over-migrated than are those with earlier ones. Over a large range of dips, migration errors that arise when anisotropy is ignored but inhomogeneity is honored tend to be considerably smaller than those encountered when inhomogeneity is ignored in migrating data from isotropic, inhomogeneous media.

Larner, K.; Cohen, J.K.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2) 2) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2011-3 2012-1 2012-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

191

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1) 1) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2010-3 2011-1 2011-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

192

APS Long Range Operations Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3) 3) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2012-3 2013-1 2013-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

193

Normal Growth of Range Cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Brazos County, Texas BULLETIN NO. 409 MARCH, 1930 DIVISION OF RANGE ANIMAL HUSBANDRY - Lr9RARv' *n+!nmt">3~roql f', 44+lpl,9-' . 16' , ,, ..!c?! cq!!f?~c nt... of these special problems, the Texas Station presents in this Bulletin a study of the growth in weight and in measurements which actually took place in the calves born during nine years at Substation No. 14, the Ranch Experiment Station. This study so far has...

Lush, Jay L. (Jay Laurence)

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A New Robust Operator for Computer Vision: Application to Range and Intensity Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because both the foreground and background project to the same sensor pixel, and in part because along on the robustness of reconstruction techniques. First, when there are many depth discontinuities, range sensors can in the foreground and one in the background, intermingling over large image regions. The data values from one

Bystroff, Chris

195

Halite depositional facies in a solar salt pond: A key to interpreting physical energy and water depth in ancient deposits  

SciTech Connect

Subaqueous deposits of aragonite, gypsum, and halite are accumulating in shallow solar salt ponds constructed in the Pekelmeer, a sea-level salina on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Several halite facies are deposited in the crystallizer ponds in response to difference in water depth and wave energy. Cumulate halite, which originates as floating rafts, is present only along the protected, upwind margins of ponds where low-energy conditions foster their formation and preservation. Cornet crystals with peculiar mushroom- and mortarboard-shaped caps precipitate in centimetre-deep brine sheets within a couple of metres of the upwind or low-energy margins. Downwind from these margins, cornet and chevron halite precipitate on the pond floors in water depths ranging from a few centimetres to {approximately} 60 cm. Halite pisoids with radial-concentric structure are precipitated in the swash zone along downwind high-energy shorelines where they form pebbly beaches. This study suggests that primary halite facies are energy and/or depth dependent and that some primary features, if preserved in ancient halite deposits, can be used to infer physical energy conditions, subenvironments such as low- to high-energy shorelines, and extremely shallow water depths in ancient evaporite basins.

Handford, C.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Revision 0)  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) activities called for the identification and remediation of surface hot spot depleted uranium (DU) with some excavation to determine the vertical extent of contamination (NNSA/NSO, 2004). During the CAU 484 SAFER investigation (conducted November 2003 through August 2007), approximately 50 locations containing DU were identified on Antelope Lake. All but four locations (CA-1, SA-5-9, SA-12-15, and SA-4) were remediated. Figure 1-1 shows locations of the four use restriction (UR) sites. The four locations were determined to have failed the SAFER conceptual site model assumption of a small volume hot spot. Two of the locations (CA-1 and SA-5-9) were excavated to depths of 3.5 to 7 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), and a third location (SA-12-15) with a footprint of 30 by 60 ft was excavated to a depth of 0.5 ft. At the fourth site (SA-4), the discovery of unexploded ordnance (UXO) halted the excavation due to potential safety concerns. Remediation activities on Antelope Lake resulted in the removal of approximately 246 cubic yards (yd3) of DU-impacted soil from the four UR sites; however, Kiwi surveys confirmed that residual DU contamination remained at each of the four sites. (The Kiwi was a Remote Sensing Laboratory [RSL] vehicle equipped with a data-acquisition system and four sodium iodide gamma detectors. Surveys were conducted with the vehicle moving at a rate of approximately 10 miles per hour with the gamma detectors positioned 14 to 28 inches [in.] above the ground surface [NNSA/NSO, 2004]).

Mark Burmeister

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

None

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids  

SciTech Connect

We have previously reported the isomerization and hydrocracking of n-hexadecane and a n-C{sub 32} straight chain paraffin with a Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst at 170{degrees}C and 350 psig of hydrogen. This study has now been extended to the treatment of a Fisher-Tropsch wax with a carbon number range from C{sub 55}-C{sub 62}. The results reported in Table 1 show that the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst is active for the isomerization and hydrocracking of this substrate. At an 88.6 wt% conversion level, an 86.1% selectivity to isoparaffins was achieved. The products consisted mainly of C{sub 4}-C{sub 9} and C{sub 10}-C{sub 14} fractions, suitable as gasoline and diesel fuels. A feed/catalyst ratio of 6:1 was used; there was no evidence of catalytic deactivation. The melted wax is viscous and there was a decrease in conversion with time, indicating that diffusion might be a limitation for chains of very high molecular weight.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network  

SciTech Connect

Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Intermediate Depths of the Atlantic Ocean: AAIW delta^13C Variability During the Younger Dryas and Lithoherms in the Straits of Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transect of cores ranging from 798 m to 1585 m water depth in the South Atlantic Ocean document the relative intermediate water mass nutrient geometry and stable isotopic variability of AAIW during the Younger Dryas cooling event. The data reveal...

Brookshire, Brian

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 5,426 5,547 5,508 5,613 6,064 5,964 1949-2008 Crude Oil 4,783 4,829 4,836 4,846 5,111 5,094 1949-2008 Natural Gas 5,616 5,757 5,777 5,961 6,522 6,500 1949-2008 Dry Holes 5,744 5,848 5,405 5,382 5,578 5,540 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 6,744 6,579 6,272 6,187 6,247 6,322 1949-2008 Crude Oil 6,950 8,136 8,011 7,448 7,537 7,778 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,589 5,948 5,732 5,770 5,901 5,899 1949-2008 Dry Holes 6,809 6,924 6,437 6,340 6,307 6,232 1949-2008

202

Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors  

SciTech Connect

A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

Prommapan, Plegchart

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, September 25, 1992 to December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Not Available

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Exergy Analysis of a GTL Process Based on Low-Temperature Slurry F-T Reactor Technology with a Cobalt Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exergy Analysis of a GTL Process Based on Low-Temperature Slurry F-T Reactor Technology of the initial exergy of the gas is used to convert it into liquid fuel. In the present study, we analyze. Next, we use exergy analysis to establish the impact of catalyst selectivity and of thermal losses

Kjelstrup, Signe

205

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of surface waters, and can lead to changes in species composition within land and water ecosystems. AmmoniaPUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S to the formation of acid rain, which can damage sensitive ecosystems. In areas where nitrogen is a limiting

Navara, Kristen

206

Strictly finite-range potential for light and heavy nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strictly finite-range (SFR) potentials are exactly zero beyond their finite range. Single-particle energies and densities, as well as S-matrix pole trajectories, are studied in a few SFR potentials suited for the description of neutrons interacting with light and heavy nuclei. The SFR potentials considered are the standard cutoff Woods-Saxon (CWS) potentials and two potentials approaching zero smoothly: the SV potential introduced by Salamon and Vertse [Phys. Rev. C 77, 037302 (2008)] and the SS potential of Sahu and Sahu [Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 21, 1250067 (2012)]. The parameters of these latter potentials were set so that the potentials may be similar to the CWS shape. The range of the SV and SS potentials scales with the cube root of the mass number of the core like the nuclear radius itself. For light nuclei a single term of the SV potential (with a single parameter) is enough for a good description of the neutron-nucleus interaction. The trajectories are compared with a benchmark for which the starting points (belonging to potential depth zero) can be determined independently. Even the CWS potential is found to conform to this benchmark if the range is identified with the cutoff radius. For the CWS potentials some trajectories show irregular shapes, while for the SV and SS potentials all trajectories behave regularly.

P. Salamon; R. G. Lovas; R. M. Id Betan; T. Vertse; L. Balkay

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

207

Vertically Loaded Anchor: Drag Coefficient, Fall Velocity, and Penetration Depth using Laboratory Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The offshore oilfield industry is continuously developing unique and break-through technologies and systems to extract hydrocarbons from ever increasing ocean depths. Due to the extreme depths being explored presently, large anchors are being...

Cenac, William

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustable penetration depth Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2002; 54:365398 (DOI: 10.1002nme.427) Summary: data with the help of ash X-ray, e.g. penetration depth, rate of rod consumption, mass e ciency... conguration is the depth of...

209

Taking Oil and Gas Exploration to New Depths | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Taking Oil and Gas Exploration to New Depths Taking Oil and Gas Exploration to New Depths Oliver Astley 2014.11.12 The challenges of offshore, deep sea drilling are, in a word,...

210

Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies  

SciTech Connect

Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Primal--Dual Algorithms for Data Depth David Bremner, Komei Fukuda, and Vera Rosta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the generalization of the median of S by Tukey. The computation of the halfspace depth of a point is equivalent as multivariate generalizations of ranks to complement classical multivariate analysis, by Tukey (1974), Oja (1983 out that the halfspace depth of Tukey and the regression depth of Rousseeuw and Hu­ bert have all

Bremner, David

212

Validity of automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy algorithm to determine the amount of substance and the depth distribution of atoms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The author reports a systematic study of the range of validity of a previously developed algorithm for automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis which takes into account the variation in both peak intensity and the intensity in the background of inelastically scattered electrons. This test was done by first simulating spectra for the Au4d peak with gold atoms distributed in the form of a wide range of nanostructures which includes overlayers with varying thickness a 5?Å layer of atoms buried at varying depths and a substrate covered with an overlayer of varying thickness. Next the algorithm was applied to analyze these spectra. The algorithm determines the number of atoms within the outermost 3 ? of the surface. This amount of substance is denoted AOS 3 ? (where ?   is the electron inelastic mean free path). In general the determined AOS 3 ? is found to be accurate to within ?10–20% depending on the depth distribution of the atoms. The algorithm also determines a characteristic length L which was found to give unambiguous information on the depth distribution of the atoms for practically all studied cases. A set of rules for this parameter which relates the value of L to the depths where the atoms are distributed was tested and these rules were found to be generally valid with only a few exceptions. The results were found to be rather independent of the spectral energy range (from 20 to 40?eV below the peak energy) used in the analysis.

Sven Tougaard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Completion of the ORNL Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Level 4 Milestone – Sigma Team – Off-Gas – ORNL – FT-14OR031202, MS# M4FT-14OR0312027, “Support to PNNL Kr-85 Preliminary Optimization Study”, due May 30, 2014  

SciTech Connect

This letter and attached emails document the completion of the FCR&D Level 4 milestone for the Sigma Team – Off-Gas – ORNL work package (FT-14OR031202), “Support to PNNL Kr-85 Preliminary Optimization Study” (M4FT-14OR0312027), due May 30, 2014. Support to this effort included providing a literature search and providing a significant number of reference documents covering more than 30 years of past work on Kr recovery, recovery system designs, and past cost analyses. In addition, ORNL provided support on several conference calls to establish an analysis approach for the current study and to review progress.

Jubin, Robert T. [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

ft.... "'~l '1~--"", ~:.~..;.,MIT's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

' group before and they were happy in their individual dorms," said Ann Orlando, Harvard Square, said hack a hack attempt gone awry. Class of 2004 Ring Committee member Amal Dorai '04.and several r In the shooting. Hack Attempt Thwarted By Theft Of Paw From MIT Beaver Costume Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

216

Quantitative Assessment of Range Fluctuations in Charged Particle Lung Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Water equivalent path length (WEL) variations due to respiration can change the range of a charged particle beam and result in beam overshoot to critical organs or beam undershoot to tumor. We have studied range fluctuations by analyzing four-dimensional computed tomography data and quantitatively assessing potential beam overshoot. Methods and Materials: The maximal intensity volume is calculated by combining the gross tumor volume contours at each respiratory phase in the four-dimensional computed tomography study. The first target volume calculates the maximal intensity volume for the entire respiratory cycle (internal target volume [ITV]-radiotherapy [RT]), and the second target volume is the maximal intensity volume corresponding to gated RT (gated-RT, {approx}30% phase window around exhalation). A compensator at each respiratory phase is calculated. Two 'composite' compensators for ITV-RT and gated-RT are then designed by selecting the minimal compensator depth at the respective respiratory phase. These compensators are then applied to the four-dimensional computed tomography data to estimate beam penetration. Analysis metrics include range fluctuation and overshoot volume, both as a function of gantry angle. We compared WEL fluctuations observed in treating the ITV-RT versus gated-RT in 11 lung patients. Results: The WEL fluctuations were <21.8 mm-WEL and 9.5 mm-WEL for ITV-RT and gated-RT, respectively for all patients. Gated-RT reduced the beam overshoot volume by approximately a factor of four compared with ITV-RT. Such range fluctuations can affect the efficacy of treatment and result in an excessive dose to a distal critical organ. Conclusion: Time varying range fluctuation analysis provides information useful for determining appropriate patient-specific treatment parameters in charged particle RT. This analysis can also be useful for optimizing planning and delivery.

Mori, Shinichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: shinshin@nirs.go.jp; Wolfgang, John; Lu, H.-M.; Schneider, Robert; Choi, Noah C.; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Tidal dissipation and eccentricity pumping: Implications for the depth of the secondary eclipse of 55 Cnc e  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the super Earth 55 Cnc e as a case study to address an observable effect of tidal heating. We investigate whether planet-planet interactions can force the eccentricity of this planet to a level affecting the eclipse depth observed with Spitzer. Using the constant time lag tidal model, we first calculate the observed planet flux as a function of albedo and eccentricity, for different tidal dissipation constants and for two extreme cases: a planet with no heat redistribution and a planet with full heat redistribution. We derive the values of albedo and eccentricity that match the observed transit depth. We then perform N-body simulations of the planetary system including tides and General Relativity to follow the evolution of the eccentricity of planet e. We compare the range of eccentricities given by the simulations with the eccentricities required to alter the eclipse depth. We find that the eccentricity of planet e can be large enough to contribute at a measurable level to the thermal emission measur...

Bolmont, Emeline; Raymond, Sean N; Leconte, Jeremy; Hersant, Franck; Maurin, Anne-Sophie; Pericaud, Jessica

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Calibrations of filter radiometers for determination of atmospheric optical depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric optical depths are determined by relating ground-based measurements of direct solar radiation to the extraterrestrial value, I0, that a filter radiometer would read outside the atmosphere. Usually I0 is determined by the Langley extrapolation technique from a high-altitude site, where clear and highly stable atmospheric conditions may be found. Alternatively, I0 can be measured in situ from a stratospheric balloon experiment. We have employed both methods and found agreement to better than 1 %. Filter radiometers tend to change over time, especially when used operationally outdoors. Absolute calibrations in the laboratory are used to monitor the radiometric stability of filter radiometers at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD/WRC, Switzerland). A spectral calibration facility based on a calibrated trap detector from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) is used to relate the filter radiometer to an accurate and long-term traceable standard. An FEL-lamp-based standard, previously used for several years, was compared with the new trap standard via a filter radiometer at four wavelengths between 368 nm and 862 nm and revealed a systematic difference of the order of 5 %. The link between radiometric and I0 calibration is the value of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum at the filter radiometer wavelengths which can be determined from these two calibrations and compared with published values.

Ch Wehrli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina  

SciTech Connect

We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

excluded, yielding a mixture of predominantly range, pasture, grass, and riparian forest covers on sandy to sandy soils and/or flat topography, such as the Nebraska Sand Hills (Figure 1) or the interfluvial sand-groundwater ecoregions (shaded) in Nebraska. The Wet Meadow and Marsh Plain region within the Sand Hills was dropped from

Szilagyi, Jozsef

222

Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan | Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan June 26, 2014 For a couple of years now, we have been waiting to get started on the next nuclear physics long range plan (LRP). What does that mean?...

223

Medium- and Long-Range Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In contrast to short and extended range forecasts, predictions for periods beyond 5 days use time-averaged, midtropospheric height fields as their primary guidance. As time ranges are increased to 3O- and 90-day outlooks, guidance increasingly ...

A. James Wagner

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

225

American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

226

Trade?off between depth and phase of modulation in the perception of pitch of complex amplitude?modulated tones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complex amplitude?modulated (CAM) tones were generated through amplitude modulating a high?frequency carrier f carH (3–10 kHz) by an AM tone having a modulating frequency and a carrier f carL about 10% of f carH modulated at a rate f 0 in the 100?Hz range. CAM sounds have been shown to have a low pitch corresponding to f 0 whose discriminability decreases as the modulation of f carL is shifted from AM to QFM phase [S. Greenberg and P. L. Divenyi Proc. 18th Midwinter Mtg. ARO p. 55 (1995)]. In the present experiments pitchdiscrimination was measured for pairs of CAM tones having fixed f 0 differences but either variable depth (1%–200%) or variable phase (1–1.5?) of modulation in the f carL complex. Results of the experiments show a pattern of modulation depth?phase trade?off over a range is constant above and much reduced below f carH=4 kHz. These findings portray time?based pitch extraction as being a process in which phase spectrum plays a role consistent with the one proposed by W. H. Huggins [ 582–589 (1952)] in his theory. [Work supported by NIH and the VA Medical Research.

