Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic mixtures. However, analysis of petroleum crude oil as well as upcoming biofuels requires continued NHMFL 9.4 T FT- species in petroleum crude oil and its products, extending to "heavy" crudes.4 tesla widebore FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Acknowledgements : Include all grant info; e.g. G.S. Boebinger

3

Ranges and moments of depth distributions of boron and phosphorus implanted into silicon in the energy range 1.7-5.0 MeV with an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE implanter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High energy implantation of dopant atoms is used to form buried layers of high conductivity in silicon. These layers have many potential applications, including triple wells for FLASH memory devices, buried layers for CCD devices, and damage induced gettering regions in all devices. In order to make optimum use of very high energy dopant implants, the depth and profile shape characteristics of these implants need to be determined. This paper presents the results of depth profiling by SIMS of implants of boron and phosphorus in silicon. The implants were done on an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE mechanically scanned implanter with energies of 1.7-3.0 MeV for boron and 3-5 MeV for phosphorus, doses of 1 {times} 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}, and tilt/twist orientations of 0{degrees}/0{degrees}, 5.2{degrees}/16.7{degrees}, and 7{degrees}/27{degrees}. The four central moments of the depth distributions, as well as the peak depth have been calculated for each of the profiles. The projected ranges of all these implants are underestimated by TRIM92 calculations.

Rubin, L.; Shaw, W.; Jones, M.A. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Wilson, R.G. [Hughes Research Labs., Malibu, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Sandia National Laboratories: SWiFT Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations SWiFT Operations wind-turbines The DOESNL SWiFT facility has three research-scale variable-speed variable-pitch modified wind turbines with full power conversion and an...

5

Sandia National Laboratories: Ft. Devens  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at Explora MuseumFloatingFront Edge Technology Inc.Ft.

6

Thrust faulting in Temblor Range, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface and subsurface studies confirm the presence of overthrusting in the Temblor Range between Gonyer Canyon and Recruit Pass. In the subsurface, three wells have penetrated the Cree fault, the Hudbay Cree' No. 1 (7,300 ft), the Frantzen Oil Company Cree' No. 1 (5,865 ft) and the Arco Cree Fee' 1A well (5,915 ft). Below the fault, 25 to 35{degree} of westerly dips on the west flank of the sub-thrust Phelps anticline are encountered. The McDonald section below the fault is comprised of siliceous fractured shale which contains live oil and gas showings. A drill-stem test of the interval from 8,247 to 8,510 ft in the Frantzen well resulted in a recovery of 1,200 ft clean 34{degree} oil and 40 MCF per day gas. The shut in pressure was 3,430 lb, which is a normal hydrostatic pressure common to the producing structures in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The equivalent of this interval has produced over 7,000 bbl of oil in the Arco Cree' 1A well. The Arco Cree Fee' No. 1A well crossed the axis of the Phelps Anticline as indicated by good dipmeter and bottomed in Lower Zemorrian at 14,512 ft total depth. This well was not drilled deep enough to reach the Point of Rocks Sand and did not test the gas showings in the lower Miocene section. In the Gonyer Canyon area, subsurface evidence indicated conditions are similar to those in the Cree area because a large structure is present below a thrust fault. It is believed that significant accumulations will be found beneath thrust faults in the eastern part of the Temblor Range where conditions are similar to those that were instrumental in forming fields such as the Elk Hills, B. V. Hills, Belgian Anticline and others.

Simonson, R.R.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process Development Unit Facility February 2014 The facility is sized as a small-scale pilot CBTL plant that would produce research quantities of FT liquid fuels at...

8

Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(T) gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of f(T) modified teleparallel gravity. We consider a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the Hubble horizon. For two viable f(T) models containing f(T) = T+?{sub 1}((?T)){sup n} and f(T) = T??{sub 2}T(1?e{sup ?T{sub 0}/T}), we first calculate the effective equation of state and deceleration parameters. Then, (we investigate the null and strong energy conditions and conclude that a sudden future singularity appears in both models. Furthermore, using a cosmographic analysis we check the viability of two models. Finally, we examine the validity of the GSL and find that for both models it) is satisfied from the early times to the present epoch. But in the future, the GSL is violated for the special ranges of the torsion scalar T.

Karami, K.; Abdolmaleki, A., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: AAbdolmaleki@uok.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

Hoffman, E.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

FTIR and FT-PL spectroscopic analysis of TPV materials and devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopic techniques are useful in determining properties of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) materials and devices. The III-V TPV absorber materials have energy bandgaps that can be optimized for conversion of the near-infrared radiation emitted by thermal sources in the 1000{degree}{endash}1200&hthinsp;{degree}C temperature range. The bandgaps of these materials can be measured at room temperature using FT-photoluminescence spectroscopy, which can be done with a modified FT-Raman spectrophotometer operating in the near-infrared spectral region. The intensities and bandwidths of the FT-PL spectra also provide information on the extent of non-radiative recombination and the compositional uniformity of the materials. To achieve adequate operating efficiencies, TPV converters must return sub-bandgap radiation to the thermal source. The percent reflectance of the device in the mid-infrared spectral region is therefore an important operating parameter that can be accurately measured using FT-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with total reflectance optical accessories. In this paper, we discuss applications of these techniques to TPV materials and devices, and variations on these approaches, such as scanning micro-FT-PL spectroscopy, that enable microanalysis of TPV device structures at the 1{endash}100-{mu}m scale. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Webb, J.D.; Gedvilas, L.M.; Olson, M.R.; Wu, X.; Duda, A.; Wanlass, M.W.; Jones, K.M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

58 45 51 H Content (% mass) 13.6 14.5 15.5 14.3 15.1 Heat of Combust. (MJ/kg) 43.3 43.8 44.4 43.8 441 Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2 Feedstock Petroleum Petroleum & Natural Gas Natural Gas Petroleum & Coal Coal Sulfur (ppm by mass) 1148 699 19 658 22 Alkanes (% vol.) 50

Meskhidze, Nicholas

12

Natural Disaster Survey Report Ft. Smith and Van Buren, Arkansas,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and conversations with volunteer amateur radio operators, members of the print and broadcast media in Ft. Smith to the U.S. Congress, to local government officials in Ft. Smith and Van Buren, and to the media on May 21Natural Disaster Survey Report Ft. Smith and Van Buren, Arkansas, Tornado of April 21, 1996 U

13

U.S. Army- Ft. Carson, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"—a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and supplying the heated air to the building's central heating system. This collector system is especially advantageous for buildings that require large volumes of heated air.

14

FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplainsEnvironmental Assessments and Related| OpenFT

15

Drilling/producing depths; Two records and a revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that record depths for natural gas or oil well drilling or producing continue to be rare occurrences, although one or two still come in each year. Records fell in Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) District 9 and in the California area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in 1990. Deep drilling and production has traditionally been defined as well depths greater than 15,000 ft. Smith Tool reported that 9.4% of all active rotary rigs were dedicated to targets below 15,000 ft at the beginning of 1991. Deep rigs had dropped to 8.1% by year-end 1991, but remained above the 1989 and 1990 levels of 8.4 and 7.6%, respectively. In 1988 about 11% of active rigs were drilling deep at any given time.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ISV FACT SHEET SINGLE ENSUITE: 198 sq.ft.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISV FACT SHEET SINGLE ENSUITE: 198 sq.ft. STANDARD ROOM: (NO AIRCOND, NO WATER HEATER, FREE WIFI): RM 590 PER MONTH PER BED PREMIER ROOM: : (AIRCOND WITH WATER HEATER, FREE WIFI) : RM740 PER MONTH PER BED TWIN SHARING: 283 sq.ft. STANDARD ROOM: (NO AIRCOND, NO WATER HEATER, FREE WIFI): RM 490 PER MONTH

Southampton, University of

17

$f(T)$ Theories and Varying Fine Structure Constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In analogy to $f(R)$ theory, recently $f(T)$ theory has been proposed to drive the current accelerated expansion without invoking dark energy. In the literature, the observational constraints on $f(T)$ theories were obtained mainly by using the cosmological data, such as type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). In this work, we instead try to constrain $f(T)$ theories with the varying fine structure "constant", $\\alpha\\equiv e^2/\\hbar c$. We find that the constraints on $f(T)$ theories from the observational $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data are very severe. In fact, they make $f(T)$ theories almost indistinguishable from $\\Lambda$CDM model.

Wei, Hao; Qi, Hao-Yu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Spherically symmetric static spacetimes in vacuum f(T) gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that Schwarzschild geometry remains as a vacuum solution for those four-dimensional f(T) gravitational theories behaving as ultraviolet deformations of general relativity. In the gentler context of three-dimensional gravity, we also find that the infrared-deformed f(T) gravities, like the ones used to describe the late cosmic speed up of the Universe, have as the circularly symmetric vacuum solution a Deser-de Sitter or a Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli-like spacetime with an effective cosmological constant depending on the infrared scale present in the function f(T).

Ferraro, Rafael [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fiorini, Franco [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Variable depth core sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Transition redshift in $f(T)$ cosmology and observational constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extract constraints on the transition redshift $z_{tr}$, determining the onset of cosmic acceleration, predicted by an effective cosmographic construction, in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity. In particular, employing cosmography we obtain bounds on the viable $f(T)$ forms and their derivatives. Since this procedure is model independent, as long as the scalar curvature is fixed, we are able to determine intervals for $z_{tr}$. In this way we guarantee that the Solar-System constraints are preserved and moreover we extract bounds on the transition time and the free parameters of the scenario. We find that the transition redshifts predicted by $f(T)$ cosmology, although compatible with the standard $\\Lambda$CDM predictions, are slightly smaller. Finally, in order to obtain observational constraints on $f(T)$ cosmology, we perform a Monte Carlo fitting using supernova data, involving the most recent union 2.1 data set.

Capozziello, Salvatore; Saridakis, Emmanuel N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ft Scott Community College Transfer Program to University of Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

461 Probability & Statistics (Computer Engineering & Electrical Engineering)) 3 No Equivalent BASIC & Computer Science (Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Information TechnologyFt Scott Community College Transfer Program to University of Kansas B.S. Electrical Engineering

22

Application of Printed Circuit Board Technology to FT-ICR MS...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to FT-ICR MS Analyzer Cell Construction and Prototyping. Abstract: Although Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICRMS) remains themass spectrometry...

23

Advanced Mass Calibration and Visualization for FT-ICR Mass Spectromet...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Mass spectrometry imaging by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) yields hundreds of unique peaks, many of which...

24

Stretching and bending with flexible FT-IR process monitors, probes and software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FT-IR process analyzers continue to gain recognition for reliable and accurate on-line analyses on a broad variety of processes around the world. When fast analyses are required, on-line FT-IR analyzers offer speed and specificity for many applications. The use of FT-IR spectroscopy, either in the Mid-IR region or Near IR region offers fundamental advantages over other technologies. These advantages make calibrations exceptionally stable for an analyzer over time and offer improved ease of calibration transfer between similar analyzers. Spectral region selection criteria are reviewed, to help define when to use the Mid-IR region or the Near-IR region (or even when to use parts of both) for a given sample stream. New fiber optic sampling probes for transmission, attenuated total reflection, diffuse reflection and web sensing have solved nagging problems. What many process analyzer specialists are discovering is that new probes are becoming available each month, offering newer process tolerance (can tolerate higher temp or pressure) or even new sampling approaches altogether. This paper describes on-line applications in pharmaceuticals, specialty chemicals, polymer production and refinery production which demonstrate the range of techniques used to appropriately optimize the on-line analyzer. In addition, calibration transfer issues will be discussed, demonstrating the importance of the software tools to help sort out the causes for cal errors (spectral contamination, etc.).

Peters, D.C. [KVB/Analect, Utica, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in local policy debates about fracking. This In-depth Report from Science for Environment Policy explores

26

Cosmological viability conditions for f(T) dark energy models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently f(T) modified teleparallel gravity where T is the torsion scalar has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy. We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of these models and find conditions for the cosmological viability of f(T) dark energy models as geometrical constraints on the derivatives of these models. We show that in the phase space exists two cosmologically viable trajectory which (i) The universe would start from an unstable radiation point, then pass a saddle standard matter point which is followed by accelerated expansion de sitter point. (ii) The universe starts from a saddle radiation epoch, then falls onto the stable matter era and the system can not evolve to the dark energy dominated epoch. Finally, for a number of f(T) dark energy models were proposed in the more literature, the viability conditions are investigated.

Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cosmological viability conditions for $f(T)$ dark energy models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently $f(T)$ modified teleparallel gravity where T is the torsion scalar has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy. We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of these models and find conditions for the cosmological viability of $f(T)$ dark energy models as geometrical constraints on the derivatives of these models. We show that in the phase space exists two cosmologically viable trajectory which (i) The universe would start from an unstable radiation point, then pass a saddle standard matter point which is followed by accelerated expansion de sitter point. (ii) The universe starts from a saddle radiation epoch, then falls onto the stable matter era and the system can not evolve to the dark energy dominated epoch. Finally, for a number of $f(T)$ dark energy models were proposed in the more literature, the viability conditions are investigated.

M. R. Setare; N. Mohammadipour

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

An energy spread correction for ERDA hydrogen depth profiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique for hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis called the channel-depth conversion was introduced by Verda, et al.' However, the energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, which causes a broadening in the energy range and leads to errors in depth profiling, was not addressed by this technique. Here we introduce a technique to addresses this problem, called the energy spread correction. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion techniques comprise the depth profiling method presented in this work.

Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Source depth for solar p-modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretically calculated power spectra are compares with observed solar p-mode velocity power spectra over a range of mode degree and frequency. The depth for the sources responsible for exciting p-modes of frequency 2.0 mHz is determined from the asymmetry of their power spectra and found to be about 800 km below the photosphere for quadrupole sources and 150 km if sources are dipole. The source depth for high frequency oscillations of frequency greater than about 6 mHz is 180 (50) km for quadrupole (dipole) sources.

Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

HydraNet-FT: network support for dependable servors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net-FT infrastructure consists of two components: host servers and redirecting. Host servers are hosts that are specially equipped to act as servers for replicated and fault-tolerant services. The location of the host servers is known to the redirecting, specially...

Shenoy, Gurudatt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Anisotropic Compact Stars in $f(T)$ Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper deals with the theoretical modeling of anisotropic compact stars in the framework of $f(T)$ theory of gravity, where $T$ is torsion scalar. To this end, we have used the exact solutions of Krori and Barua metric to a static spherically symmetric metric. The unknown constants involved in the Krori and Barua metric have been specified by using the masses and radii of compact stars 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658. The physical properties of these stars have been analyzed in the framework of $f(T)$ theory. In this setting, we have checked the anisotropic behavior, regularity conditions, stability and surface redshift of the compact stars.

Abbas, G; Zubair, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Anisotropic Compact Stars in $f(T)$ Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper deals with the theoretical modeling of anisotropic compact stars in the framework of $f(T)$ theory of gravity, where $T$ is torsion scalar. To this end, we have used the exact solutions of Krori and Barua metric to a static spherically symmetric metric. The unknown constants involved in the Krori and Barua metric have been specified by using the masses and radii of compact stars 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658. The physical properties of these stars have been analyzed in the framework of $f(T)$ theory. In this setting, we have checked the anisotropic behavior, regularity conditions, stability and surface redshift of the compact stars.

G. Abbas; Afshan Kanwal; M. Zubair

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

33

5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:...

34

High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR...

35

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URIFrontier, North Dakota: EnergyInformation Ft

36

Can f(T) gravity theories mimic ?CDM cosmic history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The f(T) modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function f(T) by demanding a background ?CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat ?CDM (the radiation ere with ?{sub eff} = (1/3), matter and de Sitter eras with ?{sub eff} = 0 and ?{sub eff} = ?1, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with ?{sub 0r} = 1 and the matter dominate during the matter phases when ?{sub 0m} = 1. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the ?CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function f(T) which mimics cosmic expansion history.

Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURE AND RESEARCH JOURNAL 32:3 (2008) 107–126 107 Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place MARGARET WICKENS PEARCE AND RENEE PUALANI LOUIS INTRODUCTION Indigenous communities have successfully used Western geospatial technolo- gies (GT... of geog- raphy at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Renee Pualani Louis is Hawaiian and recently completed her doctorate in geography at the University of Hawai‘i at MaŻnoa, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. Published as M. Pearce and R. Louis. Mapping Indigenous depth...

Pearce, Margaret Wickens; Louis, Renee Pualani

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the prices paid for energy in recent years. In the last 10 years electrical costs have ranged from $0.07 per costs associated with the live production of broilers on farms in Georgia and the United States. HeatingPUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U

Navara, Kristen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Long Range Development Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,Local Correlations andLocalThroughout theLong Range

42

Long Range Operations Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,Local Correlations andLocalThroughout theLong Range7

43

Long Range Operations Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,Local Correlations andLocalThroughout theLong Range78

44

Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdf Flash2010-57.pdfDepartment(Fact6:21Education | DepartmentFt. Carson

45

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitec doWinvest Home Jweers's"Ghost"0-ft Wave

46

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species |2008 |44Biosolids6-ft Wave

47

Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings | Department ofManagementofFront-end NuclearFt.

48

Starobinsky-like inflation induced by f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a single fluid component in a flat like universe governed by $f(T)$ gravity theories. The flat like universe does not imply a vanishing sectional curvature $k$, but assuming a vanishing of the coefficient of $k$ in the modified Friedmann equations. This enables us to extract a compatible pair of a scale factor $a(t)$ and an inverse power series $f(T)$. The Equation of State (EoS) evolves similarly in all models $k=0, \\pm 1$. In large Hubble ($H$)-spacetime the theory is consistent with the inflationary universe scenario and respects the conservation principle. We study the case when the teleparallel torsion is made of a single scalar field. The theory produces Starobinsky model naturally at its zeroth order without using a conformal transformation. Higher order solutions continuously interpolate between Starobinsky and quadratic inflation models. The slow-roll analysis shows double solutions so that for a single value of the spectral index $n_{s}$ the theory can predict double tensor-to-scalar ratios $r$ of Planck and BICEP2 data.

W. El Hanafy; G. L. Nashed

2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

49

Rotating drum variable depth sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Schuster, George J. (Kennewick, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers....

52

Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-4 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,132 m (3,713 ft bgs) below ground surface (bgs). The screened section of the well consists of alternating sections of slotted well screen and blank casing from 948 to 1,132 m bgs (3,111 to 3,713 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus in the well casing likely causes the calculated borehole flow rates being highly nonrepresentative of inflow from the formation. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

Phil L. Oberlander; Charles E. Russell

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Author's personal copy Unexpected new phase detected in FT30 type reverse osmosis membranes using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Unexpected new phase detected in FT30 type reverse osmosis membranes using Available online 13 July 2011 Keywords: Reverse osmosis membranes X-ray microscopy Poly phenylene diamine a b s t r a c t FT30 type thin film composite membranes used for reverse osmosis water purification

Hitchcock, Adam P.

54

Graceful Exit Inflation in $f(T)$ Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply a quadratic teleparallel torsion scalar of the $f(T)=T+\\alpha T^{2}$ field equations to the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model. We assume two perfect fluid components, the matter component has a fixed equation of state (EoS) parameter $\\omega$, while the torsion component has a dynamical EoS. We obtain an effective scale factor allowing a graceful exit inflation model with no need to slow roll technique. We perform a standard cosmological study to examine the cosmic evolution. In addition, the effective EoS shows consistent results confirming a smooth phase transition from inflation to radiation dominant universe. We consider the case when the torsion is made of a scalar field. This treatment enables us to induce a scalar field sensitive to the spacetime symmetry with an effective potential constructed from the quadratic $f(T)$ gravity. The model is parameterized by two parameters ($\\alpha,\\omega$) both derive the universe to exit out of de Sitter expansion. The first is purely gravitational and works effectively at large Hubble regime of the early stage allowing a slow roll potential. The second parameter $\\omega$ is a thermal-like correction coupled to the kinetic term and works effectively at low Hubble regime of late stages. The slow roll analysis of the obtained potential can perform tensor-to-scalar ratio and spectral index parameters consistent with the recent Planck and BICEP2 data. Both cosmological and scalar field analyses show consistent results.

G. G. L. Nashed; W. El Hanafy; Sh. Kh. Ibrahim

2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

New depths with mobile rig  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magee-Poole Drilling Company, a drilling contractor operating out of the south Texas drilling center of Alice, claims it operates the largest mobile drilling rig in the world. That is, it's the only wheel mounted portable rig that drills to 16,000 feet with 4 1/2-inch drill pipe - at least 3000 feet deeper than the previous mobile drilling rig ratings. The unit is designated the Ingersoll-Rand 1500 Series. What's more significant, according to co-owner Don Magee, is that the rig's portability gets the rotary table turning to the right sooner; it drills more footage per year. It rigs up in 1 1/2 days versus 3 to 4 days for a conventional skid type rig normally used at these depths. The unit's compact arrangement, with more components combined into single loads, makes possible its higher mobility. A conventional skid rig might require 25 to 30 truckloads to move the rig components, mud system, fuel and water tank, houses for utilities, storage and crew change, generators, and drill pipe. The new rig moves in anywhere from four to nine loads less. Further, the rig components weigh less without sacrificing durability.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Goulden Lab Equipment and Facilities Lab: 1400 ft2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

closed path IRGAS, (8) aluminum or steel towers ranging in height from 10' to 100', (70) 90 to 120 W solar panels. General meteorology and data acquisition equipment: Approx (50) miscellaneous data loggers

Rose, Michael R.

59

FT-ICR studies of metal-carbon binary clusters for formation mechanism of endohedral fullerene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion Mass [amu] C60 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) LaC44 + LaC50 + LaC60 + Figure 2FT-ICR studies of metal-carbon binary clusters for formation mechanism of endohedral fullerene-wall carbon nanotube), i.e. La, Y, Sc, Gd, Ce, Ca, and Ni-Y. An example of FT-ICR mass spectra is shown

Maruyama, Shigeo

60

Structural evolution of Carpinteria basin, western transverse ranges, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pleistocene Carpinteria basin is an east-trending northward-verging, faulted syncline containing up to 4,000 ft (1,220 m) of partially intertonguing Santa Barbara and Casitas Formations deposited on previously folded pre-Pleistocene strata with up to 80/sup 0/ discordance. Structures subcropping against the unconformity indicate that most of the deformation in the Santa Ynez Mountains prior to deposition of the Pleistocene Santa Barbara Formation was by folding. Quaternary faults in the area are either south-dipping reverse faults related to bedding slip in pre-Pleistocene strata or north-dipping reverse faults that truncate bedding and are seismogenic. The Red Mountain fault dips 55 to 63/sup 0/ north at the surface and steepens to 70/sup 0/ north with depth; it also steepens westward south of the Summerland Offshore oil field to 85/sup 0/ north. Vertical separation decreases westward from 14,750 ft (4,500 m) north of the Rincon field to 1,150 ft (350 m) at Rincon Point and 330 ft (100 m) south of Summerland. The main branch of the Red Mountain fault offsets a 45,000 year old marine terrace, but not a 4,500 year old terrace. The Summerland Offshore oil field is situated within a disharmonically folded anticline in which severely deformed, structurally incompetent Miocene mudstone overlies broadly folded, competent Oligocene sandstone. Because the anticline formed after deposition of the Santa Barbara Formation, oil could not have migrated into this field until middle to late Pleistocene time.

Jackson, P.A.; Yeats, R.S.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Viscous Dark Energy in $f(T)$ Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the bulk viscosity taking dust matter in the generalized teleparallel gravity. We consider different dark energy models in this scenario along with a time dependent viscous model to construct the viscous equation of state parameter for these dark energy models. We discuss the graphical representation of this parameter to investigate the viscosity effects on the accelerating expansion of the universe. It is mentioned here that the behavior of the universe depends upon the viscous coefficients showing the transition from decelerating to accelerating phase. It leads to the crossing of phantom divide line and becomes phantom dominated for specific ranges of these coefficients.

M. Sharif; Shamaila Rani

2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Geodesic Deviation Equation in GR equivalent theory of $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we show that it is possible to study the GR equivalent notion of geodesic deviation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent of $f(T)$ gravity whose equations are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

Darabi, F; Atazadeh, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Geodesic Deviation Equation in GR equivalent theory of $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we show that it is possible to study the GR equivalent notion of geodesic deviation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent of $f(T)$ gravity whose equations are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

F. Darabi; M. Mousavi; K. Atazadeh

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b) SWIFTed (c) NO 1sChemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer S. Maruyama, M- fullerene and single walled carbon nanotubes are investigated through experimental studies of interaction

Maruyama, Shigeo

68

FT-ICR ,,,Carbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 70 80 720 760 800 Ion Mass [amu] ScC60 + C64 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) ScC60FT-ICR ,�,æ,éCarbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters ·>Í­ì·³"¹1 ·C Masamichi Kohno1 , Tetsuya

Maruyama, Shigeo

69

Utility Assessment Report for SPIDERS Phase 2: Ft. Carson (Rev 1.0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Utility Assessment Report (UAR) for the Phase 2 operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). The UAR for Phase 2 shows that the SPIDERS system was able to meet the requirements of the Implementation Directive at Ft. Carson.

Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Schneider, Kevin P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

If*|lg1JEDIlls ,,ft-o-aS.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

»-H a3UW ·3USi «c« «"22"5"35» If*|lg1JEDIlls pV) 232 *2*& yuo = OW O5oc ,,ft-o-aS.2 F.O-a-- o :§>£ £1 2 (genetic code) Eukaryotes Sexual populations Animals, plants, fungi (cell differentiation) Colonies (non

71

Compressed Gated Range Sensing Grigorios Tsagkatakisa, Arnaud Woiselleb, George Tzagkarakisc,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emitting diode (LED), and an imaging sensor in order to generate a 2D depth map of a scene. Time. INTRODUCTION Active Range Imaging systems employ an active illumination source, typically a laser or a light

Tsakalides, Panagiotis

72

Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments Dan Chen School of Computer Science¨ur Theoretische Informatik Abstract A Monte Carlo approximation algorithm for the Tukey depth problem in high. Keywords: Tukey depth, computational geometry 1. Introduction Tukey depth is also known as location depth

Morin, Pat

73

Depth and Depth-Color Coding using Shape-Adaptive Wavelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-view autostereoscopic displays, 3D-TV is expected to be the next evolution of television after high definition. Three Abstract We present a novel depth and depth-color codec aimed at free-viewpoint 3D-TV. The proposed codec is implemented by shape-adaptive lifting, which enables fast computations and perfect reconstruction. We derive

Do, Minh N.

74

Africa Aerosol Optical Depth Obtained From MISR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OpticalDepth Central African Republic Chad Djibouti Egypt Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Mean Seasonal

Frank, Thomas D.

75

Collision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; compute distances between the obstacles and the robot; optionally project the results in the CartesianCollision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION When humans and robots share the same work space, safety is the primary issue of concern [8]. Secondary but not negligible is to prevent robot damages due

De Luca, Alessandro

76

Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

Bean, Keri Marie

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

78

Interacting Dark Energy in f(T) cosmology : A Dynamical System analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work deals with an interacting dark energy model in the framework of f(T) cosmology. A cosmologically viable form of f(T) is chosen (T is the torsion scalar in teleparallelism) in the background of flat homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time model of the universe. The matter content of the universe is chosen as dust interacting with minimally coupled scalar field. The evolution equations are reduced to an autonomous system of ordinary differential equations by suitable transformation of variables. The nature of critical points are analyzed by evaluating the eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobi matrix and stable attractors are examined from the point of view of cosmology. Finally, both classical and quantum stability of the model have been discussed.

Biswas, Sujay Kr

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in...

80

A special exact spherically symmetric solution in f(T) gravity theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-diagonal spherically symmetric tetrad field, involving four unknown functions of radial coordinate $r$, is applied to the equations of motion of f(T) gravity theory. A special exact vacuum solution with one constant of integration is obtained. The scalar torsion related to this special solution vanishes. To understand the physical meaning of the constant of integration we calculate the energy associated with this solution and show how it is related to the gravitational mass of the system.

G. G. L. Nashed

2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A special exact spherically symmetric solution in f(T) gravity theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-diagonal spherically symmetric tetrad field, involving four unknown functions of radial coordinate $r$, is applied to the equations of motion of f(T) gravity theory. A special exact vacuum solution with one constant of integration is obtained. The scalar torsion related to this special solution vanishes. To understand the physical meaning of the constant of integration we calculate the energy associated with this solution and show how it is related to the gravitational mass of the system.

Nashed, G G L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Trapped-ion cell with improved DC potential harmonicity for FT-ICR MS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trapped-ion cell is a key component critical for optimal performance in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS). We have upgraded our 12 Tesla FT-ICR instrument with a new open cylindrical cell that includes four additional cylindrical segments that serve as compensation electrodes. The DC potential on the additional segments can be set to specific pre-calculated values to suppress DC trapping field anharmonicity, in an effort to improve coherence of the ion cyclotron motion and minimize deviations from the calibration function of the ideal cell. Alternatively, the compensation potentials can be set equal to potentials of adjacent cell electrodes, which creates a DC potential distribution equivalent to that of a regular open cylindrical cell. The initial experimental characterization of both the compensated and open cell configurations was performed using ESI direct infusion of a peptide mixture. Operating the compensated cell at increased post-excitation radii resulted in improved mass measurement accuracy together with increased signal intensity, while the regular configuration exhibited peak splitting and reduced signal life time under these operating conditions. The observed improvement of the compensated cell performance was consistent with the expected behavior due to the improved DC potential harmonicity. These results confirm that the trapping DC potential harmonicity is significant for optimizing FT-ICR MS performance.

Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Robinson, Errol W.; Wu, Si; Kang, Hyuk; Lourette, Natacha M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

RANGE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TECHNETIUM KD VALUES IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessments (PAs) are risk calculations used to estimate the amount of low-level radioactive waste that can be disposed at DOE sites. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) are input parameters used in PA calculations to provide a measure of radionuclide sorption to sediment; the greater the K{sub d} value, the greater the sorption and the slower the estimated movement of the radionuclide through sediment. Understanding and quantifying K{sub d} value variability is important for estimating the uncertainty of PA calculations. Without this information, it is necessary to make overly conservative estimates about the possible limits of K{sub d} values, which in turn may increase disposal costs. Finally, technetium is commonly found to be amongst the radionuclides posing potential risk at waste disposal locations because it is believed to be highly mobile in its anionic form (pertechnetate, TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), it exists in relatively high concentrations in SRS waste, and it has a long half-life (213,000 years). The objectives of this laboratory study were to determine under SRS environmental conditions: (1) whether and to what extent TcO{sub 4}{sup -} sorbs to sediments, (2) the range of Tc K{sub d} values, (3) the distribution (normal or log-normal) of Tc K{sub d} values, and (4) how strongly Tc sorbs to SRS sediments through desorption experiments. Objective 3, to identify the Tc K{sub d} distribution is important because it provides a statistical description that influences stochastic modeling of estimated risk. The approach taken was to collect 26 sediments from a non-radioactive containing sediment core collected from E-Area, measure Tc K{sub d} values and then perform statistical analysis to describe the measured Tc K{sub d} values. The mean K{sub d} value was 3.4 {+-} 0.5 mL/g and ranged from -2.9 to 11.2 mL/g. The data did not have a Normal distribution (as defined by the Shapiro-Wilk's Statistic) and had a 95-percentile range of 2.4 to 4.4 mL/g. The E-Area subsurface is subdivided into three hydrostratigraphic layers: Upper Vadose Zone (11 to 30 ft depth), Lower Vadose Zone (30 to 51 ft depth), and aquifer (51 to 95 ft depth). The Upper Vadose Zone generally contains more clay than the Lower Vadose Zone, and the Aquifer tends to be made up of mostly sand layers with clay strata. The mean K{sub d} values of each of these zones did not differ significantly and the K{sub d} values from each zone were not from the Normal distribution. The ranges of values were greatest in the Upper Vadose Zone and least in the Lower Vadose Zone. Previous Best Estimate Tc K{sub d} values for Sandy Sediment and Clayey Sediment were 0.1 and 0.2 mL/g, respectively (Kaplan 2007a). A more thorough review indicates that the Best Estimates for Sandy Sediment is 0.1 mL/g and for Clayey Sediment is 0.8 mL/g (Kaplan 2007b). This current dataset greatly increases the number of Tc K{sub d} values measured with SRS sediments, but perhaps more importantly, provides a better estimate for E-Area sediments, and provides a measure of Tc K{sub d} distributions. Based on this dataset, the best overall Tc K{sub d} value for E-Area is the mean, 3.4 mL/g, with a log-normal distribution between the 95 percentile values of 2.4 to 4.4 mL/g. This document version differs from the earlier version, SRNS-STI-2008-00286, in that it includes some editorial corrections. This version does not contain any technical changes or changes to the conclusions presented in the earlier version.

Kaplan, D

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

FT-IR and thermoluminescence investigation of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-BaO-K{sub 2}O glass system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 0.5P{sub 2}O{sub 5}?xBaO?(0.5?x)K{sub 2}O glass system (0?x?0.5mol%) is investigated by FT-IR and thermoluminescence as a possible dosimetic material. FT-IR spectra show structural network modifications with the composition variations of the studied glasses. The predominant absorption bands are characterized by two broad peaks near 500 cm{sup ?1}, two weak peaks around 740 cm{sup ?1} and three peaks in the 900–1270 cm{sup ?1} region. The shift in the position of the band assigned to asymmetric stretching of PO{sub 2}{sup ?} group, ?{sub as}(PO{sub 2}{sup ?}) modes from ?1100 cm{sup ?1} to 1085 cm{sup ?1} and the decrease in its relative intensity with the increasing of K{sub 2}O content shows a network modifier role of this oxide.. Luminescence investigations show that by adding modifier oxides in the phosphate glass a dose dependent TL signals result upon irradiation. Thus P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–BaO–K{sub 2}O glass system is a possible candidate material for dosimetry in the dose 0 – 50 Gy range.

Ivascu, C. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics, Kogalniceanu 1, 400084 Cluj Napoca (Romania)] [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics, Kogalniceanu 1, 400084 Cluj Napoca (Romania); Timar-Gabor, A. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Environmental Science, Fantanele 30, 400294 Cluj Napoca (Romania)] [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Environmental Science, Fantanele 30, 400294 Cluj Napoca (Romania); Cozar, O. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics, Kogalniceanu 1, 400084 Cluj Napoca, Romania and Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest (Romania)] [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics, Kogalniceanu 1, 400084 Cluj Napoca, Romania and Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

PMo or PW heteropoly acids supported on MCM-41 silica nanoparticles: Characterisation and FT-IR study of the adsorption of 2-butanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesoporous silica, prepared in basic conditions, has been loaded (20% weight) with 12-molybdophosphoric (PMo) or 12-tungstophosphoric (PW) acid and calcined at different temperatures ranging between 250 and 550 deg. C. The samples have been characterised by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption at -196 deg. C, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-visible diffuse reflectance, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). The acidity and catalytic activity have been, respectively, examined by monitoring the adsorption of pyridine and 2-butanol by FT-IR spectroscopy. The results indicate that PW and PMo acids are highly dispersed on mesoporous silica MCM-41 spherical nanoparticles. While PMo retains its Keggin structure up to 550 deg. C, PW decomposes at this temperature into crystalline WO{sub 3} and phosphorous oxides. In both cases, the morphology, hexagonal symmetry and long-range order observed for the support are preserved with calcination up to 450 deg. C. The Broensted-type acid sites found in all samples, whose surface concentration decreases as the calcination temperature increases, are responsible for the selective formation of cis-butene detected upon adsorption of 2-butanol. The sample containing PW calcined at 450 deg. C also shows selectivity to methyl ethyl ketone. - Graphical abstract: Samples based in MCM-41 nanoparticles loaded with tungstophosphoric and molybdophosphoric acids have been synthesised. The uncalcined solids and that derived upon their calcination in the temperature range 250-550 deg. C have been characterised and evaluated in the decomposition of 2-butanol monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy.

Carriazo, Daniel [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain); Domingo, Concepcion [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C., Serrano, 123, 28006-Madrid (Spain); Martin, Cristina [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain); Rives, Vicente [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain)], E-mail: vrives@usal.es

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Magnetic Flares and the Observed Optical Depth in Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We here consider the pressure equilibrium during an intense magnetic flare above the surface of a cold accretion disk. Under the assumption that the heating source for the plasma trapped within the flaring region is an influx of energy transported inwards with a group velocity close to $c$, e.g., by magnetohydrodynamic waves, this pressure equilibrium can constrain the Thomson optical depth $\\tau_T$ to be of order unity. We suggest that this may be the reason why $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ in Seyfert Galaxies. We also consider whether current data can distinguish between the spectrum produced by a single X-ray emitting region with $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ and that formed by many different flares spanning a range of $\\tau_T$. We find that the current observations do not yet have the required energy resolution to permit such a differentiation. Thus, it is possible that the entire X-ray/$\\gamma$-ray spectrum of Seyfert Galaxies is produced by many independent magnetic flares with an optical depth $0.5<\\tau_T<2$.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

firing lanes. If possible, do not construct columns within the range. Design columns or beams to withstand local wind and seismic loads, and provide protective steel plate on the...

89

A case study, artificial insemination versus natural breeding at Overland Farms, Ft. Worth, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Ft. Worth, Texas. A total of 19 mares were bred by natural service by the Quarter Horse stallions, Tuffys Three Bars and The Ultimate Copy during the period beginning February 1, 1985 and ending July 5, 1985. As of the end of this period, 14 mares... at the case farm (Overland Farms). Presently, natural breeding is utilized. Considerations for using A. I. were: 1) number of mares and stallions to be used in the program, 2) start-up costs and 3) returns to capital investments by capital budgeting...

Migues, Loraine C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Weak-Field Spherically Symmetric Solutions in $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study weak-field solutions having spherical symmetry in $f(T)$ gravity; to this end, we solve the field equations for a non diagonal tetrad, starting from Lagrangian in the form $f(T)=T+\\alpha T^{n}$, where $\\alpha$ is a small constant, parameterizing the departure of the theory from GR. We show that the classical spherically symmetric solutions of GR, i.e. the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter solutions, are perturbed by terms in the form $\\propto r^{2-2n}$ and discuss the impact of these perturbations in observational tests.

Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ft. n. Both, Ohtef, RarourQb DWrion,Oak Ridgo  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_ ,' .' ft. n. Both, Ohtef,

92

Accurate hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique to convert reflection elastic recoil detection analysis spectra to depth profiles, the channel-depth conversion, was introduced by Verda, et al [1]. But the channel-depth conversion does not correct for energy spread, the unwanted broadening in the energy of the spectra, which can lead to errors in depth profiling. A work in progress introduces a technique that corrects for energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, the energy spread correction [2]. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion comprise an accurate and convenient hydrogen depth profiling method.

Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,; Bower, R. W. (Robert W.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vanadia was incorporated in the 3-dimensional mesoporous material TUD-1 with a loading of 2percent w/w vanadia. The performance in the selective photo-oxidation of liquid cyclohexene was investigated using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Under continuous illumination at 458 nm a significant amount of product, i.e. cyclohexenone, was identified. This demonstrates for the first time that hydroxylated vanadia centers in mesoporous materials can be activated by visible light to induce oxidation reactions. Using the rapid scan method, a strong perturbation of the vanadyl environment could be observed in the selective oxidation process induced by a 458 nm laser pulse of 480 ms duration. This is proposed to be caused by interaction of the catalytic centre with a cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide intermediate. The restoration of the vanadyl environment could be kinetically correlated to the rate of formation of cyclohexenone, and is explained by molecular rearrangement and dissociation of the peroxide to ketone and water. The ketone diffuses away from the active center and ATR infrared probing zone, resulting in a decreasing ketone signal on the tens of seconds time scale after initiation of the photoreaction. This study demonstrates the high potential of time resolved ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for mechanistic studies of liquid phase reactions by monitoring not only intermediates and products, but by correlating the temporal behavior of these species to molecular changes of the vanadyl catalytic site.

Frei, Heinz; Mul, Guido; Wasylenko, Walter; Hamdy, M. Sameh; Frei, Heinz

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

95

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality…………… Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical noise directional density function versus depth. 93 Measured and acoustically estimated wind speeds.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems David Bremner University of New de Bruxelles Pat Morin Carleton University Abstract The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p halfspace that contains p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions

Morin, Pat

97

Galactic Bulge Microlensing Optical Depth from EROS-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new EROS-2 measurement of the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic Bulge. Light curves of $5.6\\times 10^{6}$ clump-giant stars distributed over $66 \\deg^2$ of the Bulge were monitored during seven Bulge seasons. 120 events were found with apparent amplifications greater than 1.6 and Einstein radius crossing times in the range $5 {\\rm d}range $1.4\\degr<|b|<7.0\\degr$, we find $\\tau/10^{-6}=(1.62 \\pm 0.23)\\exp[-a(|b|-3 {\\rm deg})]$ with $a=(0.43 \\pm0.16)\\deg^{-1}$. These results are in good agreement with our previous measurement, with recent measurements of the MACHO and OGLE-II groups, and with predictions of Bulge models.

C. Hamadache; L. Le Guillou; P. Tisserand; C. Afonso; J. N. Albert; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; E. Aubourg; P. Bareyre; J. P. Beaulieu; X. Charlot; C. Coutures; R. Ferlet; P. Fouqué; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Gould; D. Graff; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; J. de Kat; E. Lesquoy; C. Loup; C. Magneville; J. B. Marquette; E. Maurice; A. Maury; A. Milsztajn; M. Moniez; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; Y. R. Rahal; J. Rich; M. Spiro; A. Vidal-Madjar; L. Vigroux; S. Zylberajch

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

98

Light beam range finder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Light beam range finder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam.

Grün, Rebecca [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany) [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)] [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Top-Down Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Intact Proteins by LAESI FT-ICR MS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization is a recent development in mass spectrometry imaging. It has been shown that lipids and small metabolites can be imaged in various samples such as plant material, tissue sections or bacterial colonies without anysample pre-treatment. Further, laser ablation electrospray ionization has been shown to produce multiply charged protein ions from liquids or solid surfaces. This presents a means to address one of the biggest challenges in mass spectrometry imaging; the identification of proteins directly from biological tissue surfaces. Such identification is hindered by the lack of multiply charged proteins in common MALDI ion sources and the difficulty of performing tandem MS on such large, singly charged ions. We present here top-down identification of intact proteins from tissue with a LAESI ion source combined with a hybrid ion-trap FT-ICR mass spectrometer. The performance of the system was first tested with a standard protein with ECD and IRMPD fragmentation to prove the...

Kiss, András; Reschke, Brent R; Powell, Matthew J; Heeren, Ron M A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

RangeTables.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323Program2Raftopoulos(MeVcm²/mg) LET vs. Range

106

Some intriguing properties of Tukey's half-space depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For multivariate data, Tukey's half-space depth is one of the most popular depth functions available in the literature. It is conceptually simple and satisfies several desirable properties of depth functions. The Tukey median, the multivariate median associated with the half-space depth, is also a well-known measure of center for multivariate data with several interesting properties. In this article, we derive and investigate some interesting properties of half-space depth and its associated multivariate median. These properties, some of which are counterintuitive, have important statistical consequences in multivariate analysis. We also investigate a natural extension of Tukey's half-space depth and the related median for probability distributions on any Banach space (which may be finite- or infinite-dimensional) and prove some results that demonstrate anomalous behavior of half-space depth in infinite-dimensional spaces.

Dutta, Subhajit; Chaudhuri, Probal; 10.3150/10-BEJ322

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ice cap meltdown to cause 22ft floods Ice cap meltdown to cause 22ft floods -Telegraph http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/3303624/Ice-cap-meltdow...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of no return and it were to melt then global sea levels would rise by 22ft and swallow up most of the world sheet. Likewise, global warming may cause a near-permanent El Nino in the Pacific, which would also over animal souvenirs (/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2007/08/16/eatrade116.xml) Rise of sea levels

Stevenson, Paul

108

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Flexible Solar-Energy Harvesting System on Plastic with Thin-film LC Oscillators Operating Above ft for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexible Solar-Energy Harvesting System on Plastic with Thin-film LC Oscillators Operating Above ft- This paper presents an energy-harvesting system consisting of amorphous-silicon (a-Si) solar cells and thin of the energy-harvesting system. The solar module consists of solar cells in series operating at an output

110

FINLANDFINANCIAL TIMES SPECIAL REPORT | Wednesday May 30 2012 www.ft.com/finland-2012 | twitter.com/ftreports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINLANDFINANCIAL TIMES SPECIAL REPORT | Wednesday May 30 2012 www.ft.com/finland-2012 | twitter." Like Greece, Portugal and Ire- land, Finland is on the geo- graphical periphery of the euro- zone in the past two years. Richer, happier and better educated than the OECD rich nations' club average, Finland

Kaski, Samuel

111

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Directory Home Directory Liaison List Server Help A-Z Index IFAS Main Pa Unit Name: Ft. Lauderdale -REC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Directory Home Directory Liaison List Server Help A-Z Index IFAS Main Pa Unit Name: Ft. Lauderdale, and Page 1 of 2Employee and Unit Directory - IFAS - Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Flor... 8/13/2013http://directory.ifas.ufl.edu/Dir/searchdir?pageID=2&uid=85 #12;Tampa) 1. Take US-27

Florida, University of

113

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

114

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported Co catalysts with desired activity, selectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Accomplishments for this quarter are: Four new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3 and five more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat; The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued; Seven new catalysts have been tested for their F-T synthesis performance; An investigation of the effect of pre-treatment (i.e. calcination in static air versus flowing air, direct reduction without prior calcination) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

115

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

Manglos, Stephen H. (East Syracuse, NY)

1989-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

aes depth profile: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

California eScholarship Repository Summary: al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical...

117

Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

118

Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry? Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen...

119

Bifurcation and Global Dynamical Behavior of the $f(T)$ Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usually, in order to investigate the evolution of a theory, one may find the critical points of the system and then perform perturbations around these critical points to see whether they are stable or not. This local method is very useful when the initial values of the dynamical variables are not far away from the critical points. Essentially, the nonlinear effects are totally neglected in such kind of approach. Therefore, one can not tell whether the dynamical system will evolute to the stable critical points or not when the initial values of the variables do not close enough to these critical points. Furthermore, when there are two or more stable critical points in the system, local analysis can not provide the informations that which one the system will finally evolute to. In this paper, we have further developed the nullcline method to study the bifurcation phenomenon and global dynamical behaviour of the $f(T)$ theory. We overcome the shortcoming of local analysis. And it is very clear to see the evolution of the system under any initial conditions.

Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li; Li-Yan Liu

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effect of circumferential groove casing treatment parameters on axial compressor flow range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact on compressor flow range of circumferential casing grooves of varying groove depth, groove axial location, and groove axial extent is assessed against that of a smooth casing wall using computational experiments. ...

Hanley, Brian K. (Brian Kyle)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Project of Aerosol Optical Depth Change in South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Paraguay Uruguay #12;Statistics of Aerosol M ean D ec 01 to 06 Mean Month AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela

Frank, Thomas D.

122

Depth, and Motion inVision CMSC 436/636  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, perceived depth related #12;Head Motion Parallax Bruce and Green 90, p. 231. Kinetic Depth Effect Bruce displacement) #12;Structure from Motion Bruce and Green 90, pg. 328. #12;Image Segmentation Discontinuities Representation techniques parameters #12;Experimental Findings Control necessary for development Held

Rheingans, Penny

123

SEU sensitive depth in a submicron SRAM technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work determines experimentally and by simulation the SEU sensitive depth in a 0.6 {micro}m SRAM technology. A good correlation is obtained between the two studies in the case of heavy ions deposing energy close to the critical energy. Other simulation results complete the first investigation by studying the minimum sensitive depth for ions deposing higher energies (at greater LET).

Detcheverry, C.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J. [Univ. Montpellier II (France)] [Univ. Montpellier II (France); Ecoffet, R. [CNES, Toulouse (France)] [CNES, Toulouse (France); Duzellier, S. [DERTS, Toulouse (France)] [DERTS, Toulouse (France); Barak, J.; Lifshitz, Y. [Soreq NRC, Yahvne (Israel)] [Soreq NRC, Yahvne (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance Fabrizio Flacco Torsten Kr is presented for safe human-robot coexistence. The main contribution is a fast method to evaluate distances between the robot and possibly moving obstacles (including humans), based on the concept of depth space

De Luca, Alessandro

125

On depth and deep points: a calculus Ivan Mizera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Tukey's median) plays a fundamental role similar to that of linear functions in the mathematical (1929) and Chamberlin (1933). For multivariate location, the proposal of Tukey (1975) was developed halfspace or Tukey's depth; for other brands of depth in multivariate location see Liu, Parelius and Singh

Mizera, Ivan

126

Can fusion coefficients be calculated from the depth rule ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The depth rule is a level truncation of tensor product coefficients expected to be sufficient for the evaluation of fusion coefficients. We reformulate the depth rule in a precise way, and show how, in principle, it can be used to calculate fusion coefficients. However, we argue that the computation of the depth itself, in terms of which the constraints on tensor product coefficients is formulated, is problematic. Indeed, the elements of the basis of states convenient for calculating tensor product coefficients do not have a well-defined depth! We proceed by showing how one can calculate the depth in an `approximate' way and derive accurate lower bounds for the minimum level at which a coupling appears. It turns out that this method yields exact results for $\\widehat{su}(3)$ and constitutes an efficient and simple algorithm for computing $\\widehat{su}(3)$ fusion coefficients.

A. N. Kirillov; P. Mathieu; D. Senechal; M. Walton

1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation Procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported CO catalysts with desired activity, sleectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Seven new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3. Two more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat. The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued. Fixed-bed reactor testing of the catalysts was continued. Six new catalysts were tested for their F-T synthesis performance. An investigation of the effect of pretreatment in various atmospheres (calcination in air or nitrogen prior to reduction in hydrogen, direct reduction without prior calcination, and reductiono)ddation-reduction (ROR)) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period. Under subtask 2.2 during this reporting period a total of 11 runs were made in the two slurry bubble column reactors with eleven catalysts, including five on alumina, two from Calsicat, one WGS blend, and three on silica support. Four high CO conversion runs were made. Data were compiled to compare the CO conversions and product selectivities of the-methane reduction catalysts.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

130

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially-viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. The major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. The project consists of five major tasks: catalyst development; catalyst testing; catalyst reproducibility tests; catalyst aging tests; and preliminary design and cost estimate for a demonstrate scale catalyst production facility. Technical accomplishments during this reporting period include the following. It appears that the higher activity obtained for the catalysts prepared using an organic solution and reduced directly without prior calcination was the result of higher dispersions obtained under such pretreatment. A Ru-promoted Co catalyst on alumina with 30% Co loading exhibited a 4-fold increase in dispersion and a 2-fold increase in activity in the fixed-bed reactor from that obtained with the non-promoted catalyst. Several reactor runs have again focused on pushing conversion to higher levels. The maximum conversion obtained has been 49.7% with 26g catalyst. Further investigations of the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis were started using a low activity catalyst and one of the most active catalysts. The three 1 kg catalyst batches prepared by Calsicat for the reproducibility and aging studies were tested in both the fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors under the standard reaction conditions. The effects of adding various promoters to some cobalt catalysts have also been addressed. Results are presented and discussed.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation of the effect of certain promoters (Fe, Pd, and Ru) on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis was continued during this reporting period. All catalysts were tested first at 220{degrees}C, then at higher temperatures from 240 to 280{degrees}C, while monitoring their deactivation. The choice of these promoters was based on their intrinsic ability to enhance the hydrogenation reactions while slowing down the Boudouard reaction under the conditions used in F-T synthesis. Olefin hydrogenation and CO dissociation reactions were used individually to investigate further the nature of the deactivation process of these catalyst during F-T synthesis. Hydrogenation of isobutene (IB) was carried out in the presence of CO between 120 and 180{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure. CO dissociation activities of the catalysts were measured using a pulse technique at 2.5 atm and at temperatures between 180 and 280{degrees}C with intermittent H{sub 2} bracketing at 350{degrees}C. Promotion with high loadings of Fe or Pd resulted in catalysts with relatively lower activity and higher methane selectivity. The deactivation process and rate for catalysts containing Pd or Fe were similar to those of the non-promoted or Ru-promoted alumina-supported Co catalysts tested previously. The only exception was Co.068 with 1% Pd which had adequate activity and selectivity as well as lower deactivation rate at the various temperatures tested.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Born-Infeld and Charged Black Holes with non-linear source in $f(T)$ Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate $f(T)$ theory coupled with a nonlinear source of electrodynamics, for a spherically symmetric and static spacetime in $4D$. We re-obtain the Born-Infeld and Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS solutions. We generalize the no-go theorem for any content that obeys the relationship $\\mathcal{T}^{\\;\\;0}_{0}=\\mathcal{T}^{\\;\\;1}_{1}$ for the energy-momentum tensor and a given set of tetrads. Our results show new classes of solutions where the metrics are related through $b(r)=-Na(r)$. We do the introductory analysis showing that solutions are that of asymptotically flat black holes, with a singularity at the origin of the radial coordinate, covered by a single event horizon. We also reconstruct the action for this class of solutions and obtain the functional form $f(T) = f_0\\left(-T\\right)^{(N+3)/[2(N+1)]}$ and $\\mathcal{L}_{NED} = \\mathcal{L}_0\\left(-F\\right)^{(N+3)/[2(N+1)]}$. Using the Lagrangian density of Born-Infeld, we obtain a new class of charged black holes where the action reads $f(T) = -16\\beta_{BI} \\...

Junior, Ednaldo L B; Houndjo, Mahouton J S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon|1-3, m =

134

FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES Committees of9,of Energy8 CH2MNewsFROMFT-ICR

135

Improving CID, HCD, and ETD FT MS/MS degradome-peptidome identifications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300 219Improvements to the SHDOM

136

Effectiveness of CID, HCD, and ETD with FT MS/MS for degradomic-peptidomic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYearEffect0/2002 Yun (Helen) He,analysis:

137

DE-AT26-97FT34342 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 JanReport0 3New

138

DE-AT26-97FT34343 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 JanReport0 3NewGathering,

139

DE-AT26-97FT34344 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 JanReport0

140

DE-AT26-99FT40267 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012JDA 1/31/13 JanReport0Mechanical Testing of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsoft Word - 12.18.13 NEPA UK FT DSEA draft DearReaderLtr.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScatteringWater Vapor77William.Gwilliam@netl.doe.gov ď‚·

142

Collisional Activation of Peptide Ions in FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities ofCellulosic(SNfactory) | DOEat WINDPOWER |I MPACTS

143

Commercial Scale Coal to F-T Liquid Plant Using a Dry Feed Gasifier  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean CommunitiesEFRCInformationBaseline for Fossil Energy Plants

144

Problem 2.67: A gas undergoes a process from State 1, where p1 = 60 lbf/in2 & v1 = 6:0 ft3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Problem 2.67: A gas undergoes a process from State 1, where p1 = 60 lbf/in2 & v1 = 6:0 ft3 /lbm...c volume, & internal energy is u = 0:2651 BTU-in2 lbf-ft3 pv 95:436 BTU lbm where p is in lbf/in2 , v is in ft3 /lbm, & u is in BTU/lbm. The mass of gas is 10 lbm. Neglecting kinetic- and potential-energy e

145

Variations in microbial community composition through two soil depth profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

35% of the total quantity of microbial biomass found in the top 2 m of soil is found below a depth: Microbial diversity; Phospholipid fatty acid; Soil profile; Community composition; Microbial biomass 1

Fierer, Noah

146

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

147

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of silicon supersaturated with sulfur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the luminescence of Si supersaturated with S (Si:S) using depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy as the S concentration is varied over 2 orders of magnitude ...

Fabbri, Filippo

149

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

aerosol optical depths: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

152

aerosol optical depth: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

153

High-resolution SIMS depth profiling of nanolayers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the fundamental physical limits for depth resolution of secondary ion mass spectrometry are well understood in theory, the experimental work to achieve and demonstrate them is still ongoing. We report results of high-resolution TOF SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) depth profiling experiments on a nanolayered structure, a stack of 16 alternating MgO and ZnO {approx}5.5 nm layers grown on a Si substrate by atomic layer deposition. The measurements were performed using a newly developed approach implementing a low-energy direct current normally incident Ar{sup +} ion beam for ion milling (250 eV and 500 eV energy), in combination with a pulsed 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at 60{sup o} incidence for TOF SIMS analysis. By this optimized arrangement, a noticeably improved version of the dual-beam (DB) approach to TOF SIMS depth profiling is introduced, which can be dubbed gentleDB. The mixing-roughness-information model was applied to detailed analysis of experimental results. It revealed that the gentleDB approach allows ultimate depth resolution by confining the ion beam mixing length to about two monolayers. This corresponds to the escape depth of secondary ions, the fundamental depth resolution limitation in SIMS. Other parameters deduced from the measured depth profiles indicated that a single layer thickness is equal to 6 nm so that the 'flat' layer thickness d is 3 nm and the interfacial roughness {sigma} is 1.5 nm, thus yielding d + 2{sigma} = 6 nm. We have demonstrated that gentleDB TOF SIMS depth profiling with noble gas ion beams is capable of revealing the structural features of a stack of nanolayers, resolving its original surface and estimating the roughness of interlayer interfaces, information which is difficult to obtain by traditional approaches.

Baryshev, S. V.; Zinovev, A. V.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Peng, Q.; Elam, J. W.; Veryovkin, I. V. (Energy Systems); ( MSD)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Burial depth and stratigraphic controls on shale diagenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- layer illite/smectite in Gulf Coast sediments at a shallow depth is a randomly-interstratified illite/smectite with proportions of 804 smectite and 20% illite (Perry and Hower, 1972). Many authors (Dunoyer de Segonzac, 1970; Perry and Hower, 1970..., 1972; Hower et al. , 1976; Foscolos and Kodama, 1974) have noted the increase in illite with concurrent decrease of smectite in the mixed-layer illite/smec- tite with increasing depth and temperature. The conversion of smectite into illite resulting...

Moore, David Wesley

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Prediction of sinkage depth of footings on soft marine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREDICTION OF SINKAGE DEPTH OF FOOTINGS ON SOFT MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by SHIHCHIEH YEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PREDICTION OF SINKAGE DEPTH OF FOOTINGS ON SOFI' MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by Approved as to style and content by: ayne A. Dunla (Chair of Committee) Derek V. Morr (Member) William R. Bry nt (Member...

Yen, Shihchieh

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon PropyleneHydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IRSpectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Propylene hydrogenation over Pt nanoparticles supported onmesoporous silica type SBA-15 was monitored by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy at 23 ms resolution using short propylene gas pulses thatjoined a continuous flow of hydrogen in N2 (1 atm total pressure).Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 323-413 K. Propanewas formed within 100 milliseconds or faster. The CH stretching regionrevealed distinct bands for propane molecules emerging inside thenanoscale channels of the silica support. Spectral analysis gave thedistribution of the propane product between support and surrounding gasphase as function of time. Kinetic analysis showed that the escape ofpropane molecules from the channels occurred within hundreds ofmilliseconds (3.1 + 0.4 s-1 at 383 K). A steady state distribution ofpropane between gas phase and mesoporous support is established as theproduct is swept from the catalyst zone by the continuous flow ofhydrogen co-reactant. This is the first direct spectroscopic observationof emerging products of heterogeneous catalysis on nanoporous supportsunder reaction conditions.

Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Coverage Range Retiree Only Retiree  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#:SynchrotronComplexes:4anPrepared

160

Extended range chemical sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Isotopic effect study in the LHCD and LHH experiments in hydrogen/deuterium plasmas of the FT-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of comparative experimental studies of the efficiency of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and lower hybrid heating (LHH) in the FT-2 tokamak in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas are presented. In the new comparative experimental runs in deuterium/hydrogen plasmas suppression of the LHCD and beginning of the interaction of LH waves with ions is controlled by the plasma density rise. Role of parametric instabilities in CD switch-off is considered. In order to analyze the experimentally observed effect of LHCD the GRILL3D and FRTC codes has been used.

Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Dyachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Saveliev, A. N. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shatalin, S. V. [St. Petersburg State Polytekhnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stepanov, A. Yu. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cone Depth and the Center Vertex Theorem Gary L. Miller Todd Phillips Don Sheehy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract We generalize the Tukey depth to use cones instead of halfspaces. We prove a generalization of the most enduring definitions of data depth is the Tukey depth, also known as the half-space depth. The Tukey depth of a point p relative to a point set S is defined as the minimum number of points on one

Miller, Gary L.

164

IPA Extensions Range: 025002AF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPA Extensions Range: 0250­02AF This file contains an excerpt from the character code tables 0268IPA Extensions0250 025B LATIN SMALL LETTER OPEN E = LATIN SMALL LETTER EPSILON · lower-mid front

Erjavec, TomaÂ?

165

Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

166

7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and so risks of water shortage appear. The preservation of these resources is important because73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

Camara, Gilberto

167

Steady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-current interactions [29, 37] or flows generated by wind-shear [30] (see [6] for a comprehensive discussion than the mass-flux. It is important to note that fixing the mass-flux p0 does not fix the depth d

168

Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

169

Parameterised structured light imaging for depth edge detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, [amin, amax], from the projector/camera', `width of horizontal stripes, w', and `minimum detectable depth difference, rmin'. As can be seen in Fig. 1a, amax and rmin are given as the input parameters of [amin, amax] are guaranteed to be detected. However, awkwardly enough, amin is found at a later step

California at Santa Barbara, University of

170

WaveCurrent Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave­Current Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La (Longuet-Higgins 1969; Hasselmann 1971; Garrett and Smith 1976; and many others). In particular, Hassel) changes in wave momentum that absorb some of the radiation stress gradients. Garrett and Smith (1976

Smith, Jerome A.

171

Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microsoft PowerPoint - GradedApproach_P&RA_CoP_December2013 ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

f hi "A" for geographic area "A" Depth (ft) Elevation (ft) Geologic Unit Description Hydraulic Property Type Soil Type K Zone (ft) (ft) Geologic Unit Description Property Type...

174

Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy conditions in $f(T)$ gravity with non-minimal torsion-matter coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper examines the validity of energy bounds in a modified theory of gravity involving non-minimal coupling of torsion scalar and perfect fluid matter. In this respect, we formulate the general inequalities of energy conditions by assuming the flat FRW universe. For the application of these bounds, we particularly focus on two specific models that are recently proposed in literature and also choose the power law cosmology. We find the feasible constraints on the involved free parameters and evaluate their possible ranges graphically for the consistency of these energy bounds.

Zubair, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy conditions in $f(T)$ gravity with non-minimal torsion-matter coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper examines the validity of energy bounds in a modified theory of gravity involving non-minimal coupling of torsion scalar and perfect fluid matter. In this respect, we formulate the general inequalities of energy conditions by assuming the flat FRW universe. For the application of these bounds, we particularly focus on two specific models that are recently proposed in literature and also choose the power law cosmology. We find the feasible constraints on the involved free parameters and evaluate their possible ranges graphically for the consistency of these energy bounds.

M. Zubair; Saira Waheed

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Eight-year Climatology of Dust Optical Depth on Mars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have produced a multiannual climatology of airborne dust from Martian year 24 to 31 using multiple datasets of retrieved or estimated column optical depths. The datasets are based on observations of the Martian atmosphere from April 1999 to July 2013 made by different orbiting instruments: the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The procedure we have adopted consists of gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. Our gridding method calculates averages and uncertainties on a regularly spaced, but possibly incomplete, spatio-temporal grid, using an iterative procedure weighted in space, time, and retrieval uncertainty. In order to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the resulting gridded maps, we validat...

Montabone, L; Millour, E; Wilson, R J; Lewis, S R; Cantor, B A; Kass, D; Kleinboehl, A; Lemmon, M; Smith, M D; Wolff, M J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Depth Profile Analysis of New Materials in Hollow Cathode Discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this review the possibility of hollow cathode discharge for depth profile analysis is demonstrated for several new materials: planar optical waveguides fabricated by Ag+-Na+ ion exchange process in glasses, SnO2 thin films for gas sensors modified by hexamethildisilazane after rapid thermal annealing, W- and WC- CVD layers deposited on Co-metalloceramics and WO3- CVD thin films deposited on glass. The results are compared with different standard techniques.

Djulgerova, R.; Mihailov, V.; Gencheva, V.; Popova, L.; Panchev, B. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Michaylova, V. [Technical University of Sofia, 1797 Sofia (Bulgaria); Szytula, A.; Gondek, L.; Dohnalik, T.M. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics - Jagellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Petrovic, Z.Lj. [Institute of Physics, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Colour videos with depth : acquisition, processing and evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach is a sensor fusion system which combines data Time-of-flight sensor fusionfrom a noisy, low-resolution time-of-flight camera and a high-resolution colour video camera into a coherent, noise-free video with depth. The system consists of a three... of Computer Graphics International (Short Papers), May 2009 – Proteus – semi-automatic interactive structure-from-motion Malte Schwarzkopf and Christian Richardt Poster at the Vision, Modeling, and Visualization Workshop (VMV), November 2009 – Layered photo...

Richardt, Christian

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, Moscow, 117036 (Russian Federation); Baker Hughes, Inc, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX, 77073 (United States)

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis,Technologies Available Site

183

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

Standiford, Richard B.

184

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. Hathaway, both of the Black Hills National Forest, Custer, South Dakota, provided the necessaryPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range FOREST SERVICE U. S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 Experiment Station USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 96 /1973 #12;CONTENTS

Standiford, Richard B.

185

Pacific Southwest Forest and Range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. MCKETTA is an economist with the College of Forestry, Wildlife, and Range Sciences, University of Idaho has been developed for determining the cost of Fire Management Inputs (FMls)-the direct frreline costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES

Standiford, Richard B.

186

Conceptual design report for the project to install leak detection in FAST-FT-534/548/549  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides conceptual designs and design recommendations for installing secondary containment and leak detection systems for three sumps at the Fluorinel and Storage Facility (FAST), CPP-666. The FAST facility is located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The three sumps receive various materials from the FAST water treatment process. This project involves sump upgrades to meet appropriate environmental requirements. The steps include: providing sump modifications or designs for the installation of leak chases and/or leakage accumulation, coating the sump concrete with a chemical resistant sealant (except for sump VES-FT-534 which is already lined with stainless steel) to act as secondary containment, lining the sumps with a primary containment system, and providing a means to detect and remove primary containment leakage that may occur.

Galloway, K.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan Abstract We present the first optimal algorithm to compute the maximum Tukey depth (also known as location or halfspace depth , the Tukey depth of a point q IRd is defined as: min{|P | : over all halfspaces containing q}. We

Chan, Timothy M.

188

A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING Lai-Man Po School of Peking University, Shenzhen, China ABSTRACT Depth-Image-Based Rendering (DIBR) is widely used synthesis with high-quality depth map. Index Terms - Depth-Image-Based-Rendering, DIBR, Hole

Po, Lai-Man

189

Depth-Profiling and Quantitative Characterization of the Size, Composition,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density, and Morphology of Fine Particles |

190

Erosion Rate Variations during XPS Sputter Depth Profiling of Nanoporous  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 ton Stanat rolling millEricErnestErnieFilms. |

191

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthor Jump to: navigation,AvgReservoirDepth Jump

192

Property:AvgWellDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthor Jump to: navigation,AvgReservoirDepth

193

Property:FirstWellDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProcedures Jump to: navigation,JumpFirstWellDepth Jump to:

194

Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of a MolecularAssemblythe

195

Extended-range tiltable micromirror  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Range Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerType Jump to:Co JumpRETScreen Logo: Range Fuels Name:

197

An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

None

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

LBNL/ Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift 2010 Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL/ Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift 2010 Requirements for boom lift operations. LBNL best practices requirements for boom lift Operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft protection system in required when anchor points are present in lift. It is LBNL best practices requirements

Eisen, Michael

200

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, resulting in increased early mortality as well as decreased weights at the end of the grow out. Keeping in decreased weight gains, increased feed conversions, and possibly increased mortality. One environmental at a velocity of 400 - 500 ft/min over large birds can produce a wind chill effect of ten to twelve degrees

Navara, Kristen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Analysis of MALDI FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Data: a Time Series Donald A. Barkauskasa, Scott R. Kronewitterb, Carlito B. Lebrillab, and David M. Rockec  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of MALDI FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Data: a Time Series Approach Donald A. Barkauskasa/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a technique for high mass gamma distribution with varying scale parameter but constant shape parameter and exponent. This enables

Rocke, David M.

202

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of surface waters, and can lead to changes in species composition within land and water ecosystems. AmmoniaPUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S to the formation of acid rain, which can damage sensitive ecosystems. In areas where nitrogen is a limiting

Navara, Kristen

203

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

205

Depth to bedrock using gravimetry in the Reno and Carson City, Nevada, basins Robert E. Abbott and John N. Louie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geothermal wells, and one wildcat oil well. Depths in Carson City are consistent with depths from existing

206

A New Robust Operator for Computer Vision: Application to Range and Intensity Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because both the foreground and background project to the same sensor pixel, and in part because along on the robustness of reconstruction techniques. First, when there are many depth discontinuities, range sensors can in the foreground and one in the background, intermingling over large image regions. The data values from one

Bystroff, Chris

207

A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Intermediate Depths of the Atlantic Ocean: AAIW delta^13C Variability During the Younger Dryas and Lithoherms in the Straits of Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A transect of cores ranging from 798 m to 1585 m water depth in the South Atlantic Ocean document the relative intermediate water mass nutrient geometry and stable isotopic variability of AAIW during the Younger Dryas cooling event. The data reveal...

Brookshire, Brian

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

208

Shared Communications: Volume 2. In-Depth Systems Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second of two documents that examine the literature for actual examples of organizations and agencies that share communications resources. While the primary emphasis is on rural, intelligent transportation system (ITS) communications involving transit, examples will not be limited to rural activities, nor to ITS implementation, nor even to transit. In addition, the term ''communication'' will be broadly applied to include all information resources. The first document of this series, ''Shared Communications: Volume I. A Summary and Literature Review'', defines the meaning of the term ''shared communication resources'' and provides many examples of agencies that share resources. This document, ''Shared Communications: Volume II. In-Depth Systems Research'', reviews attributes that contributed to successful applications of the sharing communication resources concept. A few examples of each type of communication sharing are provided. Based on the issues and best practice realworld examples, recommendations for potential usage and recommended approaches for field operational tests are provided.

Truett, LF

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

Mark Fabro

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Wide-range voltage modulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Superconducting Super Collider`s Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-{mu}s wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 {mu}s, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented.

Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

DEPTH OF PLEATED SURFACES IN TOROIDAL CUSPS OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPTH OF PLEATED SURFACES IN TOROIDAL CUSPS OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS Ying-Qing Wu1 Abstract. Let F 0203394 1 #12;2 YING-QING WU The following theorem gives an estimation of the depth of closed essential

Wu, Ying-Qing

213

Numerical simulation of the flow over a coastal structure in depth-limited conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of detailed measurements of irregular wave transformation in front of the structure in depth-limited conditions. The second data set consists of several test runs to study the irregular wave reflection and runup on the coastal structure in depth...

Ginting, Victor Eralingga

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Completion of the ORNL Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Level 4 Milestone – Sigma Team – Off-Gas – ORNL – FT-14OR031202, MS# M4FT-14OR0312027, “Support to PNNL Kr-85 Preliminary Optimization Study”, due May 30, 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter and attached emails document the completion of the FCR&D Level 4 milestone for the Sigma Team – Off-Gas – ORNL work package (FT-14OR031202), “Support to PNNL Kr-85 Preliminary Optimization Study” (M4FT-14OR0312027), due May 30, 2014. Support to this effort included providing a literature search and providing a significant number of reference documents covering more than 30 years of past work on Kr recovery, recovery system designs, and past cost analyses. In addition, ORNL provided support on several conference calls to establish an analysis approach for the current study and to review progress.

Jubin, Robert T. [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutrino and proton decay experiments, as well as dark matter searches even though often at greater depth for cold dark matter 3 , and is presently at shallow depth; muon-induced neutrons repre- sent a major at a shallow depth of 32 meters of water equivalent has been measured. The Palo Verde neutrino detector

Piepke, Andreas G.

216

Primal--Dual Algorithms for Data Depth David Bremner, Komei Fukuda, and Vera Rosta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the generalization of the median of S by Tukey. The computation of the halfspace depth of a point is equivalent as multivariate generalizations of ranks to complement classical multivariate analysis, by Tukey (1974), Oja (1983 out that the halfspace depth of Tukey and the regression depth of Rousseeuw and Hu­ bert have all

Bremner, David

217

Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics are graphically presented even when there are only a few data. This approach benchmarks what is currently known about the association of depth-specific hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics.

P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the collecting electrode radius and the width of the guard ring are reflecting the deep radial penetration of the electron transport processes into the gas-filled cavities and the need for appropriate corrections of the chamber reading. New values for these corrections have been established in two forms, one converting the indicated value into the absorbed dose to water in the front plane of the chamber, the other converting it into the absorbed dose to water at the depth of the effective point of measurement of the chamber. In the Appendix, the in–out imbalance of electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary is demonstrated in the approximation of classical small-angle multiple scattering theory. Conclusions: The in–out electron transport imbalance at the lateral boundaries of parallel-plate chambers in electron beams has been studied with Monte Carlo simulation over a range of depth in water, and new correction factors, covering all depths and implementing the effective point of measurement concept, have been developed.

Zink, K., E-mail: klemens.zink@kmub.thm.de [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390 (Germany); Looe, H. K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg D-26129, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg D-26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen D-37073 (Germany)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

excluded, yielding a mixture of predominantly range, pasture, grass, and riparian forest covers on sandy to sandy soils and/or flat topography, such as the Nebraska Sand Hills (Figure 1) or the interfluvial sand-groundwater ecoregions (shaded) in Nebraska. The Wet Meadow and Marsh Plain region within the Sand Hills was dropped from

Szilagyi, Jozsef

220

High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Influence of beam parameters on percentage depth dose in electron arc therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence of rotational or arc electron beam percentage depth doses on the depth of isocenter di and nominal beam field width w is presented. A characteristic angle beta, which uniquely depends on w and di, is defined and the dependence of the radial percentage depth doses on angle beta discussed. It is shown that the characteristic angle beta concept can be used in clinical situations to predict the shape of the percentage depth dose curve when w and di are known, or, more importantly, it can be used to determine the appropriate w when di and the percentage depth dose characteristics are known.

Pla, M.; Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Range Condition: Key to Sustained Ranch Productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species composition is the criteria used to make this determination. Range condition is evaluated for each range site on a ranch. Range sites are areas with the potential for producing similar amounts and kinds of vegetation (for example, shallow hillside... site, deep upland site, draw site, etc.). Sites are determined by climatic, soil, topographic and vegetation features. A complete listing and description of all range sites on a ranch can be obtained from the Soil Conservation Service (SCS). Range...

McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

225

Microsoft PowerPoint - WAPA Transmission Developments in NM (Ft. Collins, CO) 6-21-11.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScattering Properties of Aggregates ofVicksburg

226

Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

Phillip B. West

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Quantitative Assessment of Range Fluctuations in Charged Particle Lung Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Water equivalent path length (WEL) variations due to respiration can change the range of a charged particle beam and result in beam overshoot to critical organs or beam undershoot to tumor. We have studied range fluctuations by analyzing four-dimensional computed tomography data and quantitatively assessing potential beam overshoot. Methods and Materials: The maximal intensity volume is calculated by combining the gross tumor volume contours at each respiratory phase in the four-dimensional computed tomography study. The first target volume calculates the maximal intensity volume for the entire respiratory cycle (internal target volume [ITV]-radiotherapy [RT]), and the second target volume is the maximal intensity volume corresponding to gated RT (gated-RT, {approx}30% phase window around exhalation). A compensator at each respiratory phase is calculated. Two 'composite' compensators for ITV-RT and gated-RT are then designed by selecting the minimal compensator depth at the respective respiratory phase. These compensators are then applied to the four-dimensional computed tomography data to estimate beam penetration. Analysis metrics include range fluctuation and overshoot volume, both as a function of gantry angle. We compared WEL fluctuations observed in treating the ITV-RT versus gated-RT in 11 lung patients. Results: The WEL fluctuations were <21.8 mm-WEL and 9.5 mm-WEL for ITV-RT and gated-RT, respectively for all patients. Gated-RT reduced the beam overshoot volume by approximately a factor of four compared with ITV-RT. Such range fluctuations can affect the efficacy of treatment and result in an excessive dose to a distal critical organ. Conclusion: Time varying range fluctuation analysis provides information useful for determining appropriate patient-specific treatment parameters in charged particle RT. This analysis can also be useful for optimizing planning and delivery.

Mori, Shinichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: shinshin@nirs.go.jp; Wolfgang, John; Lu, H.-M.; Schneider, Robert; Choi, Noah C.; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

Demaine, Erik D.

229

Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

230

American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

231

Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

Marini, Joseph Thomas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

233

Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth in Vicinity of Broken Clouds from Reflectance Ratios: Sensitivity Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conducted a sensitivity study to better understand the potential of a new method for retrieving aerosol optical depth (AOD) under partly cloudy conditions. This method exploits reflectance ratios in the visible spectral range and provides an effective way to avoid three-dimensional (3D) cloud effects. The sensitivity study is performed for different observational conditions and random errors in input data. The results of the sensitivity study suggest that this ratio method has the ability to detect clear pixels even in close proximity to clouds. Such detection does not require a statistical analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) horizontal distribution of reflected solar radiation, and thus it could be customized for operational retrievals. In comparison with previously suggested approaches, the ratio method has the capability to increase the "harvest" of clear pixels. Similar to the traditional Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA), the ratio method has a low computational cost for retrieving AOD. In contrast to the IPA method, the ratio method provides much more accurate estimations of the AOD values under broken cloud conditions: pixel-based and domain-averaged estimations of errors in AOD are about 25% and 10%, respectively. Finally, both the ratio-based cloud screening and the accuracy of domain-averaged ratio-based AOD values do not suffer greatly when 5% random errors are introduced in the reflectances.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Auger and depth profile analysis of synthetic crystals for dispersion of soft x-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous samples have been fabricated and analyzed as part of a program to produce soft x-ray dispersion elements for various laboratory applications. The majority of this work has centered around the carbon/tungsten system, although several other low-Z/high-Z pairs have been investigated. This report describes the development of certain vacuum-deposition techniques for fabricating these dispersion elements, based upon results obtained from x-ray reflectivity measurements and Auger depth-profile analysis. The composition of the films is chiefly alternating layers of tungsten carbide and carbon. Excess carbon is introduced during the deposition of the tungsten to ensure that the carbide layer is fully stoichiometric. Layer thickness ranged from approx. 5 to 30 A for the carbide and from approx. 15 to 80 A for the carbon. The reflectivity measurements were made using Fe and Al K/sub ..cap alpha../ at grazing incidence. The emphasis in these studies is on the application of surface-analysis results in suggesting modifications to the fabrication process and in evaluating the results such modifications have on the layer stoichiometry, continuity, and periodicity of the dispersion elements so produced.

Rachocki, K.D.; Brown, D.R.; Springer, R.W.; Arendt, P.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Computing a Maximal Depth Point in the Plane Stefan Langerman # William Steiger +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], [7],[10],[11]. One of the more familiar ones was proposed by John Tukey [12], a natural extension to d > 1 of the notion in (1). Given a set S = {P 1 , . . . , Pn} of n points in R d , the Tukey depth is a point µ of maximal depth, and we write # # = #(S) for the Tukey depth of a median. For integer k > 0 let

Langerman, Stefan

236

High-energy x-ray diffractometer for nondestructive strain depth profile measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a lab-based high-energy x-ray diffraction system and a new approach to nondestructively measuring strain profiles in polycrystalline samples. This technique utilizes the tungsten K{sub ?1} characteristic radiation from a standard industrial x-ray tube. We introduce a simulation model that is used to determine strain values from data collected with this system. Examples of depth profiling are shown for shot peened aluminum and titanium samples. Profiles to 1 mm depth in aluminum and 300 ?m depth in titanium with a depth resolution of 20 ?m are presented.

Al-Shorman, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan); Jensen, T. C.; Gray, J. N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustable penetration depth Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MgB2 single crystals CATALIN MARTIN, MATTHEW VAN... , Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland -- Magnetic penetration depth was studied... on ns, thus on...

238

A depth-16 circuit for the AES S-box joan@imada.sdu.dk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metric (gate count, depth, energy consumption, etc.). In practice, no known techniques can reliably find. Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Southern Denmark. Partially sup- ported

239

Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Final quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results on the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis obtained during the last quarter confirmed that Co catalysts were very sensitive to temperature and deactivated significantly at temperatures above 240{degree}C both in the fixed bed and the slurry bubble column reactors. Following this preliminary investigation, a series of tests were carried out during this period in order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process as well as determine possible means of preventing it. In order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process, the catalysts which had undergone significant deactivation after high temperature (280{degree}C) reaction in either the fixed bed reactor or the slurry bubble column reactor were regenerated and retested in the fixed bed reactor. In both cases the catalysts recovered completely their initial activity. In addition, reactions at very high H{sub 2}CO ratios and high temperatures showed very little deactivation, suggesting that the deactivation of the Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperatures was mainly due carbon formation via the Boudouard reaction. Due to the unreactive nature of this carbon, it could only be removed by calcination. A second series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effect of certain promoters (Zr, La, Cr, and Re) as well as the effect of another support such as silica on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperature. The results suggest that the deactivation process and rate for most of these catalysts are similar to those of the alumina-supported catalysts tested previously (Co.005 and Co-053), and that none of the promoters helps to slow down the rate of carbon formation at high temperatures above 240{degree}C.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

Manhart, R.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to carry out a Moessbauer spectroscopy study of Iron-based catalysts to identify iron phases present and correlate with water gas shift and FT activities. A total of 15 catalysts were evaluated so far. Results are presented on the amounts in each catalyst of the following phases: superparamagnetic phase, hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), Chi-carbide phase ({chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}), and an epsilon-carbide phase ({var_epsilon}-Fe{sub 2.2}C).

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Range of joint motion in college males  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These include the fact that there is little agreement as to the definition and limits of normal f1exibility. It was also found that the range of joint motion is highly specific and that measurement of one body joint cannot be used to predict the range... many of the problems outlined by Holland. There have been several techniques developed for measuring range of' joint motion. Adrian (1968), The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (1968), Ayoub (1972), Clarke (1975), Dempster (1955), Garrett...

Houy, David Richard

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Range Design Criteria- June 4, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document contains the currently-approved firearms "Range Design Criteria" referred to on DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations

245

Application of a generalized methodology for quantitative thermal diffusivity depth profile reconstruction in manufactured inhomogeneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of a generalized methodology for quantitative thermal diffusivity depth profile of the thermal diffusivity of inhomogeneous solids. In the depth profile reconstruction algorithm three channels Institute of Physics. S0021-8979 98 04305-9 I. INTRODUCTION Thermal diffusivity which depends

Mandelis, Andreas

246

Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal radiometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal-thermal model to evaluate the use of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for depth profiling of port wine the desired effect. A diagnostic measurement of the distribution of laser energy deposition and ensuing

Choi, Bernard

247

On the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In nite Depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

function which satis#12;ed the correct kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions for water waves of steady water waves on ows with #12;nite depth. The inde- pendent variable was a periodic functionOn the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In#12;nite Depth J.F. Toland 1 Background

Bath, University of

248

Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements Seema C. Shah sediment load calculations on the basis of depth-integrated sediment concentration measurements for channels with significant sediment transport in suspension. The series expansion of the modified Einstein

Julien, Pierre Y.

249

Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1002, U.S.A. ABSTRACT. A lightweight, portable drilling system for coring up to 500 m depths has been developed and field-tested. The drilling system includes four major components

Howat, Ian M.

250

Spectroscopic photothermal radiometry as a deep subsurface depth profilometric technique in semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspects for three-dimensional infrared PTR for a strongly absorbed incident radiation have been optical penetration depth is presented. Numerical simulations of the PTR response to the electronic transport parameters and the optical penetration depth of the excitation source are presented. Intensity

Mandelis, Andreas

251

Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-surface structures and damage in materials, well beyond the optical penetration depth of illu- mination sources, iLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail and Manufacturing Ontario, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ont, Canada M5S 3G8 Abstract Laser Infrared Photothermal

Mandelis, Andreas

252

Discussion of "Location-Scale Depth" by I. Mizera and C. H. Muller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the distance from zi (or any monotonic function of the distance) recovers the classical no- tion of Tukey depth to Tukey depth in hyperbolic space School of Information & Computer Science, Univ. of California, Irvine. By standard techniques for modeling hyperbolic space in Euclidean spaces, all the previous machinery of Tukey

Eppstein, David

253

Ecient computation of location depth contours by methods of computational geometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the center of the deepest contour is called the Tukey median. The only available implemented algorithms for the depth contours and the Tukey median are slow, which limits their usefulness. In this paper we describe practice. Keywords: Bagplot, Bivariate Median, Graphical Display, Robust Estimation, Tukey Depth 1

Souvaine, Diane

254

A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

Kulp, Mark

255

Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district] Peat deposits contain on the order of 1/6 of the Earth's terrestrial fixed carbon (C), but uncertainty in peat depth precludes precise estimates of peat C storage. To assess peat C in the Northern Highlands

Turner, Monica G.

256

Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

Ashworth, Stephen H.

257

Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface mobility-Hames, and Thomas P. Quinn Abstract: Bed scour, egg pocket depths, and alteration of stream-bed surfaces by spawning chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) were measured in two Pacific Northwest gravel-bedded streams. Close

Montgomery, David R.

258

Photometric Calibration of High Dynamic Range Cameras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calibration of cameras with a dynamic range of more than six orders of magnitude such as complex camera re with a total dynamic range of 8 orders of luminance magnitude. Three acquisitions: without filter, using to the measurements of 6 gray patches of GretagMacbeth ColorChecker chart under 6 different illumination conditions. 0

Durand, Frédo

259

The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators: Convexity and Related Results Chi-Kwong Li Classification 47A12, 47A13, 47A55. Keywords Joint essential numerical range, self-adjoint operator, Hilbert the joint behavior of several operators A1, . . . , Am. One may see [1, 5, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 23, 28, 31

Li, Chi-Kwong

260

Energy-range relation and mean energy variation in therapeutic particle beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical expressions for the mean energy and range of therapeutic light ion beams and low- and high-energy electrons have been derived, based on the energy dependence of their respective stopping powers. The new mean energy and range relations are power-law expressions relevant for light ion radiation therapy, and are based on measured practical ranges or known tabulated stopping powers and ranges for the relevant incident particle energies. A practical extrapolated range, R{sub p}, for light ions was defined, similar to that of electrons, which is very closely related to the extrapolated range of the primary ions. A universal energy-range relation for light ions and electrons that is valid for all material mixtures and compounds has been developed. The new relation can be expressed in terms of the range for protons and alpha particles, and is found to agree closely with experimental data in low atomic number media and when the difference in the mean ionization energy is low. The variation of the mean energy with depth and the new energy-range relation are useful for accurate stopping power and mass scattering power calculations, as well as for general particle transport and dosimetry applications.

Kempe, Johanna; Brahme, Anders [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion uponC2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of ethylene hydrogenation over alumina-supported Pt catalyst were recorded at 25 ms resolution in the temperature range 323 to 473 K using various H2 flow rates (1 atm total gas pressure). Surface ethyl species (2870 and 1200 cm-1) were detected at all temperatures along with the gas phase ethane product (2954 and 2893 cm-1). The CH3CH2Pt growth was instantaneous on the time scale of 25ms under all experimental conditions. At 323 K, the decay time of surface ethyl (122 + 10 ms) coincides with the rise time of C2H6 (144 + 14 ms).This establishes direct kinetic evidence for surface ethyl as the kinetically relevant intermediate. Such a direct link between the temporal behavior of an observed intermediate and the final product growth in a heterogeneous catalytic system has not been demonstrated before to our knowledge. A fraction (10 percent) of the asymptotic ethane growth at 323 K is prompt, indicating that there are surface ethyl species that react much faster than the majority of the CH3CH2Pt intermediates. The dispersive kinetics is attributed to the varying strength of interaction of the ethyl species with the Pt surface caused by heterogeneity of the surface environment. At 473 K, the majority of ethyl intermediates are hydrogenated prior to the recording of the first time slice (24 ms), and a correspondingly large prompt growth of ethane is observed. The yield and kinetics of the surface ethylidyne are in agreement with the known spectator nature of this species.

Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Agreement Between Local and Global Measurements of the London Penetration Depth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements of the superconducting penetration depth in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} appeared to disagree on the magnitude and curvature of {delta}{lambda}{sub ab}(T), even near optimal doping. These measurements were carried out on different samples grown by different groups. To understand the discrepancy, we use scanning SQUID susceptometry and a tunnel diode resonator to measure the penetration depth in a single sample. The penetration depth observed by the two techniques is identical with no adjustments. We conclude that any discrepancies arise from differences between samples, either in growth or crystal preparation.

Lippman, Thomas M.; Kalisky, Beena; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Moler, Kathryn A.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartmentDepartmentalDeploymentDepthDepth

266

Long Range Campus Development Plan Existing Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design solutions and in serving members of the larger community. The Long Range Campus Development Plan environments and year-round recreation opportunities. During the summer season, daylight lasts into the evening

Maxwell, Bruce D.

267

Long range transport of acid rain precursors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of the long range transport of primary and secondary pollutants derived by Fay and Rosenzweig (1) is applied to the problem of the transport of acid rain precursors. The model describes the long term average (annual ...

Fay, James A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Systematic ranging and late warning asteroid impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe systematic ranging, an orbit determination technique especially suitable to assess the near-term Earth impact hazard posed by newly discovered asteroids. For these late warning cases, the time interval covered by the observations is generally short, perhaps a few hours or even less, which leads to severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. The systematic ranging approach gets around these degeneracies by performing a raster scan in the poorly-constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane of sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to identify regions corresponding to collision solutions, as well as potential impact times and locations. From the probability distribution of the observation errors, we obtain a probability distribution in the orbital space and then estimate the probability of an Earth impact. We show how this technique is effective for a number of examples, including 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, the only tw...

Farnocchia, D; Micheli, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Long range interactions in nanoscale science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

Rajter, Richard F.

270

Programmable near-infrared ranging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high angular resolution ranging system particularly suitable for indoor plications involving mobile robot navigation and collision avoidance uses a programmable array of light emitters that can be sequentially incremented by a microprocessor. A plurality of adjustable level threshold detectors are used in an optical receiver for detecting the threshold level of the light echoes produced when light emitted from one or more of the emitters is reflected by a target or object in the scan path of the ranging system.

Everett, Jr., Hobart R. (San Diego, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid...

272

Depth inversion for nonlinear waves shoaling over a barred-beach 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and calibrated for mild slopes are applied to the barred-beach. Expectedly, errors on depth prediction occur techniques such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), are still quite problematic under the current state

Grilli, Stéphan T.

273

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

274

Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 2. Prediction of bioluminescent source depth from spectral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a passive method (as opposed to active methods such as RADAR or LIDAR) to identify hostile ships, submarines this relative importance [Nealson, 1993]. Therefore the depth distribution of bioluminescent organisms is of eco

Moline, Mark

275

Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and productivity (sustainability) of trees within terrestrial ecosystems. Tree planting depth, i.e. location of the root collar relative to soil grade, is of particular concern for tree growth, development, and performance in the landscape. A series of model...

Bryan, Donita Lynn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Shear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table earthquake site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 6 Summary of seismic refraction/reflection methodsShear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table ­ earthquake site response measurements for Valley County, Idaho Lee M. Liberty and Gabriel M. Gribler, Boise State University Center

Barrash, Warren

277

Partnering: an in-depth comparison of its elements to quality improvement principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIIrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Approved as to style and content by: Donald A...

Lozada, Anthony David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to detect and avoid obstacles. Principle Investigators: Randy Beard, Tim McLain Laser Range Finder Opti-Logic RS400 Laser path, laser detects object. 2. Upon detection, insert cylindrical object into world map and plan path

Wirthlin, Michael J.

279

Time evolution of the exponential wavenumber spectra of turbulence upon helium injection into a hydrogen discharge at the FT-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of variations in the key parameter of short-wavelength turbulence-the ion-acoustic Larmor radius {rho}{sub s}, which determines the position of the maximum of the drift instability growth rate over poloidal wavenumbers-was studied experimentally at the FT-2 tokamak. For this purpose, helium was injected to hydrogen plasma, which resulted in a change in the electron temperature at the plasma edge. The universality of the exponential shape of the turbulence spectra over radial wavenumbers q and a substantial excess of the characteristic turbulence scale L over the ion-acoustic Larmor radius was confirmed with the help of correlative diagnostics of enhanced scattering. This excess at the discharge periphery reaches a value of 3-5 at a low electron temperature, apparently, due to an increase in the dissipation of drift waves upon their cascade transfer toward short scale-lengths.

Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Selyunin, E. P.; Esipov, L. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Stepanov, A. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Field evaluation of all-season tactical engine oil OE/HDO-15/40 at Ft. Knox, Kentucky and Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report, July 1984-December 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Requirements for a multiviscosity grade 15W-40 engine oil were developed and the lubricant introduced for military consumption. The program efforts cover a demonstration and field-validation program of the newly introduced grade 15W-40 lubricant. The test involved a wide variety of combat, tactical, and support equipment operated by the 2D Squadron, 6th Cavalry at Fort Knox, KY, and the 3D Armored Cavalry Regiment at Fort Bliss, TX. During the test, vehicles accumulated in excess of 1,840,000 miles of operation under ambient conditions ranging from monthly low temperatures of -8 C (18 F) at Fort Knox to monthly high temperatures of 35 C (95 F) at Fort Bliss. Two-grade 15W-40, MIL-L-2104D qualified lubricants were employed in the test, one product at each of the test locations. The test lubricants were used in all equipment components, engines, transmissions, hydraulic systems, etc., that required MIL-L-2104 engine oil. Equipment within the test fleets were monitored in regard to wear performance, frequency of component replacement, and operational characteristics. Overall, the grade 15W-40 products demonstrated satisfactory and equivalent performance to single-graded oils. The oil was well received by both operators and maintenance personnel who noted that the grade 15W-40 products significantly reduced logistics burden by having only one grade product to requisition, store, and transport to the field.

Butler, W.E.; Alvarez, R.A.; Buckingham, J.P.; Owens, E.C.; Bowen, T.C.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

Valentine, Kenneth H. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

Midya, Bikashkali; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Suárez, O L Ramírez; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Depth distribution of lithium in oxidized binary Al-Li alloys determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and neutron depth profiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation of binary Al-Li alloys during short exposures at 530 C and long exposures at 200 C was studied with regard to the Li distribution. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to obtain quantitative Li depth profiles across the surface oxide layer and the underlying alloy. The underlying alloy was depleted in Li as a result of oxidation at 530 and 200 C. The SIMS and NDP results showed good mutual agreement and were used to evaluate the oxide thickness, the Li concentration at the oxide-ally interface, and the mass balance between oxide and alloy. The Li depletion profiles in the alloy were also calculated using the interdiffusion coefficients reported in the literature and compared with the measured profiles; the two profiles differed at 530 C but showed good agreement at 200 C.

Soni, K.K. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)); Williams, D.B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)); Newbury, D.E.; Chi, P.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaza, G. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Compact range for variable-zone measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Range Creek Calibrated Dates Beta-202190  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Creek Calibrated Dates 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Beta-202190 Beta-175753 Beta-175755 Beta-235067 Beta-202189 Beta-214831 Beta-202188 Beta-202191 Beta-203630 Beta-214832 Beta-175754 Beta a Carbon-14 calibrated date (95% CI) between 1000 and 1200 C.E. (Figure 5: Beta-235067). The calibrated

Provancher, William

288

Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Machinery C T C T EET 365W Electrical Power & Machinery Laboratory C C, V V C C, V V EET 370T Energy=Virtual Laboratory, W=Web based This schedule is tentative. All Course offerings are subject to minimum enrollmentElectrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE Course Number and Name Fall 2010 Spr

289

6, 1018310216, 2006 Long-range transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 10183­10216, 2006 Long-range transport of Asian dust and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin and air pollutants to Taiwan: observed evidence and model simulation C.-Y. Lin 1 , Z. Wang 2 , W.-N. Chen and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

Boyer, Edmond

290

Gravitomagnetism and the Earth-Mercury range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically work out the impact of the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect on the Earth-Mercury range caused by the gravitomagnetic field of the rotating Sun. The peak-to peak nominal amplitude of the resulting time-varying signal amounts to 1.75 10^1 m over a temporal interval 2 yr. Future interplanetary laser ranging facilities should reach a cm-level in ranging to Mercury over comparable timescales; for example, the BepiColombo mission, to be launched in 2014, should reach a 4.5 - 10 cm level over 1 - 8 yr. We looked also at other Newtonian (solar quadrupole mass moment, ring of the minor asteroids, Ceres, Pallas, Vesta, Trans-Neptunian Objects) and post-Newtonian (gravitoelectric Schwarzschild solar field) dynamical effects on the Earth-Mercury range. They act as sources of systematic errors for the Lense-Thirring signal which, in turn, if not properly modeled, may bias the recovery of some key parameters of such other dynamical features of motion. Their nominal peak-to-peak amplitudes are as large as 4 10^5 m (Schwarzschild), 3 10^2 m (Sun's quadrupole), 8 10^1 m (Ceres, Pallas, Vesta), 4 m (ring of minor asteroids), 8 10^-1 m (Trans-Neptunian Objects). Their temporal patterns are different with respect to that of the gravitomagnetic signal.

Lorenzo Iorio

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah Hughes University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 Key Terms: earthquake

Sheehan, Anne F.

292

Tracking Dynamic Boundary Fronts using Range Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are being deployed for real-time monitoring applica- tions, such as detecting leakage of hazardous material location whereas in the latter approach a sensor finds approximate distance to a remote location where degrees and gather reflec- tivity and wind velocity information. Lidars (LIght Detection and Ranging

Ramamritham, Krithi

293

Infrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth profilometry, and scanning imaging of deep subsurface electronic defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sorption of the incident beam and nonradiative heating. The PCR theory is presented as infrared depthInfrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth May 2003 Laser-induced infrared photocarrier radiometry PCR is introduced theoretically

Mandelis, Andreas

294

Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters, J

Strathclyde, University of

295

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-369-2141, Raymond W. Bliss Army Community Hospital, Ft. Huachuca, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from a representative of the Raymond W. Bliss Army Community Hospital concerning indoor air quality at Greely Hall, Fort Huachuca (SIC-9711), Arizona, an environmental and ventilation survey was conducted. Greely Hall was a three story, multipurpose building with approximately 120,000 feet per floor. The building housed primarily offices, but also had a cafeteria, auditorium, computer rooms, conference rooms and electronics maintenance area. Over 2100 persons worked in the building. Average carbon-dioxide (124389) levels were 584 parts per million (ppm) in the morning, increasing to 1040ppm for the last measurements made that day. The levels ranged from 350 to 1000ppm in the morning to 800 to 1800ppm in the afternoon. Inordinate temperature increases during the day were found in some areas of the building. Many of the air handling units had inoperable or closed main outside air dampers. Maintenance was poor. Improperly maintained or poorly draining condesate pans, renovation of the building without upgrading the ventilation systems and insufficient maintenance personnel were some of the problems identified. The authors conclude that the potential for thermal comfort problems and microbial contamination existed. The authors recommend measures to remedy these situations.

Klein, M.; Gunter, B.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

297

Long-range correlations and trends in Colombian seismic time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We detect long-range correlations and trends in time series extracted from the data of seismic events occurred since 1973 until 2011 in a rectangular region that contain mainly all the continental part of Colombia. The long-range correlations are detected by the calculation of the Hurst exponents for the time series of interevent intervals, separation distances, depth differences and magnitude differences. By using a geometrical modification of the classical R/S method that has been developed to detect long-range correlations in short time series, we find the existence of persistence for all the time series considered. We find also, by using the DFA until the third order, that the time series of interevent intervals, separation distances and depth differences are influenced by quadratic trends, while the time series of magnitude differences is influenced by a linear trend. Finally, for the time series of interevent intervals, we present an analysis of the Hurst exponent as a function of the time and the minim...

Martin-Montoya, L A; Quimbay, C J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

OUTPUT-SENSITIVE ALGORITHMS FOR TUKEY DEPTH AND RELATED PROBLEMS David Bremner Dan Chen John Iacono Stefan Langerman Pat Morin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OUTPUT-SENSITIVE ALGORITHMS FOR TUKEY DEPTH AND RELATED PROBLEMS David Bremner Dan Chen John Iacono Stefan Langerman Pat Morin ABSTRACT. The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p with respect to a finite p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions are considered

Bremner, David

299

Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

Allison, L.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as 12C(e,e'p)11B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to directly observe these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3 < xB < 0.7 deep inelastic scattering ratios.

Douglas Higinbotham

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as {sup 12}C(e,e'p){sup 11}B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to isolate the signal from these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3

Higinbotham, Douglas W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23601 (United States)

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Long-Range Validity of Threshold Laws in Inner-Shell Photodetachment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,Local Correlations andLocalThroughoutLong-Range

304

Intermediate Range Order and Transport Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation Study February 7, 2005 Patrick Pfleiderer ICP, University of Stuttgart in Collaboration: 2 2 21 ),...,,( dt d mV i iNii r rrrF =-= t m ttt ttt t m t ttttt i ii ii i i iii 2 )()( )()( 2-range and responsible for covalent character · obtained from ab initio calculations · time step: 1.6fs 6 2 r C eA r eqq

Harting, Jens

305

Causality and the effective range expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the generalization of Wigner's causality bounds and Bethe's integral formula for the effective range parameter to arbitrary dimension and arbitrary angular momentum. We also discuss the impact of these constraints on the separation of low- and high-momentum scales and universality in low-energy scattering. Some of our results were summarized earlier in a letter publication. In this work, we present full derivations and several detailed examples.

H. -W. Hammer; Dean Lee

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

306

Rangely, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosource HistoryRaftRamsey,Rangely, Colorado: Energy

307

FT-ICR STUDIES OF METAL-CARBON BINARY CLUSTERS, MASAMICHI KOHNO (Eng. Res. Inst., Univ. Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656), SHUHEI INOUE (Dept. Mech. Eng., Univ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, no pure carbon clusters were observed, whereas pure carbon clusters with almost the same intensity of MCn encapsulated inside. 50 60 70 Number of Carbon Atoms [Cm + ] Intensity(arb.units) (b) La:0.8% (a) Sc:0.8% LaAbstract FT-ICR STUDIES OF METAL-CARBON BINARY CLUSTERS, MASAMICHI KOHNO (Eng. Res. Inst., Univ

Maruyama, Shigeo

308

Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

G. G. Howes

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Quantification of depth of anesthesia by nonlinear time series analysis of brain electrical activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate several quantifiers of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal with respect to their ability to indicate depth of anesthesia. For 17 patients anesthetized with Sevoflurane, three established measures (two spectral and one based on the bispectrum), as well as a phase space based nonlinear correlation index were computed from consecutive EEG epochs. In absence of an independent way to determine anesthesia depth, the standard was derived from measured blood plasma concentrations of the anesthetic via a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for the estimated effective brain concentration of Sevoflurane. In most patients, the highest correlation is observed for the nonlinear correlation index D*. In contrast to spectral measures, D* is found to decrease monotonically with increasing (estimated) depth of anesthesia, even when a "burst-suppression" pattern occurs in the EEG. The findings show the potential for applications of concepts derived from the theory of nonlinear dynamics, even if little can be assumed about the process under investigation.

G. Widman; T. Schreiber; B. Rehberg; A. Hoeft; C. E. Elger

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Method and system for determining depth distribution of radiation-emitting material located in a source medium and radiation detector system for use therein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method, system and a radiation detector system for use therein are provided for determining the depth distribution of radiation-emitting material distributed in a source medium, such as a contaminated field, without the need to take samples, such as extensive soil samples, to determine the depth distribution. The system includes a portable detector assembly with an x-ray or gamma-ray detector having a detector axis for detecting the emitted radiation. The radiation may be naturally-emitted by the material, such as gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, or emitted when the material is struck by other radiation. The assembly also includes a hollow collimator in which the detector is positioned. The collimator causes the emitted radiation to bend toward the detector as rays parallel to the detector axis of the detector. The collimator may be a hollow cylinder positioned so that its central axis is perpendicular to the upper surface of the large area source when positioned thereon. The collimator allows the detector to angularly sample the emitted radiation over many ranges of polar angles. This is done by forming the collimator as a single adjustable collimator or a set of collimator pieces having various possible configurations when connected together. In any one configuration, the collimator allows the detector to detect only the radiation emitted from a selected range of polar angles measured from the detector axis. Adjustment of the collimator or the detector therein enables the detector to detect radiation emitted from a different range of polar angles. The system further includes a signal processor for processing the signals from the detector wherein signals obtained from different ranges of polar angles are processed together to obtain a reconstruction of the radiation-emitting material as a function of depth, assuming, but not limited to, a spatially-uniform depth distribution of the material within each layer. The detector system includes detectors having different properties (sensitivity, energy resolution) which are combined so that excellent spectral information may be obtained along with good determinations of the radiation field as a function of position.

Benke, Roland R. (Helotes, TX); Kearfott, Kimberlee J. (Ann Arbor, MI); McGregor, Douglas S. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

313

Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartmentDepartmentalDeployment ofDepth

315

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartmentDepartmentalDeploymentDepth

316

Modern testing meets wide range of objectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing sequences in two very different wells illustrate the wide range of objectives that are met with modern testing procedures. The first example is a drill stem test in an exploration well. The second test is in an established producing well. The exploration well test incorporated tubing-conveyed perforating, fluid sampling, production logging, and matrix stimulation to evaluate and properly treat near-well bore damage, as well as to investigate reservoir volume and characterize boundaries. The test on the established producer evaluated whether a workover could remedy lower than expected productivity. Production logging was combined with stationary transient measurements.

Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Optical range measurement system: principles and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modulated infrared beam from a LED to a targeted vehicle and receiving that being reflected, the relative distance between the host and target can be determined by the ORMS. There are basically two distinctive types of ORMS's. 1. Phase Shift ORMS... of the road, b. a vehicle parked on the shoulder of the highway, c. other targets in the scene within the effective range of the ranger. 14 A LED display could also be arranged to warn the driver, but this does not seem to be necessary. The driver may...

Roan, Tian-Ming Philip

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Short range correlations and the EMC effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) is linearly related to the Short Range Correlation (SRC) scaling factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering. We speculate that the observed correlation is due to the fact that both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by high momentum nucleons in the nucleus. The observed phenomenological relationship can be used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn-pair cross sections, the DIS cross section for a free neutron, View the MathML source, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions, and the u/d ratio in a free proton.

E. Piasetzky, L.B. Weinstein, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Gomez, O. Hen, R. Shneor

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerType Jump to:Co JumpRETScreen Logo: Range Fuels Name:Jump

320

APS Long Range Schedule FY1996  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

APS Long Range Schedule FY1997  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range7 Beamline

322

APS Long Range Schedule FY1998  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range7 Beamline8

323

APS Long Range Schedule FY1999  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range7

324

APS Long Range Schedule FY2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range7

325

APS Long Range Schedule FY2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range7

326

APS Long Range Schedule FY2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range7

327

APS Long Range Schedule FY2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range72005 Long

328

APS Long Range Schedule FY2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical109)Long Range72005

329

Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral Carlos of the candelabrum coral Eunicea flexuosa across the Caribbean. Eunicea is endemic to the Caribbean and all sister: How can new marine species emerge without obvious geographic isolation? Caribbean coral reefs

Hellberg, Michael E.

330

Journal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of superconductivity is the diamagnetic response of a superconductor below its transition temperature To. The abilityJournal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in Cuprate Superconductors Steven M. AnlageI and Dong-Ho Wut Received 16 April 1992 We examine recent results

Anlage, Steven

331

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SHORE-BASED LOG PROCESSING Bottom felt: 4494 mbrf (used for depth shift to seafloor)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accurate compressional and shear veloc- ities. Quality Control During the processing, quality control to seafloor) Total penetration: 664 mbsf (drilled during DSDP Leg 45) Total core recovered: 106 m (18 old (reference curve) and new (match curve) shift depths. The total gamma-ray curve (SGR or HSGR) from

333

The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

334

Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations with a [ iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.1±0.0. Noat all depths with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0. Thiswith ethyl nitrate with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0.

Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed crust northeast China USArray a b s t r a c t We observe a clear seismic arrival at $35­45 s after

Niu, Fenglin

336

Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed February 2013 Keywords: S to P converted wave mid-mantle reflectors subducted oceanic crust northeast China

Niu, Fenglin

337

{sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Depth and controls of Ca-rhodochrosite precipitation in bioturbated sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depth and controls of Ca-rhodochrosite precipitation in bioturbated sediments of the Eastern Road, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9647, USA ABSTRACT The occurrence of early diagenetic Ca-rhodochrosite [(Mn,Ca)CO3] is reported in association with `griotte'-type nodular limestones from basinal settings

Gilli, Adrian

339

A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

Smith, K. Shafer

340

The E-utilities In-Depth: Parameters, Syntax and More Eric Sayers, PhD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The E-utilities In-Depth: Parameters, Syntax and More Eric Sayers, PhD NCBI sayers@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Introduction This chapter serves as a reference for all supported parameters for the E-utilities, along with accepted values and usage guidelines. This information is provided for each E-utility in sections below

Levin, Judith G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Intermediate-depth Circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomous Floats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intermediate-depth Circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomous Floats of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, 306 autonomous floats were deployed in the tropical and South autonomous floats that are not acoustically tracked, but rather surface at regular intervals to be located by

Davis, Russ

342

Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems Omer. Motivated by database search problems such as partial match or nearest neighbor, we present secure between k poly log(s) parties who all know C, we obtain a secure protocol for evaluating C(x) using O

Shpilka, Amir

343

Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems ? Omer. Motivated by database search problems such as partial match or nearest neighbor, we present secure distributed between k #21; poly log(s) parties who all know C, we obtain a secure protocol for evaluating C

Ishai, Yuval

344

Probabilistic models and reliability analysis of scour depth around bridge piers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters suggest that the maximum sour depth predicted by the deterministic HEC-18 Sand and HEC-18 Clay models tend to be conservative. Evidence is also found that the applicability of the HEC-18 Clay method is not limited to clay but can also be used...

Bolduc, Laura Christine

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

3D MODEL RETRIEVAL BASED ON DEPTH LINE DESCRIPTOR Mohamed Chaouch and Anne Verroust-Blondet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D MODEL RETRIEVAL BASED ON DEPTH LINE DESCRIPTOR Mohamed Chaouch and Anne Verroust-Blondet INRIA.verroust}@inria.fr. ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose a novel 2D/3D approach for 3D model matching and retrieving. Each model information provides a more accurate description of 3D shape boundaries than using other 2D shape descriptors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

3D VIDEO QUALITY EVALUATION WITH DEPTH QUALITY VARIATIONS Gustavo Leon, Hari Kalva, and Borko Furht  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D VIDEO QUALITY EVALUATION WITH DEPTH QUALITY VARIATIONS Gustavo Leon, Hari Kalva, and Borko Furht on 3D video perception on autostereoscopic displays. This study was done using objective as well image quality and compression on the perceived 3D experience. Another objective is to evaluate the use

Kalva, Hari

347

Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison of time and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 5 King's College induced in light-absorbing materials can be observed either as a transient signal in time domain

Mandelis, Andreas

348

Integrating Kinect Depth Data with a Stochastic Object Classification Framework for Forestry Robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Kinect Depth Data with a Stochastic Object Classification Framework for Forestry Robots camera for a stochastic classification system for forestry robots. The images are classified as bush- ject classification system that uses only RGB camera. The system is aimed for a forestry robot

Hellström, Thomas

349

Energy-Based 6-DOF Penetration Depth Computation for Penalty-Based Haptic Rendering Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Based 6-DOF Penetration Depth Computation for Penalty-Based Haptic Rendering Algorithms Maxim Kolesnikov and Milos Zefran Abstract-- Existing penalty-based haptic rendering ap- proaches of rigid-body motions SE(3). We propose a penalty-based six-degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) haptic rendering

Zefran, Milo?

350

IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mexico 2 Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Center for Advanced Diffusion experimental data.8­13 Some of those methods in- volve a judiciously structured functional form, several algorithms to invert the depth pro- files have been applied, using an inverse procedure to find

Mandelis, Andreas

352

CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH are used for the transport of drinking water. However, disinfectants in water seem to have a strong impact for the distribution of drinking water. HDPE pipes are exposed to an internal pressure due to water flow. Furthermore

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

Southampton, University of

354

Estimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-independent estimate of the total heat output of Cenozoic seafloor is 18.6 to 20.5 TW, which leads to a global output: Oceanic heat flow; Global heat budget; Subsidence rate 1. Introduction The total heat output of the EarthEstimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data Meng Wei , David

Sandwell, David T.

355

Vertically Loaded Anchor: Drag Coefficient, Fall Velocity, and Penetration Depth using Laboratory Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anchor point. Values such as drag coefficient and terminal velocity are vital in predicting embedment depth to obtain the mooring capacity required by the floating facility. Two scaled models of the Mark I OMNI-Max anchor were subjected to a series...

Cenac, William

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

Henderson, Gideon

357

The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 Ă? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

Battisti, David

358

Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean´veloppement, La Paz, Bolivia Received 24 April 2002; revised 6 June 2002; accepted 6 June 2002; published 10 the equilibrium line of the Zongo glacier (2.4 km2 ), Bolivia (16°S). Study of the influence of wind, air

Berthier, Etienne

359

Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. 14 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

363

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

364

Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Letter shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at intermediate xB, 0.35?xB?0.7, is linearly related to the short range correlation (SRC) scale factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at xB?1. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn pair cross sections and F2n/F2p, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

L.B. Weinstein, E. Piasetzky, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Gomez, O. Hen, R. Shneor

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at intermediate $x_B$, $0.35\\le x_B\\le 0.7$, is linearly related to the Short Range Correlation (SRC) scaling factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at $x_B\\ge 1.$. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free $pn$ pair cross sections, the DIS cross section for a free neutron, and $F_2^n/F_2^p$, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

L. B. Weinstein; E. Piasetzky; D. W. Higinbotham; J. Gomez; O. Hen; R. Shneor

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

366

Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Letter shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at intermediate x{sub B}, 0.35{<=}x{sub B{<=}}0.7, is linearly related to the short range correlation (SRC) scale factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at x{sub B{>=}}1. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn pair cross sections and F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p}, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

Weinstein, L. B. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Piasetzky, E.; Hen, O.; Shneor, R. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Higinbotham, D. W.; Gomez, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

367

NOAA Helps the Construction Sector Build for a Changing Climate The construction industry is comprised of a wide range of business involved in engineering standards,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is comprised of a wide range of business involved in engineering standards, building design is needed to protect a building foundation from frost. In the past, standard foundation depths were inturn developed new insulation standards for protecting building foundations from frost. This resulted

368

Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortgage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed-layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well.

Freed, R.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1 PNWD-SA-7032 Range Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Software Range Sustainability ModuleRange Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 2 PNWD-SA-7032 / 2 ObjectiveObjectiveObjective Learn how to use the Range

370

Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Measurement of atmospheric production depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is possible to reconstruct a muon production depth distribution. We characterize the goodness of this reconstruction for zenith angles around 60 deg. and different energies of the primary particle. From these distributions we define X(mu)max as the depth along the shower axis where the production of muons reaches maximum. We explore the potentiality of X(mu)max as a useful observable to infer the mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Likewise, we assess its ability to constrain hadronic interaction models.

Pierre Auger Collaboration

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

Report on Analysis of Forest Floor Bulk Density and Depth at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forest floor data from the Savannah River Site consists of two layers, the litter layer and the duff layer. The purpose for the study was to determine bulk density conversion factors to convert litter and duff depth values in inches to forest floor fuel values in tons per acre. The primary objective was to collect litter and duff samples to adequately characterize forest floor depth and bulk density for combinations of 4 common forest types (loblolly/slash pine, longleaf pine, pine and hardwood mix, upland hardwood), 3 age classes (5-20, 20-40, 40+ years old) and 3 categories of burning history (0-3, 3-10, 10+ years since last burn).

Bernard R. Parresol

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files

374

Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damping of magnetic fields via ambipolar diffusion and decay of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in the post decoupling era heats the intergalactic medium (IGM). Collisional ionization weakly ionizes the IGM, producing an optical depth to scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The optical depth generated at $z\\gg 10$ does not affect the "reionization bump" of the CMB polarization power spectrum at low multipoles, but affects the temperature and polarization power spectra at high multipoles. Using the Planck 2013 temperature and lensing data together with the WMAP 9-year polarization data, we constrain the present-day field strength, $B_0$, smoothed over the damping length at the decoupling epoch as a function of the spectral index, $n_B$. We find the 95% upper bounds of $B_0<0.56$, 0.31, and 0.14 nG for $n_B=-2.9$, $-2.5$, and $-1.5$, respectively. For these spectral indices, the optical depth is dominated by dissipation of the decaying MHD turbulence that occurs shortly after the decou...

Kunze, Kerstin E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

ITAR: A modified TAR method to determine depth dose distribution for an ophthalmic device that performs kilovoltage x-ray pencil-beam stereotaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: New technology has been developed to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 100 kVp pencil-beams that enter the patient through the radio-resistant sclera with a depth of interest between 1.6 and 2.6 cm. Measurement of reference and relative dose in a kilovoltage x-ray beam with a 0.42 cm diameter field size and a 15 cm source to axis distance (SAD) is a challenge that is not fully addressed in current guidelines to medical physicists. AAPM's TG-61 gives dosimetry recommendations for low and medium energy x-rays, but not all of them are feasible to follow for this modality. Methods: An investigation was conducted to select appropriate equipment for the application. PTW's Type 34013 Soft X-Ray Chamber (Freiburg, Germany) and CIRS's Plastic Water LR (Norfolk, VA) were found to be the best available options. Attenuation curves were measured with minimal scatter contribution and thus called Low Scatter Tissue Air Ratio (LSTAR). A scatter conversion coefficient (C{sub scat}) was derived through Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation using MCNPX (LANL, Los Alamos, NM) to quantify the difference between a traditional TAR curve and the LSTAR curve. A material conversion coefficient (C{sub mat}) was determined through experimentation to evaluate the difference in attenuation properties between water and Plastic Water LR. Validity of performing direct dosimetry measurements with a source to detector distance other than the treatment distance, and therefore a different field size due to a fixed collimator, was explored. A method—Integrated Tissue Air Ratio (ITAR)—has been developed that isolates each of the three main radiological effects (distance from source, attenuation, and scatter) during measurement, and integrates them to determine the dose rate to the macula during treatment. Results: LSTAR curves were determined to be field size independent within the range explored, indicating that direct dosimetry measurements may be performed with a source to detector distance of 20 cm even though the SAD is 15 cm during treatment. C{sub scat} varied from 1.102 to 1.106 within the range of depths of interest. The experimental variance among repeated measurements of C{sub mat} was larger than depth dependence, so C{sub mat} was estimated as1.019 for all depths of interest. Conclusions: Equipment selection, measurement techniques, and formalism for the determination of dose rate to the macula during stereotaxy for AMD have been determined and are strongly recommended by the authors of this paper to be used by clinical medical physicists.

Hanlon, Justin, E-mail: jhanlon@orayainc.com; Chell, Erik; Firpo, Michael; Koruga, Igor [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)] [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Abstract Fluids from the western margin of the Basin and Range have helium isotope ratios as high as...

379

T-710: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service Vulnerability T-710: Apache HTTP Server Overlapping Ranges Denial of Service Vulnerability September 6, 2011 - 3:09am...

380

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

382

Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic...

383

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

384

Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

385

Effects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan wetland complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Accepted 17 April 2009 Keywords: Wetlands Boreal region Synthetic aperture radar Water level SoilEffects of soil moisture and water depth on ERS SAR backscatter measurements from an Alaskan was negatively correlated to water depth in all open (non-forested) wetlands when water table levels were more

Turetsky, Merritt

386

IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson, Mike Brookes and Pier Luigi Dragotti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson London Exhibition Road, SW7 2AZ, London, United Kingdom. ABSTRACT Image based rendering is a technique of traditional color images with depth images. This combination promises to improve the rendering quality

Dragotti, Pier Luigi

387

American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine, and Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine warming has been happening · What might have caused global warming · Whether global warming

Ford, Andrew

388

Determination of zero-field size percent depth doses and tissue maximum ratios for stereotactic radiosurgery and IMRT dosimetry: Comparison between experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, zero-field percent depth dose (PDD) and tissue maximum ratio (TMR) for 6 MV x rays have been determined by extrapolation from dosimetric measurements over the field size range 1x1-10x10 cm{sup 2}. The key to small field dosimetry is the selection of a proper dosimeter for the measurements, as well as the alignment of the detector with the central axis (CAX) of beam. The measured PDD results are compared with those obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to examine the consistency and integrity of the measured data from which the zero-field PDD is extrapolated. Of the six most commonly used dosimeters in the clinic, the stereotactic diode field detector (SFD), the PTW Pinpoint, and the Exradin A14 are the most consistent and produce results within 2% of each other over the entire field size range 1x1-40x40 cm{sup 2}. Although the diamond detector has the smallest sensitive volume, it is the least stable and tends to disagree with all other dosimeters by more than 10%. The zero-field PDD data extrapolated from larger field measurements obtained with the SFD are in good agreement with the MC results. The extrapolated and MC data agree within 2.5% over the clinical depth range (d{sub max}-30 cm), when the MC data for the zero field are derived from a 1x1 cm{sup 2} field simulation using a miniphantom (1x1x48 cm{sup 3}). The agreement between the measured PDD and the MC data based on a full phantom (48x48x48 cm{sup 3}) simulation is fairly good within 1% at shallow depths to approximately 5% at 30 cm. Our results seem to indicate that zero-field TMR can be accurately calculated from PDD measurements with a proper choice of detector and a careful alignment of detector axis with the CAX.

Cheng, C.-W.; Sang, Hyun Cho; Taylor, Michael; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey 07962 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Portland Kaiser Permanente, Portland, Oregon 97227 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Semi-empirical model for depth dose distributions of megavoltage x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dose distribution due to absorption of photon energy fluence in a homogeneous water phantom irradiated by megavoltage x-ray beams has been analyzed with a semiempirical model. The method generalizes an analytical formalism for the scattering component of dose within a water phantom which was developed recently for monoenergetic photon beams. Contributions to dose via Compton interaction and pair creation form the essential structure of the secondary component formula. Both the central-axis percent depth dose and off-central-axis ratios can be determined for beams of different sizes, used at any value of source to surface distance. The input data include the values of linear attenuation and energy-absorption coefficients in water at energies between 10 keV and the equivalent energy of the beam. Predicted values of the central-axis percent depth dose and the off-central-axis ratios are compared with the measured data for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 20, 35, 45, and 70 MVp x-ray beams. For the central-axis percent depth dose, agreement is within 3% for fields of sizes between 5 x 5 and 20 x 20 cm/sup 2/, and 5% for larger fields, for beams of MVp up to 20. For higher energy beams, comparison was made only for the 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ fields and the discrepancies were within 3%. For the off-central-axis ratios, agreement between the predicted and measured values is within 5% over the umbra region but worsens in the penumbra region and geometrical shadow. This formalism requires large computer storage for generating data for all realistic beams irradiating normal-size phantoms.

Ahuja, S.D.; Stroup, S.L.; Bolin, M.G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

{sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter variability due to depth of anesthesia in the anesthetized canine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of {open_quotes}depth of anesthesia{close_quotes} on {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter estimates in the myocardium was tested in a series of replicated studies on six dogs using the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph. A single lateral slice through the myocardium was imaged following each of four successive injections of {sup 82}Rb. For three of the injections the animals were lightly anesthetized (mean blood pressure about 90 mmHg). For the second injection, the amount of anesthetic was increased until blood pressure dipped to about 70 mHg. The fourth injection was preceded by an infusion of dipyridamole to induce a stress-state. The entire sequence was repeated at least twice with each of the six animals. A two compartment model with parameters k{sub 1} (uptake rate), k{sub 2} (wash-out rate), and f{sub v} (vascular fraction) was fit to the data. There was a consistent finding of a 20% to 30% decrease in k{sub 1} during the deeply anesthetized state compared with the two lightly anesthetized rest states. Analysis of variance showed that the difference observed is significant, though small in comparison with the difference between the rest and stress states (60% to 160% increase). The difference between the two lightly anesthetized states was not significant. Kinetic PET studies using dogs are routinely carried out with the animal anesthetized. Depth of anesthesia has been suspected as as source of variability in parameter estimates, but this conjecture has not previously been systematically investigated. These studies at extremes in the depth of anesthesia show a small but predictable effect on the uptake k{sub 1} of {sup 82}Rb.

Coxson, P.G.; Brennan, K.M.; Yang, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

In-depth analysis of CIGS film for solar cells, structural and optical characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements performed on gradient-etched CuIn$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$Se$_2$ (CIGS) solar cells provide information about stress and texture depth profiles in the absorber layer. An important parameter for CIGS layer growth dynamics, the absorber thickness-dependent stress in the molybdenum back contact is analyzed. Texturing of grains and quality of the polycrystalline absorber layer are correlated with the intentional composition gradients (band gap grading). Band gap gradient is determined by space-resolved photoluminescence measurements and correlated with composition and strain profiles.

Slobodskyy, A; ~Ulyanenkova, T; ~Doyle, S; Powalla, M; ~Baumbach, T; ~Lemmer, U

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Molecular Depth Profiling of Sucrose Films: A Comparative Study of Cn Ions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification and Application ofof a Coflowand Traditional Cs

395

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision2 G-Band Vapor489

396

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartmentDepartmentalDeployment

397

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINLNuclear262About UsDepth Profile of

398

ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/InfraredProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

399

Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department ofAn|OilAnalysisfor the RSS

400

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and MODIS Comparison of Cloud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Spectral Signature of Dust Scattering and Polarization in the Near IR to Far UV. I. Optical Depth and Geometry Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectropolarimetry from the near IR to the far UV of light scattered by dust provides a valuable diagnostic of the dust composition, grain size distribution and spatial distribution. To facilitate the use of this diagnostic, we present detailed calculations of the intensity and polarization spectral signature of light scattered by optically thin and optically thick dust in various geometries. The polarized light radiative transfer calculations are carried out using the adding-doubling method for a plane-parallel slab, and are extended to an optically thick sphere by integrating over its surface. The calculations are for the Mathis, Rumple & Nordsieck Galactic dust model, and cover the range from 1 $\\mu m$ to 500 \\AA. We find that the wavelength dependence of the scattered light intensity provides a sensitive probe of the optical depth of the scattering medium, while the polarization wavelength dependence provides a probe of the grain scattering properties, which is practically independent of optical depth. We provide a detailed set of predictions, including polarization maps, which can be used to probe the properties of dust through imaging spectropolarimetry in the near IR to far UV of various Galactic and extragalactic objects. In a following paper we use the codes developed here to provide predictions for the dependence of the intensity and polarization on grain size distribution and composition.

Victor G. Zubko; Ari Laor

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

Device and method for the measurement of depth of interaction using co-planar electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for measuring a depth of interaction of an ionizing event and improving resolution of a co-planar grid sensor (CPG) are provided. A time-of-occurrence is measured using a comparator to time the leading edge of the event pulse from the non-collecting or collecting grid. A difference signal between the grid signals obtained with a differential amplifier includes a pulse with a leading edge occurring at the time-of-detection, measured with another comparator. A timing difference between comparator outputs corresponds to the depth of interaction, calculated using a processor, which in turn weights the difference grid signal to improve spectral resolution of a CPG sensor. The device, which includes channels for grid inputs, may be integrated into an Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The combination of the device and sensor is included. An improved high-resolution CPG is provided, e.g., a gamma-ray Cadmium Zinc Telluride CPG sensor operating at room temperature.

DeGeronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Test plan for evaluating the operational performance of the prototype nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHMC will provide Low Activity Wastes (LAW) tank wastes for final treatment by a privatization contractor from two double-shell feed tanks, 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Concerns about the inability of the baseline ''grab'' sampling to provide large volume samples within time constraints has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. This sampling system will provide large volume, representative samples without the environmental, radiation exposure, and sample volume impacts of the current base-line ''grab'' sampling method. A plan has been developed for the cold testing of this nested, fixed-depth sampling system with simulant materials. The sampling system will fill the 500-ml bottles and provide inner packaging to interface with the Hanford Sites cask shipping systems (PAS-1 and/or ''safe-send''). The sampling system will provide a waste stream that will be used for on-line, real-time measurements with an at-tank analysis system. The cold tests evaluate the performance and ability to provide samples that are representative of the tanks' content within a 95 percent confidence interval, to sample while mixing pumps are operating, to provide large sample volumes (1-15 liters) within a short time interval, to sample supernatant wastes with over 25 wt% solids content, to recover from precipitation- and settling-based plugging, and the potential to operate over the 20-year expected time span of the privatization contract.

REICH, F.R.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

404

Wide tracking range, auto ranging, low jitter phase lock loop for swept and fixed frequency systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a wide tracking range phase locked loop (PLL) circuit that achieves minimal jitter in a recovered clock signal, regardless of the source of the jitter (i.e. whether it is in the source or the transmission media). The present invention PLL has automatic harmonic lockout detection circuitry via a novel lock and seek control logic in electrical communication with a programmable frequency discriminator and a code balance detector. (The frequency discriminator enables preset of a frequency window of upper and lower frequency limits to derive a programmable range within which signal acquisition is effected. The discriminator works in combination with the code balance detector circuit to minimize the sensitivity of the PLL circuit to random data in the data stream). In addition, the combination of a differential loop integrator with the lock and seek control logic obviates a code preamble and guarantees signal acquisition without harmonic lockup. An adaptive cable equalizer is desirably used in combination with the present invention PLL to recover encoded transmissions containing a clock and/or data. The equalizer automatically adapts to equalize short haul cable lengths of coaxial and twisted pair cables or wires and provides superior jitter performance itself. The combination of the equalizer with the present invention PLL is desirable in that such combination permits the use of short haul wires without significant jitter.

Kerner, Thomas M. (Manorville, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

Johnson, L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hydrothermal monitoring data from the Cascade Range, northwestern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrothermal monitoring data from the Cascade Range, northwestern United States By S.E. Ingebritsen., and Evans, W.C., 2014, Hydrothermal monitoring data from the Cascade Range, northwestern United States: U ...................................................................................................................................27 (8) Carbonate springs

407

Monitoring Long-Range Electron Transfer Pathways in Proteins...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure and should offer a novel window for long-range ET. Citation: Zhang Y, J Biggs, N Govind, and S Mukamel.2014."Monitoring Long-Range Electron Transfer Pathways in...

408

A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chairman, Neville Carter approved funding for me to attend a GSA field trip in the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition area for an initial look at the rocks. As I wrote computer programs and ran models, it really helped me to remember..., they did not use a modeling technique; instead, Bancroft's method (1960) was used to determine the maximum possible depth to an assumed step-source. SEISMIC STUDIES Because of the basin and range physiography, and the generally north-south orientation...

Brooks, Debra Ann

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination that are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination as radiopurity testing facilities, capable of measuring the radioactivity levels of materials to be used

411

Two-dimensional spectral/statistical analysis of Marine magnetic data: implications for depth-to-magnetic source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T'A'0-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL/STATISTICAL ANAI. YSIS OF MARINE MAGNETIC DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEPTH-TO-MAGNETIC SOURCE A Thesis by JEFFREY LEE SCHRULL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Geophysics TWO-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL/STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF MARINE MAGNETIC DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEPTH-TO-MAGNETIC SOURCE A Thesis JEFFREY LEE SCHRULL Approved as to style...

Schrull, Jeffrey Lee

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 17 PNWD-SA-7032 / 17 Edit Sample Areas Define New Sample Area Defined Sample Area #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 18 PNWD-SA-7032 / 18 "New Area" button on the Toolbar Defined Sample Area #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 19 PNWD-SA-7032

413

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 41  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 41 PNWD-SA-7032 / 41 Assumptions Underlying the UCLs. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 42 PNWD-SA-7032 / 42 Hypothetical Case Study that the action limit for the RDX mean (4.4 ppm) is not exceeded. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 43

414

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 57  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 57 PNWD-SA-7032 / 57 Sample Information Box for Segment 4 the RDX Measurements for the 2 MI Samples in Segment 4 #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 58 PNWD;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 59 PNWD-SA-7032 / 59 Sample Information Box for Segment 4 UCL

415

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 25 PNWD-SA-7032 / 25 Sampling Goals Establish Boundary of Contamination Partial Boundary #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 26 PNWD-SA-7032 / 26 Required Samples #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 27 PNWD-SA-7032 / 27 Specify Constituents of Concern

416

Mercury: Supporting Scalable Multi-Attribute Range Queries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury: Supporting Scalable Multi-Attribute Range Queries Ashwin R. Bharambe Mukesh Agrawal 15213 Abstract This paper presents the design of Mercury, a scalable protocol for supporting multi-attribute range- based searches. Mercury differs from previous range-based query systems in that it supports mul

Keinan, Alon

417

IN-RANGE PROGRESSION SJSU HR: 2/20/13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Initiated Request The Workforce Planning Unit reviews requests for in-range progressions and makes in-range salary must complete and submit the following documents to Workforce Planning for an in-range progression chart. 2. Workforce Planning will review the request and may contact the manager and/or the employee

Su, Xiao

418

Effect of equatorial line nodes on the upper critical field and London penetration depth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The upper critical field Hc2 and its anisotropy are calculated for order parameters with line nodes at the equators, kz=0, of the Fermi surface of uniaxial superconductors. It is shown that characteristic features found in Fe-based materials (a nearly linear Hc2(T) in a broad T domain, a low and increasing on warming anisotropy ?H=Hc2,ab/Hc2,c) can be caused by competing effects of the equatorial nodes and of the Fermi surface anisotropy. For certain material parameters, ?H(T)?1 may change sign upon warming, in agreement with the recorded behavior of FeTeS systems. It is also shown that the anisotropy of the penetration depth ??=?c/?ab decreases upon warming to reach ?H at Tc, in agreement with data available. For some materials ??(T) may change upon warming, from ??>1 at low Ts to ??<1 at high Ts.

Kogan, V G [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, R [Ames Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Complex Faraday depth structure of Active Galactic Nuclei as revealed by broadband radio polarimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed study of the Faraday depth structure of four bright (> 1 Jy), strongly polarized, unresolved, radio-loud quasars. The Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) was used to observe these sources with 2 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth from 1.1 to 3.1 GHz. This allowed us to spectrally resolve the polarization structure of spatially unresolved radio sources, and by fitting various Faraday rotation models to the data, we conclusively demonstrate that two of the sources cannot be described by a simple rotation measure (RM) component modified by depolarization from a foreground Faraday screen. Our results have important implications for using background extragalactic radio sources as probes of the galactic and intergalactic magneto-ionic media as we show how RM estimations from narrow-bandwidth observations can give erroneous results in the presence of multiple interfering Faraday components. We postulate that the additional RM components arise from polarized structure in the compact inner regio...

O'Sullivan, S P; Robishaw, T; Schnitzeler, D H F M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Feain, I J; Taylor, A R; Gaensler, B M; Landecker, T L; Harvey-Smith, L; Carretti, E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Improving resolution and depth of astronomical observations via modern mathematical methods for image analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Pilo, Stefano; Falcone, Maurizio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Superconducting coherence length and magnetic penetration depth of a p-wave holographic superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in (3+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in (2+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconducting coherence length {xi} of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we make a perturbative study of the gravity theory analytically. The superconducting coherence length {xi} is found to be proportional to (1-T/T{sub c}){sup -1/2} near the critical temperature T{sub c}. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth {lambda}{proportional_to}(T{sub c}-T){sup 1/2} by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

Zeng Huabi; Fan Zheyong [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zong Hongshi [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Superconducting Coherence Length and Magnetic Penetration Depth of a p-wave Holographic Superconductor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in 3+1 dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in 2+1 dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we study the perturbation of the gravity theory analytically. The superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ is found to be proportional to $(1-T/T_c)^{-1/2}$ near the critical temperature $T_c$. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth $\\lambda\\propto(T_c-T)^{1/2}$ by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

Hua-Bi Zeng; Zhe-Yong Fan; Hong-Shi Zong

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Aubrey, A.D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Kieft, T L [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology] [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Silver, B J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Heerden, E. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Opperman, D. J. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Bada, J L. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,] [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Depositional patterns and reservoir morphology of Guadalupian Cherry Canyon sandstones, Indian Draw Field, Eddy County, New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shown in Fig. 29 119 Isopach of final channel-fill showing the highly sinuous geometry of the thinly interbedded sandstones siltstones and shales. Contour interval 5 ft (1. 5 m). . 121 44 Diagrammatic cross section illustrating the size, shape... at depths ranging from. 3200 to 3350 ft (975 to 1020 m). These reservoir sand- stones occur interbedded with limestones, siltstones and thin shales, and were deposited approximately 10 mi (16 km) downdip from the Guadalupian reef front in the Delaware...

Phillips, Sandra

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with a residual 2.1% coefficient of variation (COV) over the 80-150-kVp energy range. Monte Carlo corrections reduced the COV to 1.4% over this energy range. All PDD measurements were in good agreement with one another except for the uncorrected PSD data, in which an over-response was observed with depth (13% at 10 cm with a 100 kVp beam), showing that beam hardening had a non-negligible effect on the PSD response. A correction based on LCT compensated very well for this effect, reducing the over-response to 3%.Conclusion: In the diagnostic energy range, PSDs show high-energy dependence, which can be corrected using spectra-weighted mass energy-absorption coefficients, showing no considerable sign of quenching between these energies. Correction factors obtained by Monte Carlo simulations confirm that the approximations made by LCT corrections are valid. Thus, PSDs could be useful for real-time dosimetry in radiology applications.

Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); and others

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

"Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

King, J J

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

Depth absorbed dose and LET distributions of therapeutic {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The depth absorbed dose and LET (linear energy transfer) distribution of different ions of clinical interest such as {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C ions have been investigated using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT. The energies of the projectiles correspond to ranges in water and soft tissue of approximately 260 mm. The depth dose distributions of the primary particles and their secondaries have been calculated and separated with regard to their low and high LET components. A LET value below 10 eV/nm can generally be regarded as low LET and sparsely ionizing like electrons and photons. The high LET region may be assumed to start at 20 eV/nm where on average two double-strand breaks can be formed when crossing the periphery of a nucleosome, even though strictly speaking the LET limits are not sharp and ought to vary with the charge and mass of the ion. At the Bragg peak of a monoenergetic high energy proton beam, less than 3% of the total absorbed dose is comprised of high LET components above 20 eV/nm. The high LET contribution to the total absorbed dose in the Bragg peak is significantly larger with increasing ion charge as a natural result of higher stopping power and lower range straggling. The fact that the range straggling and multiple scattering are reduced by half from hydrogen to helium increases the possibility to accurately deposit only the high LET component in the tumor with negligible dose to organs at risk. Therefore, the lateral penumbra is significantly improved and the higher dose gradients of {sup 7}Li and {sup 12}C ions both longitudinally and laterally will be of major advantage in biological optimized radiation therapy. With increasing charge of the ion, the high LET absorbed dose in the beam entrance and the plateau regions where healthy normal tissues are generally located is also increased. The dose distribution of the high LET components in the {sup 7}Li beam is only located around the Bragg peak, characterized by a Gaussian-type distribution. Furthermore, the secondary particles produced by high energy {sup 7}Li ions in tissuelike media have mainly low LET character both in front of and beyond the Bragg peak.

Kempe, Johanna; Gudowska, Irena; Brahme, Anders [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effects of induced flow on the depths of active back-arc basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observational range are obtained at a modeled ridge for a viscosity of 4x 1020 Pa-s for subduction angles from 30' to 90'. Shallow basins can not be accounted for with this model. The modeled trend relating the angle of subduction with topography is opposite...

Tomlins, Robynn Lee

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

430

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

431

Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

432

Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

433

Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada...

434

Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

435

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

436

Some factors affecting the winter range of Jasper National Park.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent studies by Dr. I. McT. Cowan in Jasper National Park have revealed that many of the winter game ranges of the Park are heavily… (more)

Pfeiffer, Egbert Wheeler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

ORISE: Nuclear engineering degrees at highest ranges since 1980s  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORISE report shows graduation, enrollment rates for nuclear engineering candidates are still at highest ranges reported since 1980s Report also shows shifts in career opportunities...

438

Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Northern Basin &...

439

Steady state deformation of the Coso Range, east central California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from satellite radar interferometry Abstract Observations of deformation from 1992 to 1997 in the southern Coso Range using satellite radar interferometry show deformation rates...

440

Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

442

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration...

443

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

444

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

445

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett...

446

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

447

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

448

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

449

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

450

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

451

Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range Geothermal Region Big Windy Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Bingham Caribou Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Birdsville...

452

Extending the Temperature Range of Electric Submersible Pumps...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 4.4.5 Extending the Temperature Range of Electric Submersible Pumps to 338 C - Hotline IV - High-temperature ESP Presentation Number: 019 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh...

453

Extending the Temperature Range of Electric Submersible Pumps...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Extending the Temperature Range of Electric Submersible Pumps to 338 C - Hotline IV - High-temperature ESP; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Extending the...

454

LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION BARRELS) FILE UPDATED April 2004 Line Month Low High Number Product Name Geography...

455

Very High Fuel Economy, Heavy Duty Truck, Narrow Range Speed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heavy Duty Truck, Narrow Range Speed Engine, Optimized Via Unique Energy Recovery Turbines and Facilitated by High Efficiency Continuously Variable Drivetrain Very High Fuel...

456

Low temperature London penetration depth and superfluid density in Fe-based superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The superconducting gap symmetry of the Fe-based superconductors was studied by measurements and analysis of London penetration depth and super uid density. Tunnel diode resonator technique for these measurements was implemented in a dilution refrigerator allowing for the temperatures down to 50 mK. For the analysis of the super uid density, we used both experimental studies of Al-coated samples and original thermodynamic approach based on Rutgers relation. In three systems studied, we found that the superconducting gap at the optimal doping is best described in multi-gap full gap scenario. By performing experiments on samples with arti#12;cially introduced disorder with heavy ion irradiation, we show that evolution of the superconducting transition temperature and of the super uid density are consistent with full-gap sign changing s#6; superconducting state. The superconducting gap develops strong modulation both in the under-doped and the over-doped regimes. In the terminal hole-doped KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, both temperature dependence of the super uid density and its evolution with increase of the scattering rate are consistent with symmetry imposed vertical line nodes in the superconducting gap. By comparative studies of hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and electron-doped Ca10-3-8, we show that the superconducting gap modulation in the under-doped regime is intrinsic and is not induced by the coexisting static magnetic order.

Kim, Hyunsoo [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Magnetic reconnection on the ion-skin-depth scale in the dusty magnetotail of a comet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resistive magnetic reconnection is studied in a dusty plasma configuration without a guide magnetic field, typical for cometary tails. For a high-{beta} plasma ({beta}{approx}1) consisting of electrons, ions, and immobile dust grains that constitute a neutralizing background, a two-fluid description is used to study electromagnetic perturbations with the frequency below the ion gyrofrequency, propagating at an arbitrary angle relative to the background magnetic field and including the effects of the Hall current. The perturbations consist of both the compressional and torsional components of the magnetic field, as well as of the acoustic perturbations and the electrostatic potential. The symmetry breaking between electrons and ions, introduced by the presence of dust grains, gives rise to an E-vectorxB-vector current in the unperturbed state which can support an antiparallel magnetic field configuration even in a cold plasma. In the perturbed state, the emergence of a new electromagnetic mode in a dusty plasma, which is evanescent below the Rao cutoff frequency and has the characteristic wavelength comparable to the ion skin depth, enables the reconnection at short spatial scales. The growth rate of the tearing instability is evaluated analytically.

Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K.; Morfill, G. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Depth profiling of vacancy clusters in MeV-implanted Si using Au labeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique for profiling the clustered-vacancy region produced by high-energy ion implantation into silicon is described and tested. This technique takes advantage of the fact that metal impurities, such as Au, are trapped in the region of excess vacancies produced by MeV Si implants into silicon. In this work, the clustered-vacancy regions produced by 1-, 2-, and 8-MeV Si implants into silicon have been labeled with Au diffused in from the front surface at 750thinsp{degree}C. The trapped Au was profiled with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The dynamics of the clustered-vacancy region were monitored for isochronal annealing at 750{endash}1000thinsp{degree}C, and for isothermal annealing at 950thinsp{degree}C, for 10{endash}600 s. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that after the drive-in anneal, the Au in the region of vacancy clusters is in the form of precipitates. The results demonstrate that the Au-labeling technique offers a convenient and potentially quantitative tool for depth profiling vacancies in clusters. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Venezia, V.C.; Eaglesham, D.J. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Haynes, T.E. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Agarwal, A. [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Jacobson, D.C.; Gossmann, H.; Baumann, F.H. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome .  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon Fly Ashand|

460

DOE completes environmental assessment on INL National Security Test Range  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FYBeauTransition Documents -Printer-friendly icon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

How Magnetic Dimers Interact to Create Long-Range Order  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPA addresses EMF B OImproving

462

Hybrid Wide Range Detector Amplifier - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmasSandy-Nor'easter SituationHybrid HybridIndustrial

463

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSLtheIndustry | DepartmentContract

464

Idaho National Laboratory Stand-Off Experiment Range draft environmental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSLtheIndustry | DepartmentContractassessment

465

Variations in K{sup +}-Na{sup +} ion exchange depth in commercial and experimental float glass compositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the results of ion-exchange experiments conducted on 17 commercial soda-lime-silicate (SLS) float glass and 8 experimental SLS glass compositions. A significant variation in the depth of K{sup +} penetration with relatively small changes in composition was observed. The data were fit to a multiple regression model in which the major oxides are the independent variables and depth of K{sup +} is the dependent variable. The model indicates that increased depth of exchange (increased interdiffusion coefficient) correlates predominantly with increased K{sub 2}O and/or Na{sub 2}O content of the glass, with a decreased total alkaline earth content and with the ratio of CaO/MgO.

Sinton, C.W.; LaCourse, W.C.; O'Connell, M.J.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Corrected Table for the Parametric Coefficients for the Optical Depth of the Universe to Gamma-rays at Various Redshifts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 1 in our paper, ApJ 648, 774 (2006) entitled "Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays" had erroneous numbers for the coefficients fitting the parametric form for the optical depth of the universe to gamma-rays. The correct values for these parameters as described in the original text are given here in a corrected table for various redshifts for the baseline model (upper row) and fast evolution (lower row) for each individual redshift. The parametric approximation is good for optical depths between 0.01 and 100 and for gamma-ray energies up to ~2 TeV for all redshifts but also for energies up to ~10 TeV for redshifts less than 1.

F. W. Stecker; M. A. Malkan; S. T. Scully

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

467

Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range Wednesday, December 15, 2010 Melissa due to renewable energy infrastructure development at the Nevada Test and Training Range. Nevada has have ever-increasing renewable energy goals. However, proposals for the development of 116 renewable

Lewis, Robert Michael

468

Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

Wage, Kathleen

469

On Aerodynamic Optimization Under a Range of Operating Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Aerodynamic Optimization Under a Range of Operating Conditions David W. Zingg, and Samy Elias In aerodynamic design, good performance is generally required under a range of oper- ating conditions, including aerodynamic shape optimization.1­6 The designer specifies an objective, operating conditions, constraints

Zingg, David W.

470

Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each...

Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

ESS and Dissipation Range Dynamics of 3-D Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We carry out a self consistent calculation of the structure functions in the dissipation range using Navier Stokes equation. Combining these results with the known structures in the inertial range, we actually propose crossover functions for the structure functions that takes one smoothly from the inertial to the dissipation regime. In the process the success of the extended self similarity is explicitly demonstrated.

Anirban Sain; J. K. Bhattacharjee

1997-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

472

Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVITED P A P E R Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts To provide a potential communications channel, HVAC ducts can function as electromagnetic waveguides; a 30-m read range has been-conditioning (HVAC) ducts as a potential communication channel between passive ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) radio

Hochberg, Michael

473

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 33 PNWD-SA-7032 / 33 Map View Sample Information Box Click in this Column #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 34 PNWD-SA-7032 / 34 Sample Information Box Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 35 PNWD-SA-7032 / 35 Segment Sample Results Box Enter Measurements

474

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 49  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 49 PNWD-SA-7032 / 49 Hypothetical Case Study (Continued Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 50 PNWD-SA-7032 / 50 Hypothetical Case Study (Continued)Hypothetical Case Study Save #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 51 PNWD-SA-7032 / 51 Coordinate View X and Y

475

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9 PNWD-SA-7032 / 9 What are the Steps in Using the VSP Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 10 PNWD-SA-7032 / 10 Hypotheses Being TestedHypotheses Being Tested is false., i.e., on showing that the segment does not need to be bumped out. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP

476

Mercury: Supporting Scalable Multi-Attribute Range Ashwin R. Bharambe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury: Supporting Scalable Multi-Attribute Range Queries Ashwin R. Bharambe ashu Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 ABSTRACT This paper presents the design of Mercury, a scalable pro- tocol for supporting multi-attribute range-based searches. Mercury differs from previous

Krishnamurthy, Arvind

477

New Mexico State University Department of Animal & Range Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Mexico State University Department of Animal & Range Sciences Number 299 September 24, 2012 Holechek is giving an invited paper, "How global trends in population, energy use, water use, and climate to officially dedicate the Southwest Center for Rangeland Sustainability at the Corona Range and Livestock

Johnson, Eric E.

478

GEA Heat Exchangers GEA Searle Cooler and Condensing Unit Ranges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have high efficiency EC fans as standard across the range. All our commercial unit coolers have whiteUnits GEA Searle Condensing Units are supplied as standard to a high specification with a complete controlGEA Heat Exchangers GEA Searle Cooler and Condensing Unit Ranges Top-level engineering solutions

Frandsen, Søren

479

Decreasing range resolution of a SAR image to permit correction of motion measurement errors beyond the SAR range resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

480

Laser Ranging for Gravitational, Lunar, and Planetary Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More precise lunar and Martian ranging will enable unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity and well as lunar and planetary science. NASA is currently planning several missions to return to the Moon, and it is natural to consider if precision laser ranging instruments should be included. New advanced retroreflector arrays at carefully chosen landing sites would have an immediate positive impact on lunar and gravitational studies. Laser transponders are currently being developed that may offer an advantage over passive ranging, and could be adapted for use on Mars and other distant objects. Precision ranging capability can also be combined with optical communications for an extremely versatile instrument. In this paper we discuss the science that can be gained by improved lunar and Martian ranging along with several technologies that can be used for this purpose.

Stephen M. Merkowitz; Philip W. Dabney; Jeffrey C. Livas; Jan F. McGarry; Gregory A. Neumann; Thomas W. Zagwodzki

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depth range ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Estimation of m.w.e (meter water equivalent) depth of the salt mine of Slanic Prahova, Romania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new mobile detector was developed in IFIN-HH, Romania, for measuring muon flux at surface and in underground. The measurements have been performed in the salt mines of Slanic Prahova, Romania. The muon flux was determined for 2 different galleries of the Slanic mine at different depths. In order to test the stability of the method, also measurements of the muon flux at surface at different altitudes were performed. Based on the results, the depth of the 2 galleries was established at 610 and 790 m.w.e. respectively.

Mitrica, B.; Margineanu, R.; Stoica, S.; Petcu, M.; Brancus, I. M.; Petre, M.; Toma, G.; Saftoiu, A.; Apostu, A. [Horia Hulubei Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest, Romania, P.O.B. MG-6 (Romania); Jipa, A.; Lazanu, I.; Sima, O. [Department of Physics, University of Bucharest, P.O.B. MG-11 (Romania); Haungs, A.; Rebel, H. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology-Campus North, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

482

Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? (II) ----Ozone layer depth reconstruction via HEWV effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is suggested by Chen {\\it et al.} that the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance ($280-400$ nm) could influence the Earth's surface temperature variation by "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect. In this manuscript, we reconstruct the developing history of the ozone layer depth variation from 1860 to 2011 based on the HEWV effect. It is shown that the reconstructed ozone layer depth variation correlates with the observational variation from 1958 to 2005 very well ($R=0.8422$, $P>99.9\\%$). From this reconstruction, we may limit the spectra band of the surface Ultraviolet irradiance referred in HEWV effect to Ultraviolet B ($280-320$ nm).

Chen, Jilong; Zheng, Yujun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north?central Oklahoma: 1992–2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow?band, interference?filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloudscreening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun’s elevation is greater than 9.25°. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month?by?month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

Michalsky, Joseph J.; Denn, Frederick; Flynn, Connor J.; Hodges, G. B.; Kiedron, Piotr; Koontz, Annette S.; Schlemmer, James; Schwartz, Stephen E.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

484

Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL-Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective Range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL- Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective 500-05-026 and 500-08-061. LBNL Report Number LBNL-6683E #12;Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL- Page 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored

485

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

487

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

488

Clutter in the GMTI range-velocity map.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

NDT&E International 40 (2007) 158167 Case depth determination in heat-treated industrial steel products using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research groups have reported a well-estab- lished anticorrelation between thermal diffusivity also investigated the microstructure change and the physical mechanisms of the thermal diffusivity of thermal diffusivity with depth is dominated by the carbon concentration profile, while the absolute ther

Mandelis, Andreas

490

Evaluation of Snow Depth and Soil Temperatures Predicted by the HydroThermodynamic SoilVegetation Scheme Coupled with the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Discrepancies between predicted and observed snow- depth changes relate to the coupling. Enhanced water supply to the atmosphere, which results from water that was assumed to be open in MM5 but was actually ice covered also lead to snowfall where none occurred. For heavy snowfall the performance of the coupled model

Moelders, Nicole

491

The Nereus Hybrid Underwater Robotic Vehicle for Global Ocean Science Operations to 11,000m Depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to provide the U.S. oceanographic community with the first capable and cost- effective vehicle for routineThe Nereus Hybrid Underwater Robotic Vehicle for Global Ocean Science Operations to 11,000m Depth-- This paper reports an overview of the new Nereus hybrid underwater vehicle and summarizes the vehicle's per

Whitcomb, Louis L.

492

Confocal X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Microscopy: A New Technique for the Nondestructive Compositional Depth Profiling of Paintings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Confocal X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Microscopy: A New Technique for the Nondestructive tools such as x-ray fluorescence (XRF) [4,5,6,7] and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) [3,8,9] to address the problem of compositional depth profiling of paintings. One XRF method consists of deducing

Gruner, Sol M.

493

Loading rate dependency of maximum nanoindentation depth in nano-grained NiTi shape memory alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of loading rate on nanoindentation depth for nano-grained polycrystalline superelastic (SE) NiTi SMA superelastic NiTi polycrystalline sheets were purchased from Memory Applications Inc. (USA). With X temperature (T=23 °C). To avoid plastic deformation under the tip, two spherical diamond tips with radii of R

Sun, Qing-Ping

494

Etching depth dependence of the effective refractive index in two-dimensional photonic-crystal-patterned vertical-cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adjacent flat regions. We used a multimode optical fiber to irradiate the PhC patterns, with a halogen lamp-depth dependence parameter , which can be explained by the optical power distribution inside a VCSEL structure in realizing high- performance optical communication systems, in which single-mode operation is necessary

Choquette, Kent

495

Estimation of the mean depth of boreal lakes for use in numerical weather prediction and climate modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models through parameterisation. For parameterisation, data. The effect of lakes should be parameterised in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate modellingEstimation of the mean depth of boreal lakes for use in numerical weather prediction and climate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

496

The Effect of an Occluder on Near Field Depth Matching in Optical See-Through Augmented Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. We used an AR haploscope, which allows us to independently manipulate accommodative demand the effects of accommodative demand, brightness, and participant age on depth perception. Among the additional of Edwards et al.'s [2] work was brain surgery, and therefore they used a plastic model of a human head

Swan II, J. Edward

497

-RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION -21 Applied Vegetation Science 8: 21-26, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION - 21 Applied Vegetation during restoration. The PVC tape discolouration method enables spatially and temporally extensive studies and the same variables indicated by discolouration of PVC tape attached to green bamboo stakes installed

Navrátilová, Jana

498

Ruminant Production Systems Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in undergraduate education, graduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ruminant Production Systems Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in undergraduate education, graduate education, research, and outreach in cattle/beef production systems and be recognized as the leading university program in cattle/beef production systems in the West. This will include

499

Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Stability of gravity-capillary waves generated by a moving pressure disturbance in water of finite depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability of gravity-capillary waves generated by a moving pressure disturbance in water of finite pressure distribution moving with constant speed U in water of finite depth h . Localized solitary waves can only exist in subcritical flows where the Froude number F = U/(gh)1/2