Sample records for depth range ft

  1. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  2. A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis Nathan K. Kaiser, John P. Quinn, Greg T. Blakney NHMFL 9.4 T FT- species in petroleum crude oil and its products, extending to "heavy" crudes for unequivocal identification of sulfur-containing components in petroloeum heavy crude oils. Facilities: NHMFL 9

  3. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Korin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Mueller, Ryan [University of California, Berkeley; Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  4. heap height (ft) box height (ft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heap height (ft) box height (ft) width (ft) length (ft) Best Environmental Management Practices it analyzed to determine the nutrient content of each sample; and 4. Calculate the amount of manure rates and patterns, depending on speed and/or power take-off (PTO) speed, gearbox settings, gate

  5. Ranges and moments of depth distributions of boron and phosphorus implanted into silicon in the energy range 1.7-5.0 MeV with an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, L.; Shaw, W.; Jones, M.A. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Wilson, R.G. [Hughes Research Labs., Malibu, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy implantation of dopant atoms is used to form buried layers of high conductivity in silicon. These layers have many potential applications, including triple wells for FLASH memory devices, buried layers for CCD devices, and damage induced gettering regions in all devices. In order to make optimum use of very high energy dopant implants, the depth and profile shape characteristics of these implants need to be determined. This paper presents the results of depth profiling by SIMS of implants of boron and phosphorus in silicon. The implants were done on an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE mechanically scanned implanter with energies of 1.7-3.0 MeV for boron and 3-5 MeV for phosphorus, doses of 1 {times} 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}, and tilt/twist orientations of 0{degrees}/0{degrees}, 5.2{degrees}/16.7{degrees}, and 7{degrees}/27{degrees}. The four central moments of the depth distributions, as well as the peak depth have been calculated for each of the profiles. The projected ranges of all these implants are underestimated by TRIM92 calculations.

  6. Carnegie Mellon Moving from FT-CORBA to FT-CCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Priya

    Carnegie Mellon Moving from FT-CORBA to FT-CCM MEAD: Middleware for Embedded Adaptive Dependability-CORBA to FT-CCM Background MEAD: Real-time fault-tolerant middleware being developed at Carnegie Mellon real-time and fault tolerance #12;3 Carnegie Mellon MEAD: Moving from FT-CORBA to FT-CCM MEAD

  7. Thrust faulting in Temblor Range, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonson, R.R.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and subsurface studies confirm the presence of overthrusting in the Temblor Range between Gonyer Canyon and Recruit Pass. In the subsurface, three wells have penetrated the Cree fault, the Hudbay Cree' No. 1 (7,300 ft), the Frantzen Oil Company Cree' No. 1 (5,865 ft) and the Arco Cree Fee' 1A well (5,915 ft). Below the fault, 25 to 35{degree} of westerly dips on the west flank of the sub-thrust Phelps anticline are encountered. The McDonald section below the fault is comprised of siliceous fractured shale which contains live oil and gas showings. A drill-stem test of the interval from 8,247 to 8,510 ft in the Frantzen well resulted in a recovery of 1,200 ft clean 34{degree} oil and 40 MCF per day gas. The shut in pressure was 3,430 lb, which is a normal hydrostatic pressure common to the producing structures in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The equivalent of this interval has produced over 7,000 bbl of oil in the Arco Cree' 1A well. The Arco Cree Fee' No. 1A well crossed the axis of the Phelps Anticline as indicated by good dipmeter and bottomed in Lower Zemorrian at 14,512 ft total depth. This well was not drilled deep enough to reach the Point of Rocks Sand and did not test the gas showings in the lower Miocene section. In the Gonyer Canyon area, subsurface evidence indicated conditions are similar to those in the Cree area because a large structure is present below a thrust fault. It is believed that significant accumulations will be found beneath thrust faults in the eastern part of the Temblor Range where conditions are similar to those that were instrumental in forming fields such as the Elk Hills, B. V. Hills, Belgian Anticline and others.

  8. Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karami, K.; Abdolmaleki, A., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: AAbdolmaleki@uok.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of f(T) modified teleparallel gravity. We consider a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the Hubble horizon. For two viable f(T) models containing f(T) = T+?{sub 1}((?T)){sup n} and f(T) = T??{sub 2}T(1?e{sup ?T{sub 0}/T}), we first calculate the effective equation of state and deceleration parameters. Then, (we investigate the null and strong energy conditions and conclude that a sudden future singularity appears in both models. Furthermore, using a cosmographic analysis we check the viability of two models. Finally, we examine the validity of the GSL and find that for both models it) is satisfied from the early times to the present epoch. But in the future, the GSL is violated for the special ranges of the torsion scalar T.

  9. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  10. Formation depths of Fraunhofer lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurtovenko, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have summed up our investigations performed in 1970--1993. The main task of this paper is clearly to show processes of formation of spectral lines as well as their distinction by validity and by location. For 503 photospheric lines of various chemical elements in the wavelength range 300--1000 nm we list in Table the average formation depths of the line depression and the line emission for the line centre and on the half-width of the line, the average formation depths of the continuum emission as well as the effective widths of the layer of the line depression formation. Dependence of average depths of line depression formation on excitation potential, equivalent widths, and central line depth are demonstrated by iron lines.

  11. FTIR and FT-PL spectroscopic analysis of TPV materials and devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, J.D.; Gedvilas, L.M.; Olson, M.R.; Wu, X.; Duda, A.; Wanlass, M.W.; Jones, K.M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopic techniques are useful in determining properties of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) materials and devices. The III-V TPV absorber materials have energy bandgaps that can be optimized for conversion of the near-infrared radiation emitted by thermal sources in the 1000{degree}{endash}1200&hthinsp;{degree}C temperature range. The bandgaps of these materials can be measured at room temperature using FT-photoluminescence spectroscopy, which can be done with a modified FT-Raman spectrophotometer operating in the near-infrared spectral region. The intensities and bandwidths of the FT-PL spectra also provide information on the extent of non-radiative recombination and the compositional uniformity of the materials. To achieve adequate operating efficiencies, TPV converters must return sub-bandgap radiation to the thermal source. The percent reflectance of the device in the mid-infrared spectral region is therefore an important operating parameter that can be accurately measured using FT-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with total reflectance optical accessories. In this paper, we discuss applications of these techniques to TPV materials and devices, and variations on these approaches, such as scanning micro-FT-PL spectroscopy, that enable microanalysis of TPV device structures at the 1{endash}100-{mu}m scale. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Natural Disaster Survey Report Ft. Smith and Van Buren, Arkansas,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and conversations with volunteer amateur radio operators, members of the print and broadcast media in Ft. Smith to the U.S. Congress, to local government officials in Ft. Smith and Van Buren, and to the media on May 21Natural Disaster Survey Report Ft. Smith and Van Buren, Arkansas, Tornado of April 21, 1996 U

  13. 44 (2007-5) FT-ICR Pt,Co

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    44 (2007-5) FT-ICR Pt,Co FT-ICR study of reaction of Pt, Co cluster ion with carbon containing ions (Pt, Co) with carbon hydride was investigated by using FT-ICR (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron-dependent characteristics of reaction of Pt and Co clusters with methanol and ethylene. This experiment also shows

  14. FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolis Energy JumpFAC 04-08-DOECategorical|FSM|FT

  15. SWiFT performs accredited research testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR E QSULI ProgramSWiFT performs

  16. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving...

  17. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  18. ISV FACT SHEET SINGLE ENSUITE: 198 sq.ft.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    ISV FACT SHEET SINGLE ENSUITE: 198 sq.ft. STANDARD ROOM: (NO AIRCOND, NO WATER HEATER, FREE WIFI): RM 590 PER MONTH PER BED PREMIER ROOM: : (AIRCOND WITH WATER HEATER, FREE WIFI) : RM740 PER MONTH PER BED TWIN SHARING: 283 sq.ft. STANDARD ROOM: (NO AIRCOND, NO WATER HEATER, FREE WIFI): RM 490 PER MONTH

  19. Process Optimization of FT-Diesel Production from Lignocellulosic Switchgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Process Optimization of FT-Diesel Production from Lignocellulosic Switchgrass Mariano Martín Abstract. In this paper we present the conceptual design for the optimization of FT-diesel production to increase the yield towards green diesel. The optimization of the system is formulated as an equation

  20. $f(T)$ Theories and Varying Fine Structure Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Hao; Qi, Hao-Yu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In analogy to $f(R)$ theory, recently $f(T)$ theory has been proposed to drive the current accelerated expansion without invoking dark energy. In the literature, the observational constraints on $f(T)$ theories were obtained mainly by using the cosmological data, such as type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). In this work, we instead try to constrain $f(T)$ theories with the varying fine structure "constant", $\\alpha\\equiv e^2/\\hbar c$. We find that the constraints on $f(T)$ theories from the observational $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data are very severe. In fact, they make $f(T)$ theories almost indistinguishable from $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  1. An energy spread correction for ERDA hydrogen depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis called the channel-depth conversion was introduced by Verda, et al.' However, the energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, which causes a broadening in the energy range and leads to errors in depth profiling, was not addressed by this technique. Here we introduce a technique to addresses this problem, called the energy spread correction. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion techniques comprise the depth profiling method presented in this work.

  2. FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. Abstract: Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)...

  3. Source depth for solar p-modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

    2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretically calculated power spectra are compares with observed solar p-mode velocity power spectra over a range of mode degree and frequency. The depth for the sources responsible for exciting p-modes of frequency 2.0 mHz is determined from the asymmetry of their power spectra and found to be about 800 km below the photosphere for quadrupole sources and 150 km if sources are dipole. The source depth for high frequency oscillations of frequency greater than about 6 mHz is 180 (50) km for quadrupole (dipole) sources.

  4. IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in local policy debates about fracking. This In-depth Report from Science for Environment Policy explores

  5. Advanced Mass Calibration and Visualization for FT-ICR Mass Spectromet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Mass spectrometry imaging by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) yields hundreds of unique peaks, many of...

  6. Application of Printed Circuit Board Technology to FT-ICR MS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology to FT-ICR MS Analyzer Cell Construction and Prototyping. Abstract: Although Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICRMS) remains themass...

  7. Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation...

  8. Transition redshift in $f(T)$ cosmology and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Saridakis, Emmanuel N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract constraints on the transition redshift $z_{tr}$, determining the onset of cosmic acceleration, predicted by an effective cosmographic construction, in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity. In particular, employing cosmography we obtain bounds on the viable $f(T)$ forms and their derivatives. Since this procedure is model independent, as long as the scalar curvature is fixed, we are able to determine intervals for $z_{tr}$. In this way we guarantee that the Solar-System constraints are preserved and moreover we extract bounds on the transition time and the free parameters of the scenario. We find that the transition redshifts predicted by $f(T)$ cosmology, although compatible with the standard $\\Lambda$CDM predictions, are slightly smaller. Finally, in order to obtain observational constraints on $f(T)$ cosmology, we perform a Monte Carlo fitting using supernova data, involving the most recent union 2.1 data set.

  9. 2-port parameters z for extrinsic fT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    to the short-circuit current gain 4. |id/ig|2 = |-z23/z33|2 5. Extrapolated fT is projection at -20d from currents under various short-circuit conditions z-parameters are measured from voltages under INTRINSIC circuit to one using z-parameters 2. It's now easy to add in the parasitic R's 3. fT is related

  10. Stretching and bending with flexible FT-IR process monitors, probes and software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, D.C. [KVB/Analect, Utica, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    FT-IR process analyzers continue to gain recognition for reliable and accurate on-line analyses on a broad variety of processes around the world. When fast analyses are required, on-line FT-IR analyzers offer speed and specificity for many applications. The use of FT-IR spectroscopy, either in the Mid-IR region or Near IR region offers fundamental advantages over other technologies. These advantages make calibrations exceptionally stable for an analyzer over time and offer improved ease of calibration transfer between similar analyzers. Spectral region selection criteria are reviewed, to help define when to use the Mid-IR region or the Near-IR region (or even when to use parts of both) for a given sample stream. New fiber optic sampling probes for transmission, attenuated total reflection, diffuse reflection and web sensing have solved nagging problems. What many process analyzer specialists are discovering is that new probes are becoming available each month, offering newer process tolerance (can tolerate higher temp or pressure) or even new sampling approaches altogether. This paper describes on-line applications in pharmaceuticals, specialty chemicals, polymer production and refinery production which demonstrate the range of techniques used to appropriately optimize the on-line analyzer. In addition, calibration transfer issues will be discussed, demonstrating the importance of the software tools to help sort out the causes for cal errors (spectral contamination, etc.).

  11. w e n : Ecology ztnd Managementv Mountain F-t md Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    remain. #12;Abstract Information about the biology, ecology, and management of quaking aspen and discussed. The biology of aspen as a tree species, community relationships in the aspen ecosystem, environments, and factors affecting aspen forests are reviewed. The resources available within and from

  12. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  13. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  14. Cosmological viability conditions for f(T) dark energy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently f(T) modified teleparallel gravity where T is the torsion scalar has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy. We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of these models and find conditions for the cosmological viability of f(T) dark energy models as geometrical constraints on the derivatives of these models. We show that in the phase space exists two cosmologically viable trajectory which (i) The universe would start from an unstable radiation point, then pass a saddle standard matter point which is followed by accelerated expansion de sitter point. (ii) The universe starts from a saddle radiation epoch, then falls onto the stable matter era and the system can not evolve to the dark energy dominated epoch. Finally, for a number of f(T) dark energy models were proposed in the more literature, the viability conditions are investigated.

  15. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Oberlander; C. Russell

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-3 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,487 m (4,880 ft) below ground surface (bgs). Slotted screen is placed in an upper screened section from 1,095 to 1,160 m bgs (3,591 to 3,805 ft bgs) and in the lower screened section from 1,278 to 1,474 m bgs (4,191 to 4,834 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is significant upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus and large vertical flow velocities in the well casing result in the measured borehole flow rates being potentially highly nonrepresentative of conditions in the aquifer. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  16. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging. High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR...

  17. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of...

  18. Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) The 6-Tesla High-Field Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS), is a unique...

  19. Constraining f(T) gravity in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iorio, Lorenzo; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of $f(T)$ theories of gravity, we solve the field equations for $f(T)=T+\\alpha T^{n}$, in the weak-field approximation and for spherical symmetry spacetime. Since $f(T)=T$ corresponds to Teleparallel Gravity, which is equivalent to General Relativity, the non linearity of the Lagrangian are expected to produce perturbations of the general relativistic solutions, parameterized by $\\alpha$. Hence, we use the $f(T)$ solutions to model the gravitational field of the Sun, and exploit data from accurate tracking of spacecrafts orbiting Mercury and Saturn to infer preliminary insights on what could be obtained about the model parameter $\\alpha$ and the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. It turns out that improvements of about one-three orders with respect to the present-day constraints in the literature of magnitude seem possible.

  20. Anisotropic Compact Stars in $f(T)$ Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbas, G; Zubair, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the theoretical modeling of anisotropic compact stars in the framework of $f(T)$ theory of gravity, where $T$ is torsion scalar. To this end, we have used the exact solutions of Krori and Barua metric to a static spherically symmetric metric. The unknown constants involved in the Krori and Barua metric have been specified by using the masses and radii of compact stars 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658. The physical properties of these stars have been analyzed in the framework of $f(T)$ theory. In this setting, we have checked the anisotropic behavior, regularity conditions, stability and surface redshift of the compact stars.

  1. Anisotropic Compact Stars in $f(T)$ Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Abbas; Afshan Kanwal; M. Zubair

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the theoretical modeling of anisotropic compact stars in the framework of $f(T)$ theory of gravity, where $T$ is torsion scalar. To this end, we have used the exact solutions of Krori and Barua metric to a static spherically symmetric metric. The unknown constants involved in the Krori and Barua metric have been specified by using the masses and radii of compact stars 4$U$1820-30, Her X-1, SAX J 1808-3658. The physical properties of these stars have been analyzed in the framework of $f(T)$ theory. In this setting, we have checked the anisotropic behavior, regularity conditions, stability and surface redshift of the compact stars.

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2 CEC- CF-1R Newly Constructed Buildings and Additions Greater Than 1,000 ft2 (Page 1 of 5) Project Name: Climate________ Project Type: New Building Construction New Addition1 greater than 1,000 ft2 1. Additions greater than 1

  3. Cosmological perturbation in f(T) gravity revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, Keisuke; Ong, Yen Chin, E-mail: izumi@phys.ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: ongyenchin@member.ams.org [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform detailed investigation of cosmological perturbations in f(T) theory of gravity coupled with scalar field. Our work emphasizes on the way to gauge fix the theory and we examine all possible modes of perturbations up to second order. The analysis includes pseudoscalar and pseudovector modes in addition to the usual scalar, vector, and tensor modes. We find no gravitational propagating degree of freedom in the scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, as well as pseudovector modes. In addition, we find that the scalar and tensor perturbations have exactly the same form as their counterparts in usual general relativity with scalar field, except that the factor of reduced Planck mass squared M{sub pl}{sup 2}?1/(8?G) that occurs in the latter has now been replaced by an effective time-dependent gravitational coupling ?2(df/dT)|{sub T=T{sub 0}}, with T{sub 0} being the background torsion scalar. The absence of extra degrees of freedom of f(T) gravity at second order linear perturbation indicates that f(T) gravity is highly nonlinear. Consequently one cannot conclusively analyze stability of the theory without performing nonlinear analysis that can reveal the propagation of the extra degrees of freedom.

  4. Can f(T) gravity theories mimic ?CDM cosmic history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The f(T) modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function f(T) by demanding a background ?CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat ?CDM (the radiation ere with ?{sub eff} = (1/3), matter and de Sitter eras with ?{sub eff} = 0 and ?{sub eff} = ?1, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with ?{sub 0r} = 1 and the matter dominate during the matter phases when ?{sub 0m} = 1. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the ?CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function f(T) which mimics cosmic expansion history.

  5. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  6. FT-ICR SWNTs Co/Fe FT-ICR Mass Spectroscopy and Initial Reaction of Co/Fe Mixed Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR SWNTs Co/Fe FT-ICR Mass Spectroscopy and Initial Reaction of Co/Fe Mixed Clusters Used, for FenCoN-n + (N ) 2 (b) (Fe : Co = 0.514 : 0.486) 3 Fe2FeCoCo2 Corbett(3) Li Na 112 116 120 Mass (amu

  7. The 200 ft. Solar Tower at Sandia National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand Water |1 April 2000 AnThis is a200 ft.

  8. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phil L. Oberlander; Charles E. Russell

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-4 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,132 m (3,713 ft bgs) below ground surface (bgs). The screened section of the well consists of alternating sections of slotted well screen and blank casing from 948 to 1,132 m bgs (3,111 to 3,713 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus in the well casing likely causes the calculated borehole flow rates being highly nonrepresentative of inflow from the formation. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  9. In-Depth Temperature Profiles in Pyrolyzing Wood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reszka, Pedro

    of experimental in-depth temperature measurements were done in wood samples exposed to various intensities of radiant heat fluxes, with clearly defined boundary conditions that allow a proper input for pyrolysis models. The imposed heat fluxes range from 10 k...

  10. Starobinsky-like inflation induced by f(T) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. El Hanafy; G. L. Nashed

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a single fluid component in a flat like universe governed by $f(T)$ gravity theories. The flat like universe does not imply a vanishing sectional curvature $k$, but assuming a vanishing of the coefficient of $k$ in the modified Friedmann equations. This enables us to extract a compatible pair of a scale factor $a(t)$ and an inverse power series $f(T)$. The Equation of State (EoS) evolves similarly in all models $k=0, \\pm 1$. In large Hubble ($H$)-spacetime the theory is consistent with the inflationary universe scenario and respects the conservation principle. We study the case when the teleparallel torsion is made of a single scalar field. The theory produces Starobinsky model naturally at its zeroth order without using a conformal transformation. Higher order solutions continuously interpolate between Starobinsky and quadratic inflation models. The slow-roll analysis shows double solutions so that for a single value of the spectral index $n_{s}$ the theory can predict double tensor-to-scalar ratios $r$ of Planck and BICEP2 data.

  11. Commercial Scale Coal to F-T Liquid Plant Using a Dry Feed Gasifier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume 4: CTL via F-T Synthesis Exhibit 5-6 COP sensitivity to market price of electricity ... 70 Exhibit 5-7...

  12. Effectiveness of CID, HCD, and ETD with FT MS/MS for degradomic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fragmentation methods namely CID-, HCD-, and ETD for FT MSMS analysis of human blood plasma peptidomic peptides. The peptidomic peptides were able to be identified from...

  13. Prediction of end-depth ratio in open channels using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    (EDR). Further effort is made to verify the applicability and superiority of this expressionD coefficient of determination EDR End-depth ratio (he/hc) GP Genetic Programming MRSS mean root of sum problem and to determine the end-depth ratio (EDR ¼ he/hc) in a wide range of channels. The Boussinesq

  14. Graceful Exit Inflation in $f(T)$ Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. L. Nashed; W. El Hanafy; Sh. Kh. Ibrahim

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a quadratic teleparallel torsion scalar of the $f(T)=T+\\alpha T^{2}$ field equations to the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model. We assume two perfect fluid components, the matter component has a fixed equation of state (EoS) parameter $\\omega$, while the torsion component has a dynamical EoS. We obtain an effective scale factor allowing a graceful exit inflation model with no need to slow roll technique. We perform a standard cosmological study to examine the cosmic evolution. In addition, the effective EoS shows consistent results confirming a smooth phase transition from inflation to radiation dominant universe. We consider the case when the torsion is made of a scalar field. This treatment enables us to induce a scalar field sensitive to the spacetime symmetry with an effective potential constructed from the quadratic $f(T)$ gravity. The model is parameterized by two parameters ($\\alpha,\\omega$) both derive the universe to exit out of de Sitter expansion. The first is purely gravitational and works effectively at large Hubble regime of the early stage allowing a slow roll potential. The second parameter $\\omega$ is a thermal-like correction coupled to the kinetic term and works effectively at low Hubble regime of late stages. The slow roll analysis of the obtained potential can perform tensor-to-scalar ratio and spectral index parameters consistent with the recent Planck and BICEP2 data. Both cosmological and scalar field analyses show consistent results.