Pierre L. Divenyi; Steven Greenberg; Alain P. Algazi

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Doping-dependent anisotropic superconducting gap in Na1-?(Fe1-xCox)As from London penetration depth  

SciTech Connect

The London penetration depth was measured in single crystals of self-doped Na1-?FeAs (from under doping to optimal doping, Tc from 14 to 27 K) and electron-doped Na(Fe1-xCox)As with x ranging from undoped, x=0, to overdoped, x=0.1. In all samples, the low-temperature variation of the penetration depth exhibits a power-law dependence, ??(T)=ATn, with the exponent that varies in a domelike fashion from n˜1.1 in the underdoped, reaching a maximum of n˜1.9 in the optimally doped, and decreasing again to n˜1.3 on the overdoped side. While the anisotropy of the gap structure follows a universal domelike evolution, the exponent at optimal doping, n˜1.9, is lower than in other charge-doped Fe-based superconductors (FeSCs). The full-temperature range superfluid density, ?s(T)=?(0)/?(T)2, at optimal doping is also distinctly different from other charge-doped FeSCs but is similar to isovalently substituted BaFe2(As1-xPx)2, believed to be a nodal pnictide at optimal doping. These results suggest that the superconducting gap in Na(Fe1-xCox)As is highly anisotropic even at optimal doping.

Cho, Kyuil; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Spyrison, Nicholas; Kim, Hyunsoo; Song, Y.; Dai, Pengcheng; Zhang, C.L.; Prozorov, Ruslan

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) 1999.05.01 - 2004.05.14 Site(s) SGP General Description The MPLCOD VAP retrieves the column cloud visible optical depth using LIDAR derived backscatter from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and radiosonde thermodynamic profiles. The optical depth retrieval is derived following Comstock et al. (2001), which retrieves visible optical depth and layer average backscatter-to-extinction ratio (k) at the lidar wavelength for each backscatter profile. Data Information Data Directory Contacts Principal Investigator Jennifer Comstock (509) 372-424

229

Computing a Maximal Depth Point in the Plane Stefan Langerman # William Steiger +  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], [7],[10],[11]. One of the more familiar ones was proposed by John Tukey [12], a natural extension to d > 1 of the notion in (1). Given a set S = {P 1 , . . . , Pn} of n points in R d , the Tukey depth is a point µ of maximal depth, and we write # # = #(S) for the Tukey depth of a median. For integer k > 0 let

Langerman, Stefan

230

High-energy x-ray diffractometer for nondestructive strain depth profile measurement  

SciTech Connect

We describe a lab-based high-energy x-ray diffraction system and a new approach to nondestructively measuring strain profiles in polycrystalline samples. This technique utilizes the tungsten K{sub ?1} characteristic radiation from a standard industrial x-ray tube. We introduce a simulation model that is used to determine strain values from data collected with this system. Examples of depth profiling are shown for shot peened aluminum and titanium samples. Profiles to 1 mm depth in aluminum and 300 ?m depth in titanium with a depth resolution of 20 ?m are presented.

Al-Shorman, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan); Jensen, T. C.; Gray, J. N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Seismic evidence of negligible water carried below 400-km depth in subducting lithosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... .1038/nature09401 Seismic evidence of negligible water carried below 400-km depth in subducting lithosphereHarry W.Green IIH W

Harry W. Green II; Wang-Ping Chen; Michael R. Brudzinski

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

A new high luminosity UHV orange type magnetic spectrometer used for depth selective Mössbauer spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) a combination with an electrostatic retardation field around the sample will provide an even higher resolution. For depth selective conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy...

B. Stahl; R. Gellert; G. Klingelhöfer…

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Drazen, Jeffrey C., and Brad A. Seibel. Depth-related trends in ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

constant levels of enzymatic activity in the brains and hearts of fishes regardless of depth (Childress and Somero. 1979; Sullivan and Somero 1980; Siebenaller ...

2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effect of speckles on the depth sensitivity of laser Doppler perfusion imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical model is presented and experimentally validated that allows the prediction of the effect of speckles on the depth sensitivity of laser Doppler perfusion imaging. It is...

Rajan, V; Varghese, B; van Leeuwen, T G; Steenbergen, W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A depth-16 circuit for the AES S-box joan@imada.sdu.dk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metric (gate count, depth, energy consumption, etc.). In practice, no known techniques can reliably find. Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Southern Denmark. Partially sup- ported

236

Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth in Vicinity of Broken Clouds from Reflectance Ratios: Sensitivity Study  

SciTech Connect

We conducted a sensitivity study to better understand the potential of a new method for retrieving aerosol optical depth (AOD) under partly cloudy conditions. This method exploits reflectance ratios in the visible spectral range and provides an effective way to avoid three-dimensional (3D) cloud effects. The sensitivity study is performed for different observational conditions and random errors in input data. The results of the sensitivity study suggest that this ratio method has the ability to detect clear pixels even in close proximity to clouds. Such detection does not require a statistical analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) horizontal distribution of reflected solar radiation, and thus it could be customized for operational retrievals. In comparison with previously suggested approaches, the ratio method has the capability to increase the "harvest" of clear pixels. Similar to the traditional Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA), the ratio method has a low computational cost for retrieving AOD. In contrast to the IPA method, the ratio method provides much more accurate estimations of the AOD values under broken cloud conditions: pixel-based and domain-averaged estimations of errors in AOD are about 25% and 10%, respectively. Finally, both the ratio-based cloud screening and the accuracy of domain-averaged ratio-based AOD values do not suffer greatly when 5% random errors are introduced in the reflectances.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Depth of Maximum of Air-Shower Profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Composition Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory between December 2004 and December 2012, we have examined the implications of the distributions of depths of atmospheric shower maximum (Xmax), using a hybrid technique, for composition and hadronic interaction models. We do this by fitting the distributions with predictions from a variety of hadronic interaction models for variations in the composition of the primary cosmic rays and examining the quality of the fit. Regardless of what interaction model is assumed, we find that our data are not well described by a mix of protons and iron nuclei over most of the energy range. Acceptable fits can be obtained when intermediate masses are included, and when this is done consistent results for the proton and iron-nuclei contributions can be found using the available models. We observe a strong energy dependence of the resulting proton fractions, and find no support from any of the models for a significant contribution from iron nuclei. However, we also observe a...

,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Auger and depth profile analysis of synthetic crystals for dispersion of soft x-rays  

SciTech Connect

Numerous samples have been fabricated and analyzed as part of a program to produce soft x-ray dispersion elements for various laboratory applications. The majority of this work has centered around the carbon/tungsten system, although several other low-Z/high-Z pairs have been investigated. This report describes the development of certain vacuum-deposition techniques for fabricating these dispersion elements, based upon results obtained from x-ray reflectivity measurements and Auger depth-profile analysis. The composition of the films is chiefly alternating layers of tungsten carbide and carbon. Excess carbon is introduced during the deposition of the tungsten to ensure that the carbide layer is fully stoichiometric. Layer thickness ranged from approx. 5 to 30 A for the carbide and from approx. 15 to 80 A for the carbon. The reflectivity measurements were made using Fe and Al K/sub ..cap alpha../ at grazing incidence. The emphasis in these studies is on the application of surface-analysis results in suggesting modifications to the fabrication process and in evaluating the results such modifications have on the layer stoichiometry, continuity, and periodicity of the dispersion elements so produced.

Rachocki, K.D.; Brown, D.R.; Springer, R.W.; Arendt, P.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

Marini, Joseph Thomas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

Manhart, R.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Range Design Criteria- June 4, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document contains the currently-approved firearms "Range Design Criteria" referred to on DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations

242

From Low-Cost Depth Sensors to CAD: Cross-Domain 3D Shape Retrieval via  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications for 3D shape retrieval, such as high-quality 3D scanning, manipulation and printing. NoteFrom Low-Cost Depth Sensors to CAD: Cross-Domain 3D Shape Retrieval via Regression Tree Fields Yan@us.ibm.com Abstract. The recent advances of low-cost and mobile depth sensors dramatically extend the potential of 3D

Chang, Shih-Fu

243

Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements Seema C. Shah sediment load calculations on the basis of depth-integrated sediment concentration measurements for channels with significant sediment transport in suspension. The series expansion of the modified Einstein

Julien, Pierre Y.

244

Discussion of "Location-Scale Depth" by I. Mizera and C. H. Muller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the distance from zi (or any monotonic function of the distance) recovers the classical no- tion of Tukey depth to Tukey depth in hyperbolic space School of Information & Computer Science, Univ. of California, Irvine. By standard techniques for modeling hyperbolic space in Euclidean spaces, all the previous machinery of Tukey

Eppstein, David

245

Ecient computation of location depth contours by methods of computational geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the center of the deepest contour is called the Tukey median. The only available implemented algorithms for the depth contours and the Tukey median are slow, which limits their usefulness. In this paper we describe practice. Keywords: Bagplot, Bivariate Median, Graphical Display, Robust Estimation, Tukey Depth 1

Souvaine, Diane

246

Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

Ashworth, Stephen H.

247

Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface mobility-Hames, and Thomas P. Quinn Abstract: Bed scour, egg pocket depths, and alteration of stream-bed surfaces by spawning chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) were measured in two Pacific Northwest gravel-bedded streams. Close

Montgomery, David R.

248

Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Final quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results on the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis obtained during the last quarter confirmed that Co catalysts were very sensitive to temperature and deactivated significantly at temperatures above 240{degree}C both in the fixed bed and the slurry bubble column reactors. Following this preliminary investigation, a series of tests were carried out during this period in order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process as well as determine possible means of preventing it. In order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process, the catalysts which had undergone significant deactivation after high temperature (280{degree}C) reaction in either the fixed bed reactor or the slurry bubble column reactor were regenerated and retested in the fixed bed reactor. In both cases the catalysts recovered completely their initial activity. In addition, reactions at very high H{sub 2}CO ratios and high temperatures showed very little deactivation, suggesting that the deactivation of the Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperatures was mainly due carbon formation via the Boudouard reaction. Due to the unreactive nature of this carbon, it could only be removed by calcination. A second series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effect of certain promoters (Zr, La, Cr, and Re) as well as the effect of another support such as silica on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperature. The results suggest that the deactivation process and rate for most of these catalysts are similar to those of the alumina-supported catalysts tested previously (Co.005 and Co-053), and that none of the promoters helps to slow down the rate of carbon formation at high temperatures above 240{degree}C.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

Investigation of Compositional, Structural, and Dynamical Changes of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures on a Rat Brain by FT-IR Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An epileptic seizure originating from the activation of a group of neurons at the same time is a sudden onset of symptoms and clinical manifestations caused by an abnormal, excessive, hypersynchronous burst of electrical activity that disrupts brain functions. ... Additionally, we performed deconvolution only in the C–H region covering 3050–2800 cm–1 with 0.7 gamma factor. ... The neural networks (NNs) were first trained using FT-IR spectra of 18 water-soluble proteins whose secondary structures are known from X-ray crystallographic analysis. ...

Sevgi Turker; Gul Ilbay; Mete Severcan; Feride Severcan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to carry out a Moessbauer spectroscopy study of Iron-based catalysts to identify iron phases present and correlate with water gas shift and FT activities. A total of 15 catalysts were evaluated so far. Results are presented on the amounts in each catalyst of the following phases: superparamagnetic phase, hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), Chi-carbide phase ({chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}), and an epsilon-carbide phase ({var_epsilon}-Fe{sub 2.2}C).

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Optically thin clouds (e.g. optical depth < 3) can have a significant impact on radiative heating in the atmosphere, particularly in the cold upper troposphere. Currently, there is no value-added product (VAP) in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program archive that produces thin cloud optical depth, particularly at the Tropical Western Pacific and North Slope of Alaska sites. A VAP is under development to obtain the cirrus cloud visible optical depth from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized

254

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Herrmann, 1981) and secondary oil recovery in western Colorado at the Rangely oil field (Gibbs et al. 1973COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah

Sheehan, Anne F.

255

Photometric Calibration of High Dynamic Range Cameras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calibration of cameras with a dynamic range of more than six orders of magnitude such as complex camera re with a total dynamic range of 8 orders of luminance magnitude. Three acquisitions: without filter, using to the measurements of 6 gray patches of GretagMacbeth ColorChecker chart under 6 different illumination conditions. 0

Durand, Frédo

256

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

Transverse horizontal spatial coherence of deep arrivals at megameter ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predictions of transverse horizontal spatial coherence from path integral theory are compared with measurements for two ranges between 2000 and 3000 km. The measurements derive from a low-frequency (75 Hz) bottom-mounted source at depth 810 m near Kauai that transmitted m-sequence signals over several years to two bottom-mounted horizontal line arrays in the North Pacific. In this paper we consider the early arriving portion of the deep acoustic field at these arrays. Horizontal coherence length estimates on the order of 400 m show good agreement with lengths calculated from theory. These lengths correspond to about 1° in horizontal arrival angle variability using a simple extended spatially incoherent source model. Estimates of scintillation index log-amplitude variance and decibel intensity variance indicate that the fields were partially saturated. There was no significant seasonal variability in these measures. The scintillation index predictions agree quite well with the dataset estimates; nevertheless the scattering regime predictions (fully saturated) vary from the regime classification (partially saturated) inferred from observation. This contradictory result suggests that a fuller characterization of scattering regime metrics may be required.

Rex K. Andrew; Bruce M. Howe; James A. Mercer; The NPAL Group (J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, B. M. Howe, J. A. Mercer, W. H. Munk, R. C. Spindel, and P. F. Worcester)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Coniferous Forests of the Colorado Front Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forests along the Front Range of Colorado are exposed to elevated concentrations of ozone and other pollutants (see Chapter 3) due to emissions from the urbanized corridor stretching from Colorado Springs to D...

D. A. Graybill; D. L. Peterson…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Range Separated Brueckner Coupled Cluster Doubles Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a range-separation approximation to coupled cluster doubles (CCD) theory that successfully overcomes limitations of regular CCD when applied to the uniform electron gas. We combine the short-range ladder channel with the long-range ring channel in the presence of a Bruckner renormalized one-body interaction and obtain ground-state energies with an accuracy of 0.001 a.u./electron across a wide range of density regimes. Our scheme is particularly useful in the low-density and strongly-correlated regimes, where regular CCD has serious drawbacks. Moreover, we cure the infamous overcorrelation of approaches based on ring diagrams (i.e. the particle-hole random phase approximation). Our energies are further shown to have appropriate basis set and thermodynamic limit convergence, and overall this scheme promises energetic properties for realistic periodic and extended systems which existing methods do not possess.

Shepherd, James J; Scuseria, Gustavo E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Megatectonics of the Coast Ranges, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...folding is shearing well casings and buckling surface pipelines. There are, however, numer...sions and must be a factor in global tectonics. In the Coast Ranges...San Andreas fault has played in global tectonics. In this paper, an...

264

Long Range Campus Development Plan Existing Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design solutions and in serving members of the larger community. The Long Range Campus Development Plan environments and year-round recreation opportunities. During the summer season, daylight lasts into the evening

Maxwell, Bruce D.

265

Atmospheric Noises in SLF/ELF Ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Chap. 8, based on available materials, including public literature and non-public AD reports, and our recent work, synthesized summaries are given. By using the observation data in HF and VLF ranges, the globa...

Prof. Weiyan Pan; Dr. Kai Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Laser Range Finder Mapping of Floating Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using laser range finders as a method of navigation is popular with mobile land robots; however, there has been little research using it with water vehicles. Therefore, this thesis explores the usage and data flow of a ...

Hui, Corinna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Programmable near-infrared ranging system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high angular resolution ranging system particularly suitable for indoor plications involving mobile robot navigation and collision avoidance uses a programmable array of light emitters that can be sequentially incremented by a microprocessor. A plurality of adjustable level threshold detectors are used in an optical receiver for detecting the threshold level of the light echoes produced when light emitted from one or more of the emitters is reflected by a target or object in the scan path of the ranging system.

Everett, Jr., Hobart R. (San Diego, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Agreement Between Local and Global Measurements of the London Penetration Depth  

SciTech Connect

Recent measurements of the superconducting penetration depth in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} appeared to disagree on the magnitude and curvature of {delta}{lambda}{sub ab}(T), even near optimal doping. These measurements were carried out on different samples grown by different groups. To understand the discrepancy, we use scanning SQUID susceptometry and a tunnel diode resonator to measure the penetration depth in a single sample. The penetration depth observed by the two techniques is identical with no adjustments. We conclude that any discrepancies arise from differences between samples, either in growth or crystal preparation.

Lippman, Thomas M.; Kalisky, Beena; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Moler, Kathryn A.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Evolution of London penetration depth with scattering in single crystals of K1?xNaxFe2As2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

London penetration depth, ?(T), was measured in single crystals of K1?xNaxFe2As2, x=0 and 0.07, down to temperatures of 50 mK, ?Tc/50. Isovalent substitution of Na for K significantly increases impurity scattering, with ?(Tc) rising from 0.2 to 2.2 ?? cm, and leads to a suppression of Tc from 3.5 to 2.8 K. At the same time, a close to T-linear ??(T) in pure samples changes to almost T2 in the substituted samples. The behavior never becomes exponential as expected for the accidental nodes, as opposed to T2 dependence in superconductors with symmetry imposed line nodes. The superfluid density in the full temperature range follows a simple clean and dirty d-wave dependence, for pure and substituted samples, respectively. This result contradicts suggestions of multiband scenarios with strongly different gap structure on four sheets of the Fermi surface.