  15. Structural evolution of Carpinteria basin, western transverse ranges, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P.A.; Yeats, R.S.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pleistocene Carpinteria basin is an east-trending northward-verging, faulted syncline containing up to 4,000 ft (1,220 m) of partially intertonguing Santa Barbara and Casitas Formations deposited on previously folded pre-Pleistocene strata with up to 80/sup 0/ discordance. Structures subcropping against the unconformity indicate that most of the deformation in the Santa Ynez Mountains prior to deposition of the Pleistocene Santa Barbara Formation was by folding. Quaternary faults in the area are either south-dipping reverse faults related to bedding slip in pre-Pleistocene strata or north-dipping reverse faults that truncate bedding and are seismogenic. The Red Mountain fault dips 55 to 63/sup 0/ north at the surface and steepens to 70/sup 0/ north with depth; it also steepens westward south of the Summerland Offshore oil field to 85/sup 0/ north. Vertical separation decreases westward from 14,750 ft (4,500 m) north of the Rincon field to 1,150 ft (350 m) at Rincon Point and 330 ft (100 m) south of Summerland. The main branch of the Red Mountain fault offsets a 45,000 year old marine terrace, but not a 4,500 year old terrace. The Summerland Offshore oil field is situated within a disharmonically folded anticline in which severely deformed, structurally incompetent Miocene mudstone overlies broadly folded, competent Oligocene sandstone. Because the anticline formed after deposition of the Santa Barbara Formation, oil could not have migrated into this field until middle to late Pleistocene time.

  16. FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

  17. ** ALL CHARGES ARE PER SEMESTER UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED** Dental Hygiene FT Dental Hygiene PT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    ** ALL CHARGES ARE PER SEMESTER UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED** Dental Hygiene FT Dental Hygiene PT (Less Lease 266.00 266.00 SADHA Membership Fee - Fall 65.00 65.00 Dental Hygiene Pins - Fall - 2nd Year 70

  18. ** ALL CHARGES ARE PER SEMESTER UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED** Dental Hygiene FT Dental Hygiene PT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    ** ALL CHARGES ARE PER SEMESTER UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED** Dental Hygiene FT Dental Hygiene PT (Less Fee - Fall 65.00 65.00 Dental Hygiene Pins - Fall - 2nd Year 70.00 70.00 Disability Insurance: 10

  19. Vacuum energy $f(T)$ decay: Inflation at the open universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. El Hanafy; G. L. Nashed

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We derived a uniquely exact $f(T)$ formula of the lowest possible energy of an isotropic and homogeneous universe. We show that vanishing of the energy-momentum tensor $\\mathcal{T}^{\\mu \

  20. Reinforcement mechanisms in MWCNT-filled polycarbonate , F.T. Fisher b,*, R. Andrews c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Reinforcement mechanisms in MWCNT-filled polycarbonate A. Eitan a , F.T. Fisher b,*, R. Andrews c on understanding the reinforcement mechanisms in multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC

  1. Compressed Gated Range Sensing Grigorios Tsagkatakisa, Arnaud Woiselleb, George Tzagkarakisc,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    emitting diode (LED), and an imaging sensor in order to generate a 2D depth map of a scene. Time. INTRODUCTION Active Range Imaging systems employ an active illumination source, typically a laser or a light

  2. Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

  3. Nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler supplementary testing - AEAT doc 2926-2-002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REICH, F.R.

    1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of cold testing, completed by AEAT, as part of the proof-of-principle testing for a proposed nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampling system. This sampling system will provide waste samples from the PHMC feed tank to support the privatization contract with BNFL. Proof-of-principle tests were completed with 2 wt% and 10 wt% sand/water and 25 wt% kaolin clay/water simulants with a test setup that spanned the 24 ft to 57 ft height required in the feed tank. The tests demonstrated that the system could pump and sample waste materials with low and with high solids content. In addition, the tests demonstrated a need for some design upgrades to the sampling system, as there was material loss when the sample bottle was removed from the sampling needle. These were complementary tests, completed as part of an EM-50 Tank Focus Area (TFA) to develop a sampling system for validating LAW and HLW waste batches for the Privatization Contract.

  4. Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

  5. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  6. Viscous Dark Energy in $f(T)$ Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Shamaila Rani

    2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the bulk viscosity taking dust matter in the generalized teleparallel gravity. We consider different dark energy models in this scenario along with a time dependent viscous model to construct the viscous equation of state parameter for these dark energy models. We discuss the graphical representation of this parameter to investigate the viscosity effects on the accelerating expansion of the universe. It is mentioned here that the behavior of the universe depends upon the viscous coefficients showing the transition from decelerating to accelerating phase. It leads to the crossing of phantom divide line and becomes phantom dominated for specific ranges of these coefficients.

  7. Depth and Depth-Color Coding using Shape-Adaptive Wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Minh N.

    -view autostereoscopic displays, 3D-TV is expected to be the next evolution of television after high definition. Three Abstract We present a novel depth and depth-color codec aimed at free-viewpoint 3D-TV. The proposed codec is implemented by shape-adaptive lifting, which enables fast computations and perfect reconstruction. We derive

  8. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in...

  9. RANGE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TECHNETIUM KD VALUES IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance assessments (PAs) are risk calculations used to estimate the amount of low-level radioactive waste that can be disposed at DOE sites. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) are input parameters used in PA calculations to provide a measure of radionuclide sorption to sediment; the greater the K{sub d} value, the greater the sorption and the slower the estimated movement of the radionuclide through sediment. Understanding and quantifying K{sub d} value variability is important for estimating the uncertainty of PA calculations. Without this information, it is necessary to make overly conservative estimates about the possible limits of K{sub d} values, which in turn may increase disposal costs. Finally, technetium is commonly found to be amongst the radionuclides posing potential risk at waste disposal locations because it is believed to be highly mobile in its anionic form (pertechnetate, TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), it exists in relatively high concentrations in SRS waste, and it has a long half-life (213,000 years). The objectives of this laboratory study were to determine under SRS environmental conditions: (1) whether and to what extent TcO{sub 4}{sup -} sorbs to sediments, (2) the range of Tc K{sub d} values, (3) the distribution (normal or log-normal) of Tc K{sub d} values, and (4) how strongly Tc sorbs to SRS sediments through desorption experiments. Objective 3, to identify the Tc K{sub d} distribution is important because it provides a statistical description that influences stochastic modeling of estimated risk. The approach taken was to collect 26 sediments from a non-radioactive containing sediment core collected from E-Area, measure Tc K{sub d} values and then perform statistical analysis to describe the measured Tc K{sub d} values. The mean K{sub d} value was 3.4 {+-} 0.5 mL/g and ranged from -2.9 to 11.2 mL/g. The data did not have a Normal distribution (as defined by the Shapiro-Wilk's Statistic) and had a 95-percentile range of 2.4 to 4.4 mL/g. The E-Area subsurface is subdivided into three hydrostratigraphic layers: Upper Vadose Zone (11 to 30 ft depth), Lower Vadose Zone (30 to 51 ft depth), and aquifer (51 to 95 ft depth). The Upper Vadose Zone generally contains more clay than the Lower Vadose Zone, and the Aquifer tends to be made up of mostly sand layers with clay strata. The mean K{sub d} values of each of these zones did not differ significantly and the K{sub d} values from each zone were not from the Normal distribution. The ranges of values were greatest in the Upper Vadose Zone and least in the Lower Vadose Zone. Previous Best Estimate Tc K{sub d} values for Sandy Sediment and Clayey Sediment were 0.1 and 0.2 mL/g, respectively (Kaplan 2007a). A more thorough review indicates that the Best Estimates for Sandy Sediment is 0.1 mL/g and for Clayey Sediment is 0.8 mL/g (Kaplan 2007b). This current dataset greatly increases the number of Tc K{sub d} values measured with SRS sediments, but perhaps more importantly, provides a better estimate for E-Area sediments, and provides a measure of Tc K{sub d} distributions. Based on this dataset, the best overall Tc K{sub d} value for E-Area is the mean, 3.4 mL/g, with a log-normal distribution between the 95 percentile values of 2.4 to 4.4 mL/g. This document version differs from the earlier version, SRNS-STI-2008-00286, in that it includes some editorial corrections. This version does not contain any technical changes or changes to the conclusions presented in the earlier version.

  10. Africa Aerosol Optical Depth Obtained From MISR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    OpticalDepth Central African Republic Chad Djibouti Egypt Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Mean Seasonal

  11. Collision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    ; compute distances between the obstacles and the robot; optionally project the results in the CartesianCollision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION When humans and robots share the same work space, safety is the primary issue of concern [8]. Secondary but not negligible is to prevent robot damages due

  12. Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

  13. Oral/Poster Reference: FT242 FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH OF RUBBER UNDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    Oral/Poster Reference: FT242 FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH OF RUBBER UNDER VARIABLE AMPLITUDE LOADING R. Harbour1 , A. Fatemi1 , W. V. Mars2 1 The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA 2 Cooper Tire and Rubber Company, Findlay, OH, USA ABSTRACT Realistic loading conditions for rubber components are often more

  14. The Hidden Flat Like Universe: Starobinsky-like inflation induced by f(T) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. El Hanafy; G. G. L. Nashed

    2015-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a single fluid component in a flat like universe (FLU) governed by $f(T)$ gravity theories, where $T$ is the teleparallel torsion scalar. The FLU model, regardless the value of the spatial curvature $k$, identifies a special class of $f(T)$ gravity theories. Remarkably, the FLU $f(T)$ gravity does not reduce to teleparallel gravity theory. In large Hubble spacetime the theory is consistent with the inflationary universe scenario and respects the conservation principle. The equation of state (EoS) evolves similarly in all models $k=0, \\pm 1$. We study the case when the torsion tensor is made of a scalar field, which enables to derive a quintessence potential from the obtained $f(T)$ gravity theory. The potential produces Starobinsky-like model naturally without using a conformal transformation, with higher orders continuously interpolate between Starobinsky and quadratic inflation models. The slow-roll analysis shows double solutions so that for a single value of the scalar tilt (spectral index) $n_{s}$ the theory can predict double tensor-to-scalar ratios $r$ of $E$-mode and $B$-mode polarizations.

  15. Utility Assessment Report for SPIDERS Phase 2: Ft. Carson (Rev 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Utility Assessment Report (UAR) for the Phase 2 operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). The UAR for Phase 2 shows that the SPIDERS system was able to meet the requirements of the Implementation Directive at Ft. Carson.

  16. Ag Business Student professional@yahoo.com 201 Harmony Ave. Apt.#3 Ft. Collins, CO (970) 123-4567

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ag Business Student professional@yahoo.com 201 Harmony Ave. Apt.#3 Ft. Collins, CO (970) 123-4567 EDUCATION Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO Anticipated May 2012 Dual Bachelor of Science in Animal Science and Agricultural Business Aims Community College Loveland, CO 2007 Associates of Science RELEVANT

  17. Accurate hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,; Bower, R. W. (Robert W.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique to convert reflection elastic recoil detection analysis spectra to depth profiles, the channel-depth conversion, was introduced by Verda, et al [1]. But the channel-depth conversion does not correct for energy spread, the unwanted broadening in the energy of the spectra, which can lead to errors in depth profiling. A work in progress introduces a technique that corrects for energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, the energy spread correction [2]. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion comprise an accurate and convenient hydrogen depth profiling method.

  18. Interacting Dark Energy in f(T) cosmology : A Dynamical System analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Sujay Kr

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work deals with an interacting dark energy model in the framework of f(T) cosmology. A cosmologically viable form of f(T) is chosen (T is the torsion scalar in teleparallelism) in the background of flat homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time model of the universe. The matter content of the universe is chosen as dust interacting with minimally coupled scalar field. The evolution equations are reduced to an autonomous system of ordinary differential equations by suitable transformation of variables. The nature of critical points are analyzed by evaluating the eigenvalues of the linearized Jacobi matrix and stable attractors are examined from the point of view of cosmology. Finally, both classical and quantum stability of the model have been discussed.

  19. Variability of biomass chemical composition and rapid analysis using FT-NIR techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ye, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick method for analyzing the chemical composition of renewable energy biomass feedstock was developed by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis. The study presents the broad-based model hypothesis that a single FT-NIR predictive model can be developed to analyze multiple types of biomass feedstock. The two most important biomass feedstocks corn stover and switchgrass were evaluated for the variability in their concentrations of the following components: glucan, xylan, galactan, arabinan, mannan, lignin, and ash. A hypothesis test was developed based upon these two species. Both cross-validation and independent validation results showed that the broad-based model developed is promising for future chemical prediction of both biomass species; in addition, the results also showed the method's prediction potential for wheat straw.

  20. Monazite Th-Pb age depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grove, M.; Harrison, T.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significant capabilities of the ion microprobe for thermochronometric investigations of geologic materials remain largely unexploited. Whereas {sup 208}Pb/{sup 232}Th spot analysis allows {approximately} 10-mm-scale imaging of Pb loss profiles or overgrowths in sectioned monazite grains, the spatial resolution offered by depth profiling into the surface region of natural crystals is more than two orders of magnitude higher. The authors document here the ability of the high-resolution ion microprobe to detect {sup 208}Pb/{sup 232}Th age differences of < 1 m.y. with better than 0.05 {micro}m depth resolution in the outer micron of Tertiary monazites from the hanging wall of the Himalayan Main Central thrust. Age gradients on this scale are inaccessible to ion microprobe spot analysis or conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Interpretation of the near-surface {sup 208}Pb distributions with available monazite Pb diffusion data illustrates the potential of the approach for recovering continuous, high-temperature thermal history information not previously available.

  1. A special exact spherically symmetric solution in f(T) gravity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nashed, G G L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-diagonal spherically symmetric tetrad field, involving four unknown functions of radial coordinate $r$, is applied to the equations of motion of f(T) gravity theory. A special exact vacuum solution with one constant of integration is obtained. The scalar torsion related to this special solution vanishes. To understand the physical meaning of the constant of integration we calculate the energy associated with this solution and show how it is related to the gravitational mass of the system.

  2. A special exact spherically symmetric solution in f(T) gravity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. L. Nashed

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-diagonal spherically symmetric tetrad field, involving four unknown functions of radial coordinate $r$, is applied to the equations of motion of f(T) gravity theory. A special exact vacuum solution with one constant of integration is obtained. The scalar torsion related to this special solution vanishes. To understand the physical meaning of the constant of integration we calculate the energy associated with this solution and show how it is related to the gravitational mass of the system.

  3. TT^T7Gs!rf5ft Riso-R-425 Metallurgy Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CM tf TT^T7Gs!rf5ft Riso-R-425 (O O o o o \\l O Metallurgy Department Progress Report for the Period-R-425 METALLURGY DEPARTMENT PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 1 JANUARY TO 31 DECEMBER 1979 Abstract. The activities of the Metallurgy Department at Risø during 1979 are described. The work is presented in four chap

  4. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grün, Rebecca [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany) [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)] [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam.

  5. Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

    1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

  6. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

  7. Steady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consider steady periodic water waves for rotational flows with a specified fixed-depth over a flat bed. We the existence of steady periodic water waves for rotational flows with a specified fixed depth over a flat bedSteady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows David Henry School

  8. Statistical Data Depth and the Graphics Hardware Shankar Krishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, Nabil Hassan

    by NSF under grants CCR-00-86013 EIA-98-70724, EIA-99-72879, EIA-01-31905, and CCR-02-04118. 1 #12;Figure). Organization. We first survey various definitions of statistical depth, and the related computa- tional, and the region of all points with depth greater than some integer . Now, we survey various depth measures

  9. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Optical Depth from EROS-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hamadache; L. Le Guillou; P. Tisserand; C. Afonso; J. N. Albert; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; E. Aubourg; P. Bareyre; J. P. Beaulieu; X. Charlot; C. Coutures; R. Ferlet; P. Fouqué; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Gould; D. Graff; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; J. de Kat; E. Lesquoy; C. Loup; C. Magneville; J. B. Marquette; E. Maurice; A. Maury; A. Milsztajn; M. Moniez; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; Y. R. Rahal; J. Rich; M. Spiro; A. Vidal-Madjar; L. Vigroux; S. Zylberajch

    2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new EROS-2 measurement of the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic Bulge. Light curves of $5.6\\times 10^{6}$ clump-giant stars distributed over $66 \\deg^2$ of the Bulge were monitored during seven Bulge seasons. 120 events were found with apparent amplifications greater than 1.6 and Einstein radius crossing times in the range $5 {\\rm d}range $1.4\\degr<|b|<7.0\\degr$, we find $\\tau/10^{-6}=(1.62 \\pm 0.23)\\exp[-a(|b|-3 {\\rm deg})]$ with $a=(0.43 \\pm0.16)\\deg^{-1}$. These results are in good agreement with our previous measurement, with recent measurements of the MACHO and OGLE-II groups, and with predictions of Bulge models.

  10. Investigation of Celotex trademark charring depths in the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Celotex {trademark}, the insulating material used between the outer and inner containers of the DT-18 shipping package, undergoes decomposition, combustion, or both when heated to temperatures exceeding 150{degrees}C. Several DT-18 packages that had previously undergone hypothetical thermal accident testing were opened and Celotex {trademark} charring depths ranging from {1/2} to 1 {1/2} in. were recorded. The majority of char depth data taken was between 3/4 and 1 {1/4} in. One-dimensional HEATING 7.1 models of the DT-18 package were developed. HEATING predicts charring depths of 1 to 1 1/8 in., which are in good agreement with measured values. Both experimental and analytical data indicate that charring is fairly uniform over the DT-18 package. 7 refs.

  11. Investigation of Celotex{trademark} charring depths in the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Celotex {trademark}, the insulating material used between the outer and inner containers of the DT-18 shipping package, undergoes decomposition, combustion, or both when heated to temperatures exceeding 150{degrees}C. Several DT-18 packages that had previously undergone hypothetical thermal accident testing were opened and Celotex {trademark} charring depths ranging from {1/2} to 1 {1/2} in. were recorded. The majority of char depth data taken was between 3/4 and 1 {1/4} in. One-dimensional HEATING 7.1 models of the DT-18 package were developed. HEATING predicts charring depths of 1 to 1 1/8 in., which are in good agreement with measured values. Both experimental and analytical data indicate that charring is fairly uniform over the DT-18 package. 7 refs.

  12. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  13. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  14. Some intriguing properties of Tukey's half-space depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Subhajit; Chaudhuri, Probal; 10.3150/10-BEJ322

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For multivariate data, Tukey's half-space depth is one of the most popular depth functions available in the literature. It is conceptually simple and satisfies several desirable properties of depth functions. The Tukey median, the multivariate median associated with the half-space depth, is also a well-known measure of center for multivariate data with several interesting properties. In this article, we derive and investigate some interesting properties of half-space depth and its associated multivariate median. These properties, some of which are counterintuitive, have important statistical consequences in multivariate analysis. We also investigate a natural extension of Tukey's half-space depth and the related median for probability distributions on any Banach space (which may be finite- or infinite-dimensional) and prove some results that demonstrate anomalous behavior of half-space depth in infinite-dimensional spaces.

  15. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  16. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  17. A case study, artificial insemination versus natural breeding at Overland Farms, Ft. Worth, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migues, Loraine C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Ft. Worth, Texas. A total of 19 mares were bred by natural service by the Quarter Horse stallions, Tuffys Three Bars and The Ultimate Copy during the period beginning February 1, 1985 and ending July 5, 1985. As of the end of this period, 14 mares... at the case farm (Overland Farms). Presently, natural breeding is utilized. Considerations for using A. I. were: 1) number of mares and stallions to be used in the program, 2) start-up costs and 3) returns to capital investments by capital budgeting...

  18. ft. n. Both, Ohtef, RarourQb DWrion,Oak Ridgo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W CTheuse of_ ,' .' ft.

  19. Sandia Energy - SWiFT Commissioned to Study Wind Farm Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocuments Home StationaryFAQsSPIDERS HomeSWiFT

  20. Effect of circumferential groove casing treatment parameters on axial compressor flow range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanley, Brian K. (Brian Kyle)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on compressor flow range of circumferential casing grooves of varying groove depth, groove axial location, and groove axial extent is assessed against that of a smooth casing wall using computational experiments. ...

  1. Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the Northern Cascade Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hook, Robert D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the NorthernUSA Fred Beckey. Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of thewill find that Range of Glaciers is a must read. The book

  2. Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan (Mount Kisco, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY); Sugavanam, Krishnan (Mahopac, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Seebruck-Seeon, DE)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth dynamically changes the depth of prefetching so that the number of multiple streams as well as the hit rate of a single stream are optimized. The method and apparatus in one aspect monitor a plurality of load requests from a processing unit for data in a prefetch buffer, determine an access pattern associated with the plurality of load requests and adjust a prefetch depth according to the access pattern.

  3. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Other Institutions 13 J1711 HEV & PHEV test procedures In-depth Benchmarking DOE technology evaluation * DOE requests * National Lab requests AVTA (Advanced Vehicle Testing...

  4. aes depth profile: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California eScholarship Repository Summary: al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical...

  5. Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

  6. Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

  7. Depth Camera based Localization and Navigation for Indoor Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaren, Bruce Martin

    . 1. Snapshot of depth image processing: On the left, the complete 3D point cloud is shown in white cloud by sampling points from the depth image, and classifying local grouped sets of points as belonging. The full sampled point cloud (consisting of both plane filtered as well as outlier points) is processed

  8. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  9. A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance Fabrizio Flacco Torsten Kr is presented for safe human-robot coexistence. The main contribution is a fast method to evaluate distances between the robot and possibly moving obstacles (including humans), based on the concept of depth space

  10. Can fusion coefficients be calculated from the depth rule ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Kirillov; P. Mathieu; D. Senechal; M. Walton

    1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth rule is a level truncation of tensor product coefficients expected to be sufficient for the evaluation of fusion coefficients. We reformulate the depth rule in a precise way, and show how, in principle, it can be used to calculate fusion coefficients. However, we argue that the computation of the depth itself, in terms of which the constraints on tensor product coefficients is formulated, is problematic. Indeed, the elements of the basis of states convenient for calculating tensor product coefficients do not have a well-defined depth! We proceed by showing how one can calculate the depth in an `approximate' way and derive accurate lower bounds for the minimum level at which a coupling appears. It turns out that this method yields exact results for $\\widehat{su}(3)$ and constitutes an efficient and simple algorithm for computing $\\widehat{su}(3)$ fusion coefficients.