H. Kim; M. A. Tanatar; Yong Liu; Zachary Cole Sims; Chenglin Zhang; Pengcheng Dai; T. A. Lograsso; R. Prozorov

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Abstract Temperature gradient drilling has historically been a key tool in the exploration for geothermal resources in the Great Basin, USA, but regulatory, environmental, and accessibility issues, as well as the expense of drilling, are increasingly limiting its use. In cases where thermal groundwater is not overlain by near-surface cold aquifers, it is possible to augment temperature gradient drilling with temperatures measured from a 2-meter depth. We discuss the development of a rapid, efficient, and

271

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Wednesday, 25 January 2006 00:00 The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

272

Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals, Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals, for the RSS 103 instrument in Barrow, Alaska Gianelli, Scott Columbia University - NASA/GISS Lacis, Andrew NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Carlson, Barbara NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Category: Aerosols Bimodal aerosol retrievals, and high-resolution retrevals of nitrogen dioxide, are performed on the Langley optical depth data from the RSS 103 device that was situated in Barrow, Alaska between March and August in 1999. The results show a higher fine mode aerosol optical depth on average than was retrieved by the RSS 102 at the SGP site. The seasonal cycle is also reversed with high values at Barrow occurring in the spring and low values in the summer. The fine mode effective radius also appears to

273

Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and productivity (sustainability) of trees within terrestrial ecosystems. Tree planting depth, i.e. location of the root collar relative to soil grade, is of particular concern for tree growth, development, and performance in the landscape. A series of model...

Bryan, Donita Lynn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Shear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table earthquake site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................... 6 Summary of seismic refraction/reflection methodsShear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table ­ earthquake site response measurements for Valley County, Idaho Lee M. Liberty and Gabriel M. Gribler, Boise State University Center

Barrash, Warren

275

Latent heating contribution from precipitation systems with different sizes, depths and intensities in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Latent Heating (LH) from precipitation systems with different sizes, depths and convective intensities are quantified with 15 years of LH retrievals from Version 7 Precipitation Radar (PR) products of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)...

Chuntao Liu; Shoichi Shige; Yukari N. Takayabu; Edward Zipser

276

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

277

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect perceived depth Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicine 36 Department of Computer Science & Engineering WUCSE-2006-17 Summary: of the effect of color on perceived depth began in latter half of the 19th century (see Payne...

279

Ciliate diversity and distribution across an environmental and depth gradient in Long Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ciliate diversity and distribution across an environmental and depth gradient in Long Island Sound- trichia (Spirotrichea) and Choreotrichia (Spirotrichea) across an environmental gradient. We assessed SSU- tion showed any clear relationship to measured environmental parameters (temperature, salinity

Katz, Laura

280

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - aes depth profile Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73, No. 2, 1996, pp. 259--272. Summary: zone parameters Y and S, its depth H cz and the opacity (T ; ae; Y ). The basic assumption here... in mind that for a given sound speed...

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiproton depth dose Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the depth of the potential well... of antiprotons G. Gabrielse a , J. Estrada a , J.N. Tan a , P. Yesley a , N.S. Bowden a , P. Oxley a , T. Roach a... Positrons are used...

283

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Particle Size and Optical Depth Using Polarimetric Sensor Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a conceptual approach toward the remote sensing of cirrus cloud particle size and optical depth using the degree of polarization and polarized reflectance associated with the first three Stokes parameters, I, Q, and U, for the ...

S. C. Ou; K. N. Liou; Y. Takano; R. L. Slonaker

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Depth Value-Added Product A Koontz C Flynn G Hodges J Michalsky J Barnard March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S....

285

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased...

286

Uncertainty in Contaminant Concentration Fields Resulting from Atmospheric Boundary Layer Depth Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) depth uncertainty and uncertainty in atmospheric transport and dispersion (ATD) simulations is investigated by examining profiles of predicted concentrations of a contaminant. Because ...

Brian P. Reen; Kerrie J. Schmehl; George S. Young; Jared A. Lee; Sue Ellen Haupt; David R. Stauffer

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to detect and avoid obstacles. Principle Investigators: Randy Beard, Tim McLain Laser Range Finder Opti-Logic RS400 Laser path, laser detects object. 2. Upon detection, insert cylindrical object into world map and plan path

Wirthlin, Michael J.

288

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking November 6, 2007 - 5:00pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you. And let me say how much it means to have my old friend Vinodh here to introduce me. You are a true pioneer in this industry. I also want to thank Mitch for asking me to be here. It's good to see Tom Dorr from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, our partner in so much of the federal government's biomass research and development and deployment efforts. Gov. Perdue, as always, it's great to be in Georgia and to see the progress occurring here under your leadership. I want to reaffirm our support for governors and state legislators who exhibit the kind of leadership you've shown in developing America's new energy future.

290

Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

Valentine, Kenneth H. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

292

Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

Midya, Bikashkali; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Suárez, O L Ramírez; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Long-range correlations and trends in Colombian seismic time series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We detect long-range correlations and trends in time series extracted from the data of seismic events occurred since 1973 until 2011 in a rectangular region that contain mainly all the continental part of Colombia. The long-range correlations are detected by the calculation of the Hurst exponents for the time series of interevent intervals, separation distances, depth differences and magnitude differences. By using a geometrical modification of the classical R/S method that has been developed to detect long-range correlations in short time series, we find the existence of persistence for all the time series considered. We find also, by using the DFA until the third order, that the time series of interevent intervals, separation distances and depth differences are influenced by quadratic trends, while the time series of magnitude differences is influenced by a linear trend. Finally, for the time series of interevent intervals, we present an analysis of the Hurst exponent as a function of the time and the minim...

Martin-Montoya, L A; Quimbay, C J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Field evaluation of all-season tactical engine oil OE/HDO-15/40 at Ft. Knox, Kentucky and Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report, July 1984-December 1985  

SciTech Connect

Requirements for a multiviscosity grade 15W-40 engine oil were developed and the lubricant introduced for military consumption. The program efforts cover a demonstration and field-validation program of the newly introduced grade 15W-40 lubricant. The test involved a wide variety of combat, tactical, and support equipment operated by the 2D Squadron, 6th Cavalry at Fort Knox, KY, and the 3D Armored Cavalry Regiment at Fort Bliss, TX. During the test, vehicles accumulated in excess of 1,840,000 miles of operation under ambient conditions ranging from monthly low temperatures of -8 C (18 F) at Fort Knox to monthly high temperatures of 35 C (95 F) at Fort Bliss. Two-grade 15W-40, MIL-L-2104D qualified lubricants were employed in the test, one product at each of the test locations. The test lubricants were used in all equipment components, engines, transmissions, hydraulic systems, etc., that required MIL-L-2104 engine oil. Equipment within the test fleets were monitored in regard to wear performance, frequency of component replacement, and operational characteristics. Overall, the grade 15W-40 products demonstrated satisfactory and equivalent performance to single-graded oils. The oil was well received by both operators and maintenance personnel who noted that the grade 15W-40 products significantly reduced logistics burden by having only one grade product to requisition, store, and transport to the field.

Butler, W.E.; Alvarez, R.A.; Buckingham, J.P.; Owens, E.C.; Bowen, T.C.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Absolute measurements of nitric acid by kilometer pathlength FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and their intercomparison with other measurement methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of ambient nitric acid (HNO/sub 3/) and ammonia (NH/sub 3/) concentrations were conducted using a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer interfaced to an open-path, multiple-reflection optical system. These measurements provided benchmark data for gaseous HNO/sub 3/ and NH/sub 3/ during a field study, held at Claremont, California, September 11-19, 1985, which compared current analytical methods for determining nitrogenous species concentrations in the atmosphere. Hourly average concentrations of HNO/sub 3/ and NH/sub 3/ are reported, along with the calculated average concentrations for the sampling periods designated for the majority of the other measurement methods.

Winer, A.M.; Tuazon, E.C.; Biermann, H.W.; Wallington, T.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Gravitomagnetism and the Earth-Mercury range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically work out the impact of the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect on the Earth-Mercury range caused by the gravitomagnetic field of the rotating Sun. The peak-to peak nominal amplitude of the resulting time-varying signal amounts to 1.75 10^1 m over a temporal interval 2 yr. Future interplanetary laser ranging facilities should reach a cm-level in ranging to Mercury over comparable timescales; for example, the BepiColombo mission, to be launched in 2014, should reach a 4.5 - 10 cm level over 1 - 8 yr. We looked also at other Newtonian (solar quadrupole mass moment, ring of the minor asteroids, Ceres, Pallas, Vesta, Trans-Neptunian Objects) and post-Newtonian (gravitoelectric Schwarzschild solar field) dynamical effects on the Earth-Mercury range. They act as sources of systematic errors for the Lense-Thirring signal which, in turn, if not properly modeled, may bias the recovery of some key parameters of such other dynamical features of motion. Their nominal peak-to-peak amplitudes are as large as 4 10^5 m (Schwarzschild), 3 10^2 m (Sun's quadrupole), 8 10^1 m (Ceres, Pallas, Vesta), 4 m (ring of minor asteroids), 8 10^-1 m (Trans-Neptunian Objects). Their temporal patterns are different with respect to that of the gravitomagnetic signal.

Lorenzo Iorio

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nonperturbative short-range dynamics in TMDs  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers: deep inelastic processes and transverse momentum distributions; chiral symmetry breaking, including the physical picture, the dynamical model, and parton distributions; partonic structures, including transverse momentum distributions, coordinate space correlator, and short range correlations; and measurements of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, correlations, and multi-parton processes in pp interactions.

Weiss, Christian [JLAB

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Discussion of long-range weather prediction  

SciTech Connect

A group of scientists at Los Alamos have held a series of discussions of the issues in and prospects for improvements in Long-range Weather Predictions Enabled by Proving of the Atmosphere at High Space-Time Resolution. The group contained the requisite skills for a full evaluation, although this report presents only an informal discussion of the main technical issues. The group discussed all aspects of the proposal, which are grouped below into the headings: (1) predictability; (2) sensors and satellites, (3) DIAL and atmospheric sensing; (4) localized transponders; and (5) summary and integration. Briefly, the group agreed that the relative paucity of observations of the state of the atmosphere severely inhibits the accuracy of weather forecasts, and any program that leads to a more dense and uniform observational network is welcome. As shown in Long-range Weather more dense and uniform observational network is welcome. As shown in Long-range Weather Predictions, the pay-back of accurate long-range forecasts should more than justify the expenditure associated with improved observations and forecast models required. The essential step is to show that the needed technologies are available for field test and space qualification.

Canavan, G.H.

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

300

Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Machinery C T C T EET 365W Electrical Power & Machinery Laboratory C C, V V C C, V V EET 370T Energy=Virtual Laboratory, W=Web based This schedule is tentative. All Course offerings are subject to minimum enrollmentElectrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE Course Number and Name Fall 2010 Spr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Resonant invisibility with finite range interacting fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the eigenstates of two opposite spin fermions on a one-dimensional lattice with finite range interaction. The eigenstates are projected onto the set of Fock eigenstates of the noninteracting case. We find antiresonances for symmetric eigenstates, which eliminate the interaction between two symmetric Fock states when satisfying a corresponding selection rule.

Jean-Pierre Nguenang; Sergej Flach; Ramaz Khomeriki

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

High-Dynamic-Range Imaging for artists  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An introduction and overview of the practical applications and uses of high-dynamic-range imaging (HDRI) from a production point of view. The course begins with a brief overview of HDRI and pre-production, production, and post-production techniques. ...

Kirt Witte

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

6, 1018310216, 2006 Long-range transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 10183­10216, 2006 Long-range transport of Asian dust and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin and air pollutants to Taiwan: observed evidence and model simulation C.-Y. Lin 1 , Z. Wang 2 , W.-N. Chen and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

Boyer, Edmond

304

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tracking Dynamic Boundary Fronts using Range Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are being deployed for real-time monitoring applica- tions, such as detecting leakage of hazardous material location whereas in the latter approach a sensor finds approximate distance to a remote location where degrees and gather reflec- tivity and wind velocity information. Lidars (LIght Detection and Ranging

Ramamritham, Krithi

306

OUTPUT-SENSITIVE ALGORITHMS FOR TUKEY DEPTH AND RELATED PROBLEMS David Bremner Dan Chen John Iacono Stefan Langerman Pat Morin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OUTPUT-SENSITIVE ALGORITHMS FOR TUKEY DEPTH AND RELATED PROBLEMS David Bremner Dan Chen John Iacono Stefan Langerman Pat Morin ABSTRACT. The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p with respect to a finite p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions are considered

Bremner, David

307

Depth to bedrock using gravimetry in the Reno and Carson City, Nevada, basins Robert E. Abbott and John N. Louie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of geothermal wells, and one wildcat oil well. Depths in Carson City are consistent with depths from existing needed to model ground motion in the Mexico City basin. Frankel and Vidale (1992) used water well depth shaking at the surface. Poor existing gravity and well-data coverage of the basins below the rapidly

308

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-369-2141, Raymond W. Bliss Army Community Hospital, Ft. Huachuca, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from a representative of the Raymond W. Bliss Army Community Hospital concerning indoor air quality at Greely Hall, Fort Huachuca (SIC-9711), Arizona, an environmental and ventilation survey was conducted. Greely Hall was a three story, multipurpose building with approximately 120,000 feet per floor. The building housed primarily offices, but also had a cafeteria, auditorium, computer rooms, conference rooms and electronics maintenance area. Over 2100 persons worked in the building. Average carbon-dioxide (124389) levels were 584 parts per million (ppm) in the morning, increasing to 1040ppm for the last measurements made that day. The levels ranged from 350 to 1000ppm in the morning to 800 to 1800ppm in the afternoon. Inordinate temperature increases during the day were found in some areas of the building. Many of the air handling units had inoperable or closed main outside air dampers. Maintenance was poor. Improperly maintained or poorly draining condesate pans, renovation of the building without upgrading the ventilation systems and insufficient maintenance personnel were some of the problems identified. The authors conclude that the potential for thermal comfort problems and microbial contamination existed. The authors recommend measures to remedy these situations.

Klein, M.; Gunter, B.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids. Progress report, March 1, 1992--May 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

We have previously reported the isomerization and hydrocracking of n-hexadecane and a n-C{sub 32} straight chain paraffin with a Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst at 170{degrees}C and 350 psig of hydrogen. This study has now been extended to the treatment of a Fisher-Tropsch wax with a carbon number range from C{sub 55}-C{sub 62}. The results reported in Table 1 show that the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst is active for the isomerization and hydrocracking of this substrate. At an 88.6 wt% conversion level, an 86.1% selectivity to isoparaffins was achieved. The products consisted mainly of C{sub 4}-C{sub 9} and C{sub 10}-C{sub 14} fractions, suitable as gasoline and diesel fuels. A feed/catalyst ratio of 6:1 was used; there was no evidence of catalytic deactivation. The melted wax is viscous and there was a decrease in conversion with time, indicating that diffusion might be a limitation for chains of very high molecular weight.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Rangely, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rangely, Colorado: Energy Resources Rangely, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.0874759°, -108.8048292° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0874759,"lon":-108.8048292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

311

Front Range Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy LLC Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Front Range Energy LLC Name Front Range Energy LLC Address 31375 Great Western Dr Place Windsor, Colorado Zip 80550 Sector Biofuels Product Ethanol producer Website http://www.frontrangeenergy.co Coordinates 40.4605154°, -104.8565272° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4605154,"lon":-104.8565272,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Range of High-Energy Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The range of high-energy nucleon-nucleon interactions is examined in a simple single inelastic channel model which consists of the production of two spinless isobars. An almost transparent, purely absorbing optical approximation is made, in which case both the inelastic and elastic angular distributions are sensitive to the variation of the absorption coefficient ?l with angular momentum l. Unlike the case of the strong absorber, the inelastic and elastic interactions are described by different effective ranges. Two examples are given, one in which the inelastic channel has an angular distribution characteristic of a one-pion exchange process and the second in which it is characteristic of a "vacuum Regge pole" exchange.

Freda Salzman

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

PREDICTING RANGES FOR PULSARS' BRAKING INDICES  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical determination of braking indices of pulsars is still an open problem. In this paper we report results of a study concerning such determination based on a modification of the canonical model, which admits that pulsars are rotating magnetic dipoles, and on data from the seven pulsars with known braking indices. In order to test the modified model, we predict ranges for the braking indices of other pulsars.

Magalhaes, Nadja S.; Miranda, Thaysa A. [Federal University of Sao Paulo, DCET, Rua Sao Nicolau 210, Diadema, SP 09913-030 (Brazil); Frajuca, Carlos, E-mail: nadjasm@gmail.com [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sao Paulo, R. Pedro Vicente 625, Sao Paulo, SP 01109-010 (Brazil)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for silicon diodes using a plastic scintillation detector  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the perturbation factor in megavoltage electron beams for three models of silicon diodes (IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded) using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6-, 12-, and 18-MeV clinical electron beams. They also measured depth-dose curves using the IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded diodes. The authors used the depth-dose curves measured with the PSD as a perturbation-free reference to extract the perturbation factors of the diodes. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the diodes increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results show the same trend as published Monte Carlo simulation results for the EFD diode; however, the perturbations measured experimentally were greater. They found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed slightly away from the source reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: The manufacturer recommended EPOM appears to be incorrect at low electron energy (6 MeV). In addition, the perturbation factors for diodes may be greater than predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke est, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1, Canada and Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Quebec, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council (NRC), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Quebec, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

Allison, L.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Table 1 Highest tides (tide ranges) of the global ocean Country Site Tide range (m)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Climate. Indian Ocean Equatorial Currents. Internal Waves. Island Wakes. Langmuir Circula- tion and Instability. Mesoscale Eddies. Open Ocean Convection. Paci\\c Ocean Equatorial Currents. TurbulenceTable 1 Highest tides (tide ranges) of the global ocean Country Site Tide range (m) Canada Bay

Gorban, Alexander N.

317

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms of CTH-OD are now being produced by the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. There are notable differences in the histograms being produced by these three projects. In this poster we analyze some of the differences and discuss how the

318

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

319

In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs January 7, 2014 - 5:30pm Addthis These solar power collection dishes at Sandia National Labs' National Solar Thermal Test Facility are capable of some of the highest solar to electricity conversion. In January 2008, this technology set a new solar-to-grid system conversion efficiency record of 31.25 percent net efficiency rate; the technology is still available to benefit the U.S. by delivering power at all hours of the day by implementing thermal energy storage. CSP with storage provides important benefits to integrate more renewable energy to our electric power supply by mitigating resource variability and satisfying peak demand after sunset. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories.

320

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

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321

The impact of water depth on safety and environmental performance in offshore oil and gas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on an empirical analysis of company-reported incidents on oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico between 1996 and 2010. During these years, there was a dramatic increase in the water depths at which offshore oil and gas is extracted. Controlling for platform characteristics such as age, quantity of oil and gas produced, and number of producing wells, we find that incidents (such as blowouts, injuries, and oil spills) are positively correlated with deeper water. Controlling for these and other characteristics, for an average platform, each 100 feet of added depth increases the probability of a company-reported incident by 8.5%. While further research into the causal connections between water depth and platform risks is warranted, this study highlights the potential value of increased monitoring of deeper water platforms.

Lucija Muehlenbachs; Mark A. Cohen; Todd Gerarden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

APS Long Range Operations Schedule FY2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10) 10) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long-Range Operation Schedule 2009-3 2010-1 2010-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

323

APS Long Range Operations Schedule FY2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09) 09) Alternate Formats: iCal | Excel | PDF APS Long Range Operation Schedule (FY2009) 2008-3 2009-1 2009-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

324

Texas Range Plants Poisonous to Livestock.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. SYMPTOMS. Animals poisoned by guajillo appear bright and alert and have a good appetite but show varying degrees of muscular incoordi- nation. The rear legs are most commonly affected and a stilted gait, stumbling and falling and an apparent lateral... to the ground each year, Figure 9. Growth on Texas range areas starts in early spring and flowering begins in late summer. Reproduction is by seed following fall, winter and early spring rains. ( &ring tlhe spring but may appear at any time Figure 9...

Sperry, Omer Edison

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Tonopah Test Range 2030 Meeting Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Closed, Closed in Place, or Closure in Progress. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized. CASs and CAUs where contaminants and/or waste have been closed in place are summarized. There is also a table that summarizes the contaminant that has been closed at each site, if land-use restrictions are present, and if post-closure inspections are required.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Lunar laser ranging: the millimeter challenge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lunar laser ranging has provided many of the best tests of gravitation since the first Apollo astronauts landed on the Moon. The march to higher precision continues to this day, now entering the millimeter regime, and promising continued improvement in scientific results. This review introduces key aspects of the technique, details the motivations, observables, and results for a variety of science objectives, summarizes the current state of the art, highlights new developments in the field, describes the modeling challenges, and looks to the future of the enterprise.

T W Murphy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Optical range measurement system: principles and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modulated infrared beam from a LED to a targeted vehicle and receiving that being reflected, the relative distance between the host and target can be determined by the ORMS. There are basically two distinctive types of ORMS's. 1. Phase Shift ORMS... of the road, b. a vehicle parked on the shoulder of the highway, c. other targets in the scene within the effective range of the ranger. 14 A LED display could also be arranged to warn the driver, but this does not seem to be necessary. The driver may...

Roan, Tian-Ming Philip

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Retail market test: An in-depth evaluation of a new product concept for lamb.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RETAIL NAREET TS ST. AN IN-DEPTH EVALUATION Oi' A NET' PRODUCT CONCEPT FOH L&ivn A Thesis RUPERT KENNETH NA. LOS Submitted to the Oraduate College of the Texas Af:N University in partial fulfillment oi the ". Suire::ants for the degree... or FLASIcg 0: Sl IENCE August 1967 Najor Subject: Agricultural Economics RETAIL RAPE T. TEST: AN IN-DEPTH EVALUATION OF A N N PRODUCT CONCEPT FOR itANB A Thesis By ROBEPT KENNEIil NA YIOR Apptoved ia to stvi' and content by: (C'noise~an o: Convii...

Naylor, Robert Kenneth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect

This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

330

An empirical equation for penetration depth of ogive-nose projectiles into concrete targets  

SciTech Connect

We develop an empirical equation for penetration depth of ogive-nose projectiles penetrating concrete targets at normal impact. Our penetration equation contains a single, dimensionless empirical constant that depends only on the unconfined compressive strength of the target. We determine the empirical constant from penetration depth versus striking velocity data for targets with unconfined compressive strengths of nominally 14 MPa (2 ksi), 35 MPa (5 ksi), and 97 MPa (14 ksi). Predictions are in good agreement with six sets of penetration data for striking velocities between 250 and 800 m/s.

Forrestal, M J; Altman, B S [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cargile, J D [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States)] [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Hanchak, S J [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Research Inst.] [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Research Inst.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NOAA Helps the Construction Sector Build for a Changing Climate The construction industry is comprised of a wide range of business involved in engineering standards,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is comprised of a wide range of business involved in engineering standards, building design is needed to protect a building foundation from frost. In the past, standard foundation depths were inturn developed new insulation standards for protecting building foundations from frost. This resulted

332

Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

FT-ICR STUDIES OF METAL-CARBON BINARY CLUSTERS, MASAMICHI KOHNO (Eng. Res. Inst., Univ. Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656), SHUHEI INOUE (Dept. Mech. Eng., Univ.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, no pure carbon clusters were observed, whereas pure carbon clusters with almost the same intensity of MCn encapsulated inside. 50 60 70 Number of Carbon Atoms [Cm + ] Intensity(arb.units) (b) La:0.8% (a) Sc:0.8% LaAbstract FT-ICR STUDIES OF METAL-CARBON BINARY CLUSTERS, MASAMICHI KOHNO (Eng. Res. Inst., Univ

Maruyama, Shigeo

334

EXCEPTED SERVICE (EJ & EK) PAY RANGES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EXCEPTED SERVICE (EJ & EK) PAY RANGES EXCEPTED SERVICE (EJ & EK) PAY RANGES Eff. 01/03/2010 Pay Table (***Excludes applicable Locality Pay) Grade/Band Minimum Maximum GS Grade/Step Equivalent 01 $27,431 $47,103 5/1 to 9/5 02 $41,563 $68,310 9/1 to 12/5 03 $60,274 $95,989 12/1 to 14/5 04 $84,697 $133,403* 14/1 to 103% of 15/10 05 $145,700** $165,300 EX-V to EX-III *Change to maximum pay rate per DOE O 329.1 effective 03/30/2012. **Change to minimum pay rate per DOE O 329.1 effective 03/30/2012. ***Calculating salary to include Locality Pay: Example: An employee is selected for an EJ/EK position in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area which has a locality payment rate of 24.22% (locality rate for 2011) Step One: Convert locality payment percent to a decimal - 1.2422;

335

APS Long Range Schedule FY1996  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long Range Commissioning Schedule for FY1996 Long Range Commissioning Schedule for FY1996 Date First Shift 0:00-8:00 Second Shift 8:00-16:00 Third Shift 16:00-24:00 3/15/96 SR Studies 1-ID-A Shielding Verification SR Studies 3/23/96 SR Studies 3-ID-A , 2-ID-A , 3-ID-B Shielding Verifications User Beam 3/24/96 User Beam User Beam User Beam 3/25/96 User Beam 19-ID-A Shielding Verification User Beam 3/26/96 User Beam 2-ID-A , 12-BM-A Shielding Verifications User Beam 3/27/96 User Beam 5-BM-A Shielding Verification User Beam 3/28/96 User Beam 19-ID-C Shielding Verification User Beam until 20:00 3/29/96 SR Studies SR Studies SR Studies 3/30/96 SR Studies SR Studies SR Studies 3/31/96 SR Studies SR Studies SR Studies 4/1/96 SR Studies SR Studies SR Studies 4/2/96 SR Studies 5-BM-B Shielding Verification User Beam

336

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

Human Motion Capture Using 3D Reconstruction Based on Multiple Depth Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human motion is a critical aspect of interacting, even between people. It has become an interesting field to exploit in human-robot interaction. Even with today's computing power, it remains a difficult task to successfully follow the human's motion ... Keywords: human posture reconstruction, depth sensing, sensor fusion, machine learning, voxel

Wassim Filali; Jean-Thomas Masse; Frederic Lerasle; Jean-Louis Boizard; Michel Devy

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Synchronized B and 13 C Diamond Delta Structures for an Ultimate In-Depth Chemical Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiles in diamond was achieved by the determination of the depth resolution function (DRF). The measurement of this DRF was performed thanks to isotopic-enriched diamond. Applied to boron delta-doped diamond structures, this analysis has resolved edge widths close to 0.3 nm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Estimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-independent estimate of the total heat output of Cenozoic seafloor is 18.6 to 20.5 TW, which leads to a global output: Oceanic heat flow; Global heat budget; Subsidence rate 1. Introduction The total heat output of the EarthEstimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data Meng Wei , David

Sandwell, David T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on simulated mixed layer depth and upper ocean temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on simulated mixed layer depth and upper ocean temperature. Citation: Lee, T., and W. T. Liu (2005), Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on simulated mixed layer 2005. [1] Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing

Talley, Lynne D.

342

Estimates of North American summertime planetary boundary layer depths derived from space-borne lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), are sensitive to empirical parameters in addition to the diagnostic method chosen and verification by direct determines the PBL depth using the TKE (turbulent kinetic energy) method. This method identifies the PBL exchanges of energy, moisture, momentum, carbon, and pollutants between the surface and the atmosphere

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

343

Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G Received 23 June 2000; published 12 October 2000 The yield of neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons of one and two neutron captures was determined. Modeling the neutron capture efficiency allowed us

Piepke, Andreas G.

344

Influence of sample degradation and tissue depth on blubber cortisol in beluga whales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cortisol concentrations in a variety of biological tissues have been used to obtain short-term to long-term estimates of activation of the physiological stress response. In recent years, blubber has been demonstrated to be a good candidate tissue from which to extract steroid hormones, but no method for extracting cortisol from blubber of any marine mammal has been published and the effects of sample storage and variation in blubber depth on cortisol concentrations are unknown. The objectives of this study were to identify a method for extracting cortisol from blubber in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and to evaluate the concentration of hormones in relation to blubber depth and degradation from long-term storage using samples collected and archived over the past 30 years. Cortisol was extracted from blubber of beluga whales by modifying an existing progesterone-blubber extraction method. Cortisol concentrations were lower in degraded samples, but time in storage did not affect cortisol after controlling for sample quality. Cortisol concentrations increased with blubber depth, with highest concentrations in blubber closest to the muscle. These results show that although cortisol in blubber samples collected and archived prior to extraction may be degraded, high quality samples without visible degradation after long-term storage can still yield useful measures of cortisol. Additionally, sample depth should be controlled for during sample collection. These findings provide necessary information for developing accurate sampling protocols for extracting cortisol from blubber of marine mammals, including sampling by biopsy dart.

Marci R. Trana; James D. Roth; Gregg T. Tomy; W. Gary Anderson; Steven H. Ferguson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations with a [ iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.1±0.0. Noat all depths with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0. Thiswith ethyl nitrate with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0.

Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Scene-adaptive accurate and fast vertical crowd counting via joint using depth and color information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reliable and real-time crowd counting is one of the most important tasks in intelligent visual surveillance systems. Most previous works only count passing people based on color information. Owing to the restrictions of color information influences themselves ... Keywords: Crowd counting, Multimodal joint multimedia processing, Ordinary depth camera, Real time system, Scene-adaptive scheme

Huiyuan Fu, Huadong Ma, Hongtian Xiao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The TUM Gait from Audio, Image and Depth (GAID) database: Multimodal recognition of subjects and traits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recognizing people by the way they walk-also known as gait recognition-has been studied extensively in the recent past. Recent gait recognition methods solely focus on data extracted from an RGB video stream. With this work, we provide a means for multimodal ... Keywords: Acoustic gait recognition, Depth gradient histogram energy image, Gait energy image, Gait recognition, Multimodal fusion, Soft biometrics

Martin Hofmann; Jürgen Geiger; Sebastian Bachmann; Björn Schuller; Gerhard Rigoll

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Creating a stereoscopic magic-lens to improve depth perception in handheld augmented reality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Handheld Augmented Reality (AR) is often presented using the magic-lens paradigm where the handheld device is portrayed as if it was transparent. Such a virtual transparency is usually implemented using video captured by a single camera rendered on the ... Keywords: binocular disparity, depth perception, handheld, mobile, parallax, stereoscopic rendering, user study, virtual transparency

Klen ?opi? Pucihar; Paul Coulton; Jason Alexander

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow processes of storm and wave reworking influence the seabed through submarine erosion and sediment

Purkis, Sam

350

Pose Estimation from a Single Depth Image for Arbitrary Kinematic Skeletons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a variety of applications (eg. [8]). While recent tech- nological advances have made capturing depth images Saxena2 and Hod Lipson1 1 School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2 Department of Computer Science Cornell University, Ithaca, NY dll73@cornell.edu, asaxena@cs.cornell.edu, hod

Wikswo, John

351

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Effects of induced flow on the depths of active back-arc basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The depth of active back-arc basins, younger than 10 Ma is correlated to the angle of subduction, in that the deepest basins are associated with steep angles of subduction, and the shallowest to small angles of subduction. A two-dimensional comer...

Tomlins, Robynn Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

Southampton, University of

354

Grassmannian Representation of Motion Depth for 3D Human Gesture and Action Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

benefit from the geometric structure of the Grassmaniann manifold. The experimental evaluation- care systems and smart home systems [3]. The main challenges in almost action recognition system al. [5], represent each depth map sequence as a 4D grid by dividing the space and time axes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

355

Depth and controls of Ca-rhodochrosite precipitation in bioturbated sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depth and controls of Ca-rhodochrosite precipitation in bioturbated sediments of the Eastern Road, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9647, USA ABSTRACT The occurrence of early diagenetic Ca-rhodochrosite [(Mn,Ca)CO3] is reported in association with `griotte'-type nodular limestones from basinal settings

Gilli, Adrian

356

Proper management of wildlife populations requires an in-depth knowledge of habitat require-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper management of wildlife populations requires an in-depth knowledge of habitat require- ments not call at wind speeds > 4.8 km/h and with clear to foggy skies. Frogs called at tempera- tures > 14°C and wind speeds

McCallum, Malcolm

357

Rapid optical method for logging dust concentration versus depth in glacial ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a cable that can lower the device down a 3-in. 7.5-cm borehole filled with butyl acetate. LED photons to the attenuation by particles.6 The AMANDA collaboration recently completed a large observatory, buried in deep a hot-water drilling tech- nique, they melted cylindrical holes down to depths of 2000 m in which were

Price, P. Buford

358

The E-utilities In-Depth: Parameters, Syntax and More Eric Sayers, PhD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The E-utilities In-Depth: Parameters, Syntax and More Eric Sayers, PhD NCBI sayers@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Introduction This chapter serves as a reference for all supported parameters for the E-utilities, along with accepted values and usage guidelines. This information is provided for each E-utility in sections below

Levin, Judith G.

359

Intermediate-depth Circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomous Floats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intermediate-depth Circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomous Floats of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, 306 autonomous floats were deployed in the tropical and South autonomous floats that are not acoustically tracked, but rather surface at regular intervals to be located by

Davis, Russ

360

London penetration depth and coherence length of SU(3) vacuum flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transverse profile of the chromoelectric field generated by a quark-antiquark pair in the SU(3) vacuum is analysed within the dual superconductor scenario, then the London penetration depth and coherence length are extracted. The color field is determined on the lattice through a connected correlator of two Polyakov loops measured on smeared configurations.

Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai; Francesca Cuteri; Alessandro Papa

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

3D MODEL RETRIEVAL BASED ON DEPTH LINE DESCRIPTOR Mohamed Chaouch and Anne Verroust-Blondet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D MODEL RETRIEVAL BASED ON DEPTH LINE DESCRIPTOR Mohamed Chaouch and Anne Verroust-Blondet INRIA.verroust}@inria.fr. ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose a novel 2D/3D approach for 3D model matching and retrieving. Each model information provides a more accurate description of 3D shape boundaries than using other 2D shape descriptors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

3D VIDEO QUALITY EVALUATION WITH DEPTH QUALITY VARIATIONS Gustavo Leon, Hari Kalva, and Borko Furht  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D VIDEO QUALITY EVALUATION WITH DEPTH QUALITY VARIATIONS Gustavo Leon, Hari Kalva, and Borko Furht on 3D video perception on autostereoscopic displays. This study was done using objective as well image quality and compression on the perceived 3D experience. Another objective is to evaluate the use

Kalva, Hari

363

Vertical Spatial Sensitivity and Exploration Depth of Low-Induction-Number Electromagnetic-Induction Instruments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...overestimates of d e and poor estimates of layer thickness and composition, water content, or depth to interfaces such as the water...agricultural fields with GPR and EMI to identify offsite movement of agrochemicals. J. Appl. Geophys. 47:251-259. georef;2007029067...

James B. Callegary; Ty P. A. Ferré; R. W. Groom

364

CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH are used for the transport of drinking water. However, disinfectants in water seem to have a strong impact for the distribution of drinking water. HDPE pipes are exposed to an internal pressure due to water flow. Furthermore

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

Henderson, Gideon

366

Are there significant hydrothermal resources in the US part of the Cascade Range?  

SciTech Connect

The Cascade Range is a geothermal dichotomy. On the one hand, it is an active volcanic arc above a subducting plate and is demonstrably an area of high heat flow. On the other hand, the distribution of hydrothermal manifestations compared to other volcanic arcs is sparse, and the hydrothermal outflow calculated from stream chemistry is low. Several large estimates of undiscovered geothermal resources in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range prepared in the 1970s and early 1980s were based fundamentally on two models of the upper crust. One model assumed that large, partly molten, intrusive bodies exist in the upper 10 km beneath major volcanic centers and serve as the thermal engines driving overlying hydrothermal systems. The other model interpreted the coincident heat-flow and gravity gradients west of the Cascade crest in central Oregon to indicate a partly molten heat source at 10 {+-} 2 km depth extending {approx}30 km west from the axis of the range. Investigations of the past ten years have called both models into question. Large long-lived high-temperature hydrothermal systems at depths <3 km in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range appear to be restricted to silicic domefields at the Lassen volcanic center, Medicine Lake volcano, Newberry volcano, and possibly the Three Sisters. Federal land-use restrictions further reduce this list to Medicine Lake and Newberry. Dominantly andesitic stratocones appear to support only small transitory hydrothermal systems related to small intrusive bodies along the volcanic conduits. The only young caldera, at Crater Lake, supports only low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems. Most of the Cascade Range comprises basaltic andesites and has little likelihood for high-level silicic intrusions and virtually no potential for resultant large high-temperature hydrothermal systems. Undiscovered hydrothermal resources of the Cascade Range of the United States are substantially lower than previous estimates. The range does have potential for intermediate-temperature hot dry rock and localized low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems.

Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Guffanti, Marianne

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Use of Silicon Structures with Rapid Doping Level Transitions to Explore the Limitations of SIMS Depth Profiling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Semiconductor devices continue to shrink, with an immediate prospect of spatial dimensions ?1µm laterally and SIMS depth resolution of ?lµm (2...

M. G. Dowsett; D. S. McPhail; R. A. A. Kubiak…

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Feasibility of the Application of a Spar-type Wind Turbine at a Moderate Water Depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility of the application of a spar-type wind turbine at a moderate water depth is studied in this paper. In the oil and gas industries, spar-type offshore platforms are widely applied in deep water. The same idea is used in offshore wind technology to present the Hywind concept based on a catenary moored spar in deep water. The draft of the spar limits the application of spar-type wind turbines in shallow water. However, it is possible to design spar-type wind turbines for moderate water depths. The present article studies the feasibility and performance of such a design. A spar-type wind turbine at a moderate water depth called “ShortSpar” is introduced in the present article. A catenary moored spar-type support structure is applied as a base for the 5-MW NREL land-based turbine. The power performance, structural integrity and dynamic responses of a 5-MW catenary moored spar-type wind turbine in deep water (DeepSpar) have previously been studied. In the present article, the responses of the spar-type wind turbines, ShortSpar and DeepSpar, are compared. The HAWC2 code is used to carry out the coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic analyses. Different environmental conditions are used to compare the responses. A dynamic link library (DLL) is used to feed the mooring forces at each time step into the HAWC2 code. The force-displacement relationships are obtained from the Simo-Riflex code. The comparison of the responses of ShortSpar and DeepSpar in different load cases indicates the feasibility of implementation of spar-type wind turbine in moderate water depths. The results show that the spar-type wind turbine at a moderate water depth exhibits good performance, and its responses are reasonable compared with those associated with a spar-type wind turbine in deep water. The total mass (the structural mass plus the ballast) of ShortSpar is 35% less than the mass of DeepSpar, while the statistical characteristics of the generated power are almost the same for both spars. This mass reduction for ShortSpar helps to achieve a more cost-effective solution for floating wind turbines at a moderate water depth.

Madjid Karimirad; Torgeir Moan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1 PNWD-SA-7032 Range Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Software Range Sustainability ModuleRange Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 2 PNWD-SA-7032 / 2 ObjectiveObjectiveObjective Learn how to use the Range

370

Assess in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3c LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

371

Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Effective Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings J. Woods, J. Winkler, and D. Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-57441 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings J. Woods, J. Winkler, and D. Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. BE12.0201

372

[Geothermal system temperature-depth database and model for data analysis]. 5. quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

During this first quarter of the second year of the contract activity has involved several different tasks. The author has continued to work on three tasks most intensively during this quarter: the task of implementing the data base for geothermal system temperature-depth, the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and finally the development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. The author has completed the task of developing a data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth data that can be used in conjunction with the regional data base that he had already developed and is now implementing it. Progress is described.

Blackwell, D.D.

1998-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Measurement of atmospheric production depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is possible to reconstruct a muon production depth distribution. We characterize the goodness of this reconstruction for zenith angles around 60 deg. and different energies of the primary particle. From these distributions we define X(mu)max as the depth along the shower axis where the production of muons reaches maximum. We explore the potentiality of X(mu)max as a useful observable to infer the mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Likewise, we assess its ability to constrain hadronic interaction models.

Pierre Auger Collaboration

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

374

Report on Analysis of Forest Floor Bulk Density and Depth at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect

The forest floor data from the Savannah River Site consists of two layers, the litter layer and the duff layer. The purpose for the study was to determine bulk density conversion factors to convert litter and duff depth values in inches to forest floor fuel values in tons per acre. The primary objective was to collect litter and duff samples to adequately characterize forest floor depth and bulk density for combinations of 4 common forest types (loblolly/slash pine, longleaf pine, pine and hardwood mix, upland hardwood), 3 age classes (5-20, 20-40, 40+ years old) and 3 categories of burning history (0-3, 3-10, 10+ years since last burn).

Bernard R. Parresol

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Contour Charts of SOFAR Speed and Axis Depth in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sound speeds calculated from the physical properties of sea water as measured at hydrographic stations were used to construct contour charts of SOFAR?speed and SOFAR?axis depth for the Pacific Ocean. Wilson's formula was used for the calculation of speed. Data were averaged for 1° squares plotted and smooth contours were drawn manually. Speeds averaged along great?circle paths are compared with those measured for explosions. The charts show steep gradients along the Antarctic convergence and at the convergence of the Oyashio and Kuroshio extension. The region of highest speed as well as greatest axis depth was that extending eastward from Australia to about the 150°W. The charts are used in a program for calculating source coordinates of earthquakeT phases.

Rockne H. Johnson; Roger A. Norris

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Multi-mode wavepath depth imaging for the SEG/EAGE salt model  

SciTech Connect

Elastic depth imaging of both P-wave and S-wave prestack seismic reflection data is formulated as a degraded form of Kirchhoff migration known as Wavepath Migration (WM). Applications to the SEG/EAGE salt model show that the method is sufficiently versatile anti relaitively inexpensive. It handles S-wave data with at least the same accuracy as Pwave data when local mode conversions are removed. WM also provides an understanding of multi-mode illumination.

Druzhinin, A. (Alexander); House, L. S. (Leigh S.); Pajchel, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damping of magnetic fields via ambipolar diffusion and decay of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in the post decoupling era heats the intergalactic medium (IGM). Collisional ionization weakly ionizes the IGM, producing an optical depth to scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The optical depth generated at $z\\gg 10$ does not affect the "reionization bump" of the CMB polarization power spectrum at low multipoles, but affects the temperature and polarization power spectra at high multipoles. Using the Planck 2013 temperature and lensing data together with the WMAP 9-year polarization data, we constrain the present-day field strength, $B_0$, smoothed over the damping length at the decoupling epoch as a function of the spectral index, $n_B$. We find the 95% upper bounds of $B_0<0.56$, 0.31, and 0.14 nG for $n_B=-2.9$, $-2.5$, and $-1.5$, respectively. For these spectral indices, the optical depth is dominated by dissipation of the decaying MHD turbulence that occurs shortly after the decou...

Kunze, Kerstin E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

TOF-SIMS/MALDI-TOF combination for the molecular weight depth profiling of polymeric bilayer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A polymeric bilayer composed of two poly(styrene) layers differing by their molecular weights (MW) was elaborated to mimic a MW gradient and analyzed by a combination of TOF-SIMS, MALDI-MS and Nanoscratch (NS). A direct TOF-SIMS profiling conducted using a Cs+ ion beam lead to the detection of fragments from carbonated layers without any data about their MW, making the fine bilayer architecture indistinguishable. Spots of various depths were hence created using the same Cs+ ion bombardment for different sputtering times, and further mass-analyzed by the recently developed Surface-Layer MALDI-MS technique, to evaluate the MW of the very top polymeric layer of each crater. The off-line combination of ion etching and LASER analysis allowed a molecular weight depth profile to be plotted, as a function of the physical depth measured by NS in each crater (instead of the usual sputter time). This original coupling is expected to provide useful molecular and/or molecular weight data about complex organic and/or polymeric multi-layers or gradients.

Thierry Fouquet; Grégory Mertz; Nicolas Desbenoit; Gilles Frache; David Ruch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Long Range Correlations of Light Intensity inside Photonic Nanostructures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We measured directly long range spatial intensity correlations inside quasi-two dimensional disordered photonic waveguides. Enhancement of long-range correlations is observed in...

Sarma, Raktim; Yamilov, Alexey G; Shapiro, Boris; Cao, Hui

380

Probing Long Range Intensity Correlations inside Disordered Photonic Waveguides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report direct measurements of long-range spatial intensity correlations and fluctuations inside quasi-two-dimensional random structures. Long-range correlations are enhanced by...

Sarma, Raktim; Yamilov, Alexey; Neupane, Pauf; Shapiro, Boris; Cao, Hui

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

T-710: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service Vulnerability T-710: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service Vulnerability September 6, 2011 - 3:09am...

382

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal...

383

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

384

American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine, and Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine warming has been happening � What might have caused global warming � Whether global warming

Ford, Andrew

385

Reconstruction of original indium distribution in InGaAs quantum wells from experimental SIMS depth profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Depth profiling analysis of InGaAs/GaAs hetero-structures grown by MBE on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates is reported. A novel two-step procedure for de-convolving experimental SIMS depth distribution is employed and the original In distribution in InGaAs quantum wells (QW) is estimated. The QW thickness calculated from the de-convolved profiles is shown to be in good agreement with the cross-sectional TEM images. The experimental In depth profile is shifted from the original In distribution due to the ion mixing process during depth profiling analysis. It is shown that the de-convolution procedure is suitable for reconstruction of the original QW width and depth by SIMS even for relatively high primary ion energies.

Yu. Kudriavtsev; R. Asomoza; S. Gallardo-Hernandez; M. Ramirez-Lopez; M. Lopez-Lopez; V. Nevedomsky; K. Moiseev

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An Experiment in Earthquake Control at Rangely, Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dis-placement within the weak Mancos shale was distributed over a broad zone. In...ThickDepthFormation ness (in) (m) Mancos shale 990 990 Dakota sandstone 93 1083 Morrison...reservoir model, we experimented with anisotropic permeability along the fault zone, making...

C. B. Raleigh; J. H. Healy; J. D. Bredehoeft

1976-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

387

Range Con: a management evaluation system for assessing sucess of selected range improvement practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interview, and 80 identified agency/academic and rancher tertiary experts interviewed with a questionnaire. Responses from the tertiary experts were used to assign weight to values of the object/attribute/value triplet. Face validation procedures... success he assigned to the evaluation due to his greater level of knowledge associated with the technology. Range management experts experience the same processes, which often leads them to recommend technology to ranchers that exceeds the ranchers...

Ekblad, Steven Linn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

388

Range-gated field disturbance sensor with range-sensitivity compensation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudorandomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. 8 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Open fissure mineralization at 2600 m depth in Long Valley Exploratory Well (California) – insight into the history of the hydrothermal system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Long Valley Exploratory Well, drilled into the Resurgent Dome at Long Valley Caldera (California) to explore the potential of geothermal power in an active magmatic system, achieved temperatures of only ca. 100°C at 2500–3000 m depth, well below the range expected atop an active magma chamber. Open fissures encountered at 2600 m depth are coated by mm-sized idiomorphic quartz crystals with first- and second-order growth discontinuities. Specific growth defects indicating rapid crystallization reflect sudden changes in SiO2 supersaturation. Fluid inclusions contain low salinity (0–5 wt% NaCl) and low CO2 (<3 mole%) aqueous fluids, with V–L homogenization temperatures of 300–350°C, indicating trapping at more than 200°C above the ambient temperatures measured within the borehole today. Fluid composition and inclusion density varies between and within the growth zones, reflecting progressive changes in the hydrothermal system during crystallization. Episodic crystallization from supersaturated fluids is interpreted to reflect sudden changes in the convection pattern, presumably induced by seismic activity, with a more recent and dramatic reorganization resulting in convective cooling. The quartz crystals are sensitive recorders of the earlier higher temperature history, unaffected by the present-day situation.

M. Fischer; K. Röller; M. Küster; B. Stöckhert; V.S. McConnell

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Depth of Interaction Enhanced Gamma-Ray Imaging for Medical Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel design for an inexpensive depth of interaction capable detector for gamma rays, suitable for nuclear medical applications, especially Positron Emission Tomography, has been developed. The design takes advantage of the strong correlation between the width of the scintillation light distribution in continuous crystals and the depth of interaction of the gamma-ray. For measuring the distribution width, an inexpensive modification of the commonly used charge dividing circuits that allows analogue and instantaneous computation of the 2nd moment has been developed and is presented in this work. The method has been tested with a detector made of a continuous LSO-scintillator of dimensions 42x42x10 cubic mm and optically coupled to the compact large area position sensitive photomultiplier H8500 from Hamamatsu. The mean resolution in all non-trivial moments was found to be smaller than 5% but their direct use as estimates for the three-dimensional photoconversion position turned out to be unsuitable. Standard polynomial interpolation in higher dimensions has been adopted to reconstruct the impact positions of the gamma-rays from the measured moments. When using the reconstructed impact positions, the intrinsic mean spatial resolution of the detector was found to be 1.9 mm for the transverse components and 3.9 mm for the depth of interaction. Using directly the bare moments as position estimate, the intrinsic mean spatial resolution of the detector was found to be 3.4 mm and 4.9 mm, respectively. The cost for the required detector improvements are essentially negligible.

Christoph W. Lerche

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hardness measurements of Ar[sup +]-beam treated polyimide by depth-sensing ultra low load indentation  

SciTech Connect

Polyimide Kapton and spin-cast polyamic acid (PAA) on sapphire have been implanted with 1 MeV Ar ions to a dose of 4.7[times]10[sup 15] cm[sup [minus]2] at ambient temperature. The properties of both pristine and implanted surfaces were characterized by a depth-sensing low-load indentation technique. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of substrate, indentation rate, relaxation, and indentation technique. The results showed that (1) hardness was depth-dependent and decreased with increasing indentation depth, (2) measurements of the ion beam hardened surface with the untreated material as a substrate underestimated the hardness while measurements over the sapphire substrate overestimated it, (3) the effects of loading/unloading rates were apparent in the load displacement results, and (4) hardness values measured using the force modulation technique showed very little depth dependence. The hardness value at 100 nm depth is used for comparison purposes since the hardness value at this depth was almost independent of substrate, indentation rate, and indentation method. The hardness of Kapton, which was measured using the techniques described herein, was increased by over 30 times after Ar implantation, from 0.43 to 13 GPa at 100 nm indentation depth. A similar increase in hardness was also observed for polyamic acid. This result suggests that spin-cast PAA film may have potential technological applications for protective coatings where hardness and wear resistance are required.