  11. Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

  12. Top-Down Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Intact Proteins by LAESI FT-ICR MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiss, András; Reschke, Brent R; Powell, Matthew J; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization is a recent development in mass spectrometry imaging. It has been shown that lipids and small metabolites can be imaged in various samples such as plant material, tissue sections or bacterial colonies without anysample pre-treatment. Further, laser ablation electrospray ionization has been shown to produce multiply charged protein ions from liquids or solid surfaces. This presents a means to address one of the biggest challenges in mass spectrometry imaging; the identification of proteins directly from biological tissue surfaces. Such identification is hindered by the lack of multiply charged proteins in common MALDI ion sources and the difficulty of performing tandem MS on such large, singly charged ions. We present here top-down identification of intact proteins from tissue with a LAESI ion source combined with a hybrid ion-trap FT-ICR mass spectrometer. The performance of the system was first tested with a standard protein with ECD and IRMPD fragmentation to prove the...

  13. Ice cap meltdown to cause 22ft floods Ice cap meltdown to cause 22ft floods -Telegraph http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/3303624/Ice-cap-meltdow...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    of no return and it were to melt then global sea levels would rise by 22ft and swallow up most of the world sheet. Likewise, global warming may cause a near-permanent El Nino in the Pacific, which would also over animal souvenirs (/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2007/08/16/eatrade116.xml) Rise of sea levels

  14. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  15. FOREST SERVICE Forest andRangeU. S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE P. 0.BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 Experime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , Riverside, California Dry bulb temperature range Dry bulb temperature control tolerance Dry bulb temperature. to 120' F. 1loF. Min. 40° F./hr. -23' F. to +20° F. @ 25' F. dry bulb, and 39' F. to 90' F. @ 120° F. dry bulb with comparable limits between these dry bulb temperatures. rt l0F. Min. lo0F./hr. 3.5 to 100ft

  16. 43 "{"`"MV"|WEu~_W (2006-5) FT-ICR ,,,`J^<`NX^[,'Y...`f,Sw"z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    and ethylene. Another reaction is dehydration between two molecules of ethanol. Dehydrogenation from ethylene of transition metal cluster ions (Co) with ethylene and ethanol was investigated by using the FT-ICR mass is strongly occurred and two or three molecules of ethylene can't adsorb without dehydration. This experiment

  17. GE Advising & Registration Students FT Faculty PT Faculty Admin Unit 4 Other Staff Students have access to quality GE advising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    GE Advising & Registration Students FT Faculty PT Faculty Admin Unit 4 Other Staff Students have access to quality GE advising 9% 13% 11% 13% 10% 8% Faculty can easily advise students on GE requirements 10% 18% 9% 24% 33% 11% Staff academic advisors can easily advise students on GE requirements 8% 11

  18. Flexible Solar-Energy Harvesting System on Plastic with Thin-film LC Oscillators Operating Above ft for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flexible Solar-Energy Harvesting System on Plastic with Thin-film LC Oscillators Operating Above ft- This paper presents an energy-harvesting system consisting of amorphous-silicon (a-Si) solar cells and thin of the energy-harvesting system. The solar module consists of solar cells in series operating at an output

  19. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, A.H.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

  20. Variations in microbial community composition through two soil depth profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    35% of the total quantity of microbial biomass found in the top 2 m of soil is found below a depth: Microbial diversity; Phospholipid fatty acid; Soil profile; Community composition; Microbial biomass 1

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  2. aerosol optical depths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

  3. aerosol optical depth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

  4. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  5. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  6. Burial depth and stratigraphic controls on shale diagenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, David Wesley

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - layer illite/smectite in Gulf Coast sediments at a shallow depth is a randomly-interstratified illite/smectite with proportions of 804 smectite and 20% illite (Perry and Hower, 1972). Many authors (Dunoyer de Segonzac, 1970; Perry and Hower, 1970..., 1972; Hower et al. , 1976; Foscolos and Kodama, 1974) have noted the increase in illite with concurrent decrease of smectite in the mixed-layer illite/smec- tite with increasing depth and temperature. The conversion of smectite into illite resulting...

  7. High-resolution SIMS depth profiling of nanolayers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baryshev, S. V.; Zinovev, A. V.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Peng, Q.; Elam, J. W.; Veryovkin, I. V. (Energy Systems); ( MSD)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the fundamental physical limits for depth resolution of secondary ion mass spectrometry are well understood in theory, the experimental work to achieve and demonstrate them is still ongoing. We report results of high-resolution TOF SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) depth profiling experiments on a nanolayered structure, a stack of 16 alternating MgO and ZnO {approx}5.5 nm layers grown on a Si substrate by atomic layer deposition. The measurements were performed using a newly developed approach implementing a low-energy direct current normally incident Ar{sup +} ion beam for ion milling (250 eV and 500 eV energy), in combination with a pulsed 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at 60{sup o} incidence for TOF SIMS analysis. By this optimized arrangement, a noticeably improved version of the dual-beam (DB) approach to TOF SIMS depth profiling is introduced, which can be dubbed gentleDB. The mixing-roughness-information model was applied to detailed analysis of experimental results. It revealed that the gentleDB approach allows ultimate depth resolution by confining the ion beam mixing length to about two monolayers. This corresponds to the escape depth of secondary ions, the fundamental depth resolution limitation in SIMS. Other parameters deduced from the measured depth profiles indicated that a single layer thickness is equal to 6 nm so that the 'flat' layer thickness d is 3 nm and the interfacial roughness {sigma} is 1.5 nm, thus yielding d + 2{sigma} = 6 nm. We have demonstrated that gentleDB TOF SIMS depth profiling with noble gas ion beams is capable of revealing the structural features of a stack of nanolayers, resolving its original surface and estimating the roughness of interlayer interfaces, information which is difficult to obtain by traditional approaches.

  8. Colour videos with depth : acquisition, processing and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardt, Christian

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    . Declaration This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing which is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated in the text. This dissertation does not exceed the regulation length of 60 000 words... -step pipeline that aligns the video streams, efficiently removes and fills invalid and noisy geometry, and finally uses a spatiotemporal filter to increase the spatial resolution of the depth data and strongly reduce depth measurement noise. I show...

  9. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Catalysts For F-T SBCRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+ H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-(FE) based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment; makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult, if not impossible; and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Under a previous Department of Energy (DOE)/University Research Grant (UCR) grant, Hampton University reported, for the first time, the development of demonstrably attrition-resistant Fe F-T synthesis catalysts having good activity, selectivity, and attrition resistance. These catalysts were prepared by spray drying Fe catalysts with potassium (K), copper (Cu), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) as promoters. SiO{sub 2} was also used as a binder for spray drying. These catalysts were tested for activity and selectivity in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. Fundamental understanding of attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried HPR-43 catalyst having average particle size (aps) of 70 {micro}m with high attrition resistance. This HPR-43 attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C{sub 5+} selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of less than 5% at an {alpha} of 0.9. Research is proposed to enable further development and optimization of these catalysts by (1) better understanding the role and interrelationship of various catalyst composition and preparation parameters on attrition resistance, activity, and selectivity of these catalysts, (2) the presence of sulfide ions on a precipitated iron catalyst, and (3) the effect of water on sulfided iron F-T catalysts for its activity, selectivity, and attrition. Catalyst preparations will be based on spray drying. The research employed, among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis at high pressure. Catalyst activity and selectivity is evaluated using a small fixed-bed reactor and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation, followed by binder addition and spray drying at 250 C in a 1-m-diameter, 2-m-tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt%. The results show that the use of small amounts of precipitated SiO{sub 2} alone in spray-dried Fe catalysts can result in good attrition resistance. All catalysts investigated with SiO2 wt% {le} 12 produced fines less than 10 wt% during the jet cup attrition test, making them suitable for long-term use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Thus, concentration rather than the type of SiO{sub 2} incorporated into catalyst has a more critical impact on catalyst attrition resistance of spray-dried Fe catalysts. Lower amounts of SiO{sub 2} added to a catalyst give higher particle densities and therefore higher attrition resistances. In order to produce a suitable SBCR catalyst, however, the amount of SiO{sub 2} added has to be optimized to provide adequate surface area, particle density, and attrition resistance. Two of the catalysts with precipitated and binder silica were tested in Texas A&M University's CSTR (Autoclave Engineers). The two catalysts were also tested at The Center for Applied Energy Research in Lexington, Kentucky of the University of Kentucky. Spray-dried catalysts with compositions 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/11 (P) SiO{sub 2} and

  10. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  11. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  12. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  13. Exact charged black-hole solutions in D-dimensional f(T) gravity: torsion vs curvature analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Saridakis, Emmanuel N; Vasquez, Yerko

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract exact charged black-hole solutions with flat transverse sections in the framework of D-dimensional Maxwell-f(T) gravity, and we analyze the singularities and horizons based on both torsion and curvature invariants. Interestingly enough, we find that in some particular solution subclasses there appear more singularities in the curvature scalars than in the torsion ones. This difference disappears in the uncharged case, or in the case where f(T) gravity becomes the usual linear-in-T teleparallel gravity, that is General Relativity. Curvature and torsion invariants behave very differently when matter fields are present, and thus f(R) gravity and f(T) gravity exhibit different features and cannot be directly re-casted each other.

  14. Exact charged black-hole solutions in D-dimensional f(T) gravity: torsion vs curvature analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Capozziello; P. A. Gonzalez; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Yerko Vasquez

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract exact charged black-hole solutions with flat transverse sections in the framework of D-dimensional Maxwell-f(T) gravity, and we analyze the singularities and horizons based on both torsion and curvature invariants. Interestingly enough, we find that in some particular solution subclasses there appear more singularities in the curvature scalars than in the torsion ones. This difference disappears in the uncharged case, or in the case where f(T) gravity becomes the usual linear-in-T teleparallel gravity, that is General Relativity. Curvature and torsion invariants behave very differently when matter fields are present, and thus f(R) gravity and f(T) gravity exhibit different features and cannot be directly re-casted each other.

  15. Circularly symmetric solutions in three-dimensional Teleparallel, f(T) and Maxwell-f(T) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, P A; Vasquez, Yerko

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate teleparallel 3D gravity and we extract circularly symmetric solutions, showing that they coincide with the BTZ and Deser-de-Sitter solutions of standard 3D gravity. However, extending into f(T) 3D gravity, that is considering arbitrary functions of the torsion scalar in the action, we obtain "deformed" BTZ-like and Deser-de-Sitter-like solutions, without any requirement of the sign of the cosmological constant. Finally, extending our analysis incorporating the electromagnetic sector, we show that Maxwell-f(T) gravity accepts deformed charged BTZ-like solutions. Interestingly enough, the deformation in this case brings qualitatively novel terms, contrary to the pure gravitational solutions where the deformation is expressed only through changes in the coefficients. Such novel behaviors reveal the new features that the f(T) structure brings in 3D gravity.

  16. Focal depth measurement of scanning helium ion microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Hongxuan, E-mail: Guo.hongxuan@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chunmei [Active State Technology Research Group, Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1 Umezono 1-Chome, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Zhang, Han; Fujita, Daisuke [Nano Characterization Unit, Advanced Key Technologies Division, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When facing the challenges of critical dimension measurement of complicated nanostructures, such as of the three dimension integrated circuit, characterization of the focal depth of microscopes is important. In this Letter, we developed a method for characterizing the focal depth of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) by using an atomic force microscope tip characterizer (ATC). The ATC was tilted in a sample chamber at an angle to the scanning plan. Secondary electron images (SEIs) were obtained at different positions of the ATC. The edge resolution of the SEIs shows the nominal diameters of the helium ion beam at different focal levels. With this method, the nominal shapes of the helium ion beams were obtained with different apertures. Our results show that a small aperture is necessary to get a high spatial resolution and high depth of field images with HIM. This work provides a method for characterizing and improving the performance of HIM.

  17. Problem 2.67: A gas undergoes a process from State 1, where p1 = 60 lbf/in2 & v1 = 6:0 ft3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Problem 2.67: A gas undergoes a process from State 1, where p1 = 60 lbf/in2 & v1 = 6:0 ft3 /lbm...c volume, & internal energy is u = 0:2651 BTU-in2 lbf-ft3 pv 95:436 BTU lbm where p is in lbf/in2 , v is in ft3 /lbm, & u is in BTU/lbm. The mass of gas is 10 lbm. Neglecting kinetic- and potential-energy e

  18. Born-Infeld and Charged Black Holes with non-linear source in $f(T)$ Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junior, Ednaldo L B; Houndjo, Mahouton J S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate $f(T)$ theory coupled with a nonlinear source of electrodynamics, for a spherically symmetric and static spacetime in $4D$. We re-obtain the Born-Infeld and Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS solutions. We generalize the no-go theorem for any content that obeys the relationship $\\mathcal{T}^{\\;\\;0}_{0}=\\mathcal{T}^{\\;\\;1}_{1}$ for the energy-momentum tensor and a given set of tetrads. Our results show new classes of solutions where the metrics are related through $b(r)=-Na(r)$. We do the introductory analysis showing that solutions are that of asymptotically flat black holes, with a singularity at the origin of the radial coordinate, covered by a single event horizon. We also reconstruct the action for this class of solutions and obtain the functional form $f(T) = f_0\\left(-T\\right)^{(N+3)/[2(N+1)]}$ and $\\mathcal{L}_{NED} = \\mathcal{L}_0\\left(-F\\right)^{(N+3)/[2(N+1)]}$. Using the Lagrangian density of Born-Infeld, we obtain a new class of charged black holes where the action reads $f(T) = -16\\beta_{BI} \\...

  19. Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon PropyleneHydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IRSpectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Propylene hydrogenation over Pt nanoparticles supported onmesoporous silica type SBA-15 was monitored by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy at 23 ms resolution using short propylene gas pulses thatjoined a continuous flow of hydrogen in N2 (1 atm total pressure).Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 323-413 K. Propanewas formed within 100 milliseconds or faster. The CH stretching regionrevealed distinct bands for propane molecules emerging inside thenanoscale channels of the silica support. Spectral analysis gave thedistribution of the propane product between support and surrounding gasphase as function of time. Kinetic analysis showed that the escape ofpropane molecules from the channels occurred within hundreds ofmilliseconds (3.1 + 0.4 s-1 at 383 K). A steady state distribution ofpropane between gas phase and mesoporous support is established as theproduct is swept from the catalyst zone by the continuous flow ofhydrogen co-reactant. This is the first direct spectroscopic observationof emerging products of heterogeneous catalysis on nanoporous supportsunder reaction conditions.

  20. An Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS. An Investigation of Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using ToF-SIMS. Abstract: Hydrogen depth distributions in silicon, zinc oxide...

  1. Structural Performance of a Full-Depth Precast Concrete Bridge Deck System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mander, Thomas

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -depth concrete bridge deck overhangs, accelerating the construction of concrete bridge decks, by using full-depth precast prestressed concrete deck panels. Full-depth precast overhang panels in combination with cast-in-place (CIP) reinforced concrete...

  2. Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance Via Depth From Focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasi, Carlo

    Abstract A critical challenge in the creation of autonomous mobile robots is the reliable detection radiation such as direct sunlight. In contrast, vision systems are passive and can provide lateral and depth market. However, our particular embodiment of this concept is remarkable because our focus-based system

  3. WaveCurrent Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    Wave­Current Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La (Longuet-Higgins 1969; Hasselmann 1971; Garrett and Smith 1976; and many others). In particular, Hassel) changes in wave momentum that absorb some of the radiation stress gradients. Garrett and Smith (1976

  4. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  5. Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

  6. Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

  7. 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    , and so risks of water shortage appear. The preservation of these resources is important because73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

  8. PROOF COMPLEXITY IN ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS AND BOUNDED DEPTH FREGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sgall, Jiri

    PROOF COMPLEXITY IN ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS AND BOUNDED DEPTH FREGE SYSTEMS WITH MODULAR COUNTING S. Buss (ø) := minfjßj : f(ß) = øg; #12; 2 S. Buss et al. where jßj is the length of the string ß to showing that NP 6= coNP . Despite extensive research (see the expository articles Buss (1995b) , Kraj

  9. accurate hydrogen depth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accurate hydrogen depth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Accurate reconstruction of the...

  10. Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

  11. Range Condition: Key to Sustained Ranch Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Range condition, or a rangeland's "state of health," is an ecological measurement of the current condition of a range. Range condition is evaluated by the plant species composition. This leaflet explains the importance of range condition, how range...

  12. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . MCKETTA is an economist with the College of Forestry, Wildlife, and Range Sciences, University of Idaho has been developed for determining the cost of Fire Management Inputs (FMls)-the direct frreline costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES

  13. A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING Lai-Man Po School of Peking University, Shenzhen, China ABSTRACT Depth-Image-Based Rendering (DIBR) is widely used synthesis with high-quality depth map. Index Terms - Depth-Image-Based-Rendering, DIBR, Hole

  14. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  15. Using the Multi-Depth Deflectometer to study pavement response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Jamshed Iqbal

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - Section 11 (Load: 8500 lbs. ) Variation of layer moduli backcalculated from depth deflections - Section 11 (Load: 16000 lbs. ) Measured deflections - Section 12 Moduli values backcalculated from BISAR - Section 12, Infinite subgrade . Moduli values... . Typical N? versus bulk stress (8) relationship for granular materials . MDD deflection basin measured under FWD load- 8500 lb. load level 143 144 145 146 148 149 67 68 NDD deflection basin predicted from BISAR Measured versus predicted...

  16. Depth Profile Analysis of New Materials in Hollow Cathode Discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djulgerova, R.; Mihailov, V.; Gencheva, V.; Popova, L.; Panchev, B. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Michaylova, V. [Technical University of Sofia, 1797 Sofia (Bulgaria); Szytula, A.; Gondek, L.; Dohnalik, T.M. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics - Jagellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Petrovic, Z.Lj. [Institute of Physics, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review the possibility of hollow cathode discharge for depth profile analysis is demonstrated for several new materials: planar optical waveguides fabricated by Ag+-Na+ ion exchange process in glasses, SnO2 thin films for gas sensors modified by hexamethildisilazane after rapid thermal annealing, W- and WC- CVD layers deposited on Co-metalloceramics and WO3- CVD thin films deposited on glass. The results are compared with different standard techniques.

  17. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, Moscow, 117036 (Russian Federation); Baker Hughes, Inc, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX, 77073 (United States)

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  18. An LC-IMS-MS Platform Providing Increased Dynamic Range for High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a tryptic digest of mouse blood plasma and analyzed with both a LC-Linear Ion Trap Fourier Transform (FT) MS and LC-IMS-TOF MS. The LC-FT MS detected thirteen out of the twenty...

  19. Depth dependent dynamics in the hydration shell of a protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Servantie; C. Atilgan; A. R. Atilgan

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of hydration water/protein association in folded proteins, using lysozyme and myoglobin as examples. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to identify underlying mechanisms of the dynamical transition that corresponds to the onset of amplified atomic fluctuations in proteins. The number of water molecules within a cutoff distance of each residue scales linearly with protein depth index and is not affected by the local dynamics of the backbone. Keeping track of the water molecules within the cutoff sphere, we observe an effective residence time, scaling inversely with depth index at physiological temperatures while the diffusive escape is highly reduced below the transition. A depth independent orientational memory loss is obtained for the average dipole vector of the water molecules within the sphere when the protein is functional. While below the transition temperature, the solvent is in a glassy state, acting as a solid crust around the protein, inhibiting any large scale conformational fluctuations. At the transition, most of the hydration shell unfreezes and water molecules collectively make the protein more flexible.

  20. The advancement of a technique using principal component analysis for the non-intrusive depth profiling of radioactive contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J. C.; Joyce, M. J. [Engineering Dept., Lancaster Univ., Lancaster. LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Mellor, M. [Createc Ltd., Derwent Mills Commercial Park, Cockermouth, Cumbria. CA13 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-intrusive technique using principal component analysis, to infer the depth of the fission fragment caesium-137, when it is buried under silica sand has been described. Using energy variances within different {gamma}-ray spectra, a complete depth model was produced for a single caesium-137 source buried under 1 mm depths ranging between 5-50 mm. This was achieved using a cadmium telluride detector and a bespoke phantom. In this paper we describe the advancement of the technique by further validating it using blind tests for applications outside of the laboratory, where not only the depth (z) but also the surface (x, y) location of {gamma}-ray emitting contamination is often poorly characterised. At present the technique has been tested at the point of maximum activity above the entrained {gamma}-ray emitting source (where the optimal x, y location is known). This is not usually practical in poorly characterized environments where the detector cannot be conveniently placed at such an optimal location to begin with and scanning at multiple points around the region of interest is often required. Using a uniform scanning time, the point of maximum intensity can be located by sampling in terms of total count rate, and converging on this optimal point of maximum intensity. (authors)

  1. Halite depositional facies in a solar salt pond: A key to interpreting physical energy and water depth in ancient deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subaqueous deposits of aragonite, gypsum, and halite are accumulating in shallow solar salt ponds constructed in the Pekelmeer, a sea-level salina on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Several halite facies are deposited in the crystallizer ponds in response to difference in water depth and wave energy. Cumulate halite, which originates as floating rafts, is present only along the protected, upwind margins of ponds where low-energy conditions foster their formation and preservation. Cornet crystals with peculiar mushroom- and mortarboard-shaped caps precipitate in centimetre-deep brine sheets within a couple of metres of the upwind or low-energy margins. Downwind from these margins, cornet and chevron halite precipitate on the pond floors in water depths ranging from a few centimetres to {approximately} 60 cm. Halite pisoids with radial-concentric structure are precipitated in the swash zone along downwind high-energy shorelines where they form pebbly beaches. This study suggests that primary halite facies are energy and/or depth dependent and that some primary features, if preserved in ancient halite deposits, can be used to infer physical energy conditions, subenvironments such as low- to high-energy shorelines, and extremely shallow water depths in ancient evaporite basins.

  2. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Revision 0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burmeister

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) activities called for the identification and remediation of surface hot spot depleted uranium (DU) with some excavation to determine the vertical extent of contamination (NNSA/NSO, 2004). During the CAU 484 SAFER investigation (conducted November 2003 through August 2007), approximately 50 locations containing DU were identified on Antelope Lake. All but four locations (CA-1, SA-5-9, SA-12-15, and SA-4) were remediated. Figure 1-1 shows locations of the four use restriction (UR) sites. The four locations were determined to have failed the SAFER conceptual site model assumption of a small volume hot spot. Two of the locations (CA-1 and SA-5-9) were excavated to depths of 3.5 to 7 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), and a third location (SA-12-15) with a footprint of 30 by 60 ft was excavated to a depth of 0.5 ft. At the fourth site (SA-4), the discovery of unexploded ordnance (UXO) halted the excavation due to potential safety concerns. Remediation activities on Antelope Lake resulted in the removal of approximately 246 cubic yards (yd3) of DU-impacted soil from the four UR sites; however, Kiwi surveys confirmed that residual DU contamination remained at each of the four sites. (The Kiwi was a Remote Sensing Laboratory [RSL] vehicle equipped with a data-acquisition system and four sodium iodide gamma detectors. Surveys were conducted with the vehicle moving at a rate of approximately 10 miles per hour with the gamma detectors positioned 14 to 28 inches [in.] above the ground surface [NNSA/NSO, 2004]).

  3. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  4. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  5. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  6. Circularly symmetric solutions in three-dimensional Teleparallel, f(T) and Maxwell-f(T) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Gonzalez; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Yerko Vasquez

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present teleparallel 3D gravity and we extract circularly symmetric solutions, showing that they coincide with the BTZ and Deser-de-Sitter solutions of standard 3D gravity. However, extending into f(T) 3D gravity, that is considering arbitrary functions of the torsion scalar in the action, we obtain BTZ-like and Deser-de-Sitter-like solutions, corresponding to an effective cosmological constant, without any requirement of the sign of the initial cosmological constant. Finally, extending our analysis incorporating the electromagnetic sector, we show that Maxwell-f(T) gravity accepts deformed charged BTZ-like solutions. Interestingly enough, the deformation in this case brings qualitatively novel terms, contrary to the pure gravitational solutions where the deformation is expressed only through changes in the coefficients. We investigate the singularities and the horizons of the new solutions, and amongst others we show that the cosmic censorship can be violated. Such novel behaviors reveal the new features that the f(T) structure brings in 3D gravity.

  7. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  8. Range Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to:Radiant ElectricRamkyRange Fuels

  9. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust AugustInstruments on the Site MapDepth of

  10. Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to:Information PromotingApplicantAvgReservoirDepth Jump

  11. Property:AvgWellDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to:Information PromotingApplicantAvgReservoirDepth

  12. Property:FirstWellDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation, search Property NameFirstWellDepth Jump to: navigation, search

  13. Heat Flow At Standard Depth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas BeenLegalHeard County,Grain FuelsDepth Jump

  14. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-21960-2012Mission: Focus onDepth of Crude Oil and

  15. Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

  16. Energy conditions in $f(T)$ gravity with non-minimal torsion-matter coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubair, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper examines the validity of energy bounds in a modified theory of gravity involving non-minimal coupling of torsion scalar and perfect fluid matter. In this respect, we formulate the general inequalities of energy conditions by assuming the flat FRW universe. For the application of these bounds, we particularly focus on two specific models that are recently proposed in literature and also choose the power law cosmology. We find the feasible constraints on the involved free parameters and evaluate their possible ranges graphically for the consistency of these energy bounds.

  17. Energy conditions in $f(T)$ gravity with non-minimal torsion-matter coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zubair; Saira Waheed

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper examines the validity of energy bounds in a modified theory of gravity involving non-minimal coupling of torsion scalar and perfect fluid matter. In this respect, we formulate the general inequalities of energy conditions by assuming the flat FRW universe. For the application of these bounds, we particularly focus on two specific models that are recently proposed in literature and also choose the power law cosmology. We find the feasible constraints on the involved free parameters and evaluate their possible ranges graphically for the consistency of these energy bounds.

  18. Numerical simulation of the flow over a coastal structure in depth-limited conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginting, Victor Eralingga

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of detailed measurements of irregular wave transformation in front of the structure in depth-limited conditions. The second data set consists of several test runs to study the irregular wave reflection and runup on the coastal structure in depth...

  19. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink, K., E-mail: klemens.zink@kmub.thm.de [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390 (Germany); Looe, H. K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg D-26129, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg D-26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen D-37073 (Germany)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the collecting electrode radius and the width of the guard ring are reflecting the deep radial penetration of the electron transport processes into the gas-filled cavities and the need for appropriate corrections of the chamber reading. New values for these corrections have been established in two forms, one converting the indicated value into the absorbed dose to water in the front plane of the chamber, the other converting it into the absorbed dose to water at the depth of the effective point of measurement of the chamber. In the Appendix, the in–out imbalance of electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary is demonstrated in the approximation of classical small-angle multiple scattering theory. Conclusions: The in–out electron transport imbalance at the lateral boundaries of parallel-plate chambers in electron beams has been studied with Monte Carlo simulation over a range of depth in water, and new correction factors, covering all depths and implementing the effective point of measurement concept, have been developed.

  20. Using DUSTRAN to Simulate Fog-Oil Dispersion and Its Impacts on Local Insect Populations at Ft. Hood: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Smokes and obscurants (S&O) are important screening agents used during military training exercises on many military installations. Although the use of S&O is subject to environmental laws, the fate and effects of S&O on natural habitats are not well documented. One particular concern is the impact S&O may have on local insect populations, which can be important components of terrestrial food chains of endangered species. Fog-oil (FO) is an S&O that is of particular concern. An important part of assessing potential ecosystem impacts is the ability to predict downwind FO concentrations. This report documents the use of the comprehensive atmospheric dispersion modeling system DUST TRANsport (DUSTRAN) to simulate the downwind transport and diffusion of a hypothetical FO release on the U.S. Army installation at Ft. Hood, TX.

  1. Wide-range voltage modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Super Collider`s Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-{mu}s wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 {mu}s, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented.

  2. Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    by a blue light-emitting diode, the x and x depth profiles were reconstructed from photothermal radiometric

  3. Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of primarily E-W directed extension along N-NNW striking normal faults. Water well drilling on the eastern slopes of the Wassuk Range, west of the city of Hawthorne, Nevada...

  4. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  5. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  6. In-depth survey report of Scoular Elevator, Salina, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaebst, D.D.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in/depth industrial hygiene survey of exposures to phosphine during the use of aluminum phosphide was conducted as part of a survey on exposure to grain fumigants. Area monitoring and breathing-zone sampling for phosphine were conducted during the addition of aluminum phosphide to grain during turning operations; source samples and peak personal exposures were also analyzed. Major sources of personal exposure included the escape of air from the bin headspace during filling with treated grain, filling and emptying of the phosphide pellet dispenser, and infiltration from the treated grain bin and from the pellet dispenser itself into adjacent air space. Relatively good dust control was indicated by the total dust samples collected during the survey. Measures recommended by the author are in the report.

  7. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY WENDY ANN BRAZENEC ENTITLED EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING

  8. Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport COLM independent parameter- izations that use ocean color to estimate the penetration depth of shortwave radiation. This study offers a way to evaluate the changes in irradiance penetration depths in coupled ocean

  9. Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    neutrino and proton decay experiments, as well as dark matter searches even though often at greater depth for cold dark matter 3 , and is presently at shallow depth; muon-induced neutrons repre- sent a major at a shallow depth of 32 meters of water equivalent has been measured. The Palo Verde neutrino detector

  10. Depth of manual dismantling analysis: A cost–benefit approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achillas, Ch., E-mail: c.achillas@ihu.edu.gr [School of Economics and Business Administration, International Hellenic University, 14th km Thessaloniki-Moudania, 57001 Thermi (Greece); Aidonis, D. [Department of Logistics, Alexander Technological Educational Institute, Branch of Katerini, 60100 Katerini (Greece); Vlachokostas, Ch.; Karagiannidis, A.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Loulos, V. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Box 483, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? A mathematical modeling tool for OEMs. ? The tool can be used by OEMs, recyclers of electr(on)ic equipment or WEEE management systems’ regulators. ? The tool makes use of cost–benefit analysis in order to determine the optimal depth of product disassembly. ? The reusable materials and the quantity of metals and plastics recycled can be quantified in an easy-to-comprehend manner. - Abstract: This paper presents a decision support tool for manufacturers and recyclers towards end-of-life strategies for waste electrical and electronic equipment. A mathematical formulation based on the cost benefit analysis concept is herein analytically described in order to determine the parts and/or components of an obsolete product that should be either non-destructively recovered for reuse or be recycled. The framework optimally determines the depth of disassembly for a given product, taking into account economic considerations. On this basis, it embeds all relevant cost elements to be included in the decision-making process, such as recovered materials and (depreciated) parts/components, labor costs, energy consumption, equipment depreciation, quality control and warehousing. This tool can be part of the strategic decision-making process in order to maximize profitability or minimize end-of-life management costs. A case study to demonstrate the models’ applicability is presented for a typical electronic product in terms of structure and material composition. Taking into account the market values of the pilot product’s components, the manual disassembly is proven profitable with the marginal revenues from recovered reusable materials to be estimated at 2.93–23.06 €, depending on the level of disassembly.

  11. Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics are graphically presented even when there are only a few data. This approach benchmarks what is currently known about the association of depth-specific hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics.

  12. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  13. Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

  14. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  15. PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    , resulting in increased early mortality as well as decreased weights at the end of the grow out. Keeping in decreased weight gains, increased feed conversions, and possibly increased mortality. One environmental at a velocity of 400 - 500 ft/min over large birds can produce a wind chill effect of ten to twelve degrees

  16. Analysis of MALDI FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Data: a Time Series Donald A. Barkauskasa, Scott R. Kronewitterb, Carlito B. Lebrillab, and David M. Rockec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocke, David M.

    Analysis of MALDI FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Data: a Time Series Approach Donald A. Barkauskasa/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a technique for high mass gamma distribution with varying scale parameter but constant shape parameter and exponent. This enables

  17. LBNL/ Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift 2010 Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    LBNL/ Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift 2010 Requirements for boom lift operations. LBNL best practices requirements for boom lift Operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft protection system in required when anchor points are present in lift. It is LBNL best practices requirements

  18. 542 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 22, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2001 A 210-GHz fT SiGe HBT With a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieh, Jae-Sung

    542 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 22, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2001 A 210-GHz fT SiGe HBT With a Non. Subbanna Abstract--A record 210­GHz SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor at a collector current density by telecommunication systems. The viable materials of choice for the implementa- tion of these systems include Si(Ge

  19. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  20. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  1. DISTRIBUTION AND RANGE OF RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION COEFFICIENTS IN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SUBSURFACE: STOCHASTIC MODELING CONSIDERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; et. al

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty associated with the sorption coefficient, or K{sub d} value, is one of the key uncertainties in estimating risk associated with burying low-level nuclear waste in the subsurface. The objective of this study was to measure >648 K{sub d} values and provide a measure of the range and distribution (normal or log-normal) of radionuclide K{sub d} values appropriate for the E-Area disposal site, within the Savannah River Site, near Aiken South Carolina. The 95% confidence level for the mean K{sub d} was twice the mean in the Aquifer Zone (18-30.5 m depth), equal to the mean for the Upper Vadose Zone (3.3-10 m depth), and half the mean for the Lower Vadose Zone (3.10-18 m depth). The distribution of K{sub d} values was log normal in the Upper Vadose Zone and Aquifer Zone, and normal in the Lower Vadose Zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural radionuclide Kd variability in the literature. Using ranges and distribution coefficients that are specific to the hydrostratigraphic unit improved model accuracy and reduced model uncertainty. Unfortunately, extension of these conclusions to other sites is likely not appropriate given that each site has its own sources of hydrogeological variability. However, this study provides one of the first examples of the development stochastic ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values for a hydrological unit for stochastic modeling.

  2. Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  3. American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demaine, Erik D.

    We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

  5. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  6. Insights gained from in-depth reviews of several industry generated PRAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, W.T.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Bari, R.A.; Rosenthal, J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last several years BNL staff have performed in-depth reviews of the containment failure modes and fission product release analyses of all the ''industry'' PRAs submitted to the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, NRC. This program started with a reevaluation of the risks reported in the Zion and Indian Point Probabilistic Safety Studies (PWRs with large dry containments) and was followed by reviews of the Limerick (BWR with Mark II containment) and Big Rock Point (early BWR design) PRAs. We are currently completing reviews of the GESSAR-II (BWR with a Mark III containment) and Millstone-3 (PWR with a subatmospheric containment) PRAs. This paper therefore presents the insights gained from extensive reevaluations of the risk associated with a wide range of reactor and containment designs. In particular, the paper shows how changing methodology has influenced our understanding of containment performance under degraded core conditions and how this influences the frequency, timing and magnitude of fission product release to the environment, which in turn impacts potential off-site consequences. 18 refs.

  7. High-energy x-ray diffractometer for nondestructive strain depth profile measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shorman, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan); Jensen, T. C.; Gray, J. N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a lab-based high-energy x-ray diffraction system and a new approach to nondestructively measuring strain profiles in polycrystalline samples. This technique utilizes the tungsten K{sub ?1} characteristic radiation from a standard industrial x-ray tube. We introduce a simulation model that is used to determine strain values from data collected with this system. Examples of depth profiling are shown for shot peened aluminum and titanium samples. Profiles to 1 mm depth in aluminum and 300 ?m depth in titanium with a depth resolution of 20 ?m are presented.

  8. alluvial basins in-depth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of structures requires more accurate design methods. An important variable in the fire performance of timber structures is the in-depth temperature distribution, ......

  9. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is...

  10. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  11. Energy-range relation and mean energy variation in therapeutic particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, Johanna; Brahme, Anders [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical expressions for the mean energy and range of therapeutic light ion beams and low- and high-energy electrons have been derived, based on the energy dependence of their respective stopping powers. The new mean energy and range relations are power-law expressions relevant for light ion radiation therapy, and are based on measured practical ranges or known tabulated stopping powers and ranges for the relevant incident particle energies. A practical extrapolated range, R{sub p}, for light ions was defined, similar to that of electrons, which is very closely related to the extrapolated range of the primary ions. A universal energy-range relation for light ions and electrons that is valid for all material mixtures and compounds has been developed. The new relation can be expressed in terms of the range for protons and alpha particles, and is found to agree closely with experimental data in low atomic number media and when the difference in the mean ionization energy is low. The variation of the mean energy with depth and the new energy-range relation are useful for accurate stopping power and mass scattering power calculations, as well as for general particle transport and dosimetry applications.

  12. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  13. Milestone Report - Demonstrate Braided Material with 3.5 g U/kg Sorption Capacity under Seawater Testing Condition (Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 - 1/30/2015)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Das, Sadananda [ORNL; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Gill, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wood, Jordana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 (1/30/2015) entitled, Demonstrate braided material with 3.5 g U/kg sorption capacity under seawater testing condition . This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent braided materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed four braided fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 3.5 g U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. The braided adsorbents were synthesized by braiding or leno weaving high surface area polyethylene fibers and conducting radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile monomers onto the braided materials followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. The four braided adsorbents demonstrated capacity values ranging from 3.7 to 4.2 g U/kg adsorbent after 56 days of exposure in natural coastal seawater at 20 oC. All data are normalized to a salinity of 35 psu.

  14. Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen H.

    Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

  15. Quantitative Depth Recovery from Time-Varying Optical Flow in a Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    Quantitative Depth Recovery from Time-Varying Optical Flow in a Kalman Filter Framework John Barron Julich, 52425 Julich, Germany h.spies@fz-juelich.de Abstract. We present a Kalman lter framework, Depth from Optical Flow, Kalman Filter, 3D Camera Motion, Quantitative Error Analysis 1 Introduction We

  16. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  17. Robust Head Pose Estimation by Fusing Time-of-Flight Depth and Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    . The key to our method is a model-based approach based on the fusion of color and time-of-flight depth data setup or knowledge of a pre-built model or training data. The use of additional depth data leads of user interaction, or controlling industrial machinery from a distance. Although many different systems

  18. Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1002, U.S.A. ABSTRACT. A lightweight, portable drilling system for coring up to 500 m depths has been developed and field-tested. The drilling system includes four major components

  19. Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania A. Jardin1, F Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania -- The challenge of seismic exploration in fold and thrust belt settings compte plus importante des données géologiques. Abstract -- Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural

  20. The efficiency of depth discrimination for non-transparent and transparent stereoscopic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamassian, Pascal

    The efficiency of depth discrimination for non-transparent and transparent stereoscopic surfaces investigate here how well human observers cope with stereo transparency by comparing their efficiency between transparent and opaque depth judgments. In two experiments, the efficiency measure was computed relative

  1. Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Bernard

    Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal-thermal model to evaluate the use of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for depth profiling of port wine the desired effect. A diagnostic measurement of the distribution of laser energy deposition and ensuing

  2. On the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In nite Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bath, University of

    function which satis#12;ed the correct kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions for water waves of steady water waves on ows with #12;nite depth. The inde- pendent variable was a periodic functionOn the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In#12;nite Depth J.F. Toland 1 Background

  3. A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

  4. Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district] Peat deposits contain on the order of 1/6 of the Earth's terrestrial fixed carbon (C), but uncertainty in peat depth precludes precise estimates of peat C storage. To assess peat C in the Northern Highlands

  5. Lower Bounds for Bounded Depth Frege Proofs via Pudlak-Buss Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harsha, Prahladh

    19 Lower Bounds for Bounded Depth Frege Proofs via Pudl´ak-Buss Games ELI BEN-SASSON Technion. Our method uses the interpretation of proofs as two player games given by Pudl´ak and Buss. Our lower. 2010. Lower bounds for bounded depth Frege proofs via Pudl´ak- Buss games. ACM Trans. Comput. Logic, 11

  6. ESTIMATION OF SNOW ACCUMULATION IN ANTARCTICA USING AUTOMATED ACOUSTIC DEPTH GAUGE MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ESTIMATION OF SNOW ACCUMULATION IN ANTARCTICA USING AUTOMATED ACOUSTIC DEPTH GAUGE MEASUREMENTS microwave sounders, snow gauges, or radar are not feasible or not available in Antarctica at the present precipitation, remains largely unknown. Acoustic depth gauges (ADG) provide the only concrete real

  7. Viking Range: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Viking Range, LLC failed to certify cooking products as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  8. Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Joseph Thomas

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

  9. Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Joseph Thomas

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

  10. The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators: Convexity and Related Results Chi-Kwong Li Classification 47A12, 47A13, 47A55. Keywords Joint essential numerical range, self-adjoint operator, Hilbert the joint behavior of several operators A1, . . . , Am. One may see [1, 5, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 23, 28, 31

  11. Effective range from tetramer dissociation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadizadeh, M R; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shifts in the four-body recombination peaks, due to lowest order range corrections in the zero range results close to the unitary limit, are obtained and used to extract the corresponding effective range of a given atomic system. From the experimental values of the tetramer dissociation positions of an ultracold gas of cesium atoms close to broad Feshbach resonances, the effective ranges are extracted, with a weighted average given by 3.9$\\pm 0.8 R_{{vdW}}$, where $R_{{vdW}}$ is the van der Waals length scale. This result is consistent with the van der Waals potential tail for the $Cs_2$ system. The method can be generally applied to other cold atom experimental setups to determine the corresponding effective range.

  12. Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

  13. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Aiello; F. Ameli; M. Anghinolfi; G. Barbarino; E. Barbarito; F. Barbato; N. Beverini; S. Biagi; B. Bouhadef; C. Bozza; G. Cacopardo; M. Calamai; C. Calì; A. Capone; F. Caruso; A. Ceres; T. Chiarusi; M. Circella; R. Cocimano; R. Coniglione; M. Costa; G. Cuttone; C. D'Amato; A. D'Amico; G. De Bonis; V. De Luca; N. Deniskina; G. De Rosa; F. Di Capua; C. Distefano; P. Fermani; L. A. Fusco; F. Garufi; V. Giordano; A. Gmerk; R. Grasso; G. Grella; C. Hugon; M. Imbesi; V. Kulikovskiy; G. Larosa; D. Lattuada; K. P. Leismueller; E. Leonora; P. Litrico; A. Lonardo; F. Longhitano; D. Lo Presti; E. Maccioni; A. Margiotta; A. Martini; R. Masullo; P. Migliozzi; E. Migneco; A. Miraglia; C. M. Mollo; M. Mongelli; M. Morganti; P. Musico; M. Musumeci; C. A. Nicolau; A. Orlando; R. Papaleo; C. Pellegrino; M. G. Pellegriti; C. Perrina; P. Piattelli; C. Pugliatti; S. Pulvirenti; A. Orselli; F. Raffaelli; N. Randazzo; G. Riccobene; A. Rovelli; M. Sanguineti; P. Sapienza; V. Sciacca; I. Sgura; F. Simeone; V. Sipala; F. Speziale; M. Spina; A. Spitaleri; M. Spurio; S. M. Stellacci; M. Taiuti; G. Terreni; L. Trasatti; A. Trovato; C. Ventura; P. Vicini; S. Viola; D. Vivolo

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Cherenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also included. The associated depth intensity relation was evaluated and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. With the present analysis, the muon depth intensity relation has been measured up to 13 km of water equivalent.

  14. Long range transport of acid rain precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of the long range transport of primary and secondary pollutants derived by Fay and Rosenzweig (1) is applied to the problem of the transport of acid rain precursors. The model describes the long term average (annual ...

  15. APS Long Range Schedule FY1996

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long Range Commissioning Schedule for FY1996 Date First Shift 0:00-8:00 Second Shift 8:00-16:00 Third Shift 16:00-24:00 31596 SR Studies 1-ID-A Shielding Verification SR Studies...

  16. Descriptions of Range and Pasture Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby; Welch, Tommy G.

    2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of common range and pasture plants are listed in this publication. The common and scientific name of each species are given, along with the species' value as a grazing plant for wildlife and livestock....

  17. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

    2009-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

  18. Systematic ranging and late warning asteroid impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnocchia, D; Micheli, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe systematic ranging, an orbit determination technique especially suitable to assess the near-term Earth impact hazard posed by newly discovered asteroids. For these late warning cases, the time interval covered by the observations is generally short, perhaps a few hours or even less, which leads to severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. The systematic ranging approach gets around these degeneracies by performing a raster scan in the poorly-constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane of sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to identify regions corresponding to collision solutions, as well as potential impact times and locations. From the probability distribution of the observation errors, we obtain a probability distribution in the orbital space and then estimate the probability of an Earth impact. We show how this technique is effective for a number of examples, including 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, the only tw...

  19. COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehan, Anne F.

    COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado, seismic, seismicity, crust, fault, hazard ABSTRACT Construction of seismic hazard and risk maps depends upon carefully constrained input parameters including background seismicity, seismic attenuation

  20. Long range interactions in nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajter, Richard F.

    Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

  1. Programmable near-infrared ranging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Jr., Hobart R. (San Diego, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high angular resolution ranging system particularly suitable for indoor plications involving mobile robot navigation and collision avoidance uses a programmable array of light emitters that can be sequentially incremented by a microprocessor. A plurality of adjustable level threshold detectors are used in an optical receiver for detecting the threshold level of the light echoes produced when light emitted from one or more of the emitters is reflected by a target or object in the scan path of the ranging system.

  2. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  3. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors related to operations of a well that impact drilling uncertainties in the shallow water region of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) can be directly linked to the site specific issues; such as water depth and local geological ...

  4. Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Donita Lynn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and productivity (sustainability) of trees within terrestrial ecosystems. Tree planting depth, i.e. location of the root collar relative to soil grade, is of particular concern for tree growth, development, and performance in the landscape. A series of model...

  5. Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to...

  6. Depth inversion for nonlinear waves shoaling over a barred-beach 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    and calibrated for mild slopes are applied to the barred-beach. Expectedly, errors on depth prediction occur techniques such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), are still quite problematic under the current state

  7. Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 2. Prediction of bioluminescent source depth from spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Mark

    of a passive method (as opposed to active methods such as RADAR or LIDAR) to identify hostile ships, submarines this relative importance [Nealson, 1993]. Therefore the depth distribution of bioluminescent organisms is of eco

  8. PROOF COMPLEXITY IN ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS AND BOUNDED DEPTH FREGE SYSTEMS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krajíèek, Jan

    PROOF COMPLEXITY IN ALGEBRAIC SYSTEMS AND BOUNDED DEPTH FREGE SYSTEMS WITH MODULAR COUNTING S. Buss; 2 S. Buss et al. NP 6= coNP . Despite extensive research (see the expository articles Buss (1995b

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

  10. Partnering: an in-depth comparison of its elements to quality improvement principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozada, Anthony David

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIIrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Approved as to style and content by: Donald A...

  11. Range Con: a management evaluation system for assessing sucess of selected range improvement practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekblad, Steven Linn

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategic resource management plans. Individual management skills and managerial environment have not been considered when predicting biological and economic response of range management practices. Risk for individual managers adopting unsuited... APPENDIX Prototype Range Management Skills Survey. Range Management Skills Survey Survey Data Tables. Validation Figures. VITA 64 65 74 92 104 106 1X LIST OP FIGURES FIGURE Page 1. The Range Con expert system in relation to the Resource...

  12. Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to detect and avoid obstacles. Principle Investigators: Randy Beard, Tim McLain Laser Range Finder Opti-Logic RS400 Laser path, laser detects object. 2. Upon detection, insert cylindrical object into world map and plan path

  13. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  14. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  15. Infrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth profilometry, and scanning imaging of deep subsurface electronic defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    - sorption of the incident beam and nonradiative heating. The PCR theory is presented as infrared depthInfrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth May 2003 Laser-induced infrared photocarrier radiometry PCR is introduced theoretically

  16. Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Relationships between inherent optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation optical properties and the depth of penetration of solar radiation in optically complex coastal waters, J

  17. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  18. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Zhe-Xuan; Hu, Anzi; Wall, Michael L; Foss-Feig, Michael; Gorshkov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  19. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  20. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midya, Bikashkali; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Suárez, O L Ramírez; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  1. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  2. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe-Xuan Gong; Mohammad F. Maghrebi; Anzi Hu; Michael L. Wall; Michael Foss-Feig; Alexey V. Gorshkov

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  3. Prospects for river discharge and depth estimation through assimilation of swath-altimetry into a raster-based hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Prospects for river discharge and depth estimation through assimilation of swath water depth and discharge, reducing the discharge RMSE from 23.2% to 10.0% over an 84-day simulation. Clark, D. P. Lettenmaier, and D. E. Alsdorf (2007), Prospects for river discharge and depth estimation

  4. Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion uponC2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of ethylene hydrogenation over alumina-supported Pt catalyst were recorded at 25 ms resolution in the temperature range 323 to 473 K using various H2 flow rates (1 atm total gas pressure). Surface ethyl species (2870 and 1200 cm-1) were detected at all temperatures along with the gas phase ethane product (2954 and 2893 cm-1). The CH3CH2Pt growth was instantaneous on the time scale of 25ms under all experimental conditions. At 323 K, the decay time of surface ethyl (122 + 10 ms) coincides with the rise time of C2H6 (144 + 14 ms).This establishes direct kinetic evidence for surface ethyl as the kinetically relevant intermediate. Such a direct link between the temporal behavior of an observed intermediate and the final product growth in a heterogeneous catalytic system has not been demonstrated before to our knowledge. A fraction (10 percent) of the asymptotic ethane growth at 323 K is prompt, indicating that there are surface ethyl species that react much faster than the majority of the CH3CH2Pt intermediates. The dispersive kinetics is attributed to the varying strength of interaction of the ethyl species with the Pt surface caused by heterogeneity of the surface environment. At 473 K, the majority of ethyl intermediates are hydrogenated prior to the recording of the first time slice (24 ms), and a correspondingly large prompt growth of ethane is observed. The yield and kinetics of the surface ethylidyne are in agreement with the known spectator nature of this species.

  5. Depth distribution of lithium in oxidized binary Al-Li alloys determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and neutron depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, K.K. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)); Williams, D.B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)); Newbury, D.E.; Chi, P.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaza, G. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidation of binary Al-Li alloys during short exposures at 530 C and long exposures at 200 C was studied with regard to the Li distribution. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to obtain quantitative Li depth profiles across the surface oxide layer and the underlying alloy. The underlying alloy was depleted in Li as a result of oxidation at 530 and 200 C. The SIMS and NDP results showed good mutual agreement and were used to evaluate the oxide thickness, the Li concentration at the oxide-ally interface, and the mass balance between oxide and alloy. The Li depletion profiles in the alloy were also calculated using the interdiffusion coefficients reported in the literature and compared with the measured profiles; the two profiles differed at 530 C but showed good agreement at 200 C.

  6. Range Creek Calibrated Dates Beta-202190

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Range Creek Calibrated Dates 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Beta-202190 Beta-175753 Beta-175755 Beta-235067 Beta-202189 Beta-214831 Beta-202188 Beta-202191 Beta-203630 Beta-214832 Beta-175754 Beta a Carbon-14 calibrated date (95% CI) between 1000 and 1200 C.E. (Figure 5: Beta-235067). The calibrated

  7. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  8. 6, 1018310216, 2006 Long-range transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 10183­10216, 2006 Long-range transport of Asian dust and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin and air pollutants to Taiwan: observed evidence and model simulation C.-Y. Lin 1 , Z. Wang 2 , W.-N. Chen and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  9. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sixsmith, H.; Valenzuela, J.A.; Nutt, W.E.

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof. 6 figures.

  10. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sixsmith, Herbert (Norwich, VT); Valenzuela, Javier A. (Grantham, NH); Nutt, William E. (Enfield, NH)

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof.

  11. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna (10), so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive (24) and transmit cavities (22) by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling.

  12. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling. 25 figs.

  13. Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Machinery C T C T EET 365W Electrical Power & Machinery Laboratory C C, V V C C, V V EET 370T EnergyElectrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE Course Number and Name Fall 2010 Spr 2011 Sum 2011 Fall 2011 Spr 2012 Sum 2012 Fall 2012 Spr 2013 Sum 2013 Fall 2013 Spr 2014 Sum 2014 EET

  14. Method and system for determining depth distribution of radiation-emitting material located in a source medium and radiation detector system for use therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benke, Roland R. (Helotes, TX); Kearfott, Kimberlee J. (Ann Arbor, MI); McGregor, Douglas S. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, system and a radiation detector system for use therein are provided for determining the depth distribution of radiation-emitting material distributed in a source medium, such as a contaminated field, without the need to take samples, such as extensive soil samples, to determine the depth distribution. The system includes a portable detector assembly with an x-ray or gamma-ray detector having a detector axis for detecting the emitted radiation. The radiation may be naturally-emitted by the material, such as gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, or emitted when the material is struck by other radiation. The assembly also includes a hollow collimator in which the detector is positioned. The collimator causes the emitted radiation to bend toward the detector as rays parallel to the detector axis of the detector. The collimator may be a hollow cylinder positioned so that its central axis is perpendicular to the upper surface of the large area source when positioned thereon. The collimator allows the detector to angularly sample the emitted radiation over many ranges of polar angles. This is done by forming the collimator as a single adjustable collimator or a set of collimator pieces having various possible configurations when connected together. In any one configuration, the collimator allows the detector to detect only the radiation emitted from a selected range of polar angles measured from the detector axis. Adjustment of the collimator or the detector therein enables the detector to detect radiation emitted from a different range of polar angles. The system further includes a signal processor for processing the signals from the detector wherein signals obtained from different ranges of polar angles are processed together to obtain a reconstruction of the radiation-emitting material as a function of depth, assuming, but not limited to, a spatially-uniform depth distribution of the material within each layer. The detector system includes detectors having different properties (sensitivity, energy resolution) which are combined so that excellent spectral information may be obtained along with good determinations of the radiation field as a function of position.

  15. DISTRIBUTION AND RANGE OF RADIONUCLIDE SORPTIOIN COEFFICIENTS IN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SUBSURFACE: STOCHASTIC MODELING CONSIDERATIONS - 10259

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty associated with the sorption coefficient, or K{sub d} value, is one of the key uncertainties in estimating risk associated with burying low-level nuclear waste in the subsurface. The objective of this study was to measure >648 K{sub d} values and provide a measure of the range and distribution (normal or log-normal) of radionuclide K{sub d} values appropriate for the E-Area disposal site, within the Savannah River Site, near Aiken South Carolina. The 95% confidence level for the mean K{sub d} was twice the mean in the Aquifer Zone (18-30.5 m depth), equal to the mean for the Upper Vadose Zone (3.3-10 m depth), and half the mean for the Lower Vadose Zone (3.3-18 m depth). The distribution of K{sub d} values was log normal in the Upper Vadose Zone and Aquifer Zone, and normal in the Lower Vadose Zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural radionuclide K{sub d} variability in the literature. Using ranges and distribution coefficients that are specific to the hydrostratigraphic unit improved model accuracy and reduced model uncertainty. Unfortunately, extension of these conclusions to other sites is likely not appropriate given that each site has its own sources of hydrogeological variability. However, this study provides one of the first examples of the development stochastic ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values for a hydrological unit for stochastic modeling.

  16. Predicting dissolution patterns in variable aperture fractures: 1. Development and evaluation of an enhanced depth-averaged computational model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detwiler, R L; Rajaram, H

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-rock interactions within variable-aperture fractures can lead to dissolution of fracture surfaces and local alteration of fracture apertures, potentially transforming the transport properties of the fracture over time. Because fractures often provide dominant pathways for subsurface flow and transport, developing models that effectively quantify the role of dissolution on changing transport properties over a range of scales is critical to understanding potential impacts of natural and anthropogenic processes. Dissolution of fracture surfaces is controlled by surface-reaction kinetics and transport of reactants and products to and from the fracture surfaces. We present development and evaluation of a depth-averaged model of fracture flow and reactive transport that explicitly calculates local dissolution-induced alterations in fracture apertures. The model incorporates an effective mass transfer relationship that implicitly represents the transition from reaction-limited dissolution to transport-limited dissolution. We evaluate the model through direct comparison to previously reported physical experiments in transparent analog fractures fabricated by mating an inert, transparent rough surface with a smooth single crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), which allowed direct measurement of fracture aperture during dissolution experiments using well-established light transmission techniques [Detwiler, et al., 2003]. Comparison of experiments and simulations at different flow rates demonstrate the relative impact of the dimensionless Peclet and Damkohler numbers on fracture dissolution and the ability of the computational model to simulate dissolution. Despite some discrepancies in the small-scale details of dissolution patterns, the simulations predict the evolution of large-scale features quite well for the different experimental conditions. This suggests that our depth-averaged approach to simulating fracture dissolution provides a useful approach for extending laboratory results that are often limited in scale to scales that are more representative of geologic processes of interest.

  17. Experimental investigation of welding penetration-depth in high-purity aluminium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, W. [Babcock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States). Naval Nuclear Fuel Div.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important parameters in the superconducting splice design is the welding penetration-depth because it determines the electrical resistivity across the welded joints through the high-purity aluminum stabilizers. Highly resistive welds could lead to conductor instability when the superconductor goes normal. In the present investigation, experiments were performed using gas tungsten-arc welding to identify the effects of the welding parameters on the penetration-depth. The experimental results will be applied to the optimization of the superconducting splice design. The mock-up test data and theoretical analysis have shown that the higher energy input and lower welding speed produce the deeper penetration-depth in high-purity aluminum. In order to achieve an approximately uniform penetration-depth, three methods were explored: (i) a starting-delay at the welding start point, (ii) an external cooling, and (iii) staggered overlapping weldments. The experimental results have suggested that a uniform penetration-depth can be obtained under the thermal equilibrium welding conditions.

  18. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  19. Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as 12C(e,e'p)11B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to directly observe these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3 < xB < 0.7 deep inelastic scattering ratios.

  20. Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23601 (United States)

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as {sup 12}C(e,e'p){sup 11}B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to isolate the signal from these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3

  1. Intermediate Range Order and Transport Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    Simulation Study February 7, 2005 Patrick Pfleiderer ICP, University of Stuttgart in Collaboration: 2 2 21 ),...,,( dt d mV i iNii r rrrF =-= t m ttt ttt t m t ttttt i ii ii i i iii 2 )()( )()( 2-range and responsible for covalent character · obtained from ab initio calculations · time step: 1.6fs 6 2 r C eA r eqq

  2. What Range Herbivores Eat -- and Why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Forbes, T. D. A.; Machen, Richard V.

    1999-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    systems that have the chemicals need- ed to digest it. Cellulose is digested by fermenta- tion. Fermentation requires time and a con- ducive environment in the digestive system *Assistant Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor... fermentation can take place. Some monogastrics (like horses, rabbits) have either an enlarged stomach or areas in the large intestine and/or cecum where fermentation can take place. Monogastrics with an enlarged stomach (like the hippopotamus) are called...

  3. Causality and the effective range expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -W. Hammer; Dean Lee

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the generalization of Wigner's causality bounds and Bethe's integral formula for the effective range parameter to arbitrary dimension and arbitrary angular momentum. We also discuss the impact of these constraints on the separation of low- and high-momentum scales and universality in low-energy scattering. Some of our results were summarized earlier in a letter publication. In this work, we present full derivations and several detailed examples.

  4. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  5. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  6. Quantification of depth of anesthesia by nonlinear time series analysis of brain electrical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Widman; T. Schreiber; B. Rehberg; A. Hoeft; C. E. Elger

    2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate several quantifiers of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal with respect to their ability to indicate depth of anesthesia. For 17 patients anesthetized with Sevoflurane, three established measures (two spectral and one based on the bispectrum), as well as a phase space based nonlinear correlation index were computed from consecutive EEG epochs. In absence of an independent way to determine anesthesia depth, the standard was derived from measured blood plasma concentrations of the anesthetic via a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for the estimated effective brain concentration of Sevoflurane. In most patients, the highest correlation is observed for the nonlinear correlation index D*. In contrast to spectral measures, D* is found to decrease monotonically with increasing (estimated) depth of anesthesia, even when a "burst-suppression" pattern occurs in the EEG. The findings show the potential for applications of concepts derived from the theory of nonlinear dynamics, even if little can be assumed about the process under investigation.

  7. Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

  8. Depth Profiling Of Small Molecule Ingress Into Planar and Cylindrical Materials Using NRA and PIXE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Richard W.; Massingham, Gary; Clough, Anthony S. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a 3He ion micro-beam technique to study the ingress/diffusion of water into a planar fibre optic grade glass and a cylindrical drug-release polymer is described. One-dimensional concentration profiles showing the depth of water ingress were produced. The depth of penetration of water into the glass was measured by fitting a gaussian function to the concentration profile. The ingress of water into the drug-release polymer was found to be Fickian and a cylindrical diffusion model used to obtain a diffusion coefficient.

  9. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  10. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalToDepth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in anDepth

  11. Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freed, R.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortgage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed-layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well.

  12. Modern testing meets wide range of objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing sequences in two very different wells illustrate the wide range of objectives that are met with modern testing procedures. The first example is a drill stem test in an exploration well. The second test is in an established producing well. The exploration well test incorporated tubing-conveyed perforating, fluid sampling, production logging, and matrix stimulation to evaluate and properly treat near-well bore damage, as well as to investigate reservoir volume and characterize boundaries. The test on the established producer evaluated whether a workover could remedy lower than expected productivity. Production logging was combined with stationary transient measurements.

  13. Tonopah Test Range 2030 Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Closed, Closed in Place, or Closure in Progress. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized. CASs and CAUs where contaminants and/or waste have been closed in place are summarized. There is also a table that summarizes the contaminant that has been closed at each site, if land-use restrictions are present, and if post-closure inspections are required.

  14. Fan-less long range alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fan-less long range alpha detector is disclosed which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces. 2 figures.

  15. Short range correlations and the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Piasetzky, L.B. Weinstein, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Gomez, O. Hen, R. Shneor

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) is linearly related to the Short Range Correlation (SRC) scaling factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering. We speculate that the observed correlation is due to the fact that both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by high momentum nucleons in the nucleus. The observed phenomenological relationship can be used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn-pair cross sections, the DIS cross section for a free neutron, View the MathML source, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions, and the u/d ratio in a free proton.

  16. Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.Frequency |DepartmentEventRange Fuels

  17. Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to:Radiant ElectricRamkyRange

  18. Rangely, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name:Rancia 2Rangely, Colorado: Energy

  19. Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11 Connecticut2 of 3)the Office98RainRaisingRange

  20. Time evolution of the exponential wavenumber spectra of turbulence upon helium injection into a hydrogen discharge at the FT-2 tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Selyunin, E. P.; Esipov, L. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Stepanov, A. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of variations in the key parameter of short-wavelength turbulence-the ion-acoustic Larmor radius {rho}{sub s}, which determines the position of the maximum of the drift instability growth rate over poloidal wavenumbers-was studied experimentally at the FT-2 tokamak. For this purpose, helium was injected to hydrogen plasma, which resulted in a change in the electron temperature at the plasma edge. The universality of the exponential shape of the turbulence spectra over radial wavenumbers q and a substantial excess of the characteristic turbulence scale L over the ion-acoustic Larmor radius was confirmed with the help of correlative diagnostics of enhanced scattering. This excess at the discharge periphery reaches a value of 3-5 at a low electron temperature, apparently, due to an increase in the dissipation of drift waves upon their cascade transfer toward short scale-lengths.

  1. Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison of time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 5 King's College induced in light-absorbing materials can be observed either as a transient signal in time domain

  2. Integrating Kinect Depth Data with a Stochastic Object Classification Framework for Forestry Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellström, Thomas

    Integrating Kinect Depth Data with a Stochastic Object Classification Framework for Forestry Robots camera for a stochastic classification system for forestry robots. The images are classified as bush- ject classification system that uses only RGB camera. The system is aimed for a forestry robot

  3. Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shpilka, Amir

    Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems Omer. Motivated by database search problems such as partial match or nearest neighbor, we present secure between k poly log(s) parties who all know C, we obtain a secure protocol for evaluating C(x) using O

  4. Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishai, Yuval

    Secure Computation of Constant-Depth Circuits with Applications to Database Search Problems ? Omer. Motivated by database search problems such as partial match or nearest neighbor, we present secure distributed between k #21; poly log(s) parties who all know C, we obtain a secure protocol for evaluating C

  5. An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5732E An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings Author(s), Hung Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH than 7 trillion Joules of site energy annually [USDOE]. Analyzing building space heating performance

  6. Probabilistic models and reliability analysis of scour depth around bridge piers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolduc, Laura Christine

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters suggest that the maximum sour depth predicted by the deterministic HEC-18 Sand and HEC-18 Clay models tend to be conservative. Evidence is also found that the applicability of the HEC-18 Clay method is not limited to clay but can also be used...

  7. Energy-Based 6-DOF Penetration Depth Computation for Penalty-Based Haptic Rendering Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zefran, Milo?

    Energy-Based 6-DOF Penetration Depth Computation for Penalty-Based Haptic Rendering Algorithms Maxim Kolesnikov and Milos Zefran Abstract-- Existing penalty-based haptic rendering ap- proaches of rigid-body motions SE(3). We propose a penalty-based six-degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) haptic rendering

  8. Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

  9. Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow energy regime to be reliable indicators of facies type when considered in isolation. Consid- ered

  10. Submission (November 1, 2001) to 'Journal of Systems and Software' A Controlled Experiment on Inheritance Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prechelt, Lutz

    effort that is much more powerful than a model relying on inheritance depth. Keywords: controlled of the key elements that makes object-oriented programming powerful[Meyer, 1997]. Many design problems canSubmission (November 1, 2001) to 'Journal of Systems and Software' A Controlled Experiment

  11. Submission (November 1, 2001) to 'Journal of Systems and Software' A Controlled Experiment on Inheritance Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prechelt, Lutz

    effort that is much more powerful than a model relying on inheritance depth. Keywords: controlledSubmission (November 1, 2001) to 'Journal of Systems and Software' A Controlled Experiment was significantly easier to maintain than the 0­level program. We describe the design and setup of our experiment

  12. The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

  13. Anytime AND/OR Depth-first Search for Combinatorial Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dechter, Rina

    ] [ ] Decomposition Cache table for F (independent of A) Time and Space: O( n·k w ) Prune based on current best with current child subproblems. 1. Move breadth-first to next open subproblem P . 2. Process P depth-first, until either: P is solved optimally, P decomposes into child subproblems, a predefined threshold

  14. Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed crust northeast China USArray a b s t r a c t We observe a clear seismic arrival at $35­45 s after

  15. Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed February 2013 Keywords: S to P converted wave mid-mantle reflectors subducted oceanic crust northeast China

  16. {sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Refining k-means by Bootstrap and Data Depth Aurora Torrente and Juan Romo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romo, Juan

    Refining k-means by Bootstrap and Data Depth Aurora Torrente and Juan Romo Departamento de Estad two simple, computationally fast methods that allow the refinement of the initial points of k-means to cluster a given data set. They are based on alternating k-means and the search of the deepest (most

  18. Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellberg, Michael E.

    Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral Carlos of the candelabrum coral Eunicea flexuosa across the Caribbean. Eunicea is endemic to the Caribbean and all sister: How can new marine species emerge without obvious geographic isolation? Caribbean coral reefs

  19. Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    -scattering or in the transmission mode using a variety of sensor probes. In this work we used the infrared (IR) photothermal radioLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation A. Mandelis*, M. Munidasa, L. Nicolaides Photothermal and Optoelectronic Diagnostics

  20. The role of nutricline depth in regulating the ocean carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The role of nutricline depth in regulating the ocean carbon cycle Pedro Cermen~ oa , Stephanie, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307; c play key roles in the regulation of atmospheric pCO2 and the maintenance of upper trophic levels (1

  1. Possible overestimation of shallow-depth calcium carbonate dissolution in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    Possible overestimation of shallow-depth calcium carbonate dissolution in the ocean K. Friis,1,2 R calcium carbonate (TA*) above the saturation horizon cannot be unambiguously interpreted in terms of local and biogeochemistry with explicit representation of the formation and dissolution of calcium carbonate. In particular

  2. Journal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    of superconductivity is the diamagnetic response of a superconductor below its transition temperature To. The abilityJournal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in Cuprate Superconductors Steven M. AnlageI and Dong-Ho Wut Received 16 April 1992 We examine recent results

  3. IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

  4. Numerical Simulation of Impact Rollers for Estimating the Influence Depth of Soil Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kukjoo

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    will estimate more precisely the depth of influence for impact rollers. To do so, the general purpose finite element computer program LS-DYNA is used for numerical predictions. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models. A simplified...

  5. CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BY NOL RING TESTS UNDER CREEP LOADING C. Devilliers 1), 2), 3) , L. Laiarinandrasana 1) , B. Fayolle 2. KEYWORDS HDPE pipes, Nol Ring creep test, ageing effects, fracture mechanism, crack depth ratio, aged layer loading than a monotonic tensile loading. It is to be noticed that the Nol Ring test subjected to a creep

  6. A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, K. Shafer

    A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

  7. Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

  8. London penetration depth and coherence length of SU(3) vacuum flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai; Francesca Cuteri; Alessandro Papa

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse profile of the chromoelectric field generated by a quark-antiquark pair in the SU(3) vacuum is analysed within the dual superconductor scenario, then the London penetration depth and coherence length are extracted. The color field is determined on the lattice through a connected correlator of two Polyakov loops measured on smeared configurations.

  9. The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 Ã? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

  10. Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean´veloppement, La Paz, Bolivia Received 24 April 2002; revised 6 June 2002; accepted 6 June 2002; published 10 the equilibrium line of the Zongo glacier (2.4 km2 ), Bolivia (16°S). Study of the influence of wind, air

  11. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control.

  12. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. 14 figs.

  13. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  14. Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.B. Weinstein, E. Piasetzky, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Gomez, O. Hen, R. Shneor

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at intermediate xB, 0.35?xB?0.7, is linearly related to the short range correlation (SRC) scale factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at xB?1. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn pair cross sections and F2n/F2p, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

  15. Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B. Weinstein; E. Piasetzky; D. W. Higinbotham; J. Gomez; O. Hen; R. Shneor

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at intermediate $x_B$, $0.35\\le x_B\\le 0.7$, is linearly related to the Short Range Correlation (SRC) scaling factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at $x_B\\ge 1.$. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free $pn$ pair cross sections, the DIS cross section for a free neutron, and $F_2^n/F_2^p$, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

  16. Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinstein, L. B. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Piasetzky, E.; Hen, O.; Shneor, R. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Higinbotham, D. W.; Gomez, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at intermediate x{sub B}, 0.35{<=}x{sub B{<=}}0.7, is linearly related to the short range correlation (SRC) scale factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at x{sub B{>=}}1. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn pair cross sections and F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p}, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

  17. 560 GHz ft, fmax InGaAs/InP DHBT in a novel dry-etched emitter process Erik Lind, Adam M. Crook, Zach Griffith, Mark J.W. Rodwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    560 GHz ft, fmax InGaAs/InP DHBT in a novel dry-etched emitter process Erik Lind, Adam M. Crook Phone: (805) 893-3273, Fax: (805) 893-3262, Email:Erik.Lind@ftf.lth.se / lind@ece.ucsb.edu Xiao

  18. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1 PNWD-SA-7032 Range Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Software Range Sustainability ModuleRange Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 2 PNWD-SA-7032 / 2 ObjectiveObjectiveObjective Learn how to use the Range

  19. ITAR: A modified TAR method to determine depth dose distribution for an ophthalmic device that performs kilovoltage x-ray pencil-beam stereotaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanlon, Justin, E-mail: jhanlon@orayainc.com; Chell, Erik; Firpo, Michael; Koruga, Igor [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)] [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: New technology has been developed to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 100 kVp pencil-beams that enter the patient through the radio-resistant sclera with a depth of interest between 1.6 and 2.6 cm. Measurement of reference and relative dose in a kilovoltage x-ray beam with a 0.42 cm diameter field size and a 15 cm source to axis distance (SAD) is a challenge that is not fully addressed in current guidelines to medical physicists. AAPM's TG-61 gives dosimetry recommendations for low and medium energy x-rays, but not all of them are feasible to follow for this modality. Methods: An investigation was conducted to select appropriate equipment for the application. PTW's Type 34013 Soft X-Ray Chamber (Freiburg, Germany) and CIRS's Plastic Water LR (Norfolk, VA) were found to be the best available options. Attenuation curves were measured with minimal scatter contribution and thus called Low Scatter Tissue Air Ratio (LSTAR). A scatter conversion coefficient (C{sub scat}) was derived through Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation using MCNPX (LANL, Los Alamos, NM) to quantify the difference between a traditional TAR curve and the LSTAR curve. A material conversion coefficient (C{sub mat}) was determined through experimentation to evaluate the difference in attenuation properties between water and Plastic Water LR. Validity of performing direct dosimetry measurements with a source to detector distance other than the treatment distance, and therefore a different field size due to a fixed collimator, was explored. A method—Integrated Tissue Air Ratio (ITAR)—has been developed that isolates each of the three main radiological effects (distance from source, attenuation, and scatter) during measurement, and integrates them to determine the dose rate to the macula during treatment. Results: LSTAR curves were determined to be field size independent within the range explored, indicating that direct dosimetry measurements may be performed with a source to detector distance of 20 cm even though the SAD is 15 cm during treatment. C{sub scat} varied from 1.102 to 1.106 within the range of depths of interest. The experimental variance among repeated measurements of C{sub mat} was larger than depth dependence, so C{sub mat} was estimated as1.019 for all depths of interest. Conclusions: Equipment selection, measurement techniques, and formalism for the determination of dose rate to the macula during stereotaxy for AMD have been determined and are strongly recommended by the authors of this paper to be used by clinical medical physicists.

  20. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  1. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  2. Brain Tissue Depth (mm) LightPowerDensity(mW/mm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Mark

    Brain Tissue Depth (mm) LightPowerDensity(mW/mm2 ) Power Meter Tissue block Bare Fiber = 12° = 6 with the beveled cannula over CeA. d) Chart indicating estimated light power density seen at various distances from the fiber tip in mouse brain tissue when the light power density seen at the fiber tip was 7 mW (~99 mW/mm2

  3. {sup 14}C depth profiles in Apollo 15 and 17 cores and lunar rock 68815

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Cloudt, S.; Donahue, D.J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Arizona AMS Facility] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Arizona AMS Facility; Sisterson, J.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Harvard Cyclotron Lab.] [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Harvard Cyclotron Lab.; Reedy, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Masarik, J. [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics] [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the activity vs. depth profiles of {sup 14}C produced by both solar cosmic rays (SCR) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in Apollo 15 lunar cores 15001-6 and 15008, Apollo 17 core 76001, and lunar rock 68815. Calculated GCR production rates are in good agreement with {sup 14}C measurements at depths below {approximately}10 cm. Carbon-14 produced by solar protons was observed in the top few cm of the Apollo 15 cores and lunar rock 68815, with near-surface values as high as 66 dpm/kg in 68815. Only low levels of SCR-produced {sup 14}C were observed in the Apollo 17 core 76001. New cross sections for production of {sup 14}C by proton spallation on O, Si, Al, Mg, Fe, and Ni were measured using AMS. These cross sections are essential for the analysis of the measured {sup 14}C depth profiles. The best fit to the activity-depth profiles for solar-proton-produced {sup 14}C measured in the tops of both the Apollo 15 cores and 68815 was obtained for an exponential rigidity spectral shape R{sub 0} of 110--115 MV and a 4 {pi} flux (J{sub 10}, Ep > 10 MeV) of 103--108 protons/cm{sup 2}/s. These values of R{sub 0} are higher, indicating a harder rigidity, and the solar-proton fluxes are higher than those determined from {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 53}Mn measurements.

  4. Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

  5. Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

  6. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic...

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  8. Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    behavior of basin and range extensionalgeothermal systems, and particularly, the evolution ofthe system temperature with time. Each modelconsists of two mountain ranges (1 km...

  9. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  10. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  11. Cluster formation in fluids with competing short-range and long-range interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweatman, Martin B., E-mail: martin.sweatman@ed.ac.uk; Fartaria, Rui [Institute of Materials and Processes, School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Materials and Processes, School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom); Lue, Leo [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the low density behaviour of fluids that interact through a short-ranged attraction together with a long-ranged repulsion (SALR potential) by developing a molecular thermodynamic model. The SALR potential is a model of effective solute interactions where the solvent degrees of freedom are integrated-out. For this system, we find that clusters form for a range of interaction parameters where attractive and repulsive interactions nearly balance, similar to micelle formation in aqueous surfactant solutions. We focus on systems for which equilibrium behaviour and liquid-like clusters (i.e., droplets) are expected, and find in addition a novel coexistence between a low density cluster phase and a high density cluster phase within a very narrow range of parameters. Moreover, a simple formula for the average cluster size is developed. Based on this formula, we propose a non-classical crystal nucleation pathway whereby macroscopic crystals are formed via crystal nucleation within microscopic precursor droplets. We also perform large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, which demonstrate that the cluster fluid phase is thermodynamically stable for this system.

  12. IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson, Mike Brookes and Pier Luigi Dragotti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    IMAGE BASED RENDERING WITH DEPTH CAMERAS: HOW MANY ARE NEEDED? Christopher Gilliam, James Pearson London Exhibition Road, SW7 2AZ, London, United Kingdom. ABSTRACT Image based rendering is a technique of traditional color images with depth images. This combination promises to improve the rendering quality

  13. Comparison of Air Fluorescence and Ionization Measurements of E.M. Shower Depth Profiles: Test of a UHECR Detector Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belz, J.; Cao, Z.; Huentemeyer, P.; Jui, C.C.H.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J.; Maestas, M.; Smith, J.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R.W.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, S.; /Utah U.; Chen,P.; Field, Clive; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Ng, J.S.T.; Odian, A.; Reil, K.; Vincke, H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC /Montana U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; ,

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are reported on the fluorescence of air as a function of depth in electromagnetic showers initiated by bunches of 28.5 GeV electrons. The light yield is compared with the expected and observed depth profiles of ionization in the showers. It validates the use of atmospheric fluorescence profiles in measuring ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  14. American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine, and Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    1 American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine warming has been happening · What might have caused global warming · Whether global warming

  15. The Spectral Signature of Dust Scattering and Polarization in the Near IR to Far UV. I. Optical Depth and Geometry Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor G. Zubko; Ari Laor

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectropolarimetry from the near IR to the far UV of light scattered by dust provides a valuable diagnostic of the dust composition, grain size distribution and spatial distribution. To facilitate the use of this diagnostic, we present detailed calculations of the intensity and polarization spectral signature of light scattered by optically thin and optically thick dust in various geometries. The polarized light radiative transfer calculations are carried out using the adding-doubling method for a plane-parallel slab, and are extended to an optically thick sphere by integrating over its surface. The calculations are for the Mathis, Rumple & Nordsieck Galactic dust model, and cover the range from 1 $\\mu m$ to 500 \\AA. We find that the wavelength dependence of the scattered light intensity provides a sensitive probe of the optical depth of the scattering medium, while the polarization wavelength dependence provides a probe of the grain scattering properties, which is practically independent of optical depth. We provide a detailed set of predictions, including polarization maps, which can be used to probe the properties of dust through imaging spectropolarimetry in the near IR to far UV of various Galactic and extragalactic objects. In a following paper we use the codes developed here to provide predictions for the dependence of the intensity and polarization on grain size distribution and composition.

  16. POLYGENETIC TOPOGRAPHY OF THE CASCADE RANGE, WASHINGTON STATE, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -relief topography, 2) post-Miocene surface uplift of the range superimposed on pre-existing high-relief topographyPOLYGENETIC TOPOGRAPHY OF THE CASCADE RANGE, WASHINGTON STATE, USA SARA GRAN MITCHELL Range of Washington State by analyzing the topography, geology, and exhumation patterns across the range

  17. Range-gated field disturbance sensor with range-sensitivity compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudorandomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. 8 figs.

  18. Range-gated field disturbance sensor with range-sensitivity compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudorandomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies.

  19. A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Debra Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chairman, Neville Carter approved funding for me to attend a GSA field trip in the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition area for an initial look at the rocks. As I wrote computer programs and ran models, it really helped me to remember..., they did not use a modeling technique; instead, Bancroft's method (1960) was used to determine the maximum possible depth to an assumed step-source. SEISMIC STUDIES Because of the basin and range physiography, and the generally north-south orientation...

  20. {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter variability due to depth of anesthesia in the anesthetized canine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coxson, P.G.; Brennan, K.M.; Yang, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of {open_quotes}depth of anesthesia{close_quotes} on {sup 82}Rb kinetic parameter estimates in the myocardium was tested in a series of replicated studies on six dogs using the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph. A single lateral slice through the myocardium was imaged following each of four successive injections of {sup 82}Rb. For three of the injections the animals were lightly anesthetized (mean blood pressure about 90 mmHg). For the second injection, the amount of anesthetic was increased until blood pressure dipped to about 70 mHg. The fourth injection was preceded by an infusion of dipyridamole to induce a stress-state. The entire sequence was repeated at least twice with each of the six animals. A two compartment model with parameters k{sub 1} (uptake rate), k{sub 2} (wash-out rate), and f{sub v} (vascular fraction) was fit to the data. There was a consistent finding of a 20% to 30% decrease in k{sub 1} during the deeply anesthetized state compared with the two lightly anesthetized rest states. Analysis of variance showed that the difference observed is significant, though small in comparison with the difference between the rest and stress states (60% to 160% increase). The difference between the two lightly anesthetized states was not significant. Kinetic PET studies using dogs are routinely carried out with the animal anesthetized. Depth of anesthesia has been suspected as as source of variability in parameter estimates, but this conjecture has not previously been systematically investigated. These studies at extremes in the depth of anesthesia show a small but predictable effect on the uptake k{sub 1} of {sup 82}Rb.

  1. Semi-empirical model for depth dose distributions of megavoltage x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahuja, S.D.; Stroup, S.L.; Bolin, M.G.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dose distribution due to absorption of photon energy fluence in a homogeneous water phantom irradiated by megavoltage x-ray beams has been analyzed with a semiempirical model. The method generalizes an analytical formalism for the scattering component of dose within a water phantom which was developed recently for monoenergetic photon beams. Contributions to dose via Compton interaction and pair creation form the essential structure of the secondary component formula. Both the central-axis percent depth dose and off-central-axis ratios can be determined for beams of different sizes, used at any value of source to surface distance. The input data include the values of linear attenuation and energy-absorption coefficients in water at energies between 10 keV and the equivalent energy of the beam. Predicted values of the central-axis percent depth dose and the off-central-axis ratios are compared with the measured data for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 20, 35, 45, and 70 MVp x-ray beams. For the central-axis percent depth dose, agreement is within 3% for fields of sizes between 5 x 5 and 20 x 20 cm/sup 2/, and 5% for larger fields, for beams of MVp up to 20. For higher energy beams, comparison was made only for the 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ fields and the discrepancies were within 3%. For the off-central-axis ratios, agreement between the predicted and measured values is within 5% over the umbra region but worsens in the penumbra region and geometrical shadow. This formalism requires large computer storage for generating data for all realistic beams irradiating normal-size phantoms.

  2. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  3. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, M.D.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position. 8 figures.

  4. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Melvin D. (Richland, WA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position.

  5. 2nd Quarterly technical progress report for geothermal system temperature-depth database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1997-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory in Dallas, Texas, the Earth`s surface and internal temperature are studied. With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy, a data base containing geothermal temperature well information for the United States is being developed. During this calendar quarter, activity with this project has continued involving several different tasks: planning and development of the geothermal system thermal-well data base and temperature-depth data, development of the specifications for the data base, and completion of an initial inventory of the geothermal areas for which data are available.

  6. 3rd Quarterly technical progress report for geothermal system temperature-depth database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory in Dallas, Texas, the Earth`s surface and internal temperature are studied. With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy, a data base containing geothermal temperature well information for the United States is being developed. During this calendar quarter, activity with this project has continued involving several different tasks: planning and development of the geothermal system thermal-well data base and temperature-depth data, and development of a World Wide Web home page.

  7. In-depth analysis of CIGS film for solar cells, structural and optical characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slobodskyy, A; ~Ulyanenkova, T; ~Doyle, S; Powalla, M; ~Baumbach, T; ~Lemmer, U

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements performed on gradient-etched CuIn$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$Se$_2$ (CIGS) solar cells provide information about stress and texture depth profiles in the absorber layer. An important parameter for CIGS layer growth dynamics, the absorber thickness-dependent stress in the molybdenum back contact is analyzed. Texturing of grains and quality of the polycrystalline absorber layer are correlated with the intentional composition gradients (band gap grading). Band gap gradient is determined by space-resolved photoluminescence measurements and correlated with composition and strain profiles.

  8. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

  9. ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi1-minProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth

  10. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3Depth Profile of Uncompensated

  11. NREL: State and Local Governments - In-Depth Solar Technical Assistance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCost of6Data TheNews The followingIn-Depth

  12. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalTo helpUniversitiesofDepartmentalDeploymentDepth

  13. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalToDepth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an

  14. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortalToDepth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 423, Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CADD provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend a preferred corrective action for the single Corrective Action Site (CAS), 03-02-002-0308, within CAU 423. Corrective Action Unit 423 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The TTR is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles[mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The UDP is approximately 73 meters (m) (240 feet [ft]) northwest of the northwest corner of Building 03-60, the Auto Maintenance Shop. Corrective Action Unit 423 is comprised of the UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60. The UDP received waste oil products from the Auto Maintenance Shop, a light-duty fleet maintenance shop in the Area 3 compound, from 1965 to 1989 or 1990 (DOE/NV, 1997).

  16. Wide tracking range, auto ranging, low jitter phase lock loop for swept and fixed frequency systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerner, Thomas M. (Manorville, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a wide tracking range phase locked loop (PLL) circuit that achieves minimal jitter in a recovered clock signal, regardless of the source of the jitter (i.e. whether it is in the source or the transmission media). The present invention PLL has automatic harmonic lockout detection circuitry via a novel lock and seek control logic in electrical communication with a programmable frequency discriminator and a code balance detector. (The frequency discriminator enables preset of a frequency window of upper and lower frequency limits to derive a programmable range within which signal acquisition is effected. The discriminator works in combination with the code balance detector circuit to minimize the sensitivity of the PLL circuit to random data in the data stream). In addition, the combination of a differential loop integrator with the lock and seek control logic obviates a code preamble and guarantees signal acquisition without harmonic lockup. An adaptive cable equalizer is desirably used in combination with the present invention PLL to recover encoded transmissions containing a clock and/or data. The equalizer automatically adapts to equalize short haul cable lengths of coaxial and twisted pair cables or wires and provides superior jitter performance itself. The combination of the equalizer with the present invention PLL is desirable in that such combination permits the use of short haul wires without significant jitter.

  17. Device and method for the measurement of depth of interaction using co-planar electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY)

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for measuring a depth of interaction of an ionizing event and improving resolution of a co-planar grid sensor (CPG) are provided. A time-of-occurrence is measured using a comparator to time the leading edge of the event pulse from the non-collecting or collecting grid. A difference signal between the grid signals obtained with a differential amplifier includes a pulse with a leading edge occurring at the time-of-detection, measured with another comparator. A timing difference between comparator outputs corresponds to the depth of interaction, calculated using a processor, which in turn weights the difference grid signal to improve spectral resolution of a CPG sensor. The device, which includes channels for grid inputs, may be integrated into an Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The combination of the device and sensor is included. An improved high-resolution CPG is provided, e.g., a gamma-ray Cadmium Zinc Telluride CPG sensor operating at room temperature.

  18. Depositional patterns and reservoir morphology of Guadalupian Cherry Canyon sandstones, Indian Draw Field, Eddy County, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Sandra

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shown in Fig. 29 119 Isopach of final channel-fill showing the highly sinuous geometry of the thinly interbedded sandstones siltstones and shales. Contour interval 5 ft (1. 5 m). . 121 44 Diagrammatic cross section illustrating the size, shape... at depths ranging from. 3200 to 3350 ft (975 to 1020 m). These reservoir sand- stones occur interbedded with limestones, siltstones and thin shales, and were deposited approximately 10 mi (16 km) downdip from the Guadalupian reef front in the Delaware...

  19. Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno Bokhove, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno navigation channels are maintained by dredging sand and slurries off sea and river removal by dredging. Some progress has already been made, both at Leeds

  20. Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination that are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination!) of 14C per gram of carbon. Sensitivities to uranium and thorium in a 5-kg sample, assuming secular

  1. An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

  2. United States Army; Fort Gordon, Georgia, Range Control Operations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (DPTMS), Page 10 2.5 Chief-Training Division, DPTMS, Page 10 2.6 Fort Gordon Range Control Operations, Page 10 2.7 Fort Gordon Installation Range Manager, Page 10 2.8 Fort...

  3. Digital Dynamic Range Compressor Design--A Tutorial and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiss, Josh

    PAPERS Digital Dynamic Range Compressor Design-- A Tutorial and Analysis DIMITRIOS GIANNOULIS formal knowledge and analysis of compressor design techniques. In this tutorial we describe several different approaches to digital dynamic range compressor design. Digital implementations of several classic

  4. Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

  5. Monitoring Long-Range Electron Transfer Pathways in Proteins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure and should offer a novel window for long-range ET. Citation: Zhang Y, J Biggs, N Govind, and S Mukamel.2014."Monitoring Long-Range Electron Transfer Pathways in...

  6. Design, installation and implementation of a Neutron Depth Profiling facility at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, Nazir Sabbar

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING FACILITY AT THE TEXAS A&M NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER A Thesis by NAZIR SABBAR KHALIL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING FACILITY AT THE TEXAS A(IM NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER A Thesis by NAZIR SABBAR KHALIL...

  7. Two-dimensional spectral/statistical analysis of Marine magnetic data: implications for depth-to-magnetic source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrull, Jeffrey Lee

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T'A'0-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL/STATISTICAL ANAI. YSIS OF MARINE MAGNETIC DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEPTH-TO-MAGNETIC SOURCE A Thesis by JEFFREY LEE SCHRULL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Geophysics TWO-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL/STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF MARINE MAGNETIC DATA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEPTH-TO-MAGNETIC SOURCE A Thesis JEFFREY LEE SCHRULL Approved as to style...

  8. The Effects of Large Storm Events on Basin-Range Riparia_nStream Habitats1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This report des cribes habitat changes in Creek show peak flows of 114 cfs on May 30, three riparian stream was to randomly select ~:Sstream and subdivide it into 181 6.02 laced at 10-ft intervals along t he UJ

  9. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 57

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 57 PNWD-SA-7032 / 57 Sample Information Box for Segment 4 the RDX Measurements for the 2 MI Samples in Segment 4 #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 58 PNWD;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 59 PNWD-SA-7032 / 59 Sample Information Box for Segment 4 UCL

  10. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 25 PNWD-SA-7032 / 25 Sampling Goals Establish Boundary of Contamination Partial Boundary #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 26 PNWD-SA-7032 / 26 Required Samples #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 27 PNWD-SA-7032 / 27 Specify Constituents of Concern

  11. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 17 PNWD-SA-7032 / 17 Edit Sample Areas Define New Sample Area Defined Sample Area #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 18 PNWD-SA-7032 / 18 "New Area" button on the Toolbar Defined Sample Area #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 19 PNWD-SA-7032

  12. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 41

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 41 PNWD-SA-7032 / 41 Assumptions Underlying the UCLs. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 42 PNWD-SA-7032 / 42 Hypothetical Case Study that the action limit for the RDX mean (4.4 ppm) is not exceeded. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 43

  13. Effect of equatorial line nodes on the upper critical field and London penetration depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V G [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, R [Ames Laboratory

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper critical field Hc2 and its anisotropy are calculated for order parameters with line nodes at the equators, kz=0, of the Fermi surface of uniaxial superconductors. It is shown that characteristic features found in Fe-based materials (a nearly linear Hc2(T) in a broad T domain, a low and increasing on warming anisotropy ?H=Hc2,ab/Hc2,c) can be caused by competing effects of the equatorial nodes and of the Fermi surface anisotropy. For certain material parameters, ?H(T)?1 may change sign upon warming, in agreement with the recorded behavior of FeTeS systems. It is also shown that the anisotropy of the penetration depth ??=?c/?ab decreases upon warming to reach ?H at Tc, in agreement with data available. For some materials ??(T) may change upon warming, from ??>1 at low Ts to ??<1 at high Ts.

  14. Superconducting coherence length and magnetic penetration depth of a p-wave holographic superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng Huabi; Fan Zheyong [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zong Hongshi [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in (3+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in (2+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconducting coherence length {xi} of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we make a perturbative study of the gravity theory analytically. The superconducting coherence length {xi} is found to be proportional to (1-T/T{sub c}){sup -1/2} near the critical temperature T{sub c}. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth {lambda}{proportional_to}(T{sub c}-T){sup 1/2} by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  15. Superconducting Coherence Length and Magnetic Penetration Depth of a p-wave Holographic Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua-Bi Zeng; Zhe-Yong Fan; Hong-Shi Zong

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in 3+1 dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in 2+1 dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we study the perturbation of the gravity theory analytically. The superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ is found to be proportional to $(1-T/T_c)^{-1/2}$ near the critical temperature $T_c$. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth $\\lambda\\propto(T_c-T)^{1/2}$ by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  16. Complex Faraday depth structure of Active Galactic Nuclei as revealed by broadband radio polarimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, S P; Robishaw, T; Schnitzeler, D H F M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Feain, I J; Taylor, A R; Gaensler, B M; Landecker, T L; Harvey-Smith, L; Carretti, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the Faraday depth structure of four bright (> 1 Jy), strongly polarized, unresolved, radio-loud quasars. The Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) was used to observe these sources with 2 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth from 1.1 to 3.1 GHz. This allowed us to spectrally resolve the polarization structure of spatially unresolved radio sources, and by fitting various Faraday rotation models to the data, we conclusively demonstrate that two of the sources cannot be described by a simple rotation measure (RM) component modified by depolarization from a foreground Faraday screen. Our results have important implications for using background extragalactic radio sources as probes of the galactic and intergalactic magneto-ionic media as we show how RM estimations from narrow-bandwidth observations can give erroneous results in the presence of multiple interfering Faraday components. We postulate that the additional RM components arise from polarized structure in the compact inner regio...

  17. Transmission of Solar Radiation by Clouds over Snow and Ice Surfaces. Part II: Cloud Optical Depth and Shortwave Radiative Forcing from Pyranometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    coincident hourly sea ice reports, instantaneous cloud radiative forcing and effective cloud optical depth. "Effective" optical depths (for a radiatively equivalent horizontally homogeneous cloud) are classified a characteristic optical depth of 15 at 47°S, increasing to 24 in the region of maximum cloud cover at 58°S

  18. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Aubrey, A.D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Kieft, T L [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology] [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Silver, B J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Heerden, E. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Opperman, D. J. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Bada, J L. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,] [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  19. Depth absorbed dose and LET distributions of therapeutic {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, Johanna; Gudowska, Irena; Brahme, Anders [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth absorbed dose and LET (linear energy transfer) distribution of different ions of clinical interest such as {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C ions have been investigated using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT. The energies of the projectiles correspond to ranges in water and soft tissue of approximately 260 mm. The depth dose distributions of the primary particles and their secondaries have been calculated and separated with regard to their low and high LET components. A LET value below 10 eV/nm can generally be regarded as low LET and sparsely ionizing like electrons and photons. The high LET region may be assumed to start at 20 eV/nm where on average two double-strand breaks can be formed when crossing the periphery of a nucleosome, even though strictly speaking the LET limits are not sharp and ought to vary with the charge and mass of the ion. At the Bragg peak of a monoenergetic high energy proton beam, less than 3% of the total absorbed dose is comprised of high LET components above 20 eV/nm. The high LET contribution to the total absorbed dose in the Bragg peak is significantly larger with increasing ion charge as a natural result of higher stopping power and lower range straggling. The fact that the range straggling and multiple scattering are reduced by half from hydrogen to helium increases the possibility to accurately deposit only the high LET component in the tumor with negligible dose to organs at risk. Therefore, the lateral penumbra is significantly improved and the higher dose gradients of {sup 7}Li and {sup 12}C ions both longitudinally and laterally will be of major advantage in biological optimized radiation therapy. With increasing charge of the ion, the high LET absorbed dose in the beam entrance and the plateau regions where healthy normal tissues are generally located is also increased. The dose distribution of the high LET components in the {sup 7}Li beam is only located around the Bragg peak, characterized by a Gaussian-type distribution. Furthermore, the secondary particles produced by high energy {sup 7}Li ions in tissuelike media have mainly low LET character both in front of and beyond the Bragg peak.

  20. Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  3. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett...

  5. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  7. LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION BARRELS) FILE UPDATED April 2004 Line Month Low High Number Product Name Geography...

  8. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

  9. Extending the Temperature Range of Electric Submersible Pumps...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0 4.4.5 Extending the Temperature Range of Electric Submersible Pumps to 338 C - Hotline IV - High-temperature ESP Presentation Number: 019 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh...

  10. ORISE: Nuclear engineering degrees at highest ranges since 1980s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows graduation, enrollment rates for nuclear engineering candidates are still at highest ranges reported since 1980s Report also shows shifts in career opportunities...

  11. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  12. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  13. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

  14. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

  15. Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites Pre-activity survey report to clear areas to be cleaned up. No sensitive species were...

  16. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada...

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  18. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  19. Steady state deformation of the Coso Range, east central California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from satellite radar interferometry Abstract Observations of deformation from 1992 to 1997 in the southern Coso Range using satellite radar interferometry show deformation rates...

  20. Structure, tectonics and stress field of the Coso Range, Inyo...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Structure, tectonics and stress field of the Coso Range, Inyo County,...

  1. Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States...

  2. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  3. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  4. "Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J J

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

  5. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qiguang [Norfolk State University; Williams, Frances [Norfolk State University; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Krishnan, Mahadevan [AASC, San Leandro, California

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials? microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials? crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surface?s top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  6. Decreasing range resolution of a SAR image to permit correction of motion measurement errors beyond the SAR range resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  7. Long-Range Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging for Bioaffinity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-Range Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging for Bioaffinity Sensors Alastair W. Wark, Hye Jin Lee A novel bioaffinity sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging measurements of a multiple- layered structure that supports the generation of long- range surface plasmons (LRSPs) at the water

  8. Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

  9. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 33 PNWD-SA-7032 / 33 Map View Sample Information Box Click in this Column #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 34 PNWD-SA-7032 / 34 Sample Information Box Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 35 PNWD-SA-7032 / 35 Segment Sample Results Box Enter Measurements

  10. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 49 PNWD-SA-7032 / 49 Hypothetical Case Study (Continued Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 50 PNWD-SA-7032 / 50 Hypothetical Case Study (Continued)Hypothetical Case Study Save #12;Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 51 PNWD-SA-7032 / 51 Coordinate View X and Y

  11. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9 PNWD-SA-7032 / 9 What are the Steps in Using the VSP Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 10 PNWD-SA-7032 / 10 Hypotheses Being TestedHypotheses Being Tested is false., i.e., on showing that the segment does not need to be bumped out. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP

  12. Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each...

  13. Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1 Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range Wednesday, December 15, 2010 Melissa due to renewable energy infrastructure development at the Nevada Test and Training Range. Nevada has have ever-increasing renewable energy goals. However, proposals for the development of 116 renewable

  14. ESS and Dissipation Range Dynamics of 3-D Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Sain; J. K. Bhattacharjee

    1997-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We carry out a self consistent calculation of the structure functions in the dissipation range using Navier Stokes equation. Combining these results with the known structures in the inertial range, we actually propose crossover functions for the structure functions that takes one smoothly from the inertial to the dissipation regime. In the process the success of the extended self similarity is explicitly demonstrated.

  15. Optimal Short-Range Routing of Vessels in a Seaway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert L.

    Optimal Short-Range Routing of Vessels in a Seaway Irina S. Dolinskaya¹ Miltiadis Kotinis² Michael Industrial and Operations Engineering 1205 Beal Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 ²Old Dominion University Short-Range Routing of Vessels in a Seaway Dolinskaya, I. S.1 , Kotinis, M.2 , Parsons, M. G.3

  16. Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    INVITED P A P E R Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts To provide a potential communications channel, HVAC ducts can function as electromagnetic waveguides; a 30-m read range has been-conditioning (HVAC) ducts as a potential communication channel between passive ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) radio

  17. Calibration methodology for a dual-ended readout silicon photomultiplier based depth-of-interaction PET detector module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, Wenze [JLAB; McKisson, John E. [JLAB; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Lee, Seung Joon [JLAB; Taylor, William Mark [JLAB; Stepanyan, Armenak [JLAB; Zorn, Carl J. [JLAB

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a novel calibration methodology for a PET detector with dual-ended readout of an LYSO array by two silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). By introducing a detector gain balancing step in the calibration process, improved depth-of-interaction calibration uniformity and accuracy can be achieved. The entire calibration process has four steps: scintillation crystal array mappings for two SiPM readouts, detector gain balancing, energy calibration, and depth-of-interaction calibration. This document provides a detailed description on the detector calibration system setup.

  18. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? (II) ----Ozone layer depth reconstruction via HEWV effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jilong; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested by Chen {\\it et al.} that the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance ($280-400$ nm) could influence the Earth's surface temperature variation by "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect. In this manuscript, we reconstruct the developing history of the ozone layer depth variation from 1860 to 2011 based on the HEWV effect. It is shown that the reconstructed ozone layer depth variation correlates with the observational variation from 1958 to 2005 very well ($R=0.8422$, $P>99.9\\%$). From this reconstruction, we may limit the spectra band of the surface Ultraviolet irradiance referred in HEWV effect to Ultraviolet B ($280-320$ nm).

  19. Laser Ranging for Gravitational, Lunar, and Planetary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Merkowitz; Philip W. Dabney; Jeffrey C. Livas; Jan F. McGarry; Gregory A. Neumann; Thomas W. Zagwodzki

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    More precise lunar and Martian ranging will enable unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity and well as lunar and planetary science. NASA is currently planning several missions to return to the Moon, and it is natural to consider if precision laser ranging instruments should be included. New advanced retroreflector arrays at carefully chosen landing sites would have an immediate positive impact on lunar and gravitational studies. Laser transponders are currently being developed that may offer an advantage over passive ranging, and could be adapted for use on Mars and other distant objects. Precision ranging capability can also be combined with optical communications for an extremely versatile instrument. In this paper we discuss the science that can be gained by improved lunar and Martian ranging along with several technologies that can be used for this purpose.

  20. Low temperature London penetration depth and superfluid density in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyunsoo [Ames Laboratory] [Ames Laboratory

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting gap symmetry of the Fe-based superconductors was studied by measurements and analysis of London penetration depth and super uid density. Tunnel diode resonator technique for these measurements was implemented in a dilution refrigerator allowing for the temperatures down to 50 mK. For the analysis of the super uid density, we used both experimental studies of Al-coated samples and original thermodynamic approach based on Rutgers relation. In three systems studied, we found that the superconducting gap at the optimal doping is best described in multi-gap full gap scenario. By performing experiments on samples with arti#12;cially introduced disorder with heavy ion irradiation, we show that evolution of the superconducting transition temperature and of the super uid density are consistent with full-gap sign changing s#6; superconducting state. The superconducting gap develops strong modulation both in the under-doped and the over-doped regimes. In the terminal hole-doped KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, both temperature dependence of the super uid density and its evolution with increase of the scattering rate are consistent with symmetry imposed vertical line nodes in the superconducting gap. By comparative studies of hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and electron-doped Ca10-3-8, we show that the superconducting gap modulation in the under-doped regime is intrinsic and is not induced by the coexisting static magnetic order.

  1. Vacuum Energy and Casimir Force in a Presence of Skin-depth Dependent Boundary Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. L. Lebedev

    2000-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum energy-momentum tensor (EMT) and the vacuum energy corresponding to massive scalar field on $\\Re_{t}\\times [0,l] \\times \\Re^{D-2}$ space-time with boundary condition involving a dimensional parameter ($\\delta$) are found. The dependent on the cavity size $l$ Casimir energy $\\wt E_{C}$ is a uniquely determinable function of mass $m$, size $l$ and "skin-depth" $\\delta$. This energy includes the "bulk" and the surface (potential energy) contributions. The latter dominates when $l \\sim \\delta$. Taking the surface potential energy into account is crucial for the coincidence between the derivative $-\\d \\wt E_{C}/\\d l$ and the $ll$-component of the vacuum EMT. Casimir energy $\\wt E_C$ and the bulk contribution to it are interconnected through Legendre transformation, in which the quantity $\\delta^{-1}$ is conjugate to the vacuum surface energy multiplied by $\\delta$. The surface singularities of the vacuum EMT do not depend on $l$ and, for even $D$, $\\delta =0$ or $\\infty$, possess finite interpretation. The corresponding vacuum energy is finite and retains known analytical dependence on the dimension $D$.

  2. Magnetic reconnection on the ion-skin-depth scale in the dusty magnetotail of a comet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K.; Morfill, G. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistive magnetic reconnection is studied in a dusty plasma configuration without a guide magnetic field, typical for cometary tails. For a high-{beta} plasma ({beta}{approx}1) consisting of electrons, ions, and immobile dust grains that constitute a neutralizing background, a two-fluid description is used to study electromagnetic perturbations with the frequency below the ion gyrofrequency, propagating at an arbitrary angle relative to the background magnetic field and including the effects of the Hall current. The perturbations consist of both the compressional and torsional components of the magnetic field, as well as of the acoustic perturbations and the electrostatic potential. The symmetry breaking between electrons and ions, introduced by the presence of dust grains, gives rise to an E-vectorxB-vector current in the unperturbed state which can support an antiparallel magnetic field configuration even in a cold plasma. In the perturbed state, the emergence of a new electromagnetic mode in a dusty plasma, which is evanescent below the Rao cutoff frequency and has the characteristic wavelength comparable to the ion skin depth, enables the reconnection at short spatial scales. The growth rate of the tearing instability is evaluated analytically.

  3. Depth profiling of vacancy clusters in MeV-implanted Si using Au labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezia, V.C.; Eaglesham, D.J. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Haynes, T.E. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Agarwal, A. [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Jacobson, D.C.; Gossmann, H.; Baumann, F.H. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for profiling the clustered-vacancy region produced by high-energy ion implantation into silicon is described and tested. This technique takes advantage of the fact that metal impurities, such as Au, are trapped in the region of excess vacancies produced by MeV Si implants into silicon. In this work, the clustered-vacancy regions produced by 1-, 2-, and 8-MeV Si implants into silicon have been labeled with Au diffused in from the front surface at 750thinsp{degree}C. The trapped Au was profiled with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The dynamics of the clustered-vacancy region were monitored for isochronal annealing at 750{endash}1000thinsp{degree}C, and for isothermal annealing at 950thinsp{degree}C, for 10{endash}600 s. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that after the drive-in anneal, the Au in the region of vacancy clusters is in the form of precipitates. The results demonstrate that the Au-labeling technique offers a convenient and potentially quantitative tool for depth profiling vacancies in clusters. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Large Dynamic Range Electromagnetic FieldLarge Dynamic Range Electromagnetic Field Sensor based on Domain Inverted Electro-Optic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Large Dynamic Range Electromagnetic FieldLarge Dynamic Range Electromagnetic Field Sensor based on Domain Inverted Electro-Optic Polymer Directional CouplerPolymer Directional Coupler Alan X. Wang Ray T. Chen Omega Optics Inc Austin TXOmega Optics Inc., Austin, TX -1- #12;Application of Electric Field

  5. Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL-Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL- Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective 500-05-026 and 500-08-061. LBNL Report Number LBNL-6683E #12;Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL- Page 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored

  6. Multiscale nature of the dissipation range in solar wind turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Told, D; TenBarge, J M; Howes, G G; Hammett, G W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear energy transfer and dissipation in Alfv\\'en wave turbulence are analyzed in the first gyrokinetic simulation spanning all scales from the tail of the MHD range to the electron gyroradius scale. For typical solar wind parameters at 1 AU, about 30% of the nonlinear energy transfer close to the electron gyroradius scale is mediated by modes in the tail of the MHD cascade. Collisional dissipation occurs across the entire kinetic range $k_\\perp\\rho_i\\gtrsim 1$. Both mechanisms thus act on multiple coupled scales, which have to be retained for a comprehensive picture of the dissipation range in Alfv\\'enic turbulence.

  7. -RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION -21 Applied Vegetation Science 8: 21-26, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navrátilová, Jana

    - RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION - 21 Applied Vegetation during restoration. The PVC tape discolouration method enables spatially and temporally extensive studies and the same variables indicated by discolouration of PVC tape attached to green bamboo stakes installed

  8. release of SF6 at a depth of 4000 m in the Brazil Basin of the South Atlantic. It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Nathan

    642 release of SF6 at a depth of 4000 m in the Brazil Basin of the South Atlantic. It revealed, excess salinity is "locked" into sinking fin- gers, whereas excess heat tends to leak away. Because SF6. Based on SF6 dispersion, Schmitt et al. deduce a mixing rate for salinity that is approximately double

  9. Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

  10. Loading rate dependency of maximum nanoindentation depth in nano-grained NiTi shape memory alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qing-Ping

    of loading rate on nanoindentation depth for nano-grained polycrystalline superelastic (SE) NiTi SMA superelastic NiTi polycrystalline sheets were purchased from Memory Applications Inc. (USA). With X temperature (T=23 °C). To avoid plastic deformation under the tip, two spherical diamond tips with radii of R

  11. SQL SERVER DATABASE ADMINISTRATION An eleven-week in-depth program covering database administration using Microsoft SQL Server 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    SQL SERVER DATABASE ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM An eleven-week in-depth program covering database administration using Microsoft SQL Server® 2012 DePaul University's SQL Server Database Administration Program Server technologies. The program focuses on teaching IT professionals the knowledge for implementing

  12. SQL SERVER DATABASE ADMINISTRATION An eleven-week in-depth program covering database administration using Microsoft SQL Server 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    SQL SERVER DATABASE ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM An eleven-week in-depth program covering database administration using Microsoft SQL Server® 2008 DePaul University's SQL Server Database Administration Program Server technologies. The program focuses on teaching IT professionals the knowledge for implementing

  13. Ez, a Depth-dependent Potential for Assessing the Energies of Insertion of Amino Acid Side-chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senes, Alessandro

    with experimental data such as amino acid transfer free energy scales (water to membrane center and water core, a polar headgroup region, and the extra-membrane aqueous region. The free energies of transfer the free energy profile for each residue type as a continuous function of its depth of insertion within

  14. The Nereus Hybrid Underwater Robotic Vehicle for Global Ocean Science Operations to 11,000m Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcomb, Louis L.

    The Nereus Hybrid Underwater Robotic Vehicle for Global Ocean Science Operations to 11,000m Depth-- This paper reports an overview of the new Nereus hybrid underwater vehicle and summarizes the vehicle's per hybrid underwater vehicle and summarizes its performance during its first sea trials. Nereus is a novel

  15. Depth Profiling Photoelectron-Spectroscopic Study of an Organic Spin Valve with a Plasma-Modified Pentacene Spacer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Minn-Tsong

    Depth Profiling Photoelectron-Spectroscopic Study of an Organic Spin Valve with a Plasma) in an organic spin valve with an oxygen plasma-treated pentacene (PC) spacer. The spin valve containing PC and in turn to enhance the MR performance in organic spin valves. INTRODUCTION Organic semiconductors (OSC

  16. Confocal X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Microscopy: A New Technique for the Nondestructive Compositional Depth Profiling of Paintings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    #12;Confocal X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Microscopy: A New Technique for the Nondestructive tools such as x-ray fluorescence (XRF) [4,5,6,7] and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) [3,8,9] to address the problem of compositional depth profiling of paintings. One XRF method consists of deducing

  17. Novel Technique for the CO2 Laser Fabrication of Optical Devices with Sub-Micrometer Ablation Depth Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a strong wavelength and temperature dependence 5 . In this work a 100 W, pulse width modulated (PWM), CO2Novel Technique for the CO2 Laser Fabrication of Optical Devices with Sub-Micrometer Ablation Depth techniques for the processing of fibre end face and cladding surfaces using a 9.6 µm CO2 laser. We

  18. The Effect of an Occluder on Near Field Depth Matching in Optical See-Through Augmented Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan II, J. Edward

    ]. We used an AR haploscope, which allows us to independently manipulate accommodative demand the effects of accommodative demand, brightness, and participant age on depth perception. Among the additional of Edwards et al.'s [2] work was brain surgery, and therefore they used a plastic model of a human head

  19. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north?central Oklahoma: 1992–2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Denn, Frederick; Flynn, Connor J.; Hodges, G. B.; Kiedron, Piotr; Koontz, Annette S.; Schlemmer, James; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow?band, interference?filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloudscreening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun’s elevation is greater than 9.25°. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month?by?month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

  20. A wide-dynamic-range time-based CMOS imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Halloran, Micah G. (Micah Galletta), 1978-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a novel dual-threshold time-based current sensing algorithm suitable for use in wide-dynamic-range CMOS imagers. A prototype 150 x 256 pixel imager employing this algorithm experimentally achieves ...

  1. Temperature Driven Diet Quality Prediction for Free-Ranging Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yingjie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapid and accurate method to determine or predict cattle diet quality is essential to effectively manage free-ranging cattle production. One popular tool currently available for predicting cattle diet quality is fecal Near Infrared Reflectance...

  2. Temperature inversion in long-range interacting systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teles, Tarcisio N; Casetti, Lapo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature inversions occur in nature, e.g., in the solar corona and in interstellar molecular clouds: somewhat counterintuitively, denser parts of the system are colder than dilute ones. We propose a simple and appealing mechanism to spontaneously generate temperature inversions in systems with long-range interactions, by preparing them in inhomogeneous thermal equilibrium states and then applying an impulsive perturbation. In similar situations, short-range systems would typically relax to another thermal equilibrium, with uniform temperature profile. By contrast, in long-range systems, the interplay between wave-particle interaction and spatial inhomogeneity drives the system to nonequilibrium stationary states that generically exhibit temperature inversion. Our work underlines the crucial role the range of interparticle interaction plays in determining the nature of steady states attained when macroscopic systems are brought out of thermal equilibrium.

  3. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  5. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  6. Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  7. Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation Plans in the Pacific Northwest: A Review Climate Change and Impacts Mitigation versus Adaptation Impacts of Climate Change: Nation & the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Planning Efforts Transportation Sector Response - Survey Recommendations Continued

  8. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Toxic Range Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic plants can pose a major threat to livestock during a drought. This publication explains the importance of knowing which plants are toxic, keeping the range healthy, and preventing toxic plant problems....

  9. Multi-dimensional position sensor using range detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small, non-contact optical sensor uses ranges and images to detect its relative position to an object in up to six degrees of freedom. The sensor has three light emitting range detectors which illuminate a target and can be used to determine distance and two tilt angles. A camera located between the three range detectors senses the three remaining degrees of freedom, two translations and one rotation. Various range detectors, with different light sources, e.g. lasers and LEDs, different collection options, and different detection schemes, e.g. diminishing return and time of flight can be used. This sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines, e.g. it can instruct a robot how to adjust automatically to different positions and orientations of a part.

  10. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography West of Death Valley California...

  11. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Toxic Range Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic plants can pose a major threat to livestock during a drought. This publication explains the importance of knowing which plants are toxic, keeping the range healthy, and preventing toxic plant problems....

  12. Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of 150-200C have been discovered in the northern Basin and Range Province of the USA. A comparison of these high and moderate temperature systems shows considerable overlap...

  13. A single-chip real-Time range finder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sicheng

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    for their temporal bandwidth and detection performance. The mathematical and optical models of the system are built and carefully verified. A prototype based on this technique has been fabricated and tested. The experimental results prove that the range finder can...

  14. Folded Compact Range Development and Coherent Change Detection Measurement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, K.W.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel, folded compact range configuration has been developed at the Sandia National Laboratories compact range antenna and radar cross section measurement facility, operated by the Radar/Antenna Department 2343, as a means of performing indoor, environmentally-controlled, far-field simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD) measurements. This report describes the development of the folded compact range configuration, as well as the initial set of coherent change detection measurements made with the system. These measurements have been highly successful, and have demonstrated the viability of the folded compact range concept in simulating SAR CCD measurements. It is felt that follow-on measurements have the potential of contributing significantly to the body of knowledge available to the scientific community involved in CCD image generation and processing, and that this tool will be a significant aid in the research and development of change detection methodologies.

  15. Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  16. Colorado Front Range Fuel Photo Series Michael A. Battaglia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    Colorado Front Range Fuel Photo Series Michael A. Battaglia Jonathan M. Dodson Wayne D. Shepperd of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station June 2005 #12;Battaglia, Michael A.; Dodson

  17. HIGH DYNAMIC-RANGE HIGH SPEED LINAC CURRENT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deibele, Craig Edmond [ORNL] [ORNL; Curry, Douglas E [ORNL] [ORNL; Dickson, Richard W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is desired to measure the linac current of a charged particle beam with a consistent accuracy over a dynamic range of over 120 dB. Conventional current transformers suffer from droop, can be susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and can be bandwidth limited. A novel detector and electronics were designed to maximize dynamic range of about 120 dB and measure rise-times on the order of 10 nanoseconds.

  18. Range Vegetation After Mechanical Brush Treatment on the Coastal Prairie.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutz, J.L.; Scifres, C.J.; Drawe, D.L.; Box, T.W.; Whitson, R.E.

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    director. The Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Founda- tion. Sinton. Texas Box. T . W., dean. College of Natural Resources. Utah State University. Logan Whitson. R . E., associate professor. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (Departments of Range... Science and Agricultural Economics) Summary In 1963, several mechanical brush management practices were installed on a Blackland range site which supported a "Chaparral-bristlegras~" community of the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Refuge near Sinton...

  19. Hard probes of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Arrington; D. W. Higinbotham; G. Rosner; M. Sargsian

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is providing a complete description of the structure of atomic nuclei. While mean-field calculations provide detailed information on the nuclear shell structure for a wide range of nuclei, they do not capture the complete structure of nuclei, in particular the impact of small, dense structures in nuclei. The strong, short-range component of the nucleon-nucleon potential yields hard interactions between nucleons which are close together, generating a high-momentum tail to the nucleon momentum distribution, with momenta well in excess of the Fermi momentum. This high-momentum component of the nuclear wave-function is one of the most poorly understood parts of nuclear structure. Utilizing high-energy probes, we can isolate scattering from high-momentum nucleons, and use these measurements to examine the structure and impact of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. Over the last decade we have moved from looking for evidence of such short-range structures to mapping out their strength in nuclei and examining their isospin structure. This has been made possible by high-luminosity and high-energy accelerators, coupled with an improved understanding of the reaction mechanism issues involved in studying these structures. We review the general issues related to short-range correlations, survey recent experiments aimed at probing these short-range structures, and lay out future possibilities to further these studies.

  20. Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L.G. Thompson and E. Mosley-Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L.G. Thompson and E. Mosley-Thompson

  1. New Technique for Developing a Proton Range Compensator With Use of a 3-Dimensional Printer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Sang Gyu, E-mail: sg.ju@samsung.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Kyu; Hong, Chae-Seon; Kim, Jin Sung; Han, Youngyih; Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A new system for manufacturing a proton range compensator (RC) was developed by using a 3-dimensional printer (3DP). The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of the new RC manufactured by 3DP (RC{sub 3}DP) were compared with those of a conventional RC (RC{sub C}MM) manufactured by a computerized milling machine (CMM). Methods and Materials: An RC for brain tumor treatment with a scattered proton beam was calculated with a treatment planning system, and the resulting data were converted into a new format for 3DP using in-house software. The RC{sub 3}DP was printed with ultraviolet curable acrylic plastic, and an RC{sub C}MM was milled into polymethylmethacrylate using a CMM. The inner shape of both RCs was scanned by using a 3D scanner and compared with TPS data by applying composite analysis (CA; with 1-mm depth difference and 1 mm distance-to-agreement criteria) to verify their geometric accuracy. The position and distal penumbra of distal dose falloff at the central axis and field width of the dose profile at the midline depth of spread-out Bragg peak were measured for the 2 RCs to evaluate their dosimetric characteristics. Both RCs were imaged on a computed tomography scanner to evaluate uniformity of internal density. The manufacturing times for both RCs were compared to evaluate the production efficiency. Results: The pass rates for the CA test were 99.5% and 92.5% for RC{sub 3}DP and RC{sub C}MM, respectively. There was no significant difference in dosimetric characteristics and uniformity of internal density between the 2 RCs. The net fabrication times of RC{sub 3}DP and RC{sub C}MM were about 18 and 3 hours, respectively. Conclusions: The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of RC{sub 3}DP were comparable with those of the conventional RC{sub C}MM, and significant system minimization was provided.

  2. Reddy and Kikuchi: Host Range Assessment of Podisus maculiventris 853 LABORATORY HOST RANGE ASSESSMENT OF A PREDATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Gadi VP

    RANGE ASSESSMENT OF A PREDATORY PENTATOMID, PODISUS MACULIVENTRIS (HEMIPTERA: PENTATOMIDAE) FOR FIELD by Podisus maculiventris (Say) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) was evaluated with Erionota thrax (L.) (Lepidoptera) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) utili- zando Erionota thrax (L.) (Lepidoptera; Hesperidae), Pericyma cruegeri

  3. Long-range hybrid ridge and trench plasmonic waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian, Yusheng [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gong, Qihuang, E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a class of long-range hybrid plasmon polariton waveguides capable of simultaneously achieving low propagation loss and tight field localization at telecommunication wavelength. The symmetric (quasi-symmetric) hybrid configurations featuring high-refractive-index-contrast near the non-uniform metallic nanostructures enable significantly improved optical performance over conventional hybrid waveguides, exhibiting considerably longer propagation distances and dramatically enhanced figure of merits for similar degrees of confinement. Compared to their traditional long-range plasmonic counterparts, the proposed hybrid waveguides put much less stringent requirements on index-matching conditions, demonstrating nice performance under a wide range of physical dimensions and robust characteristics against certain fabrication imperfections. Studies concerning crosstalk between adjacent identical waveguides further reveal their potential for photonic integrations. In addition, alternative configurations with comparable guiding properties to the structures in our case studies are also proposed, which can potentially serve as attractive prototypes for numerous high-performance nanophotonic components.

  4. Rattlesnake Mountain Observator (46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W) multispectral optical depth measurements, 1979--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [ed.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface measurements of solar irradiance of the atmosphere were made by a multipurpose computer-controlled scanning photometer at the Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory. The observatory is located at 46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W at an elevation of 1088 m above mean sea level. The photometer measures the attenuation of direct solar radiation for different wavelengths using 12 filters. Five of these filters (ie., at 428 nm, 486 nm, 535 nm, 785 nm, and 1010 nm, with respective half-power widths of 2, 2, 3, 18, and 28 nm) are suitable for monitoring variations in the total optical depth of the atmosphere. Total optical depths for the five wavelength bands were derived from solar irradiance measurements taken at the observatory from August 5, 1979, to September 2, 1994; these total optical depth data are distributed with this numeric data package (NDP). To determine the contribution of atmospheric aerosols to the total optical depths, the effects of Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption were subtracted (other molecular scattering was minimal for the five filters) to obtain total column aerosol optical depths. The total aerosol optical depths were further decomposed into tropospheric and stratospheric components by calculating a robustly smoothed mean background optical depth (tropospheric component) for each wavelength using data obtained during periods of low stratospheric aerosol loading. By subtracting the smoothed background tropospheric aerosol optical depths from the total aerosol optical depths, residual aerosol optical depths were obtained. These residuals are good estimates of the stratospheric aerosol optical depth at each wavelength and may be used to monitor the long-term effects of volcanic eruptions on the atmosphere. These data are available as an NDP from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), and the NDP consists of this document and a set of computerized data files.

  5. Environmental survey of the B-3 and Ford's Farm ranges.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Waite, D.A.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Army has been firing depleted-uranium (DU) projectiles into targets on the Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. An environmental survey was conducted of two areas known as the B-3 range and the Ford's Farm range to determine the location of DU in their environments. The survey included ground survey measurements and some environmental sampling. Several special studies were also conducted, including analyses of the isotopic composition of uranium in a limited number of samples and a dissolution rate study to estimate the solubility of DU dust in sea and river water.

  6. Effective-Range Dependence of Resonantly Interacting Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael McNeil Forbes; Stefano Gandolfi; Alexandros Gezerlis

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract the leading effective range corrections to the equation of state of the unitary Fermi gas from ab initio fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo (FNQMC) calculations in a periodic box using a density functional theory (DFT), and show them to be universal by considering several two-body interactions. Furthermore, we find that the DFT is consistent with the best available unbiased QMC calculations, analytic results, and experimental measurements of the equation of state. We also discuss the asymptotic effective-range corrections for trapped systems and present the first QMC results with the correct asymptotic scaling.

  7. Final Report: Depth-specific Hydraulic Testing of Yucca Flat and Frenchman Flat Environmental Restoration Wells, FY 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlander, Phil; Russell, Charles

    2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole flow logging contributes a greater understanding of subsurface conditions than measuring well discharge only at land surface. Combining the results of up to nine borehole flow logs to estimate hydraulic conductivity with depth includes data averaging over vertical intervals and averaging of calculated hydraulic conductivities among the various flow logs. Data filtering is also necessary to aid in differentiating between changes in borehole flow rate due to flow turbulence (and other causes) and those associated with groundwater inflow. Borehole flow logging during well pumping has provided the quantity of groundwater iniflow and hydraulic conductivity at depth for three wells. The results provided are believed to be an appropriate balance between predictive accuracy and preserving spatial resolution.

  8. Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, H.-M.; Rutqvist, J.; Ryu, D.-W.; Choi, B.-H.; Sunwoo, C.; Song, W.-K.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a numerical modeling study of coupled thermodynamic, multiphase fluid flow and heat transport associated with underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns. Specifically, we explored the concept of using concrete lined caverns at a relatively shallow depth for which constructing and operational costs may be reduced if air tightness and stability can be assured. Our analysis showed that the key parameter to assure long-term air tightness in such a system was the permeability of both the concrete lining and the surrounding rock. The analysis also indicated that a concrete lining with a permeability of less than 1×10{sup -18} m{sup 2} would result in an acceptable air leakage rate of less than 1%, with the operational pressure range between 5 and 8 MPa at a depth of 100 m. It was further noted that capillary retention properties and the initial liquid saturation of the lining were very important. Indeed, air leakage could be effectively prevented when the air-entry pressure of the concrete lining is higher than the operational air pressure and when the lining is kept moist at a relatively high liquid saturation. Our subsequent energy-balance analysis demonstrated that the energy loss for a daily compression and decompression cycle is governed by the air-pressure loss, as well as heat loss by conduction to the concrete liner and surrounding rock. For a sufficiently tight system, i.e., for a concrete permeability off less than 1×10{sup -18} m{sup 2}, heat loss by heat conduction tends to become proportionally more important. However, the energy loss by heat conduction can be minimized by keeping the air-injection temperature of compressed air closer to the ambient temperature of the underground storage cavern. In such a case, almost all the heat loss during compression is gained back during subsequent decompression. Finally, our numerical simulation study showed that CAES in shallow rock caverns is feasible from a leakage and energy efficiency viewpoint. Our numerical approach and energy analysis will next be applied in designing and evaluating the performance of a planned full-scale pilot test of the proposed underground CAES concept.

  9. EVALUATION OF FROST HEAVE ON WASTE TRANSFER LINES WITH SHALLOW DEPTHS IN DST (DOUBLE SHELL TANK) FARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAQ MA

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the effect of frost heave on waste transfer lines with shallow depths in DST farms. Because of the insulation, well compacted sandy material around waste transfer lines, the type of sandy and gravel soil, and relatively low precipitation at Hanford site, it is concluded that waste transfer lines with one foot of soil covers (sandy cushion material and insulation) are not expected to undergo frost heave damaging effects.

  10. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

  11. Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by ¾ of a mile toward the north and is located over ½ mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

  12. Investigation of the modulation between EEG alpha waves and slow/fast delta waves in children in different depths of Desflurane anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in different depths of Desflurane anesthesia Behnam Molaee-Ardekani1,2,3, , Mohammad-Bagher Shamsollahi3-band EEG activities in various depths of anesthesia (DOA). Methods: This modulation, which is a sort anesthesia. Two parameters are defined to quantify the modulation: strength of modulation (SOM) and phase

  13. Photothermal depth profilometry of heat-treated hardened 0.15% 0.2% C, 0.6% 0.9% Mn Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Liu, Natalie Baddour, and Andreas Mandelis Center for Advanced Diffusion Wave Technologies, Department-diffusivity depth profiles are reconstructed using laser infrared photothermal radiometry. The inverted depth as a function of length of service in the train transportation field. From this wealth of evidence it is now

  14. Design of frequency synthesizers for short range wireless transceivers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valero Lopez, Ari Yakov

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid growth of the market for short-range wireless devices, with standards such as Bluetooth and Wireless LAN (IEEE 802.11) being the most important, has created a need for highly integrated transceivers that target drastic power and area...

  15. Session 2: Modelling air pollution across a range of scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session 2: Modelling air pollution across a range of scales Ruth Doherty, Massimo Vieno, Ian Mac) EMEP2009 (less complex) Observations Modelling regional air pollution #12;Nested regions: 50 to 5 to 1 km2 O3 concentration (ppb) NO2 concentration (µg m-3) #12;Modelling Urban air pollution Regional

  16. Little Green Codes: Energy-Efficient Short-Range Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Little Green Codes: Energy-Efficient Short-Range Communication Pulkit Grover and Anant Sahai, the optimizing rate for our bounds on the energy consumption of green codes converges to 1 in the context of AWGN energy as green codes. Classical information theoretic approach finds the minimum transmission energy

  17. HOUSING: Senior year offers the broadest range of housing options.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    SENIOR HOUSING: Senior year offers the broadest range of housing options. Most seniors live in an apartment or wood frame house with a group of friends, although some choose to live in a residence hall or program house. STUDENT STAFF: Senior areas are staffed by Community Advisors. See previous box

  18. CRBTree: An Efficient Indexing Scheme for RangeAggregate Queries ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arge, Lars

    database requires efficient exter­ nal memory (secondary storage) support for its language features. Range processing (OLAP), spatial databases such as geographic information sys­ tems (GIS), and several other grants ITR--333--1050, EIA--9870724, EIA--997287, and CCR--9732787, and by a grant from the U

  19. Efficient Numerical Simulation for Long Range Wave Propagation 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solna, Knut

    Efficient Numerical Simulation for Long Range Wave Propagation 1 Kai Huang 2 George Papanicolaou 3 for simulating wave propagation over long dis- tances with both weak and strong scatterers. In domains with weak heterogeneities the wave field is decomposed into forward propagating and back scattered modes using two coupled

  20. Historical Range of Variability and Current Landscape Condition Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical Range of Variability and Current Landscape Condition Analysis: South Central Highlands the Reference Period E. Overview of Integrated Ecosystem Management ... p 30 F. Literature Cited ... p 34 structures C. Legacies of Euro-American Settlement and Current Conditions ... p 67 1. Logging ("High