Lee, E.H.; Lee, Y.; Oliver, W.C.; Mansur, L.K. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

In-depth analysis of CIGS film for solar cells, structural and optical characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements performed on gradient-etched CuIn$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$Se$_2$ (CIGS) solar cells provide information about stress and texture depth profiles in the absorber layer. An important parameter for CIGS layer growth dynamics, the absorber thickness-dependent stress in the molybdenum back contact is analyzed. Texturing of grains and quality of the polycrystalline absorber layer are correlated with the intentional composition gradients (band gap grading). Band gap gradient is determined by space-resolved photoluminescence measurements and correlated with composition and strain profiles.

Slobodskyy, A; ~Ulyanenkova, T; ~Doyle, S; Powalla, M; ~Baumbach, T; ~Lemmer, U

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Interpretation of the depths of maximum of extensive air showers measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect

To interpret the mean depth of cosmic ray air shower maximum and its dispersion, we parametrize those two observables as functions of the first two moments of the ln A distribution. We examine the goodness of this simple method through simulations of test mass distributions. The application of the parameterization to Pierre Auger Observatory data allows one to study the energy dependence of the mean ln A and of its variance under the assumption of selected hadronic interaction models. We discuss possible implications of these dependences in term of interaction models and astrophysical cosmic ray sources.

Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Wide tracking range, auto ranging, low jitter phase lock loop for swept and fixed frequency systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a wide tracking range phase locked loop (PLL) circuit that achieves minimal jitter in a recovered clock signal, regardless of the source of the jitter (i.e. whether it is in the source or the transmission media). The present invention PLL has automatic harmonic lockout detection circuitry via a novel lock and seek control logic in electrical communication with a programmable frequency discriminator and a code balance detector. (The frequency discriminator enables preset of a frequency window of upper and lower frequency limits to derive a programmable range within which signal acquisition is effected. The discriminator works in combination with the code balance detector circuit to minimize the sensitivity of the PLL circuit to random data in the data stream). In addition, the combination of a differential loop integrator with the lock and seek control logic obviates a code preamble and guarantees signal acquisition without harmonic lockup. An adaptive cable equalizer is desirably used in combination with the present invention PLL to recover encoded transmissions containing a clock and/or data. The equalizer automatically adapts to equalize short haul cable lengths of coaxial and twisted pair cables or wires and provides superior jitter performance itself. The combination of the equalizer with the present invention PLL is desirable in that such combination permits the use of short haul wires without significant jitter.

Kerner, Thomas M. (Manorville, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Local Measurement of the Penetration Depth in the Pnictide Superconductor Ba(Fe_0.95 Co_0.05)_2 As_2  

SciTech Connect

We use magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to measure the local penetration depth {lambda} in Ba(Fe{sub 0.95}Co{sub 0.05}){sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals and use scanning SQUID susceptometry to measure its temperature variation down to 0.4 K. We observe that superfluid density {rho}{sub s} over the full temperature range is well described by a clean two-band fully gapped model. We demonstrate that MFM can measure the important and hard-to-determine absolute value of {lambda}, as well as obtain its temperature dependence and spatial homogeneity. We find {rho}{sub s} to be uniform on the submicron scale despite the highly disordered vortex pinning.

Matsushita, Y.

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

396

Test plan for evaluating the operational performance of the prototype nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler  

SciTech Connect

The PHMC will provide Low Activity Wastes (LAW) tank wastes for final treatment by a privatization contractor from two double-shell feed tanks, 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Concerns about the inability of the baseline ''grab'' sampling to provide large volume samples within time constraints has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. This sampling system will provide large volume, representative samples without the environmental, radiation exposure, and sample volume impacts of the current base-line ''grab'' sampling method. A plan has been developed for the cold testing of this nested, fixed-depth sampling system with simulant materials. The sampling system will fill the 500-ml bottles and provide inner packaging to interface with the Hanford Sites cask shipping systems (PAS-1 and/or ''safe-send''). The sampling system will provide a waste stream that will be used for on-line, real-time measurements with an at-tank analysis system. The cold tests evaluate the performance and ability to provide samples that are representative of the tanks' content within a 95 percent confidence interval, to sample while mixing pumps are operating, to provide large sample volumes (1-15 liters) within a short time interval, to sample supernatant wastes with over 25 wt% solids content, to recover from precipitation- and settling-based plugging, and the potential to operate over the 20-year expected time span of the privatization contract.

REICH, F.R.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

397

Dip-moveout error in transversely isotropic media with linear velocity variation in depth  

SciTech Connect

Levin modeled the moveout, within common-mid-point (CMP) gathers, of reflection from plane-dipping reflectors beneath homogeneous, transversely isotropic media. For some media, when the axis of symmetry for the anisotropy was vertical, the author found departures in stacking velocity from predictions based upon the familiar cosine-of-dip correction for isotropic media. Here, the author does similar tests, again with transversely isotropic models with vertical axis of symmetry, but now allowing the medium velocity of vary linearly with depth. Results for the same four anisotropic media studied by Levin show behavior of dip-corrected stacking velocity with reflector dip that, for all velocity gradients considered, differs little from that for the counterpart homogeneous media. As with isotropic media, travel times in an inhomogeneous, transversely isotropic medium can be modeled adequately with a homogeneous model with vertical velocity equal to the vertical rms velocity of the inhomogeneous medium. In practice, dip-moveout (DMO) is based on the assumption that either the medium is homogeneous or its velocity varies with depth, but in both cases isotropy is assumed. It turns out that for only one of the traversely isotropic media considered here--shale-limestone--would v(z) DMO fail to give an adequate correction within CMP gathers. For the shale-limestone, fortuitously the constant-velocity DMO gives a better moveout correction than does the v(z) DMO.

Larner, K.L. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Dip-moveout error in transversely isotropic media with linear velocity variation in depth  

SciTech Connect

Levin (1990) modeled the moveout, within Common-midpoint (CMP) gathers, of reflections from plane-dipping reflectors beneath homogeneous, transversely isotropic media. For some media, when the axis of symmetry for the anisotropy was vertical, he found departures in stacking velocity from predictions based upon the familiar cosine-of-dip correction for isotropic media. Here, I do similar tests, again with transversely isotropic models with vertical axis of symmetry, but now allowing the medium velocity to vary linearly with depth. Results for the same four anisotropic media studied by Levin show behavior of dip-corrected stacking velocity with reflector dip that, for all velocity gradients considered, differs little from that for the counterpart homogeneous media. As with isotropic media, traveltimes in an inhomogeneous, transversely isotropic medium can be modeled adequately with a homogeneous model with vertical velocity equal to the vertical rms velocity of the inhomogeneous medium. In practice, dip-moveout (DMO) is based on the assumption that either the medium is homogeneous or its velocity varies with depth, but in both cases isotropy is assumed. It turns out that for only one of the transversely isotropic media considered here --shale-limestone -- would v(z) DMO fail to give an adequate correction within CMP gathers. For the shale-limestone, fortuitously the constant-velocity DMO gives a better moveout correction than does the v(z) DMO.

Larner, K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Dip-moveout error in transversely isotropic media with linear velocity variation in depth  

SciTech Connect

Levin (1990) modeled the moveout, within Common-midpoint (CMP) gathers, of reflections from plane-dipping reflectors beneath homogeneous, transversely isotropic media. For some media, when the axis of symmetry for the anisotropy was vertical, he found departures in stacking velocity from predictions based upon the familiar cosine-of-dip correction for isotropic media. Here, I do similar tests, again with transversely isotropic models with vertical axis of symmetry, but now allowing the medium velocity to vary linearly with depth. Results for the same four anisotropic media studied by Levin show behavior of dip-corrected stacking velocity with reflector dip that, for all velocity gradients considered, differs little from that for the counterpart homogeneous media. As with isotropic media, traveltimes in an inhomogeneous, transversely isotropic medium can be modeled adequately with a homogeneous model with vertical velocity equal to the vertical rms velocity of the inhomogeneous medium. In practice, dip-moveout (DMO) is based on the assumption that either the medium is homogeneous or its velocity varies with depth, but in both cases isotropy is assumed. It turns out that for only one of the transversely isotropic media considered here --shale-limestone -- would v(z) DMO fail to give an adequate correction within CMP gathers. For the shale-limestone, fortuitously the constant-velocity DMO gives a better moveout correction than does the v(z) DMO.

Larner, K.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Offshore oil: Investigating production parameters of fields of varying size, location and water depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper derives empirical estimates of field depletion level, depletion rate, decline rate and characteristic time intervals in offshore oil production based on a global field-by-field database containing 603 offshore oil fields. Statistical distributions as well as arithmetic and weighted averages of production parameters are derived for different categories of fields specified by size, location and water depth. A significant tendency of small fields having higher depletion and decline rates is found. Similarly, OECD countries generally have higher rates compared to non-OECD countries. Trends related to water depth are not clearly distinguishable and require additional investigation of time related aspects. Resulting spreads in derived parameter estimates are found to be well described by positively skewed probability distributions. Also, in line with theory, a strong correlation between depletion and decline rate is found. According to the study, the net share of global offshore production from smaller and deeper fields is increasing. A continuation of these trends would likely have implications for future aggregate offshore production behaviour, most notably, increasing global aggregate decline rates.

David Sällh; Henrik Wachtmeister; Xu Tang; Mikael Höök

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Linda Suttora*, U.S. Department of Energy ; Andrew Wallo, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted an integrated protection system for the safety of radioactive waste disposal similar to the concept of a safety case that is used internationally. This approach has evolved and been continuously improved as a result of many years of experience managing low-level waste (LLW) and mixed LLW from on-going operations, decommissioning and environmental restoration activities at 29 sites around the United States. The integrated protection system is implemented using a defense-in-depth approach taking into account the combination of natural and engineered barriers, performance objectives, long-term risk assessments, maintenance of those assessments based on the most recent information to ascertain continued compliance, site-specific waste acceptance criteria based on the risk assessment and a commitment to continuous improvement. There is also a strong component of stakeholder involvement. The integrated protection system approach will be discussed to demonstrate the commitment to safety for US DOE disposal.

402

Fact #797: September 16, 2013 Driving Ranges for Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The figure below shows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) driving ranges for electric vehicles (EVs) offered for the 2013 model year (MY). The Tesla Model S has the longest range of any EV...

403

EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Field technicians survey a shaker used in past cleanup...

404

Hydrothermal monitoring data from the Cascade Range, northwestern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrothermal monitoring data from the Cascade Range, northwestern United States By S.E. Ingebritsen., and Evans, W.C., 2014, Hydrothermal monitoring data from the Cascade Range, northwestern United States: U ...................................................................................................................................27 (8) Carbonate springs

405

Free-surface hydrodynamics of a submerged prolate spheroid in finite water depth based on the method of multipole expansions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......particular, we employ the following fundamental relation that expresses any exterior...Also, it appears that the water depth does not affect considerably the degree needed...M. Abramowitz and I. A. Stegun, Handbook of Mathematical Functions (Dover Publications......

Ioannis K. Chatjigeorgiou; Touvia Miloh

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The relationship between induction case depth and load power for high frequency, high load power and short heating time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between induction case depth and load power is derived. Excellent agreement is obtained between ... calculated from the derived equation and the experimental data obtained for a constant heating ...

W. T. Shieh

1972-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Bi 3 + cluster primary ions in SIMS depth profiling of YBaCuO high-temperature superconductor films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SIMS depth profiling of YBa2Cu3O7 high-temperature superconductor films was performed using a TOF.SIMS-...2Cu3O7 films based on detection of cluster secondary ions.

M. N. Drozdov; Yu. N. Drozdov…

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Source Parameters for Moderate Earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains with Implications for the Depth Extent of Seismicity  

SciTech Connect

Six earthquakes within the Zagros Mountains with magnitudes between 4.9 and 5.7 have been studied to determine their source parameters. These events were selected for study because they were reported in open catalogs to have lower crustal or upper mantle source depths and because they occurred within an area of the Zagros Mountains where crustal velocity structure has been constrained by previous studies. Moment tensor inversion of regional broadband waveforms have been combined with forward modeling of depth phases on short period teleseismic waveforms to constrain source depths and moment tensors. Our results show that all six events nucleated within the upper crust (<11 km depth) and have thrust mechanisms. This finding supports other studies that call into question the existence of lower crustal or mantle events beneath the Zagros Mountains.

Adams, A; Brazier, R; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

A New Algorithm for Finding Mixed Layer Depths with Applications to Argo Data and Subantarctic Mode Water Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new hybrid method for finding the mixed layer depth (MLD) of individual ocean profiles models the general shape of each profile, searches for physical features in the profile, and calculates threshold and gradient MLDs to assemble a suite of ...

James Holte; Lynne Talley

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Mercury: Supporting Scalable Multi-Attribute Range Queries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury: Supporting Scalable Multi-Attribute Range Queries Ashwin R. Bharambe Mukesh Agrawal 15213 Abstract This paper presents the design of Mercury, a scalable protocol for supporting multi-attribute range- based searches. Mercury differs from previous range-based query systems in that it supports mul

Keinan, Alon

411

IN-RANGE PROGRESSION SJSU HR: 2/20/13  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Initiated Request The Workforce Planning Unit reviews requests for in-range progressions and makes in-range salary must complete and submit the following documents to Workforce Planning for an in-range progression chart. 2. Workforce Planning will review the request and may contact the manager and/or the employee

Su, Xiao

412

TWEET: an envelope detection based broadband ultrasonic ranging system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fine-grained location information at long range can benefit many applications of embedded sensor networks and robotics. In this paper, we focus on range estimation - an important prerequisite for fine-grained localization - in the ultrasonic domain for ... Keywords: envelope detection, linear chirp, ultrasonic ranging

Prasant Kumar Misra; Diethelm Ostry; Navinda Kottege; Sanjay Jha

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Global registration of dynamic range scans for articulated model reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the articulated global registration algorithm to reconstruct articulated 3D models from dynamic range scan sequences. This new algorithm aligns multiple range scans simultaneously to reconstruct a full 3D model from the geometry of these scans. ... Keywords: Range scanning, animation reconstruction, articulated model, nonrigid registration

Will Chang; Matthias Zwicker

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Transverse Effect due to Short-range Resistive Wall Wakefield  

SciTech Connect

For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

Juhao Wu; Alex Chao; Jean Delayen

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

415

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 17 PNWD-SA-7032 / 17 Edit Sample Areas Define New Sample Area Defined Sample Area #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 18 PNWD-SA-7032 / 18 "New Area" button on the Toolbar Defined Sample Area #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 19 PNWD-SA-7032

416

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 41  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 41 PNWD-SA-7032 / 41 Assumptions Underlying the UCLs. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 42 PNWD-SA-7032 / 42 Hypothetical Case Study that the action limit for the RDX mean (4.4 ppm) is not exceeded. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 43

417

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 57  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 57 PNWD-SA-7032 / 57 Sample Information Box for Segment 4 the RDX Measurements for the 2 MI Samples in Segment 4 #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 58 PNWD;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 59 PNWD-SA-7032 / 59 Sample Information Box for Segment 4 UCL

418

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 25  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 25 PNWD-SA-7032 / 25 Sampling Goals Establish Boundary of Contamination Partial Boundary #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 26 PNWD-SA-7032 / 26 Required Samples #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 27 PNWD-SA-7032 / 27 Specify Constituents of Concern

419

The ontogeny of home ranges: evidence from coral reef fishes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research articles 1001 60 14 The ontogeny of home ranges: evidence from coral reef fishes...Queensland 4811, Australia The concept of home ranges is fundamental to ecology. Numerous studies have quantified how home ranges scale with body size across taxa...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Home range evolution and its implication in population outbreaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by C. Anteneodo and M. G. E. da Luz Home range evolution and its implication in...evolutionary point of view, where the predator home range is a hereditary trait subjected to...found that mutation drives the predator home range area to an optimal value where pattern...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with a residual 2.1% coefficient of variation (COV) over the 80-150-kVp energy range. Monte Carlo corrections reduced the COV to 1.4% over this energy range. All PDD measurements were in good agreement with one another except for the uncorrected PSD data, in which an over-response was observed with depth (13% at 10 cm with a 100 kVp beam), showing that beam hardening had a non-negligible effect on the PSD response. A correction based on LCT compensated very well for this effect, reducing the over-response to 3%.Conclusion: In the diagnostic energy range, PSDs show high-energy dependence, which can be corrected using spectra-weighted mass energy-absorption coefficients, showing no considerable sign of quenching between these energies. Correction factors obtained by Monte Carlo simulations confirm that the approximations made by LCT corrections are valid. Thus, PSDs could be useful for real-time dosimetry in radiology applications.

Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); and others

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

A full range detector for the HIRRBS high resolution RBS magnetic spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

The UAlbany HIRRBS (High Resolution RBS) system has been updated for better use in rapid analysis. The focal plane detector now covers the full range from U down to O using a linear stepper motor to translate the 1-cm detector across the 30-cm range. Input is implemented with zero-back-angle operation in all cases. The chamber has been modified to allow for quick swapping of sample holders, including a channeling goniometer. A fixed standard surface-barrier detector allows for normal RBS simultaneously with use of the magnetic spectrometer. The user can select a region on the standard spectrum or can select an element edge or an energy point for collection of the expanded spectrum portion. The best resolution currently obtained is about 2-to-3 keV, probably representing the energy width of the incoming beam. Calibration is maintained automatically for any spectrum portion and any beam energy from 1.0 to 3.5 MeV. Element resolving power, sensitivity and depth resolution are shown using several examples. Examples also show the value of simultaneous conventional RBS.

Skala, Wayne G.; Haberl, Arthur W. [Ion Beam Laboratory, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Bakhru, Hassaram [Ion Beam Laboratory, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12222, United States and College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Lanford, William [Ion Beam Laboratory, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12222, United States and Physics Department, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

Longevity and progressive abandonment of the Rocky Flats surface, Front Range, Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The post-orogenic evolution of the Laramide landscape of the western U.S. has been characterized by late Cenozoic channel incision of basins and their adjacent ranges. One means of constraining the incision history of basins is dating the remnants of gravel-capped surfaces above modern streams. Here, we focus on an extensive remnant of the Rocky Flats surface between Golden and Boulder, Colorado, and use in situ-produced 10Be and 26Al concentrations in terrace alluvium to constrain the Quaternary history of this surface. Coal and Ralston Creeks, both tributaries of the South Platte River, abandoned the Rocky Flats surface and formed the Verdos and Slocum pediments, which are cut into Cretaceous bedrock between Rocky Flats and the modern stream elevations. Rocky Flats alluvium ranges widely in age, from > 2 Ma to ? 400 ka, with oldest ages to the east and younger ages closer to the mountain front. Numerical modeling of isotope concentration depth profiles suggests that individual sites have experienced multiple resurfacing events. Preliminary results indicate that Verdos and Slocum alluvium along Ralston Creek, which is slightly larger than Coal Creek, is several hundred thousand years old. Fluvial incision into these surfaces appears therefore to progress headward in response to downcutting of the South Platte River. The complex ages of these surfaces call into question any correlation of such surfaces based solely on their elevation above the modern channel.

Catherine A. Riihimaki; Robert S. Anderson; Elizabeth B. Safran; David P. Dethier; Robert C. Finkel; Paul R. Bierman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Transient Phenomena and Impurity Relocation in SIMS Depth Profiling using Oxygen Bombardment: Pursuing the Physics to Interpret the Data [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Transient Phenomena and Impurity Relocation in SIMS Depth Profiling using Oxygen Bombardment: Pursuing the Physics...analysis or depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can only be achieved, for positively charged ions, if the...

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal Systems Abstract A suite of models utilizing a range of bulkrock permeabilities were developed to analyze thetransient behavior of basin and range extensionalgeothermal systems, and particularly, the evolution ofthe system temperature with time. Each modelconsists of two mountain ranges (~1 km relief fromthe valley floor) separated by a thick sequence (about4 km) of clastic sediments derived from the adjacentranges, and a relatively permeable, high angle faultthat functions as a conduit for subsurface fluids. Thisgeometry is typical of Basin and Range extensionalsystems.We

426

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (48) Power Plants (8) Projects (15) Techniques (33) The Basin and Range Province in northwestern Nevada and northeastern California is characterized by late Cretaceous - early Cenozoic regional erosion, Oligocene - Miocene volcanism, and subsequent late Miocene extension. Extensional faulting in northwestern Nevada began everywhere at 12 Ma and has continued up to the present. Faulting in the Warner Range in northeastern California can only be constrained to have begun between 14 and 3 Ma, but may represent westward migration of Basin and Range extension during the Pliocene. Compared to the many parts of the Basin and Range in

427

Seismicity of the Coso Range, California | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Coso Range, California of the Coso Range, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity of the Coso Range, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 16-station seismographic network, approximately 40 km north-south by 30 km east-west, was installed in the Coso Range, California, in September 1975 as part of a geological and geophysical assessment of the geothermal resource potential of range. During the first 2 years of network operations, 4216 local earthquakes (0.5< or =m< or =3.9) defined zones of seismicity that strike radially outward from a Pleistocene rhyolite field located near the center of the Coso Range. Most earthquakes were located in zones showing a general northwest trend across the range.

428

A statistical study of the depth of precipitable water in western Texas and eastern New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the followi ig pages follow the style of the Journal of AppLied Meteomologi. . . 1. 5 MEAN PRECIPITATION MEAN PRECIPITABLE WATER N IJI I. O Z / / 0. 0 J F M A M J J A S 0 N D FIG. I. PRECIPITABLE WATER AND PRECIPITA- TION VS Tl ME OF YEA R ( EL.... 2 14 1. 6 2. 0 3. 0 4. 0 5. 0 10 20 30 40 50 100 200 500 RETURN PERIOD T (YEARS) FIG. 4. A PLOT OF DEPTH OF PRECITI TABLE WATER vs RETURN PERIOD FOR EL PASO, TEXAS. 39 where n a =? x (?) and Y n X =X-o f x o n (32) The theoretical...

Baker, Samuel Erick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Improving resolution and depth of astronomical observations via modern mathematical methods for image analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Pilo, Stefano; Falcone, Maurizio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Magnetometry and transport data complement polarized neutron reflectometry in magnetic depth profiling  

SciTech Connect

Exchange coupled magnetic hard layer/soft layer thin films show a variety of complex magnetization reversal mechanisms depending on the hierarchy of interaction strengths within and between the films. Magnetization reversal can include uniform rotation, soft layer biasing, as well as exchange spring behavior. We investigate the magnetization reversal of a CoPt/Permalloy/Ta/Permalloy heterostructure. Here, Stoner-Wohlfarth-type uniform magnetization rotation of the virtually free Permalloy layer and exchange spring behavior of the strongly pinned Permalloy layer are found in the same sample. We investigate the complex magnetization reversal by polarized neutron reflectometry, magnetometry, and magneto-transport. The synergy of combining these experimental methods together with theoretical modeling is key to obtain the complete quantitative depth resolved information of the magnetization reversal processes for a multilayer of mesoscopic thickness.

Wang Yi; He Xi; Mukherjee, T.; Binek, Ch. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, Jorgenson Hall, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0111 (United States); Fitzsimmons, M. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sahoo, S. [Seagate Technology, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55435 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Structure, depositional environment, and pressure characteristics of the Vicksburg formation: Javelina and East McCook fields, Hidalgo County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structure, Depositional Environment, and Pressure Characteristics of the Vicksburg Formation: Javelina and East McCook Fields, Hidalgo County, Texas (December, 1984) John Olcott Hastings Jr. , B. A. , Dartmouth College Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr.... Robert R. Berg Lower Oligocene Vicksburg sandstones at Javelina and East McCook fields produce gas and gas condensate from multiple, stacked, low- permeability, abnormally-pressured reservoirs. Production depths range from 9750 ft (Z972 m) to 13950 ft...

Hastings, John Olcott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Applicability ranges for offshore oil and gas production facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the early stages of the selection process for the hardware to exploit an offshore petroleum reservoir, it is important to be able to identify rapidly which production facility type(s) are likely to deliver the greatest value. This paper explores key features and constraints of the ten common fixed, floating and subsea facility options. Both shallow and deepwater are considered, along with regional variations. It is shown that facility applications may be categorised in a very simple matrix form, with the water depth and well count being particularly important drivers of facility choice.

Beverley F. Ronalds

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Rangely Oilfield Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Airborne hyperspectral imaging applied to determine vegetation and CO2 leakage in the Rangely oilfield of northwest Colorado - results may be useful for geothermal exploration. References W. Pickles, W. Cover (2004) Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Rangely_Oilfield_Area_(Pickles_%26_Cover,_2004)&oldid=511013"

434

Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin and Range Geothermal Region Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} North-south-striking and west-dipping Basin and Range province normal faults form the western edge of the Sierra Madre Occidental plateau in northeastern Sonora. These faults and associated half-grabens extend over a distance of more than 300 km between the San Bernardino basin in the north and the Sahuaripa basin in the south. Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake [1] References ↑ "Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake"

435

Object segmentation and classification using 3-D range camera  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a vision system using a 3-D range camera for scene segmentation and pedestrian classification. The system detects and segments objects in the foreground, measures their distances to the camera, and classifies them into pedestrians ... Keywords: 3-D range image segmentation, Assistive navigation, Feature extraction, Image segmentation evaluation, Object classification, Pedestrian classification, RGB-D image processing, Range/intensity image processing

Xue Wei; Son Lam Phung; Abdesselam Bouzerdoum

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

HOME RANGE AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR OF THE ENDANGERED TEHUANTEPEC JACKRABBIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOME RANGE AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR OF THE ENDANGERED TEHUANTEPEC JACKRABBIT (LEPUS FLAVIGULARIS Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Coyoaca´n, Me´xico D.F. 04510, Me´xico We studied the home-range and core home-range and core-area sizes averaged 55 ha 6 8 SE and 8 6 1 ha for 10 adults of both sexes using

Schweik, Charles M.

437

Depth absorbed dose and LET distributions of therapeutic {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C beams  

SciTech Connect

The depth absorbed dose and LET (linear energy transfer) distribution of different ions of clinical interest such as {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C ions have been investigated using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT. The energies of the projectiles correspond to ranges in water and soft tissue of approximately 260 mm. The depth dose distributions of the primary particles and their secondaries have been calculated and separated with regard to their low and high LET components. A LET value below 10 eV/nm can generally be regarded as low LET and sparsely ionizing like electrons and photons. The high LET region may be assumed to start at 20 eV/nm where on average two double-strand breaks can be formed when crossing the periphery of a nucleosome, even though strictly speaking the LET limits are not sharp and ought to vary with the charge and mass of the ion. At the Bragg peak of a monoenergetic high energy proton beam, less than 3% of the total absorbed dose is comprised of high LET components above 20 eV/nm. The high LET contribution to the total absorbed dose in the Bragg peak is significantly larger with increasing ion charge as a natural result of higher stopping power and lower range straggling. The fact that the range straggling and multiple scattering are reduced by half from hydrogen to helium increases the possibility to accurately deposit only the high LET component in the tumor with negligible dose to organs at risk. Therefore, the lateral penumbra is significantly improved and the higher dose gradients of {sup 7}Li and {sup 12}C ions both longitudinally and laterally will be of major advantage in biological optimized radiation therapy. With increasing charge of the ion, the high LET absorbed dose in the beam entrance and the plateau regions where healthy normal tissues are generally located is also increased. The dose distribution of the high LET components in the {sup 7}Li beam is only located around the Bragg peak, characterized by a Gaussian-type distribution. Furthermore, the secondary particles produced by high energy {sup 7}Li ions in tissuelike media have mainly low LET character both in front of and beyond the Bragg peak.

Kempe, Johanna; Gudowska, Irena; Brahme, Anders [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Some factors affecting the winter range of Jasper National Park.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent studies by Dr. I. McT. Cowan in Jasper National Park have revealed that many of the winter game ranges of the Park are heavily… (more)

Pfeiffer, Egbert Wheeler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Journal Article: Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western United States: 10 Years of Observation with the Global Positioning System Abstract...

440

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

443

Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At...

444

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At...

445

Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites Pre-activity survey report to clear areas to be cleaned up. No sensitive species were...

446

Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

447

Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005)...

448

Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Northern Basin &...

449

Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In...

450

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

451

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

452

Extending the Temperature Range of Electric Submersible Pumps...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extending the Temperature Range of Electric Submersible Pumps to 338 C - Hotline IV - High-temperature ESP; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Extending the...

453

Verification Method for SSI Problems with Extended Parameter Ranges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Verification Method for SSI Problems with Extended Parameter Ranges 2014 U.S. DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting Carl J. Costantino and Associates www.cjcassoc.com

454

"Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

King, J J

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

455

Variations in K{sup +}-Na{sup +} ion exchange depth in commercial and experimental float glass compositions  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the results of ion-exchange experiments conducted on 17 commercial soda-lime-silicate (SLS) float glass and 8 experimental SLS glass compositions. A significant variation in the depth of K{sup +} penetration with relatively small changes in composition was observed. The data were fit to a multiple regression model in which the major oxides are the independent variables and depth of K{sup +} is the dependent variable. The model indicates that increased depth of exchange (increased interdiffusion coefficient) correlates predominantly with increased K{sub 2}O and/or Na{sub 2}O content of the glass, with a decreased total alkaline earth content and with the ratio of CaO/MgO.

Sinton, C.W.; LaCourse, W.C.; O'Connell, M.J.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials? microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials? crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surface?s top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

Yang, Qiguang [Norfolk State University; Williams, Frances [Norfolk State University; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Krishnan, Mahadevan [AASC, San Leandro, California

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Mercury: Supporting Scalable Multi-Attribute Range Ashwin R. Bharambe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury: Supporting Scalable Multi-Attribute Range Queries Ashwin R. Bharambe ashu Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 ABSTRACT This paper presents the design of Mercury, a scalable pro- tocol for supporting multi-attribute range-based searches. Mercury differs from previous

Krishnamurthy, Arvind

458

GEA Heat Exchangers GEA Searle Cooler and Condensing Unit Ranges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have high efficiency EC fans as standard across the range. All our commercial unit coolers have whiteUnits GEA Searle Condensing Units are supplied as standard to a high specification with a complete controlGEA Heat Exchangers GEA Searle Cooler and Condensing Unit Ranges Top-level engineering solutions

Frandsen, Søren

459

ESS and Dissipation Range Dynamics of 3-D Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We carry out a self consistent calculation of the structure functions in the dissipation range using Navier Stokes equation. Combining these results with the known structures in the inertial range, we actually propose crossover functions for the structure functions that takes one smoothly from the inertial to the dissipation regime. In the process the success of the extended self similarity is explicitly demonstrated.

Anirban Sain; J. K. Bhattacharjee

1997-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

460

On Aerodynamic Optimization Under a Range of Operating Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Aerodynamic Optimization Under a Range of Operating Conditions David W. Zingg, and Samy Elias In aerodynamic design, good performance is generally required under a range of oper- ating conditions, including aerodynamic shape optimization.1­6 The designer specifies an objective, operating conditions, constraints

Zingg, David W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

LRRR Emplacement Range and Azimuth From. LM for Fra Mauro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LRRR Emplacement Range and Azimuth From. LM for Fra Mauro Landing Site NO. A Tl\\1- WIO PAGE I REV abovt by LM or other lunar equipment (ALSEP), Potential damage to the .i RRR l'Ould be caused . (}~/ #12;.. ~ospace LRRR Emplacement Range and Azimuth From LM for Fra Mauro Landing Site NO. ATM-890 PAGE

Rathbun, Julie A.

462

THE MANGANESE DEPOSITS OF THE PAMPEAN RANGES, ARGENTINA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OF THE PAMPEAN RANGES, ARGENTINA Pablo Rodrigo Leal 1 Maria Jose Correa 2 Silvia J...Leal, P.R., Hartmann, L.A., Santos, J.O.S., Miro, R.C. Ramos...Pampean Ranges, Argentina Leal Pablo Rodrigo Author leal@gl.fcen.uba.ar University...

Pablo Rodrigo Leal; María José Correa; Silvia J. Ametrano; Ricardo O. Etcheverry; Milka K. de Brodtkorb

463

Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each...

Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

New Mexico State University Department of Animal & Range Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Mexico State University Department of Animal & Range Sciences Number 299 September 24, 2012 Holechek is giving an invited paper, "How global trends in population, energy use, water use, and climate to officially dedicate the Southwest Center for Rangeland Sustainability at the Corona Range and Livestock

Johnson, Eric E.

465

An UV-range photodetector based on a diamond photosensor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new UV-range photodetector based on a diamond one-element photosensor has been designed, manufactured and studied. The photodetector possesses the operating range between 180 and 225 nm (the maximum is attained around 220 nm), and the threshold of ...

V. S. Feshchenko; A. A. Altukhov; S. A. L'Vov; Yu. A. Mityagin; V. A. Shepelev

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVITED P A P E R Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts To provide a potential communications channel, HVAC ducts can function as electromagnetic waveguides; a 30-m read range has been-conditioning (HVAC) ducts as a potential communication channel between passive ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) radio

Hochberg, Michael

467

Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

Wage, Kathleen

468

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 33 PNWD-SA-7032 / 33 Map View Sample Information Box Click in this Column #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 34 PNWD-SA-7032 / 34 Sample Information Box Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 35 PNWD-SA-7032 / 35 Segment Sample Results Box Enter Measurements

469

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 49  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 49 PNWD-SA-7032 / 49 Hypothetical Case Study (Continued Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 50 PNWD-SA-7032 / 50 Hypothetical Case Study (Continued)Hypothetical Case Study Save #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 51 PNWD-SA-7032 / 51 Coordinate View X and Y

470

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9 PNWD-SA-7032 / 9 What are the Steps in Using the VSP Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 10 PNWD-SA-7032 / 10 Hypotheses Being TestedHypotheses Being Tested is false., i.e., on showing that the segment does not need to be bumped out. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP

471

Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

472

Range Design Criteria - June 4, 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Design Criteria - June 4, 2012 Range Design Criteria - June 4, 2012 Range Design Criteria - June 4, 2012 June 4, 2012 This document contains the currently-approved firearms "Range Design Criteria" referred to on DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations PURPOSE. This document contains design criteria for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) live-fire ranges for use in planning new facilities and major rehabilitation of existing facilities. This document will be approved and maintained by the Office of Security, Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) as a stand-alone document on the HSS website: http://www.hss.doe.gov/SecPolicy/pfs.html. PLANNING FACTORS. All applicable local, State, Federal, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA),

473

Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Nevada Test And Training Range Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) occupies over 3 million acres in southern Nevada (Figure 1). We recently assessed potential utility-grade geothermal resources and possible target areas for exploration by constructing a GIS of this area and applying the occurrence model ideas outlined above (ITSI, 2003; Sabin et al., 2004). We list below many of the factors considered.

474

NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'greens' firing range | National Nuclear 'greens' firing range | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range Posted By Greg Cunningham, Pantex The lead that flies at the Pantex Firing Range has to land somewhere, and

475

Aeromagnetic and gravity surveys in the Coso Range, California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and gravity surveys in the Coso Range, California and gravity surveys in the Coso Range, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aeromagnetic and gravity surveys in the Coso Range, California Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The effect of an underlying magma reservoir cannot be identified within the complex gravity pattern in the Coso Range, California. Rather, linear gravity contours, which suggest a regional tectonic origin, enclose the location of most of the volcanic activity of the Coso Range. Faults along the edges of northwest trending, magnetic blocks probably provided paths of minimum resistance to the ascending viscous magma that was extruded as rhyolite domes. Dense, magnetic rocks associated with a complex mafic pluton 9 km in diameter form a relatively impermeable north border of

476

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract N/A Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation Elaine J. Bell,Lawrence T. Larson,Russell W. Juncal. 1980. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province,

477

Laser Ranging for Gravitational, Lunar, and Planetary Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More precise lunar and Martian ranging will enable unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity and well as lunar and planetary science. NASA is currently planning several missions to return to the Moon, and it is natural to consider if precision laser ranging instruments should be included. New advanced retroreflector arrays at carefully chosen landing sites would have an immediate positive impact on lunar and gravitational studies. Laser transponders are currently being developed that may offer an advantage over passive ranging, and could be adapted for use on Mars and other distant objects. Precision ranging capability can also be combined with optical communications for an extremely versatile instrument. In this paper we discuss the science that can be gained by improved lunar and Martian ranging along with several technologies that can be used for this purpose.

Stephen M. Merkowitz; Philip W. Dabney; Jeffrey C. Livas; Jan F. McGarry; Gregory A. Neumann; Thomas W. Zagwodzki

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area (Redirected from Nevada Test And Training Range Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

479

Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth in Vicinity of Broken Clouds from Reflectance Ratios: Case Study  

SciTech Connect

A recently developed reflectance ratio (RR) method for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) is evaluated using extensive airborne and ground-based data sets collected during the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) and the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS), which took place in June 2007 over the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site. A detailed case study is performed for a field of single-layer shallow cumuli observed on June 12, 2007. The RR method is applied to retrieve the spectral values of AOD from the reflectance ratios measured by the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) for two pairs of wavelengths (660 and 470 nm and 870 and 470 nm) collected at a spatial resolution of 0.05 km. The retrieval is compared with an independent AOD estimate from three ground-based Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs). The interpolation algorithm that is used to project MFRSR point measurements onto the aircraft flight tracks is tested using AOD derived from NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The RR AOD estimates are in a good agreement (within 5%) with the MFRSR-derived AOD values for the 660-nm wavelength. The AODs obtained from MAS reflectance ratios overestimate those derived from MFRSR measurements by 15-30% for the 470-nm wavelength and underestimate the 870-nm AOD by the same amount.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris A.; Alexandrov, Mikhail

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

480

Rut depth, soil compaction and rolling resistance when using bogie tracks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are few studies of rolling resistance for bogie tracks on forestry machines. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of wheels and two types of bogie tracks on rut formation, cone index, and vehicle rolling resistance on some typical forest soils in Sweden. In an experiment, two types of tracks were put on a trailer with a bogie with hydraulic extension on the pulling bar giving the trailer repeatable travelling speed. Loads of 0 and 9.9 Mg were used on the trailer. The main results of this study are: Compared to rather wide and soft tires, tracks on the bogie reduced rut depth by up to 40% and cone index in the ruts by about 10%, although the tracks increased the mass on the trailer by 10–12%. The relative rolling resistance coefficient was not higher for tracks than for wheels. Further studies should be conducted to show the effect of track tension on rolling resistance and flotation and of the effects of tracks on heavy vehicles on subsoil compaction.

Gunnar Bygdén; Lars Eliasson; Iwan Wästerlund

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

In-depth survey report of Roadway Express, Inc. , Toledo, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An in-depth survey was conducted at Roadway Express, Inc., Toledo, Ohio to determine relative exposures to diesel aerosols among the four major presumably exposed job groups of road drivers, local drivers, dock workers, and mechanics. Element carbon sampling results at the Roadway terminal in Toledo, Ohio, during cold weather indicated low level exposures only slightly above geometric mean ambient residential and highway background concentrations in road drivers and local drivers. Exposures were significantly above background highway concentrations in dock workers and in mechanics, with exposures of 29 and 58 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/cu m), respectively. The highest levels of exposure were to mechanics working in the shop. Exposure to nitrogen oxides and respirable particulates were far below recommended limits. The major source of exposures in dock workers appeared to be the operation of diesel powered fork lift trucks on the dock. The principal source in mechanics was the entry and egress of diesel tractors to and from the shop area, but the more enclosed environment in which they were working exacerbated concentrations of diesel aerosols.

Zaebst, D.D.; Ringenburg, V.; Sanderson, W.

1989-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

482

Low temperature London penetration depth and superfluid density in Fe-based superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting gap symmetry of the Fe-based superconductors was studied by measurements and analysis of London penetration depth and super uid density. Tunnel diode resonator technique for these measurements was implemented in a dilution refrigerator allowing for the temperatures down to 50 mK. For the analysis of the super uid density, we used both experimental studies of Al-coated samples and original thermodynamic approach based on Rutgers relation. In three systems studied, we found that the superconducting gap at the optimal doping is best described in multi-gap full gap scenario. By performing experiments on samples with arti#12;cially introduced disorder with heavy ion irradiation, we show that evolution of the superconducting transition temperature and of the super uid density are consistent with full-gap sign changing s#6; superconducting state. The superconducting gap develops strong modulation both in the under-doped and the over-doped regimes. In the terminal hole-doped KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, both temperature dependence of the super uid density and its evolution with increase of the scattering rate are consistent with symmetry imposed vertical line nodes in the superconducting gap. By comparative studies of hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and electron-doped Ca10-3-8, we show that the superconducting gap modulation in the under-doped regime is intrinsic and is not induced by the coexisting static magnetic order.

Kim, Hyunsoo [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Atmospheric Temperature Effect for ? Mesons Observed at a Depth of 846 m.w.e.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experiment reported was a measurement of the effect of variations in atmospheric temperatures on the intensity of ? mesons observed underground at a depth of 846 m.w.e. The average energy of these particles is known to be ?2×1011 ev. A total of ?1.2×106 coincidences, between two large trays of Geiger counters located in a salt mine, was collected over a two-year period. The correlation between variations in counting rate and simultaneous variations in effective atmospheric temperature was analyzed. The effective temperature was determined from radiosonde measurements of atmospheric temperatures at pressure levels up to 20 millibars performed by a U. S. Air Force weather observation unit near the salt mine. The resulting temperature coefficient is 0.22±0.06 percent per degree and the correlation coefficient is 0.75. The results are compared with those obtained from similar measurements at 1574 m.w.e. and with the theoretical values of the temperature coefficient derived from various schemes describing the production of ? mesons with high energies.

Noah Sherman

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Investigation of operating range in a methanol fumigated diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An experimental study was conducted to investigate the operating range and combustion characteristics in a methanol fumigated diesel engine. The test engine was a six-cylinder, turbocharged direct injection engine with methanol injected into the intake manifold of each cylinder. The experimental results showed that the viable diesel methanol dual fuel (DMDF) operating range in terms of load and methanol substitution percent (MSP) was achieved over a load range from 6% to 100%. The operating range was restricted by four bounds: partial burning, misfire, roar combustion and knock. The lower bound of the operating range was the partial burn bound, which occurred under very low load conditions with high MSP. As the load increased to medium load, MSP reached its maximum value of about 76%, and the onset of misfire provided the right bound for normal operation. At medium to high load, maximum MSP began to decrease. DMDF combustion with excessive MSP was extremely loud with high pressure rise rate, which defined the roar combustion bound. As it increased to nearly full load, measured pressure traces in-cylinder showed strong acoustic oscillations. The appearance of knock provided the upper bound of the operating range. In general, as the load increased, the characters of the combustion changed from partial burn to misfire to roar combustion and to knocking. The range between these four bounds and the neat diesel combustion bound constituted the viable operating range. Over the viable operating range, DMDF combustion worsened the brake thermal efficiency (BTE) at light load while boosted it at medium and high load.

Quangang Wang; Lijiang Wei; Wang Pan; Chunde Yao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

486

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System (Redirected from LEAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

487

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

488

DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This program is undertaken in order to construct and field-demonstrate EXPLORER, a modular, remotely controllable, self-powered, untethered robot system for the inspection of live gas distribution 150 mm (6-inch) to 200 mm (8-inch) diameter mains. The modular design of the system allows it to accommodate various components intended to accomplish different inspection, repair, sample retrieval, and other in-pipe tasks. The prototype system being built under this project will include all the basic modules needed, i.e. the locomotor, power storage, wireless communication, and camera. The camera, a solid-state fisheye-type, is used to transmit real-time video to the operator that allows for the live inspection of gas distribution pipes. The system under development significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its fifth six-month period. The project has in general achieved its goals for this period as outlined in the report. The prototype robot is undergoing extensive endurance testing in order to prepare for the field demonstrations planned for June 2004.

George C. Vradis, Hagen Schempf

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Closure Report for CAU No. 430: Buried Depleted Uraniuim Artillery Round No. 1, Tonopah Test Range, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

1.1 Purpose This Closure Report presents the information obtained from investigative actions performed to justify the decision for clean closure of CAU 430 through "No Further Action." The investigative actions were performed per the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan, CA UNO. 430: Buried Depleted Uranium Artille~ Round No. 1, Tonopah Test Range (DOE/NV, 1996a) (hereafter referred to as the SAFER Plan). The Buried DU Artillery Round No. 1 is located approximately 1.1 kilometers (km) (0.7 mile [mi]) south of Avenue 13 in the test area south of Area 9 (Figure 1-2). The site was thought to consist of a potentially unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) test artillery projectile with high explosives (HE) and DU. The DU was substituted for Special Nuclear Material to prevent a nuclear explosion and yet retain the physical characteristics of uranium for ballistic and other mechanical tests. The projectile was reportedly buried in one pit, approximately 5 to 10 feet (ft) deep (Smith, 1993; Smith, 1996; Quas, 1996). The exact location of the burial pit is unknown; however, three disturbed areas (Sites A, B, and C) were identified through geophysical surveys, site visits, and employee interviews as possible locations of the test projectile (Figure 1-3). Results of the investigation are summarized within this Closure Report. Additional information about the site and investigation activities may be found in the SAFER Plan (DOE/NV, 1996a). 1.2 Scope The objectives of the SAFER Plan (DOE/NV, 1996a) activities were to prepare the site for closure through locating and identi~ing the projectile (Buried DU Artillery Round No. 1), destroying the projectile and any remaining components, collecting soil samples to detect residual contamination resulting from projectile destruction, and finally, remediating residual contamination.

None

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

490

Muon-induced neutron and pion production in an organic liquid scintillator at a shallow depth  

SciTech Connect

The production of fast neutrons and pions by inelastic interactions of cosmic-ray muons in an organic liquid scintillator has been investigated. A detector filled with 190 liters of a 0.09% gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator was installed in the Stanford Underground Facility, at an underground depth of approximately 20 meters water equivalent. The detector served as the target material for hadron production. Our measurements find a single-neutron production yield of (4.3{plus_minus}0.3{plus_minus}0.8){times}10{sup {minus}5} neutrons per muon g/cm{sup 2} and a double-neutron production yield of (1.6{plus_minus}0.2{plus_minus}0.5){times}10{sup {minus}5} double neutrons per muon g/cm{sup 2}. We measured a {pi}{sup +} production yield of (3.5{plus_minus}0.2{plus_minus}0.7){times}10{sup {minus}6} pions per muon g/cm{sup 2}. Nearly all the {pi}{sup +} produced were accompanied by neutrons. These yields were dependent on the energy threshold of the muon trigger, revealing an enhancement associated with hadronic showers initiated by muons. The production yield due to nonshowering muons was lower: 2{times}10{sup {minus}5} neutrons per muon g/cm{sup 2}, with a single-to-double neutron multiplicity ratio of roughly 4:1. The nonshowering muon {pi}{sup +} production probability was 2.5{times}10{sup {minus}6} pions per muon g/cm{sup 2}, with about half of these nonshowering {pi}{sup +} events accompanied by neutrons.

Hertenberger, R.; Chen, M. [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Dougherty, B.L. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

492

Distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: Implications for extent of the geothermal anomaly Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: Implications for extent of the geothermal anomaly Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thirty-eight separate domes and flows of phenocryst-poor, high-silica rhyolite of similar major element chemical composition were erupted over the past 1 m.y. from vents arranged in a crudely S-shaped array atop a granitic horst in the Coso Range, California. Most of the extrusions are probably less than about 0.3 m.y. old. The area is one of Quaternary basaltic volcanism and crustal extension. The central part of

493

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western United States: 10 Years of Observation with the Global Positioning System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western United States: 10 Years of Observation with the Global Positioning System Abstract [1] We have estimated patterns and rates of crustal movement across 800 km of the Basin and Range at ∼39° north latitude with Global Positioning System surveys in 1992, 1996, 1998, and 2002. The total rate of motion tangent to the small circle around the Pacific-North America pole of rotation is 10.4 ± 1.0 mm/yr, and motion normal to this small circle is 3.9 ± 0.9 mm/yr compared to the east end of our network. On the Colorado

494

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Abstract Some of the earliest volcanic rocks attributed to the Yellowstone hotspot erupted from the McDermitt caldera and related volcanic centers in northwestern Nevada at 17-15 Ma. At that time, extensional faulting was ongoing to the south in central Nevada, leading some to suggest that the nascent hotspot caused or facilitated middle Miocene Basin and Range extension. Regional geologic relationships indicate that the total magnitude of extension in northwestern Nevada is low compared to the amount

495

Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge

496

Reconnaissance electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance electrical surveys in the Coso Range, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Telluric current, audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), and direct current (dc) methods were used to study the electrical structure of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal area. Telluric current mapping outlined major resistivity lows associated with conductive valley fill of the Rose Valley basin, the Coso Basin, and the northern extension of the Coso Basin east of Coso Hot Springs. A secondary resistivity low with a north-south trend runs through the Coso Hot Springs--Devil's Kitchen geothermal area. The secondary low in the geothermal area, best defined by the 7.5-Hz AMT map

497

T-710: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service 10: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service Vulnerability T-710: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service Vulnerability September 6, 2011 - 3:09am Addthis PROBLEM: Apache HTTP Server contains a vulnerability that could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to cause a denial of service (DoS) condition. PLATFORM: Apache HTTP Server versions 2.2.19 and prior ABSTRACT: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service Vulnerability. reference LINKS: FreeBSD VuXML Document Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20110830-apache IBM Alert: swg21512087 Red Hat Advisory: RHSA-2011:1245-1 CVE-2011-3192 CVE-2011-3192 (Update2) IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The vulnerability is due to improper processing of certain user-supplied requests by the affected software. An unauthenticated, remote attacker

498

Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Range Geothermal Region and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (34) Power Plants (3) Projects (7) Techniques (33) Map: {{{Name}}} Examination of seismicity and late Quaternary faults in Montana and Idaho north of the Snake River Plain shows a geographic correspondence between high seismicity and 24 faults that have experienced surface rupture during the late Quaternary. The Lewis and Clark Zone delineates the northern boundary of this tectonically active extensional region. Earthquakes greater than magnitude 5.5 and all identified late Quaternary faults are confined to the Montana-Idaho portion of the Basin and Range Province south of the Lewis and Clark Zone. Furthermore, all 12 Holocene faults are

499

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range lies at the west edge of the Great Basin, adjacent to the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. A basement complex of pre-Cenozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks is partly buried by approx.35 km^3 of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km^3 of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending order of abundance, and (2) < or =1.1 m.y., nearly equal amounts of basalt and

500

Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Details Activities (12) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy