National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for depth point stacked

  1. Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration the Marmousi data Karel Zacek*, Department Geophysics, Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration the Marmousi data Karel Zacek*, Department Geophysics--stack depth migration. method on Marmousi data (Versteeg & 1991). advantage over methods Gaussian beams. Thus, Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration is especially suitable target--oriented imaging

  2. Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Praha 2, Czech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration Karel #20; Z#19;a#20;cek Department of Geophysics method | the Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration. The advantages over the methods based on Gaussian pre{stack depth migration is especially suitable for a target{oriented imaging. Key words Gaussian

  3. Pre-Stack Depth Migration and Attribute Analysis of 3-D Time-Lapse P-wave Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pre-Stack Depth Migration and Attribute Analysis of 3-D Time-Lapse P-wave Data Vacuum Field, New the application of Pre-Stack Depth Migration (PSDM) and innovative window-based attribute analysis applied to 4-D seismic data. The data were acquired in Central Vacuum Unit, Lea County, New Mexico by the Reservoir

  4. Insights into Structure and Stratigraphy of the Northern Gulf of Mexico from 2D Pre-Stack Depth Migration Imaging of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Christopher D.

    Insights into Structure and Stratigraphy of the Northern Gulf of Mexico from 2D Pre-Stack Depth of Mexico because the onshore shelf margins and linked deep water systems can be seen in continuous sec water of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico and displays distinct, large-scale structural styles and salt

  5. Single point aerosol sampling: Evaluation of mixing and probe performance in a nuclear stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, J.C.; Fairchild, C.I.; Wood, G.O.; Ortiz, C.A.; Muyshondt, A.; McFarland, A.R. |

    1994-12-31

    Alternative Reference Methodologies (ARMS) have been developed for sampling of radionuclide; from stacks and ducts that differ from the methods required by the US EPA. The EPA methods are prescriptive in selection of sampling locations and in design of sampling probes whereas the alternative methods are performance driven. Tests were conducted in a stack at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the efficacy of the ARMS. Coefficients of variation of the velocity tracer gas, and aerosol particle profiles were determined at three sampling locations. Results showed numerical criteria placed upon the coefficients of variation by the ARMs were met at sampling stations located 9 and 14 stack diameters from flow entrance, but not at a location that is 1.5 diameters downstream from the inlet. Experiments were conducted to characterize the transmission of 10 {mu}m aerodynamic equivalent diameter liquid aerosol particles through three types of sampling probes. The transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the concentration in the free stream) was 107% for a 113 L/min (4-cfm) an isokinetic shrouded probe, but only 20% for an isokinetic probe that follows the EPA requirements. A specially designed isokinetic probe showed a transmission ratio of 63%. The shrouded probe performance would conform to the ARM criteria; however, the isokinetic probes would not.

  6. Single point aerosol sampling: Evaluation of mixing and probe performance in a nuclear stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, J.C.; Fairchild, C.I.; Wood, G.O.; Ortiz, C.A.; Muyshondt, A.

    1996-01-01

    Alternative reference methodologies have been developed for sampling of radionuclides from stacks and ducts, which differ from the methods previously required by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. These alternative reference methodologies have recently been approved by the U.S. EPA for use in lieu of the current standard techniques. The standard EPA methods are prescriptive in selection of sampling locations and in design of sampling probes whereas the alternative reference methodologies are performance driven. Tests were conducted in a stack at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the efficacy of some aspects of the alternative reference methodologies. Coefficients of variation of velocity, tracer gas, and aerosol particle profiles were determined at three sampling locations. Results showed that numerical criteria placed upon the coefficients of variation by the alternative reference methodologies were met at sampling stations located 9 and 14 stack diameters from the flow entrance, but not at a location that was 1.5 diameters downstream from the inlet. Experiments were conducted to characterize the transmission of 10 {mu}m aerodynamic diameter liquid aerosol particles through three types of sampling probes. The transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the concentration in the free stream) was 107% for a 113 L min{sup {minus}1} (4-cfm) anistokinetic shrouded probe, but only 20% for an isokinetic probe that follows the existing EPA standard requirements. A specially designed isokinetic probe showed a transmission ratio of 63%. The shrouded probe performance would conform to the alternative reference methodologies criteria; however, the isokinetic probes would not. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Signal-to-noise ratios of teleseismic receiver functions and effectiveness of stacking for their enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    pre-stack depth migration in which the records are first mapped to depth using the PdS mode conversion-ROM, conventional pre-stack depth migration results in RF sections with S/N ranging between about 1], and pre-stack depth migration [e.g., Bostock and Rondenay, 1999; Sheehan et al., 2000; Poppeliers

  8. Fuel cell stack arrangements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA); Somers, Edward V. (Murrysville, PA)

    1982-01-01

    Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

  9. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  10. THE FERNALD DOSIMETRY RECONSTRUCTION Task 1: Identification of Release Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fires, spills, and UF6 leaks and releases. The Stack Release Points and Other Release Points are located

  11. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration of the Marmousi data set Karel Zacek*, Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics , Charles University, Prague,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet pre­stack depth migration of the Marmousi data set Karel Zacek*, Department in the common­shot domain -- the Gaussian packet pre­stack depth migration. We test our method on the Marmousi section. Thus, the Gaussian packet pre­stack depth migration is especially suitable for a target

  12. Porous coolant tube holder for fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT)

    1981-01-01

    A coolant tube holder for a stack of fuel cells is a gas porous sheet of fibrous material adapted to be sandwiched between a cell electrode and a nonporous, gas impervious flat plate which separates adjacent cells. The porous holder has channels in one surface with coolant tubes disposed therein for carrying coolant through the stack. The gas impervious plate is preferably bonded to the opposite surface of the holder, and the channel depth is the full thickness of the holder.

  13. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  14. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  15. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  16. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Peter M. (Hamburg, NY); Reger, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  17. Center Stack Vacuum Vessel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1,Center Organization People People Scientific Stack

  18. Thermoacoustic pin stacks. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keolian, R.M.

    1994-07-06

    The construction and testing of a new stack geometry for thermoacoustic engines, called a pin stack, has been started. The stack is at the heart of a class of heat engines that use sound to deliver refrigeration, or use a temperature difference to generate sound. Calculations show that the pin stack should make useful improvements in engine efficiency. About 2000 wires will be hand sewn in a hexagonal lattice between the hot and cold heat exchangers in a sound source using low pressure neon gas between 300 K and 77 K. Thermoacoustics, Refrigeration, Acoustic source, Heat pump.

  19. Dose assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site: NESHAP compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kenoyer, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the assessment results for the registered stacks on the Hanford Site for potential emissions, i.e. emissions with no control devices in place. Further, the document will identify those stacks requiring continuous monitoring, i.e. the effective dose equivalent from potential emissions >0.1 mrem/yr. The stack assessment of potential emissions was performed on 84 registered stacks on the Hanford Site. These emission sources represent individual point sources presently registered under Washington Administrative code 246-247 with the Washington Department of Health. The methods used in assessing the potential emissions from the stacks are described.

  20. 293-F Stack Reduction Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Demoltion of the 293-F Stack. A look at the environmental management at the Savannah River Site. Training and experience benefits for employees and better management of environmental safety.

  1. Efficient Local Unfolding with Ancestor Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puebla, G; Hermenegildo, M

    2009-01-01

    The most successful unfolding rules used nowadays in the partial evaluation of logic programs are based on well quasi orders (wqo) applied over (covering) ancestors, i.e., a subsequence of the atoms selected during a derivation. Ancestor (sub)sequences are used to increase the specialization power of unfolding while still guaranteeing termination and also to reduce the number of atoms for which the wqo has to be checked. Unfortunately, maintaining the structure of the ancestor relation during unfolding introduces significant overhead. We propose an efficient, practical local unfolding rule based on the notion of covering ancestors which can be used in combination with a wqo and allows a stack-based implementation without losing any opportunities for specialization. Using our technique, certain non-leftmost unfoldings are allowed as long as local unfolding is performed, i.e., we cover depth-first strategies.

  2. Depth-domain processing of teleseismic receiver functions and generalized three-dimensional imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    by itself or as a part of depth migration, is usually used for noise suppression in teleseismic receiver generalize the pre-stack depth migration methodology by introducing numerous signal-enhancement schemes could be superior to record summation used in conventional depth migration. #12;3 Introduction

  3. Energy Economizer for Low Temperature Stack Gas: A Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipton, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    , the burner air supply is preheated by passing through the heat exchanger. Sensitive design problems that had to be resolved were: Overall cost-effectiveness; below dew point cooling of stack gas causing acid corrosion; and selection of an effective heat...

  4. Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2006-09-08

    Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

  5. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  6. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  7. Thermoacoustics in pin-array stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W. ); Keolian, R.M. )

    1993-08-01

    A new thermoacoustic stack geometry, the pin array, is described. Analytical expressions for velocity and temperature in the pin array are derived, and potential advantages of the pin stack are demonstrated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Fuel Cell Stack Components BipolarPlate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Metallic Bipolar Plates · Carbon Foam for Fuel Cell Humidification · High Temperature Proton ExchangeFuel Cell Stack Components Fuel Processor BipolarPlate Cathode+ Anode- Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN Crossover Fuel Cell Stack Components #12;Barriers

  9. Stack Components Nancy L. Garland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /manufacturing · Durability · Electrode performance · Thermal and water management #12;Stack Component Targets 500 @ 0.75 VmA/cm2Performance on O2 400 @ 0.8 VmA/cm2Performance on H2 10$/kWCostMEA 5000hoursDurability 1000ppm-) · In collaboration with LANL (K. Weisbrod) and NREL (H. Wang) · Initial testing at General Motors indicates nitrided

  10. Control of electrode depth in electroslag remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM); Damkroger, Brian K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace by driving the electrode at a nominal speed based upon melting rate and geometry while making minor proportional adjustments based on a measured metric of the electrode immersion depth. Electrode drive speed is increased if a measured metric of electrode immersion depth differs from a set point by a predetermined amount, indicating that the tip is too close to the surface of a slag pool. Impedance spikes are monitored to adjust the set point for the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon one or more properties of the impedance spikes.

  11. CONTROL-ORIENTED MODELING OF A SOLID-OXIDE FUEL CELL STACK USING AN LPV MODEL STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.

    CONTROL-ORIENTED MODELING OF A SOLID-OXIDE FUEL CELL STACK USING AN LPV MODEL STRUCTURE Borhan M. Sanandaji, Tyrone L. Vincent, Andrew Colclasure, and Robert J. Kee Colorado Fuel Cell Center Engineering dynamic model of a solid oxide fuel cell stack. Using a detailed physical model as a starting point, we

  12. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  13. Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The stack characterization system (SCS) is a tele-operated remote system that collects samples and data to characterize the quantitativeand qualitative levels of contamination inside off-gas stacks...

  14. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

    2010-07-13

    A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

  15. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  16. Novel PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEA Novel PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEA This project received DOE...

  17. Parallel Transport on Principal Bundles over Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Collier; Eugene Lerman; Seth Wolbert

    2015-09-16

    In this paper we introduce a notion of parallel transport for principal bundles with connections over differentiable stacks. We show that principal bundles with connections over stacks can be recovered from their parallel transport thereby extending the results of Barrett, Caetano and Picken, and Schreiber and Waldof from manifolds to stacks. In the process of proving our main result we simplify Schreiber and Waldorf's definition of a transport functor for principal bundles with connections over manifolds and provide a more direct proof of the correspondence between principal bundles with connections and transport functors.

  18. Patent Hold-Up and Royalty Stacking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemley, Mark A; Shapiro, Carl

    2007-01-01

    have been calculated. Patent Hold-Up and Royalty Stacking,Ragesh K. Tangri, Ending Patent Law’s Willfulness Game, 18to Challenge and Defend Patents: Why Litigation Won’t

  19. StackOverview 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    17 Web #12;Web Web 81% Web Web Web Web StackOverview #12;1 1 2 Web 3 2.2.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 Web 6 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3

  20. Convective Cooling and Passive Stack Improvements in Motors (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL in convective cooling and passive stack improvements in motors.

  1. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley, Dana A. (New Milford, CT); Farooque, Mohammad (Danbury, CT)

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  2. Dose assessment from potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order required RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which points are subject to the continuous emission sampling requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61 (40 CFR 61), Subpart H, and (2) continuously sample radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Any stack identified in the assessment as having potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1} must have a compliant sampling system. In addition, a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was signed on. February 7, 1994. The FFCA required that all unregistered stacks on the Hanford Site be assessed. This requirement increased the number of stacks to be assessed to 123 stacks. Six methods for performing the assessments are described. An initial assessment using only the HEPA filtration factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions which would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}. When the other methods were applied the number was reduced to 20 stacks. The paper discusses reasons for these overestimates.

  3. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

    1993-04-13

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  4. Technical description of Stack 296-B-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridge, T.M.

    1994-11-15

    Of particular concern to facilities on the Hanford site is Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 40, Part 61, Subpart H, ``National emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.`` Assessments of facility stacks and potential radionuclide emissions determined whether these stacks would be subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. Stack 296-B-5 exhausts 221-BB building which houses tanks containing B Plant steam condensate and B Plant process condensate from the operation of the low-level waste concentrator. The assessment of potential radionuclide emissions from the 296-B-5 stack resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual of less than 0.1 millirem per year. Therefore, the stack is not subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. However, the sampling and monitoring system must be in compliance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5. Currently, 296-B-5 is sampled continuously with a record sampler and continuous air monitor (CAM).

  5. Constructing a Weyl semimetal by stacking one dimensional topological phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriram Ganeshan; S. Das Sarma

    2015-04-02

    Topological semimetals in three-dimensions (e.g. Weyl semimetal) can be built by stacking two dimensional topological phases. The interesting aspect of such a construction is that even though the topological building blocks in the low dimension may be gapped, the higher dimensional semimetallic phase emerges as a gapless critical point of a topological phase transition between two distinct insulating phases. In this work, we extend this idea by constructing three-dimensional topological semimetallic phases akin to Weyl systems by stacking one-dimensional Aubry-Andre-Harper (AAH) lattice tight binding models with non-trivial topology. The generalized AAH model is a family of one dimensional tight binding models with cosine modulations in both hopping and onsite energy terms. In this paper, we present a two-parameter generalization of the AAH model that can access topological phases in three dimensions within a unified framework. We show that the $\\pi$-flux state of this two-parameter AAH model manifests three dimensional topological semimetallic phases where the topological features are embedded in one dimension. The topological nature of the band touching points of the semimetallic phase in 3D is explicitly established both analytically and numerically from the 1D perspective. This dimensional reduction provides a simple protocol to experimentally construct the three dimensional Brillouin zone of the topological semimetallic phases using `legos' of simple 1D double well optical lattices. We also propose Zak phase imaging of optical lattices as a tool to capture the topological nature of the band touching points. Our work provides a theoretical connection between the commensurate AAH model in 1D and Weyl semimetals in 3D, and points toward practical methods for the laboratory realization of such three dimensional topological systems in atomic optical lattices.

  6. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2005-01-25

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell. Other polarization curves may be generated and used for fuel cell stack monitoring based on different operating pressures, temperatures, hydrogen quantities.

  7. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  8. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-02-17

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell.

  9. When is Stacking Confusing?: The Impact of Confusion on Stacking in Deep HI Galaxy Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michael G; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Papastergis, Emmanouil

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytic model to predict the HI mass contributed by confused sources to a stacked spectrum in a generic HI survey. Based on the ALFALFA correlation function, this model is in agreement with the estimates of confusion present in stacked Parkes telescope data, and was used to predict how confusion will limit stacking in the deepest SKA-precursor HI surveys. Stacking with LADUMA and DINGO UDEEP data will only be mildly impacted by confusion if their target synthesised beam size of 10 arcsec can be achieved. Any beam size significantly above this will result in stacks that contain a mass in confused sources that is comparable to (or greater than) that which is detectable via stacking, at all redshifts. CHILES' 5 arcsec resolution is more than adequate to prevent confusion influencing stacking of its data, throughout its bandpass range. FAST will be the most impeded by confusion, with HI surveys likely becoming heavily confused much beyond z = 0.1. The largest uncertainties in our model are the reds...

  10. Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM)

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

  11. Fundamental stack and system issues in molten carbonate fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.; Mayfield, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    Stack research and system issues in molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) technology development and commercialization are discussed within context of status of MCFC development and commercialization in US. Status of MCFC development is addressed. Major known fundamental stack research issues remaining for the MCFC technology are identified and discussed. The cathode remains a focal point of performance improvement and cost reduction. The various aspects of MCFC power plant network and systems issues are also addressed and discussed. These include cost, heat loss management, startup and shutdown modes, dynamic response, footprint, packaging and integration, parasitic power losses, pressurization and reforming. Potential of MCFC networks is discussed. With the initial demonstration of full-area, fullheight 250-kW to 2-MW MCFC power plants, the spatial configuration of the MCFC stacks into networks in the fuel cell power plant takes on importance for the first time.

  12. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants registered stack source assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency,, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site . The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified a total of 16 stacks as having potential emissions that,would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

  13. A Thermal Model to Evaluate Sub-Freezing Startup for a Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicle Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Stack and System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundaresan, Meena

    2004-01-01

    fuel cell electric power generation system below the freezingthe fuel cell stack and system during the sub-freezingbelow the freezing point of water the fuel cell must be

  14. Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-02

    Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

  15. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulkowski, J.E.

    1986-10-21

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will. 3 figs.

  16. IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in local policy debates about fracking. This In-depth Report from Science for Environment Policy explores

  17. Mobility and coalescence of stacking fault tetrahedra in Cu

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martínez, Enrique; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2015-03-13

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are ubiquitous defects in face-centered cubic metals. They are produced during cold work plastic deformation, quenching experiments or under irradiation. From a dislocation point of view, the SFTs are comprised of a set of stair-rod dislocations at the (110) edges of a tetrahedron bounding triangular stacking faults. These defects are extremely stable, increasing their energetic stability as they grow in size. At the sizes visible within transmission electron microscope they appear nearly immobile. Contrary to common belief, we show in this report, using a combination of molecular dynamics and temperature accelerated dynamics, how small SFTs canmore »diffuse by temporarily disrupting their structure through activated thermal events. More over, we demonstrate that the diffusivity of defective SFTs is several orders of magnitude higher than perfect SFTs, and can be even higher than isolated vacancies. Finally, we show how SFTs can coalesce, forming a larger defect in what is a new mechanism for the growth of these omnipresent defects.« less

  18. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings Dortheof passive stack ventilation in residential buildings Dorthepassive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings

  19. High-resolution common depth point seismic reflection profiling: instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapp, Ralph W.; Steeples, Don W.

    1986-02-01

    so the magnitude of the low?frequency signal does not swamp the high?frequency signal. The objective is to permit boosting the magnitude of the high?frequency signals to fill a significant number of bits of the digital word. Judicious use of a low...

  20. Extending OpenStack Access Control with Domain Trust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    Stack identity service Keystone has introduced several entities, such as domains and projects in addition-of-concept prototype of this trust extension based on Keystone. The authorization delay introduced by the domain trustsStack.2 The identity service in OpenStack, called Keystone, is used to manage users as globally available

  1. Quadratic forms and Clifford algebras on derived stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vezzosi, Gabriele

    Quadratic forms and Clifford algebras on derived stacks Gabriele Vezzosi Institut de Math structures in derived algebraic geometry. We define derived n-shifted quadratic complexes, over derived affine stacks and over general derived stacks, and give several examples of those. We define

  2. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen (Pinole, CA)

    2011-08-16

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  3. SOFC cells and stacks for complex fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward M. Sabolsky; Matthew Seabaugh; Katarzyna Sabolsky; Sergio A. Ibanez; Zhimin Zhong

    2007-07-01

    Reformed hydrocarbon and coal (syngas) fuels present an opportunity to integrate solid oxide fuel cells into the existing fuel infrastructure. However, these fuels often contain impurities or additives that may lead to cell degradation through sulfur poisoning or coking. Achieving high performance and sulfur tolerance in SOFCs operating on these fuels would simplify system balance of plant and sequestration of anode tail gas. NexTech Materials, Ltd., has developed a suite of materials and components (cells, seals, interconnects) designed for operation in sulfur-containing syngas fuels. These materials and component technologies have been integrated into an SOFC stack for testing on simulated propane, logistic fuel reformates and coal syngas. Details of the technical approach, cell and stack performance is reported.

  4. Average transmission probability of a random stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin Lu; Christian Miniatura; Berthold-Georg Englert

    2009-07-31

    The transmission through a stack of identical slabs that are separated by gaps with random widths is usually treated by calculating the average of the logarithm of the transmission probability. We show how to calculate the average of the transmission probability itself with the aid of a recurrence relation and derive analytical upper and lower bounds. The upper bound, when used as an approximation for the transmission probability, is unreasonably good and we conjecture that it is asymptotically exact.

  5. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  6. Subsea BOP stack built for Caspian drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-16

    This paper reports that Shaffer Inc. completed construction of a multi-million dollar subsea drilling system for Caspmorneftegas, an operating company in the Republic of Azerbaijan. The subsea stack will be installed on the semisubmersible drilling rig Shelf 7 currently under construction in Astrakan in the Soviet Union. Shelf 7 will drill wells in the Caspian Sea, one of the most prolific production areas in the Soviet Union.

  7. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  8. Transport in PEMFC Stacks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavingsTransmissionin PEMFC Stacks Transport in PEMFC

  9. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  10. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  11. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-04-01

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  12. G-1 Stack Pattern 1: Instrument Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming UpgradesArea:Benefits ofofStack Pattern 1:

  13. A general approach to develop reduced order models for simulation of solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Bao, Jie; Lo, Chaomei; Lai, Canhai; Agarwal, Khushbu; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-06-15

    A reduced order modeling approach based on response surface techniques was developed for solid oxide fuel cell stacks. This approach creates a numerical model that can quickly compute desired performance variables of interest for a stack based on its input parameter set. The approach carefully samples the multidimensional design space based on the input parameter ranges, evaluates a detailed stack model at each of the sampled points, and performs regression for selected performance variables of interest to determine the responsive surfaces. After error analysis to ensure that sufficient accuracy is established for the response surfaces, they are then implemented in a calculator module for system-level studies. The benefit of this modeling approach is that it is sufficiently fast for integration with system modeling software and simulation of fuel cell-based power systems while still providing high fidelity information about the internal distributions of key variables. This paper describes the sampling, regression, sensitivity, error, and principal component analyses to identify the applicable methods for simulating a planar fuel cell stack.

  14. Stack and cell modelling with SOFC3D: a computer program for the 3D simulations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    Stack and cell modelling with SOFC3D: a computer program for the 3D simulations of solid oxide fuel, France 1 Introduction SOFC3D is a computer program, which simulates the behaviour of a solid oxide fuel or the channels, the electrical potential \\Phi at any point of the solid part of the SOFC, and the molar fractions

  15. Mechanism of magnetism in stacked nanographite with open shell electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kikuo Harigaya; Toshiaki Enoki

    2001-10-23

    Antiferromagnetism in stacked nanographite is investigated with using the Hubbard-type models. The A-B stacking or the stacking near to that of A-B type is favorable for the hexagonal nanographite with zigzag edges, in order that magnetism appears. Next, we find that the open shell electronic structure can be an origin of the decreasing magnetic moment with the decrease of the inter-graphene distance, as experiments on adsorption of molecules suggest.

  16. Co-flow planar SOFC fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-30

    A co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell stack with an integral, internal manifold and a casing/holder to separately seal the cell. This construction improves sealing and gas flow, and provides for easy manifolding of cell stacks. In addition, the stack construction has the potential for an improved durability and operation with an additional increase in cell efficiency. The co-flow arrangement can be effectively utilized in other electrochemical systems requiring gas-proof separation of gases.

  17. Cassette less SOFC stack and method of assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meinhardt, Kerry D

    2014-11-18

    A cassette less SOFC assembly and a method for creating such an assembly. The SOFC stack is characterized by an electrically isolated stack current path which allows welded interconnection between frame portions of the stack. In one embodiment electrically isolating a current path comprises the step of sealing a interconnect plate to a interconnect plate frame with an insulating seal. This enables the current path portion to be isolated from the structural frame an enables the cell frame to be welded together.

  18. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, M.; Schroll, C.R.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention relates to a device for preventing the electrical shorting of a stack of electrolytic cells during an extended period of operation. The device has application to fuel cell and other electrolytic cell stacks operating in low or high temperature corrosive environments. It is of particular importance for use in a stack of fuel cells operating with molten metal carbonate electrolyte for the production of electric power. Also, the device may have application in similar technology involving stacks of electrolytic cells for electrolysis to decompose chemical compounds.

  19. Conceptual design report for Project W-420, stack monitoring upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, D.T., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-10

    This document provides the Conceptual Design for the upgrade of seven designated Tank Farm stacks to meet NESHAP Title 40, CFR, Part 61, Sub-part H requirements.

  20. Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on new fuel cell projects. newfcliuargonne.pdf More Documents & Publications Novel PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEA Advanced Cathode...

  1. Automatic Lung Vessel Segmentation via Stacked Multiscale Feature Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Automatic Lung Vessel Segmentation via Stacked Multiscale Feature Learning Ryan Kiros, Karteek We introduce a representation learning approach to segmenting vessels in the lungs. Our algorithm

  2. Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability, and Durability under Automotive Load Cycle Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability,...

  3. Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keolian, Robert M. (Monterey, CA); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid volume that is adjacent the surface within which viscous energy losses occur. Increasing the volume ratio results in an increase in the ratio of transferred thermal energy to viscous energy losses, with a concomitant increase in operating efficiency of the thermoacoustic converter. The convex surfaces may be easily provided by a pin array having elements arranged parallel to the direction of acoustic oscillations and with effective radial dimensions much smaller than the thicknesses of the viscous energy loss and thermoacoustic energy transfer volumes.

  4. Manifold seal structure for fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, William P. (South Windsor, CT)

    1988-01-01

    The seal between the sides of a fuel cell stack and the gas manifolds is improved by adding a mechanical interlock between the adhesive sealing strip and the abutting surface of the manifolds. The adhesive is a material which can flow to some extent when under compression, and the mechanical interlock is formed providing small openings in the portion of the manifold which abuts the adhesive strip. When the manifolds are pressed against the adhesive strips, the latter will flow into and through the manifold openings to form buttons or ribs which mechanically interlock with the manifolds. These buttons or ribs increase the bond between the manifolds and adhesive, which previously relied solely on the adhesive nature of the adhesive.

  5. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, G.T.

    1991-04-08

    This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  6. Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Reply Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley** & Carl Shapiro*** We argued in our article, Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking,1 that the threat to obtain a permanent injunction can greatly enhance a patent holder's negotiating power, leading to royalty rates that exceed a benchmark level based

  7. Stacked Convolutional Auto-Encoders for Hierarchical Feature Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidhuber, Juergen

    convolutional auto-encoder (CAE) for unsupervised feature learning. A stack of CAEs forms a convolutional neural network (CNN). Each CAE is trained using conventional on-line gradient descent without additional with those found by previous approaches. Initializing a CNN with filters of a trained CAE stack yields

  8. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, George T. (15 Cherry Hills Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1992-01-01

    An off-gas stack for a melter comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes pervents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  9. Energy Effective 3D Stacked Hybrid NEMFET-CMOS Caches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotofana, Sorin

    Energy Effective 3D Stacked Hybrid NEMFET-CMOS Caches Mihai Lefter, Marius Enachescu, George Razvan-stacked hybrid memories as alternative to traditional CMOS SRAMs in L1 and L2 cache implementations and analyse-per-Cycle (IPC) and energy consumption. The 3D hybrid memory cell relies on: (i) a Short Circuit Current Free

  10. FEDERAL FACILITY COMPLIANCE AGREEMENT (FFCA) STACK ISOLATION PROJECT FUNCTIONS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRANBARGER, R.K.

    2003-12-16

    This document delineates the functions and requirements for the FFCA Stack Isolation Project for the 244-A, 244-BX, 244-5, and 244-TX DCRTs. The isolation of each ventilation system and stack includes the electrical, instrumentation, and mechanical isolation of the ventilation system and the installation of primary and annulus breather filters to provide passive ventilation to meet the FFCA requirements.

  11. FAQs Manhattanville Campus Central Energy Plant Boiler Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    FAQs Manhattanville Campus Central Energy Plant Boiler Stacks Installation Frequently Asked Questions What is happening? Columbia University is installing two (2) boiler stacks on top of the Jerome L, a below-grade facility which will consist four (4) 45,000 lbs/hr steam boilers and related equipment

  12. SOFCSOFC (10kW(10kW )) Stack Stack ( )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    & Mitsubishi (band ) 150 kW module Rolls-Royce () 100kW SOFC TOTO, Kyushu () 20kW stack wet process #12;2 SOFC () Mitsubishi Heavy Ind. § SIS § 250kW § 55% Rolls-Royce § SIS § 250kW (micro GT-SOFC) § 53% (125 kW ) Tokyo Gas § SIS § kW (5kW ) / #12

  13. Decommissioning a 60-m-tall exhaust stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, R.L.; Speer, D.R. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The decommissioning of the Strontium Semiworks Complex, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, is nearing completion. This facility operated as a pilot plant from 1949 to 1967 to develop fuel reprocessing technology and a method for separating strontium from high-level liquid wastes. Contamination of the facility from these operations was extensive. One of the major activities completed was the decommissioning of the plant exhaust stack. Demolition of the stack was accomplished using explosives. This required decontamination of the stack interior to minimize the release of airborne contamination. Radiation levels in the stack prior to cleaning ranged from 2.5 to 90 mGy/h as measured along the stack centerline. Decontamination was accomplished by sandblasting, using equipment specially designed and fabricated to allow the work to be performed remotely.

  14. Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiser, Carl A. (Glastonbury, CT); Maricle, Donald L. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1987-04-21

    A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack.

  15. Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiser, C.A.; Maricle, D.L.

    1987-04-21

    A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack. 6 figs.

  16. Extended Tully-Fisher Relations using HI Stacking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Scott A; Obreschkow, Danail; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for the statistical evaluation of the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) using spectral line stacking. This technique has the potential to extend TFR observations to lower masses and higher redshifts than possible through a galaxy-by-galaxy analysis. It further avoids the need for individual galaxy inclination measurements. To quantify the properties of stacked HI emission lines, we consider a simplistic model of galactic disks with analytically expressible line profiles. Using this model, we compare the widths of stacked profiles with those of individual galaxies. We then follow the same procedure using more realistic mock galaxies drawn from the S3-SAX model (a derivative of the Millennium simulation). Remarkably, when stacking the apparent HI lines of galaxies with similar absolute magnitude and random inclinations, the width of the stack is very similar to the width of the deprojected (= corrected for inclination) and dedispersed (= after removal of velocity dispersion) input lines. Th...

  17. Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes Department of Geophysics, Faculty inversion, seismic anisotropy. 1. Introduction A general formulation of prestack depth migration based numerical methods (Claerbout, 1971) is considered in this paper. A common­shot prestack depth migration

  18. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

    2008-07-01

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  19. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    scaling the passive stack diameter with house size (floora single-story house ventilated by a passive stack with andTable 1: Passive stack diameters scaling with house size

  20. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  1. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    2014-11-06

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  2. Fabrication of high gradient insulators by stack compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, John Richardson; Sanders, Dave; Hawkins, Steven Anthony; Norona, Marcelo

    2014-04-29

    Individual layers of a high gradient insulator (HGI) are first pre-cut to their final dimensions. The pre-cut layers are then stacked to form an assembly that is subsequently pressed into an HGI unit with the desired dimension. The individual layers are stacked, and alignment is maintained, using a sacrificial alignment tube that is removed after the stack is hot pressed. The HGI's are used as high voltage vacuum insulators in energy storage and transmission structures or devices, e.g. in particle accelerators and pulsed power systems.

  3. Visualization of stacking faults in fcc crystals in plastic deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeshi Kawasaki; Akira Onuki

    2011-11-27

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the dynamics of stacking faults in fcc crystals in uniaxial stretching in a Lennard-Jones binary mixture composed of 4096 particles in three dimensions. We visualize stacking faults using a disorder variable $D_j(t)$ for each particle $j$ constructed from local bond order parameters based on spherical harmonics (Steinhardt order parameters). Also introducing a method of bond breakage, we examine how stacking faults are formed and removed by collective particle motions. These processes are relevant in plasticity of fcc crystals.

  4. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunz, H.R.; Guthrie, R.J.; Katz, M.

    1987-03-17

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate. 5 figs.

  5. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  6. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunz, H. Russell (Vernon, CT); Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT); Katz, Murray (Newington, CT)

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  7. Assessment of the Revised 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2013-12-01

    In order to support the air emissions permit for the 3410 Building, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a series of tests in the exhaust air discharge from the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The objective was to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring meets the applicable regulatory criteria governing such effluent monitoring systems. In particular, the capability of the air sampling probe location to meet the acceptance criteria of ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 , Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities was determined. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks address 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity of tracer particle concentration. Testing was performed to conform to the quality requirements of NQA-1-2000. Fan configurations tested included all fan combinations of any two fans at a time. Most of the tests were conducted at the normal flow rate, while a small subset of tests was performed at a slightly higher flow rate achieved with the laboratory hood sashes fully open. The qualification criteria for an air monitoring probe location are taken from ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 and are paraphrased as follows with key results summarized: 1. Angular Flow—The average air velocity angle must not deviate from the axis of the stack or duct by more than 20°. Our test results show that the mean angular flow angles at the center two-thirds of the ducts are smaller than 4.5? for all testing conditions. 2. Uniform Air Velocity—The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ? 20% across the center two thirds of the area of the stack. Our results show that the COVs of the air velocity across the center two-thirds of the stack are smaller than 2.9% for all testing conditions. 3. Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases—The uniformity of the concentration of potential contaminants is first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The tracer is injected downstream of the fan outlets and at the junction downstream fan discharges meet. The acceptance criteria are that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. Our test results show that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is < 2.9% for all test conditions and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >6.5%. 4. Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles—Tracer particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter are used for the second demonstration of concentration uniformity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ? 20% across the center two thirds of the sampling plane. Our test results indicate that the COV of particle concentration is <9.9% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane among all testing conditions. Thus, the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack was determined to meet the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside the bounds described in this report (e.g., exhaust stack velocity changes, relocation of sampling probe, and addition of fans) may require re-testing or re-evaluation to determine compliance.

  8. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Schuster, George J. (Kennewick, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  9. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  10. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beverly, Claude R. (Paducah, KY); Ernstberger, Harold G. (Paducah, KY)

    1988-01-01

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases.

  11. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, E.G.

    1985-07-03

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases. 1 fig.

  12. Progress on the Development of Reversible SOFC Stack Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Littleton, Colorado, United States · SOFC development facility in Calgary, Alberta, Canada · Activities coal ­ Scale-up and R&D of SOFC for Coal-Based SOFC systems ­ Large area cells and high kW stacks

  13. Progress Update: P&R Reactor Stacks Demolition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    October 2010 progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The demolition of nuclear reactor stacks and filling the reactors with grout to reduce the site footprint.

  14. Progress Update: P&R Reactor Stacks Demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    October 2010 progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The demolition of nuclear reactor stacks and filling the reactors with grout to reduce the site footprint.

  15. A liquid water management strategy for PEM fuel cell stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nguyen, Trung; Knobbe, M. W.

    2003-02-25

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a PEM fuel cell stack. Previous experimentation had found, and this experimentation confirms, that one very effective method of achieving proper gas and water management is the use...

  16. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistentmore »tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  17. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gong, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.

  18. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Malba, V.

    1999-08-03

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips is disclosed. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM. 12 figs.

  19. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA); Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM.

  20. Improved Durability of SOEC Stacks for High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Xiaoyu Zhang; Joseph J. Hartvigsen; Greg Tao

    2013-01-01

    High temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology for efficient and sustainable large-scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) are able to utilize high temperature heat and electric power from advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors or renewable sources to generate carbon-free hydrogen at large scale. However, long term durability of SOECs needs to be improved significantly before commercialization of this technology can be realized. A degradation rate of 1%/khr or lower is proposed as a threshold value for commercialization of this technology. Solid oxide electrolysis stack tests have been conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate recent improvements in long-term durability of SOECs. Electrolyte-supported and electrode-supported SOEC stacks were provided by Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI), respectively, for these tests. Long-term durability tests were generally operated for a duration of 1000 hours or more. Stack tests based on technologies developed at Ceramatec and MSRI have shown significant improvement in durability in the electrolysis mode. Long-term degradation rates of 3.2%/khr and 4.6%/khr were observed for MSRI and Ceramatec stacks, espectively. One recent Ceramatec stack even showed negative degradation (performance improvement) over 1900 hours of operation. Optimization of electrode materials, interconnect coatings, and electrolyte-electrode interface microstructures contribute to better durability of SOEC stacks.

  1. Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, K M

    1957-01-01

    Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

  2. Decoupled elastic prestack depth migration Alexander Druzhinin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Decoupled elastic prestack depth migration $ Alexander Druzhinin* British Geological Survey of the formula for common-shot or common-receiver amplitude-preserving elastic prestack depth migration (Pre to enhance strongly polarized wave modes prior to prestack depth migration (PreSDM) (e.g. Dillon et al., 1988

  3. Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes Department of Geophysics, Faculty of a general 3­D common­shot elastic prestack depth migration in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium is studied. Geophys. AS CR, Prague 457 #12;L. Klimes 1. INTRODUCTION A general formulation of prestack depth migration

  4. Traveling water waves with point vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffer Varholm

    2015-03-20

    We construct small-amplitude solitary traveling gravity-capillary water waves with a finite number of point vortices along a vertical line, on finite depth. This is done using a local bifurcation argument. The properties of the resulting waves are also examined: We find that they depend significantly on the position of the point vortices in the water column.

  5. Analysis of Proper Depth for Gaining Seawater Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and seawater temperatures near the city. · It is impossible to get deep sea water for Busan area, since according to the season, while that of deep sea water is constant. Point 1 207 Area 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20 the maximum sea water depth around Busan is about 150m. · It will be a good option to use surface layer water

  6. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-15

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  7. Stacking fault induced tunnel barrier in platelet graphite nanofiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Yann-Wen, E-mail: chiidong@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chii-Dong, E-mail: chiidong@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-Hao [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Opto-Mechatronics, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi 62102, Taiwan (China); Li, Yuan-Yao [Graduate Institute of Opto-Mechatronics, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi 62102, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-08

    A correlation study using image inspection and electrical characterization of platelet graphite nanofiber devices is conducted. Close transmission electron microscopy and diffraction pattern inspection reveal layers with inflection angles appearing in otherwise perfectly stacked graphene platelets, separating nanofibers into two domains. Electrical measurement gives a stability diagram consisting of alternating small-large Coulomb blockade diamonds, suggesting that there are two charging islands coupled together through a tunnel junction. Based on these two findings, we propose that a stacking fault can behave as a tunnel barrier for conducting electrons and is responsible for the observed double-island single electron transistor characteristics.

  8. Security Analysis of an Open Car Immobilizer Protocol Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    --apply the principle of open evaluation. A recent example is the specification of an open security protocol stack in principle be deployed on any suitable type of transponder chip. In this paper we re-evaluate the security] and the KeeLoq algo- rithm used in remote control systems [8] demonstrate the risks of this security

  9. Experimental and computational studies on stacking faults in zinc titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, W.; Ageh, V.; Mohseni, H.; Scharf, T. W. E-mail: Jincheng.Du@unt.edu; Du, J. E-mail: Jincheng.Du@unt.edu

    2014-06-16

    Zinc titanate (ZnTiO{sub 3}) thin films grown by atomic layer deposition with ilmenite structure have recently been identified as an excellent solid lubricant, where low interfacial shear and friction are achieved due to intrafilm shear velocity accommodation in sliding contacts. In this Letter, high resolution transmission electron microscopy with electron diffraction revealed that extensive stacking faults are present on ZnTiO{sub 3} textured (104) planes. These growth stacking faults serve as a pathway for dislocations to glide parallel to the sliding direction and hence achieve low interfacial shear/friction. Generalized stacking fault energy plots also known as ?-surfaces were computed for the (104) surface of ZnTiO{sub 3} using energy minimization method with classical effective partial charge potential and verified by using density functional theory first principles calculations for stacking fault energies along certain directions. These two are in qualitative agreement but classical simulations generally overestimate the energies. In addition, the lowest energy path was determined to be along the [451{sup ¯}] direction and the most favorable glide system is (104) ?451{sup ¯}? that is responsible for the experimentally observed sliding-induced ductility.

  10. Salt Concentration Differences Alter Membrane Resistance in Reverse Electrodialysis Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt Concentration Differences Alter Membrane Resistance in Reverse Electrodialysis Stacks Geoffrey is usually measured by immersing the membrane in a salt solution at a single, fixed concentration. While salt resistance of the membranes separating different salt concentration solutions has implications for modeling

  11. Individually addressable cathodes with integrated focusing stack or detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Lowndes, Douglas; Whealton, John; Whitson, John C.; Wilgen, John B.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and method are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A plurality of individually addressable cathodes are integrated with an electrostatic focusing stack and/or a plurality of detectors on the addressable field emission array. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  12. Photovoltaic device having light transmitting electrically conductive stacked films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Michael F. (St. Paul, MN); Tran, Nang T. (St. Paul, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (St. Paul, MN); Gilbert, James R. (St. Paul, MN); Aspen, Frank E. (St. Paul, MN)

    1990-07-10

    A light transmitting electrically conductive stacked film, useful as a light transmitting electrode, including a first light transmitting electrically conductive layer, having a first optical thickness, a second light transmitting layer, having a second optical thickness different from the optical thickness of the first layer, and an electrically conductive metallic layer interposed between and in initimate contact with the first and second layers.

  13. Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley** & Carl Shapiro*** We study several interconnected problems that arise under the current U.S. patent system when a patent covers one component using bargaining theory that the threat to obtain a permanent injunction greatly enhances the patent

  14. Java Card Operand Stack: Fault Attacks, Combined Attacks and Countermeasures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Java Card Operand Stack: Fault Attacks, Combined Attacks and Countermeasures Guillaume Barbu1. Until 2009, Java Cards have been mainly threatened by Log- ical Attacks based on ill-formed applications. The publication of the Java Card 3.0 Connected Edition specifications and their mandatory on-card byte code

  15. Wireless Sensor Networks: The Protocol Stack Iowa State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Wireless Sensor Networks: The Protocol Stack Mat Wymore Iowa State University Wind Energy Science Design an anycast WSN for a wind turbine SHM application that is very energy efficient. meets reliability for turbine structural health monitoring Are composed of sensor nodes Are very resource constrained

  16. Investigating dicarboxylic acid complexation on random stacked birnessite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    GEOC 180 Investigating dicarboxylic acid complexation on random stacked birnessite Michael J. Borda the adsorptive characteristics of RSB towards C1 -C6 dicarboxylic acids as a proxy for this important functional organic acids and RSB at the molecular scale, and under aqueous conditions representative of natural soil

  17. SINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dominates and total ventilation can be calculated by treating other effects (i.e., wind and small fansSINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman Energy Performance of Buildings Group Energy, Office of Buildings and Community Systems Building Systems Division of the U.S. Department

  18. cs281: Computer Organization Stack Conventions with Subroutines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kretchmar, R. Matthew

    a stack frame while you are writing and/or debugging an assembly program. Earlier Frames saved ebp other space arg n P . . . Caller's arg 2 Frame arg 1 rtn addr ebp saved P ebp space for saved registers local without worry and which ones need to be saved and restored. The caller must always save: · eax · ecx · edx

  19. THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY: STACKED IMAGES AND CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwyn, Stephen D. J., E-mail: Stephen.Gwyn@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-02-15

    This paper describes the image stacks and catalogs of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey produced using the MegaPipe data pipeline at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. The Legacy Survey is divided into two parts. The Deep Survey consists of four fields each of 1 deg{sup 2}, with magnitude limits (50% completeness for point sources) of u = 27.5, g = 27.9, r = 27.7, i = 27.4, and z = 26.2. It contains 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} sources. The Wide Survey consists of 150 deg{sup 2} split over four fields, with magnitude limits of u = 26.0, g = 26.5, r = 25.9, i = 25.7, and z = 24.6. It contains 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} sources. This paper describes the calibration, image stacking, and catalog generation process. The images and catalogs are available on the web through several interfaces: normal image and text file catalog downloads, a 'Google Sky' interface, an image cutout service, and a catalog database query service.

  20. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for AP-40 exhauster stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Davis, W.E.; Bussell, J.H.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as applied to the AP-40 exhauster stack, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/AP-40 system meets all applicable performance criteria. The contaminant mixing tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the wind tunnel facility, 331-H Building, using a mockup of the actual stack. The particle sample transport tests were conducted by PNNL at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The AP-40 stack is typical of several 10-in. diameter stacks that discharge the filtered ventilation air from tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles. Unrelated to the performance criteria, it was found that the record sample filter holder exhibited symptoms of sample bypass around the particle collection filter. This filter holder should either be modified or replaced with a different type. 10 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. T-559: Stack-based buffer overflow in oninit in IBM Informix...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Stack-based buffer overflow in oninit in IBM Informix Dynamic Server (IDS) 11.50 allows remote execution. PLATFORM: IBM Informix Dynamic Server (IDS) 11.50 ABSTRACT: Stack-based...

  2. Three-dimensional nanostructures fabricated by stacking pre-patterned monocrystalline silicon nanomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucetola, Corey Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This thesis considers the viability of nanomembrane handling and stacking approaches to enable the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nano-structured materials. Sequentially stacking previously-patterned membranes to ...

  3. Sequences 10/15/2007 9:49 AM ADTs, Stacks, Queues 1 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    , Tamassia The Stack ADT The Stack ADT stores arbitrary objects Insertions and deletions follow the last-in first-out scheme Think of a spring-loaded plate dispenser Main stack operations: push(object): inserts in a Web browser Undo sequence in a text editor Chain of method calls in the Java Virtual Machine Indirect

  4. A critical review of cooling techniques in proton exchange membrane fuel cell stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    November 2011 Keywords: Proton exchange membrane fuel cell PEMFC Stacks Heat generation Cooling Review a b fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks with high power. The narrow range of operating temperature and the small of the heat generation and cooling requirements in a PEMFC stack are introduced. Then the advantages

  5. String topology for stacks K. Behrend, G. Ginot, B. Noohi and P. Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    string topology. We prove that the homology of the free loop stack of an oriented stack is a BV-algebra and a Frobenius algebra, and the homology of hidden loops is a Frobenius algebra. Using our gen- eral machinery 8 1.1 Stacks over Top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.2 Morphisms

  6. Effective intermediate layers for highly efficient stacked organic light-emitting devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    studied in stacked organic light-emitting devices OLEDs . Stacked OLEDs with two identical emissive units organic light-emitting diode OLED device.1­3 The first three-color SOLED was reported in 1997, in whichEffective intermediate layers for highly efficient stacked organic light-emitting devices J. X. Sun

  7. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous ari pollutants registered and and unregistered stack (powered exhaust) source assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    On February 3, 1993, US DOE Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Div. of US EPA, Region X. The compliance order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford site to determine which are subject to the continuous emission measurement requirements in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, and to continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required The provision of a written compliance plan to meet the requirements of the compliance order. A compliance plan was submitted to EPA, Region X, on April 30, 1993. It set as one of the milestones, the complete assessment of the Hanford Site 84 stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health, by December 17, 1993. This milestone was accomplished. The compliance plan also called for reaching a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement; this was reached on February 7, 1994, between DOE Richland Operations and EPA, Region X. The milestone to assess the unregistered stacks (powered exhaust) by August 31, 1994, was met. This update presents assessments for 72 registered and 22 unregistered stacks with potential emissions > 0.1 mrem/yr.

  8. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  9. Stacking-dependent electronic structure of bilayer silicene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Huixia; Zhang, Jin; Ding, Zijing; Li, Hui, E-mail: huili8@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn; Meng, Sheng, E-mail: huili8@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-31

    Bilayer silicene (BLS) is a class of material that possibly holds both topological and superconducting properties; however, its structure is not fully understood. By scanning stacking modes and lattice constants using first principles calculations, several meta-stable configurations are identified, including a slightly faulted-AA packing structure, named slide-2AA. Different from the metallic properties of conventional AA and AB stacking forms, band structure of slide-2AA bilayer presents a sizeable indirect energy gap of ?1.16?eV. A metal-semiconductor phase transition along the sliding pathway with a small energy barrier is also observed, indicating its electronic properties can be easily tuned by applying small shear force along the BLS surface plane. Such unique quantitative relationship of structure and electronic properties has profound implications in nanoelectronics and electromechanical devices.

  10. National Spherical Torus Experiment NSTX CENTER STACK UPGRADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    ; added section 2.6 "Design Criteria"; added 3.1.3.3 "Center Stack Assembly"; 3.1.3.4 "Coil Bus Runs 2.5 Field Errors 14 2.6 Design Criteria 14 2.6.1 General Design Guidelines 14 2.6.2 Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) 15 2.6.3 Structural Design Criteria 15 2.7 Material

  11. Stacked Optical Precursors from Amplitude and Phase Modulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. F.; Feng, L.; Loy, M. M. T.; Wong, G. K. L.; Du, Shengwang [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Jeong, Heejeong [Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Suwon, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-04

    We report the generation of stacked optical precursors from a laser beam whose amplitude or phase is modulated by sequenced on-off step waveforms. Making use of the constructive interference between the precursors produced from different steps, as well as the main field, we generate optical transient pulses having peak powers of eight times the input power with electromagnetically induced transparency in laser-cooled atoms.

  12. Integrated fuel cell stack shunt current prevention arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roche, Robert P. (Cheshire, CT); Nowak, Michael P. (Bolton, CT)

    1992-01-01

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of fuel cells juxtaposed with one another in the stack and each including a pair of plate-shaped anode and cathode electrodes that face one another, and a quantity of liquid electrolyte present at least between the electrodes. A separator plate is interposed between each two successive electrodes of adjacent ones of the fuel cells and is unified therewith into an integral separator plate. Each integral separator plate is provided with a circumferentially complete barrier that prevents flow of shunt currents onto and on an outer peripheral surface of the separator plate. This barrier consists of electrolyte-nonwettable barrier members that are accommodated, prior to the formation of the integral separator plate, in corresponding edge recesses situated at the interfaces between the electrodes and the separator plate proper. Each barrier member extends over the entire length of the associated marginal portion and is flush with the outer periphery of the integral separator plate. This barrier also prevents cell-to-cell migration of any electrolyte that may be present at the outer periphery of the integral separator plate while the latter is incorporated in the fuel cell stack.

  13. LINKING Ly? AND LOW-IONIZATION TRANSITIONS AT LOW OPTICAL DEPTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-08-20

    We suggest that low optical depth in the Lyman continuum (LyC) may relate the Ly? emission, C II and Si II absorption, and C II* and Si II* emission seen in high-redshift galaxies. We base this analysis on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectra of four Green Pea (GP) galaxies, which may be analogs of z > 2 Ly? emitters (LAEs). In the two GPs with the strongest Ly? emission, the Ly? line profiles show reduced signs of resonant scattering. Instead, the Ly? profiles resemble the H? line profiles of evolved star ejecta, suggesting that the Ly? emission originates from a low column density and similar outflow geometry. The weak C II absorption and presence of non-resonant C II* emission in these GPs support this interpretation and imply a low LyC optical depth along the line of sight. In two additional GPs, weak Ly? emission and strong C II absorption suggest a higher optical depth. These two GPs differ in their Ly? profile shapes and C II* emission strengths, however, indicating different inclinations of the outflows to our line of sight. With these four GPs as examples, we explain the observed trends linking Ly?, C II, and C II* in stacked LAE spectra, in the context of optical depth and geometric effects. Specifically, in some galaxies with strong Ly? emission, a low LyC optical depth may allow Ly? to escape with reduced scattering. Furthermore, C II absorption, C II* emission, and Ly? profile shape can reveal the optical depth, constrain the orientation of neutral outflows in LAEs, and identify candidate LyC emitters.

  14. Using the depth-velocity-size diagram to interpret equilibrium bed configurations in river flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, J.B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Data from flume studies that report equilibrium bed configuration as well as water temperature, flow depth, flow velocity, and sediment size were used to develop the best approximation to the relationships among the various bed phases (ripples, dunes, lower regime plane bed, upper regime plane bed, and antidunes) in a three-axis graph (depth-velocity-size diagram) with dimensionless measures of mean flow depth, mean flow velocity, and sediment size along the axis. Relationships are shown in a series of depth-velocity and velocity-size sections through the diagram. Boundaries between bed-phase stability fields are drawn as surfaces that minimize, misplacement of data points. A large subset of the data, for which reliable values of bed shear stress are reported, was also used to represent the stability relationships in a graph of dimensionless boundary shear stress against dimensionless sediment size, but with results less useful for fluvial flow interpretation. The diagram covers about one order of magnitude in flow depth. To be useful for river flows, the diagram must be extrapolated in flow depth by about one more order of magnitude, but this is not a serious problem for approximate work. The depth-velocity-size diagram permits prediction of equilibrium bed configuration in river flows when the approximate flow depth and mean flow velocity are known. Because the diagram is essentially dimensionless, the effect of water temperature (via the fluid viscosity) on the bed configuration is easily accounted for by use of the diagram.

  15. Investigations of stacking fault density in perpendicular recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piramanayagam, S. N. Varghese, Binni; Yang, Yi; Kiat Lee, Wee; Khume Tan, Hang

    2014-06-28

    In magnetic recording media, the grains or clusters reverse their magnetization over a range of reversal field, resulting in a switching field distribution. In order to achieve high areal densities, it is desirable to understand and minimize such a distribution. Clusters of grains which contain stacking faults (SF) or fcc phase have lower anisotropy, an order lower than those without them. It is believed that such low anisotropy regions reverse their magnetization at a much lower reversal field than the rest of the material with a larger anisotropy. Such clusters/grains cause recording performance deterioration, such as adjacent track erasure and dc noise. Therefore, the observation of clusters that reverse at very low reversal fields (nucleation sites, NS) could give information on the noise and the adjacent track erasure. Potentially, the observed clusters could also provide information on the SF. In this paper, we study the reversal of nucleation sites in granular perpendicular media based on a magnetic force microscope (MFM) methodology and validate the observations with high resolution cross-section transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurements. Samples, wherein a high anisotropy CoPt layer was introduced to control the NS or SF in a systematic way, were evaluated by MFM, TEM, and magnetometry. The magnetic properties indicated that the thickness of the CoPt layer results in an increase of nucleation sites. TEM measurements indicated a correlation between the thickness of CoPt layer and the stacking fault density. A clear correlation was also observed between the MFM results, TEM observations, and the coercivity and nucleation field of the samples, validating the effectiveness of the proposed method in evaluating the nucleation sites which potentially arise from stacking faults.

  16. Thermoacoustic relaxation in a pin-array stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, M.E.; Swift, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The pressure response p{sub 1} of a fixed quantity of {sup 4}He gas subjected to sinusoidal volume perturbations is studied experimentally. Thermal diffusion near solid boundaries causes the gas response to be neither adiabatic nor isothermal. The data are interpreted in terms of the thermal relaxation function f{sub {kappa}} which relates p{sub 1} to the spatial average of the acoustic temperature profile. Comparison of a number of geometries allows us to accurately determine f{sub {kappa}} for a thermoacoustic pin-array stack. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  17. The change of microstructure and thermal properties in ion irradiated carbon nanotube mats as a function of ion penetration depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitkaliyeva, A. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Shao, L. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2013-02-11

    A stack of three carbon nanotube (CNT) mats was irradiated with 3 MeV He ions. The change in structural and thermal properties of individual mats as a function of ion penetration depth was characterized using electron microscopy and laser flash techniques. Ion irradiation can enhance thermal conductivity of the mats by introducing inter-tube displacements, which improve phonon transport across adjacent nanotubes. The enhancement, however, is reduced at higher damage levels due to the increasing phonon-defect scattering within the tubes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using ion irradiation to manipulate thermal transport in carbon nanotubes.

  18. Low hydrostatic head electrolyte addition to fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA)

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell and system for supply electrolyte, as well as fuel and an oxidant to a fuel cell stack having at least two fuel cells, each of the cells having a pair of spaced electrodes and a matrix sandwiched therebetween, fuel and oxidant paths associated with a bipolar plate separating each pair of adjacent fuel cells and an electrolyte fill path for adding electrolyte to the cells and wetting said matrices. Electrolyte is flowed through the fuel cell stack in a back and forth fashion in a path in each cell substantially parallel to one face of opposite faces of the bipolar plate exposed to one of the electrodes and the matrices to produce an overall head uniformly between cells due to frictional pressure drop in the path for each cell free of a large hydrostatic head to thereby avoid flooding of the electrodes. The bipolar plate is provided with channels forming paths for the flow of the fuel and oxidant on opposite faces thereof, and the fuel and the oxidant are flowed along a first side of the bipolar plate and a second side of the bipolar plate through channels formed into the opposite faces of the bipolar plate, the fuel flowing through channels formed into one of the opposite faces and the oxidant flowing through channels formed into the other of the opposite faces.

  19. Evaluation of a stack: A concrete chimney with brick liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R.; Amin, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, West Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A 200 ft. tall stack, consisting of a concrete chimney with an independent acid proof brick liner built in the 1950`s, serving the Separations facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), was evaluated for the performance category 3 (PC3) level of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) effects. The inelastic energy absorption capacity of the concrete chimney was considered in the evaluation of the earthquake resistance, in particular, to compute the F{sub {mu}} factor. The calculated value of F{sub {mu}} exceeded 3.0, while the seismic demand for the PC3 level, using an F{sub {mu}} value of 1.5, was found to be less than the capacity of the concrete chimney. The capacity formulation of ACI 307 was modified to incorporate the effect of an after design opening on the tension side. There are considerable uncertainties in determining the earthquake resistance of the independent brick liner. The critical liner section, located at the bottom of the breeching opening, does not meet the current recommendations. A discussion is provided for the possible acceptable values for the ``Moment Reduction Factor``, R{sub w} or F{sub {mu}} for the liner. Comments are provided on the comparison of stack demands using response spectra (RS) versus time history (TH) analysis, with and without soil structure interaction (SSI) effects.

  20. Probabilistic Based Design Methodology for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xin; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-05-01

    A probabilistic-based component design methodology is developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack. This method takes into account the randomness in SOFC material properties as well as the stresses arising from different manufacturing and operating conditions. The purpose of this work is to provide the SOFC designers a design methodology such that desired level of component reliability can be achieved with deterministic design functions using an equivalent safety factor to account for the uncertainties in material properties and structural stresses. Multi-physics-based finite element analyses were used to predict the electrochemical and thermal mechanical responses of SOFC stacks with different geometric variations and under different operating conditions. Failures in the anode and the seal were used as design examples. The predicted maximum principal stresses in the anode and the seal were compared with the experimentally determined strength characteristics for the anode and the seal respectively. Component failure probabilities for the current design were then calculated under different operating conditions. It was found that anode failure probability is very low under all conditions examined. The seal failure probability is relatively high, particularly for high fuel utilization rate under low average cell temperature. Next, the procedures for calculating the equivalent safety factors for anode and seal were demonstrated such that uniform failure probability of the anode and seal can be achieved. Analysis procedures were also included for non-normal distributed random variables such that more realistic distributions of strength and stress can be analyzed using the proposed design methodology.

  1. Systems and methods that generate height map models for efficient three dimensional reconstruction from depth information

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc Andre Leon; Gallup, David Robert

    2015-12-08

    Methods of generating a three dimensional representation of an object in a reference plane from a depth map including distances from a reference point to pixels in an image of the object taken from a reference point. Weights are assigned to respective voxels in a three dimensional grid along rays extending from the reference point through the pixels in the image based on the distances in the depth map from the reference point to the respective pixels, and a height map including an array of height values in the reference plane is formed based on the assigned weights. An n-layer height map may be constructed by generating a probabilistic occupancy grid for the voxels and forming an n-dimensional height map comprising an array of layer height values in the reference plane based on the probabilistic occupancy grid.

  2. The Square Root Depth Wave Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin C. Cotter; Darryl D. Holm; James R. Percival

    2009-12-11

    We introduce a set of coupled equations for multilayer water waves that removes the ill-posedness of the multilayer Green-Naghdi (MGN) equations in the presence of shear. The new well-posed equations are Hamiltonian and in the absence of imposed background shear they retain the same travelling wave solutions as MGN. We call the new model the Square Root Depth equations, from the modified form of their kinetic energy of vertical motion. Our numerical results show how the Square Root Depth equations model the effects of multilayer wave propagation and interaction, with and without shear.

  3. Final Report - MEA and Stack Durability for PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yandrasits, Michael A.

    2008-02-15

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are expected to change the landscape of power generation over the next ten years. For this to be realized one of the most significant challenges to be met for stationary systems is lifetime, where 40,000 hours of operation with less than 10% decay is desired. This project conducted fundamental studies on the durability of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and fuel cell stack systems with the expectation that knowledge gained from this project will be applied toward the design and manufacture of MEAs and stack systems to meet DOE’s 2010 stationary fuel cell stack systems targets. The focus of this project was PEM fuel cell durability – understanding the issues that limit MEA and fuel cell system lifetime, developing mitigation strategies to address the lifetime issues and demonstration of the effectiveness of the mitigation strategies by system testing. To that end, several discoveries were made that contributed to the fundamental understanding of MEA degradation mechanisms. (1) The classically held belief that membrane degradation is solely due to end-group “unzipping” is incorrect; there are other functional groups present in the ionomer that are susceptible to chemical attack. (2) The rate of membrane degradation can be greatly slowed or possibly eliminated through the use of additives that scavenge peroxide or peroxyl radicals. (3) Characterization of GDL using dry gases is incorrect due to the fact that fuel cells operate utilizing humidified gases. The proper characterization method involves using wet gas streams and measuring capillary pressure as demonstrated in this project. (4) Not all Platinum on carbon catalysts are created equally – the major factor impacting catalyst durability is the type of carbon used as the support. (5) System operating conditions have a significant impact of lifetime – the lifetime was increased by an order of magnitude by changing the load profile while all other variables remain the same. (6) Through the use of statistical lifetime analysis methods, it is possible to develop new MEAs with predicted durability approaching the DOE 2010 targets. (7) A segmented cell was developed that extend the resolution from ~ 40 to 121 segments for a 50cm2 active area single cell which allowed for more precise investigation of the local phenomena in a operating fuel cell. (8) The single cell concept was extended to a fuel size stack to allow the first of its kind monitoring and mapping of an operational fuel cell stack. An internal check used during this project involved evaluating the manufacturability of any new MEA component. If a more durable MEA component was developed in the lab, but could not be scaled-up to ‘high speed, high volume manufacturing’, then that component was not selected for the final MEA-fuel cell system demonstration. It is the intent of the team to commercialize new products developed under this project, but commercialization can not occur if the manufacture of said new components is difficult or if the price is significantly greater than existing products as to make the new components not cost competitive. Thus, the end result of this project is the creation of MEA and fuel cell system technology that is capable of meeting the DOEs 2010 target of 40,000 hours for stationary fuel cell systems (although this lifetime has not been demonstrated in laboratory or field testing yet) at a cost that is economically viable for the developing fuel cell industry. We have demonstrated over 2,000 hours of run time for the MEA and system developed under this project.

  4. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  5. Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Keri Marie

    2013-07-22

    was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

  6. Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth Yi Y. Liu,1 optical depth (VOD) retrievals from three satellitebased passive microwave instruments were merged longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38

  7. U-207: Pidgin 'mxit_show_message()' Function Stack-Based Buffer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pidgin Multiple Vulnerabilities T-527: OpenSC Smart Card Serial Number Multiple Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities U-202: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities...

  8. PART I The Making of a Geochemist: Q&A with Andrew Stack | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    discoveries Andrew Stack of Oak Ridge National Laboratory calls on his expertise in geology, chemistry and computing to advance understanding of the dynamics of minerals...

  9. Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster Concepts Nora Broy1,2,3 , Benedikt Zierer instrument cluster. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal more pronounced as auto-stereoscopic displays become available for the car. For instance, H¨akkil¨a et

  10. A novel micro-Raman technique to detect and characterize 4H-SiC stacking faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piluso, N. Camarda, M.; La Via, F.

    2014-10-28

    A novel Micro-Raman technique was designed and used to detect extended defects in 4H-SiC homoepitaxy. The technique uses above band-gap high-power laser densities to induce a local increase of free carriers in undoped epitaxies (n?stacking faults; the obtained morphologies were found to be in excellent agreement with those provided by standard photoluminescence techniques. The results show that the detection of defects via i-LOPC spectroscopy is totally independent from the stacking fault photoluminescence signals that cover a large energy range up to 0.7?eV, thus allowing for a single-scan simultaneous determination of any kind of stacking fault. Combining the i-LOPC method with the analysis of the transverse optical mode, the micro-Raman characterization can determine the most important properties of unintentionally doped film, including the stress status of the wafer, lattice impurities (point defects, polytype inclusions) and a detailed analysis of crystallographic defects, with a high spectral and spatial resolution.

  11. Germanium-induced stabilization of a very high-k zirconia phase in ZrO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2} gate stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsipas, P.; Volkos, S. N.; Sotiropoulos, A.; Galata, S. F.; Mavrou, G.; Tsoutsou, D.; Panayiotatos, Y.; Dimoulas, A.; Marchiori, C.; Fompeyrine, J.

    2008-08-25

    Electrical data on ZrO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2} stacks prepared by atomic oxygen beam deposition on Ge at 225 deg. C reveal a relatively weak dependence of the stack equivalent oxide thickness upon the ZrO{sub 2} thickness. This trend points to a very high zirconia dielectric permittivity (k) value which is estimated to be around 44. This is indicative of zirconia crystallization into a tetragonal phase which is also supported by x-ray diffraction data. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is in line with the assumption that due to a finite GeO{sub 2} decomposition, Ge is incorporated into the growing ZrO{sub 2}, thus, stabilizing the high-k tetragonal phase.

  12. Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Jo Ann

    1994-01-01

    . Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed...

  13. High-resolution common depth point seismic reflection profiling: field acquisition parameter design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapp, Ralph W.; Steeples, Don W.

    1986-02-01

    of dollars apiece, depending upon the length of the lead wires. Seismic blasting caps should always be used if a blasting box is used for the time break. Regular (nonseismic) electric caps some­ times delay for a millisecond or two before exploding, intro...­ ducing intolerable timing errors into seismic data. Nonelectric blasting caps or regular electric caps can be used if an uphole geophone is used for time break. We do not recommend this Using a large spike and planting the geophone firmly and carefully...

  14. On the Depth Information in the Point Spread Function of a Defocused Optical System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbarao, Murali "Rao"

    is determined by paraxial geometric op­ tics. In this paper we show that oe 2 w = oe 2 g + oe 2 0 . Consequently by paraxial geometric optics. We also compare here the PSF determined by paraxial geometric op­ tics

  15. Measurements with reticulated vitreous carbon stacks in thermoacoustic prime movers and refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeff, J.A.; Hofler, T.J.; Atchley, A.A.; Moss, W.C.

    1998-07-01

    Reticulated vitreous carbon has been successfully used as a stack material in thermoacoustic prime movers and refrigerators. It is a rigid glassy carbon material, with a porous spongelike structure. Test results indicate peak pressure amplitudes of up to 32{percent} in a prime mover, and refrigeration performance comparable to that of a traditional plastic roll stack. {copyright} {ital 1998 Acoustical Society of America.}

  16. Thermal and optical properties of freestanding flat and stacked single-layer graphene in aqueous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Thermal and optical properties of freestanding flat and stacked single-layer graphene in aqueous May 2014; published online 2 June 2014) Graphene, a two-dimensional atomic layer of carbon atoms the thermal and optical properties of suspended flat and stacked graphene ribbons that are typical structures

  17. Update on Electron Tomography Analysis of Plant Golgi Stacks Nanoscale Architecture of Endoplasmic Reticulum Export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    Reticulum Export Sites and of Golgi Membranes as Determined by Electron Tomography1[W] L. Andrew Staehelin) export sites, Golgi stacks, trans-Golgi network (TGN) cisternae, and associated vesicles and scaffolds at different rates, it is easy to imagine how a given Golgi stack that was close to an ER export site

  18. Efficient light harvesting in multiple-device stacked structure for polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient light harvesting in multiple-device stacked structure for polymer solar cells Vishal structure of polymer solar cells for efficient light harvesting. Two polymer photovoltaic cells are stacked harvesting has been demonstrated for organic solar cells uti- lizing tandem structure.11,12 However

  19. Physically Based Model-Predictive Control for SOFC Stacks and Systems Tyrone L. Vincent, Borhan Sanandaji

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.

    Physically Based Model-Predictive Control for SOFC Stacks and Systems Tyrone L. Vincent, Borhan output tra- jectory. The process is demonstrated for a tubular SOFC stack that could be used, solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC) must deliver power profiles that meet the demands of transient loads

  20. How Do API Changes Trigger Stack Overflow Discussions? A Study on the Android SDK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poshyvanyk, Denys

    How Do API Changes Trigger Stack Overflow Discussions? A Study on the Android SDK Mario LinaresOverflow highlights an increasing interest of software developers in mobile programming. For the Android platform, 213,836 questions were tagged with Android-related labels in StackOverflow between July 2008 and August 2012

  1. Enhancing the laser power by stacking multiple dye-doped chiral polymer films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Enhancing the laser power by stacking multiple dye-doped chiral polymer films Yuhua Huang, Tsung increasing the number of stacked films, the output laser power is further increased. It is also observed that the output laser power in the forward direction is almost the same as that in the backward for the two

  2. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 2: Optimized Gaussian packets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 2: Optimized Gaussian packets V#19;aclav Bucha packet prestack depth migration consists of four basic steps: (a) preparation of a velocity model su to the Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Keywords Gaussian packets, Gaussian beams, prestack depth

  3. Performance of transducers with segmented piezoelectric stacks using materials with high electromechanical coupling coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Stephen C; Markley, Douglas C

    2013-01-01

    Underwater acoustic transducers often include a stack of thickness polarized piezoelectric material pieces of alternating polarity interspersed with electrodes, bonded together and electrically connected in parallel. The stack is normally much shorter than a quarter wavelength at the fundamental resonance frequency, so that the mechanical behavior of the transducer is not affected by the segmentation. When the transducer bandwidth is less than a half octave, as has conventionally been the case, stack segmentation has no significant effect on the mechanical behavior of the device. However, when a high coupling coefficient material such as PMN-PT is used to achieve a wider bandwidth, the difference between a segmented stack and a similar piezoelectric section with electrodes only at the two ends can be significant. This paper investigates the effects of stack segmentation on the performance of wideband underwater acoustic transducers, particularly tonpilz transducer elements. Included is discussion of transduce...

  4. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  5. AUTOMATIC ALIGNMENT OF STACKS OF FILAMENT DATA V.J. Dercksen, B. Weber, D. Gunther, M. Oberlaender

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Steffen

    AUTOMATIC ALIGNMENT OF STACKS OF FILAMENT DATA V.J. Dercksen, B. Weber, D. G¨unther, M. Oberlaender a fast and robust method for the alignment of image stacks containing filamentous structures. Such stacks. For reconstruction, the filaments have to be traced and the sub-volumes aligned. Our algorithm takes traced filaments

  6. Assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks and diffuse and fugitive sources on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

    1995-06-01

    By using the six EPA-approved methods, instead of only the original back calculation method for assessing the 84 WHC registered stacks, the number of stacks requiring continuous monitoring was reduced from 32 to 19 stacks. The intercomparison between results showed that no correlation existed between back calculations and release fractions. Also the NDA, upstream air samples, and powder release fraction method results were at least three orders of magnitude lower then the back calculations results. The most surprising results of the assessment came from NDA. NDA was found to be an easy method for assessing potential emissions. For the nine stacks assessed by NDA, all nine of the stacks would have required continuous monitoring when assessed by back calculations. However, when NDA was applied all stacks had potential emissions that would cause an EDE below the > 0.1 mrem/y standard. Apparent DFs for the HEPA filter systems were calculated for eight nondesignated stacks with emissions above the detection limit. These apparent DFs ranged from 0.5 to 250. The EDE dose to the MEI was calculated to be 0.028 mrem/y for diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Sited. This is well below the > 0.1 mrem/y standard.

  7. EFFECT OF GEOMETRY AND OPERATING PARAMETERS ON SIMULATED SOFC STACK TEMPERATURE UNIFORMITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Lai, Canhai; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-08-10

    A uniform temperature field is desirable in the solid oxide fuel cell stack to avoid local hot regions that contribute to material degradation, thermal stresses, and differences in electrochemical performance. Various geometric and operational design changes were simulated by numerical modeling of co-flow and counter-flow multi-cell stacks, and the effects on stack maximum temperature, stack temperature difference, and maximum cell temperature difference were characterized. The results showed that 40-60% on-cell steam reforming of methane and a reduced reforming rate of 25-50% of the nominal rate was beneficial for a more uniform temperature field. Fuel exhaust recycling up to 30% was shown to be advantageous for reforming fuels and co-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel, but counter-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel showed higher temperature differences. Cells with large aspect ratios showed a more uniform temperature response due to either the strong influence of the inlet gas temperatures or the greater thermal exchange with the furnace boundary condition. Improved lateral heat spreading with thicker interconnects was demonstrated, but greater improvements towards a uniform thermal field for the same amount of interconnect mass could be achieved using thicker heat spreader plates appropriately distributed along the stack height.

  8. Pulsar Emission above the Spectral Break - A Stacked Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Fermi space telescope has provided us with a bountiful new population of gamma-ray sources following its discovery of 150 new gamma-ray pulsars. One common feature exhibited by all of these pulsars is the form of their spectral energy distribution, which can be described by a power law followed by a spectral break occurring between $\\sim$1 and $\\sim$8 GeV. The common wisdom is that the break is followed by an exponential cut-off driven by radiation/reaction-limited curvature emission. The discovery of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab pulsar, the only pulsar so far detected at very high energies (E$>$100GeV), contradicts this "cutoff" picture. Here we present a new stacked analysis with an average of 4.2 years of data on 115 pulsars published in the 2nd LAT catalog of pulsars. This analysis is sensitive to low-level $\\sim$100 GeV emission which cannot be resolved in individual pulsars but can be detected from an ensemble.

  9. Analysis of NSTX Upgrade OH Magnet and Center Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Zolfaghari, P. Titus, J. Chrzanowski, A. Salehzadeh, F. Dahlgren

    2010-11-30

    The new ohmic heating (OH) coil and center stack for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) upgrade are required to meet cooling and structural requirements for operation at the enhanced 1 Tesla toroidal field and 2 MA plasma current. The OH coil is designed to be cooled in the time between discharges by water flowing in the center of the coil conductor. We performed resistive heating and thermal hydraulic analyses to optimize coolant channel size to keep the coil temperature below 100 C and meet the required 20 minute cooling time. Coupled electromagnetic, thermal and structural FEA analyses were performed to determine if the OH coil meets the requirements of the structural design criteria. Structural response of the OH coil to its self-field and the field from other coils was analyzed. A model was developed to analyze the thermal and electromagnetic interaction of centerstack components such as the OH coil, TF inner legs and the Bellville washer preload mechanism. Torsional loads from the TF interaction with the OH and poloidal fields are transferred through the TF flag extensions via a torque transfer coupling to the rest of the tokamak structure. A 3D FEA analysis was performed to qualify this design. The results of these analyses, which will be presented in this paper, have led to the design of OH coil and centerstack components that meet the requirements of the NSTX-upgrade structural design criteria.

  10. Intra-Fuel Cell Stack Measurements of Transient Concentration Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partridge Jr, William P; Toops, Todd J; Green Jr, Johney Boyd; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2006-01-01

    Intra-fuel-cell measurements are required to understand detailed fuel-cell chemistry and physics, validate models, optimize system design and control, and realize enhanced efficiency regimes; in comparison, conventional integrated fuel-cell supply and effluent measurements are fundamentally limited in value. Intra-reactor measurements are needed for all fuel cell types. This paper demonstrates the ability of a capillary-inlet mass spectrometer to resolve transient species distributions within operating polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) fuel cells and at temperatures typical of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). This is the first such demonstration of a diagnostic that is sufficiently minimally invasive as to allow measurements throughout an operating fuel cell stack. Measurements of transient water, hydrogen, oxygen and diluent concentration dynamics associated with fuel-cell load switching suggest oxygen-limited chemistry. Intra-PEM fuel cell measurements of oxygen distribution at various fuel-cell loads are used to demonstrate concentration gradients, non-uniformities, and anomalous fuel cell operation.

  11. System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J; Weissman, Jeffrey G

    2013-08-13

    A system for adding sulfur to a reformate stream feeding a fuel cell stack, having a sulfur source for providing sulfur to the reformate stream and a metering device in fluid connection with the sulfur source and the reformate stream. The metering device injects sulfur from the sulfur source to the reformate stream at a predetermined rate, thereby providing a conditioned reformate stream to the fuel cell stack. The system provides a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

  12. Modeling of On-Cell Reforming Reaction for Planar SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Choongmo; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Hwang, Soon Cheol; Kim, Dohyung; Lai, Canhai; Koeppel, Brian J.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-30

    Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack is known to suffer thermal problem from high stack temperature during operation to generate high current. On-Cell Reforming (OCR) phenomenon is often used to reduce stack temperature by an endothermic reaction of steam-methane reforming process. RIST conducted single-cell experiment to validate modeling tool to simulate OCR performance including temperature measurement. 2D modeling is used to check reforming rate during OCR using temperature measurement data, and 3D modeling is used to check overall thermal performance including furnace boundary conditions.

  13. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

  14. Ocean General Circula-on near 1000 m depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lherminier, Pascale

    currents near 1000 m depth · Eddy Kine-c Energy near 1000 m depth · Seasonal hemisphere), Kuroshio, Oyashio, East Kamchatka, Alaska Stream, Gulf Stream, Labrador, East and West Greenland (northern hemisphere). · Alternate zonal bands

  15. Effect of stacking fault energy on mechanism of plastic deformation in nanotwinned FCC metals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borovikov, Valery; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; King, Alexander H.; LeSar, Richard

    2015-05-15

    Starting from a semi-empirical potential designed for Cu, we have developed a series of potentials that provide essentially constant values of all significant (calculated) materials properties except for the intrinsic stacking fault energy, which varies over a range that encompasses the lowest and highest values observed in nature. In addition, these potentials were employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate how stacking fault energy affects the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. The results indicate that properties such as yield strength and microstructural stability do not vary systematically with stacking fault energy, but rather fall into twomore »distinct regimes corresponding to 'low' and 'high' stacking fault energies.« less

  16. Fracture Spacing and Orientation Estimation from Spectral Analyses of Azimuth Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetri, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Discrete, vertically aligned fracture systems impart one or more notches in the spectral ratios of stacked reflected seismic traces. This apparent attenuation is due to the azimuth dependant scattering introduced by the ...

  17. Planting density effects on lint yield and quality of three stacked gene cotton cultivars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halfmann, Shane William

    2006-08-16

    The increased cost of planting transgenic or stacked gene cotton cultivars has stimulated interest in determining the optimal planting density for commercial production. If seeding rates can be reduced without adversely ...

  18. Device for equalizing molten electrolyte content in a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.L.

    1985-12-23

    A device for equalizing the molten electrolyte content throughout the height of a fuel cell stack is disclosed. The device includes a passageway for electrolyte return with electrolyte wettable wicking material in the opposite end portions of the passageway. One end portion is disposed near the upper, negative end of the stack where electrolyte flooding occurs. The second end portion is placed near the lower, positive end of the stack where electrolyte is depleted. Heating means are provided at the upper portion of the passageway to increase electrolyte vapor pressure in the upper wicking material. The vapor is condensed in the lower passageway portion and conducted as molten electrolyte in the lower wick to the positive end face of the stack. An inlet is provided to inject a modifying gas into the passageway and thereby control the rate of electrolyte return.

  19. Oxygen and Opacity Stack Emission Monitoring Systems To Optimize Combustion Efficiency and Meet EPA Requirements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molloy, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The combustion efficiency of industrial fuel burning equipment can be optimized through the use of oxygen and opacity stack emission monitoring systems. By providing the operator with the means to obtain accurate, continuous, dynamic feedback...

  20. HPC-ABDS High Performance Computing Enhanced Apache Big Data Stack Geoffrey Foxa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sqoop GridFTP 9. Scheduling Yarn Slurm 8. File Systems HDFS, Object Stores Lustre 1, 11A Formats Thrift, Zookeeper, Giraffe, JGroups 3) Security & Privacy: InCommon, Eduroam OpenStack Keystone, LDAP, Sentry, Sqrrl

  1. Stealth dicing characterization, optimization, integration, and operations management for ultra-thin stacked memory dies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teh, Weng Hong

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation presents original work in the development of multi-strata subsurface infrared (1.342 [mu]m) nanosecond pulsed laser die singulation (stealth dicing) to enable defect-free ultra-thin stacked memory dies. ...

  2. Algorithms and Automated Material Handling Systems Design for Stacking 3D Irregular Stone Pieces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Ming-Cheng

    2011-10-21

    problems, many algorithms such as the genetic algorithm, simulated annealing and other heuristic algorithms have been proposed. The three-dimensional stacking problem has a practical application in the transportation, manufacturing, and construction...

  3. Characterization of a 5 kW solid oxide fuel cell stack using power electronic excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seger, Eric

    Fuel cells have attracted great interest as a means of clean, efficient conversion of chemical to electrical energy. This paper demonstrates the identification of both non-parametric and lumped circuit models of our stack ...

  4. Device for equalizing molten electrolyte content in a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A device for equalizing the molten electrolyte content throughout the height of a fuel cell stack is disclosed. The device includes a passageway for electrolyte return with electrolyte wettable wicking material in the opposite end portions of the passageway. One end portion is disposed near the upper, negative end of the stack where electrolyte flooding occurs. The second end portion is placed near the lower, positive end of the stack where electrolyte is depleted. Heating means are provided at the upper portion of the passageway to increase electrolyte vapor pressure in the upper wicking material. The vapor is condensed in the lower passageway portion and conducted as molten electrolyte in the lower wick to the positive end face of the stack. An inlet is provided to inject a modifying gas into the passageway and thereby control the rate of electrolyte return.

  5. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The resultsthe indoor air quality and energy use of passive stacks.of the improved air quality is energy consumption increases

  6. Photonic band gap of a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yuancheng; Wei, Zeyong; Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Hong; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2013-12-10

    Here, we present a mechanism for tailoring the photonic band structure of a quarter-wave stack without changing its physical periods by embedding conductive sheets. Graphene is utilized and studied as a realistic, two-dimensional conductive sheet. In a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack, the synergic actions of Bragg scattering and graphene conductance contributions open photonic gaps at the center of the reduced Brillouin zone that are nonexistent in conventional quarter-wave stacks. Such photonic gaps show giant, loss-independent density of optical states at the fixed lower-gap edges, of even-multiple characteristic frequency of the quarter-wave stack. The conductive sheet-induced photonic gaps provide a platform for the enhancement of light-matter interactions.

  7. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in simple models of various anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in simple models of various anisotropy V´aclav Bucha Department Republic, E-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration anisotropy and monoclinic anisotropy. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in two ways: a

  8. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D simple models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D simple models: comparison of triclinic anisotropy depth migration to calculate migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic homogeneous velocity models interface. The anisotropy in the upper layer is triclinic. We apply Kirch- hoff prestack depth migration

  9. Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater Relationship in the Platte River Valley rates were correlated with depth to groundwater (d) values in the wide alluvial valley of the Platte soils with a shallow groundwater table. The transition depth (dt) between negative and positive values

  10. Numerical study of oscillatory flow and heat transfer in a loaded thermoacoustic stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worlikar, A.S.; Knio, O.M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoacoustic refrigerator may be idealized as consisting of a straight resonance tube housing a stack of parallel plates and heat exchangers, and an acoustic source. Among the advantages of thermoacoustic refrigerators are the simplicity of their design and the fact that they naturally avoid the need for harmful refrigerants such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The operation of these devices is based on exploiting the well-known thermoacoustic effect to induce a temperature difference across the stack and to transport heat from one end of the plate to the other. Heat exchangers are then used to transfer energy from the thermoacoustic refrigerator to hot and cold reservoirs. A two-dimensional, low-Mach-number computational model is used to analyze the unsteady flow and temperature fields in the neighborhood of an idealized stack/heat exchanger configuration. The model relies on a vorticity-based formulation of the mass, momentum, and energy equations in the low-Mach-number, short-stack limit. The stack and heat exchangers are assumed to consist of flat plates of equal thickness. The heat exchanger plates are assumed isothermal and in perfect thermal contact with the stack plates. The simulations are used to study the effect of heat exchanger size and operating conditions on the heat transfer and stack performance. Computed results show that optimum stack performance is achieved when the length of the heat exchanger is nearly equal to the peak-to-peak particle displacement. Numerical estimates of the mean enthalpy flux within the channel are in good agreement with the predictions of linear theory. However, the results reveal that a portion of the heat exchangers is ineffective due to reverse heat transfer. Details of the energy flux density around the heat exchangers are visualized, and implications regarding heat exchanger design and model extension are discussed.

  11. Effects of stacking faults on the electronic structures of quantum rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-03-30

    Atomistic semiempirical pseudopotential method is used to study the effects of stacking faults in a wurtzite structure quantum rod. It is found that a single stacking fault can cause a 10-50 meV change in the conduction state eigen energy, and a localization in the electron wave function. However, the effects on the hole eigen energies and wave functions are very small.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  13. Inherent Driving Force for Charge Separation in Curved Stacks of Oligothiophenes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Qin

    2015-01-30

    Coexistence of high local charge mobility and an energy gradient can lead to efficient free charge carrier generation from geminate charge transfer states at the donor–acceptor interface in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics. It is, however, not clear what polymer microstructures can support such coexistence. Using recent methods from density functional theory, we propose that a stack of similarly curved oligothiophene chains can deliver the requirements for efficient charge separation. Curved stacks are stable because of the polymer’s strong ?-stacking ability and because backbone torsions are flexible in neutral chains. However, energy of a charge in a polymer chain has remarkablymore »stronger dependence on torsions. The trend of increasing planarity in curved stacks effectively creates an energy gradient that drives charge in one direction. The curvature of these partially ordered stacks is found to beneficially interact with fullerenes for charge separation. The curved stacks, therefore, are identified as possible building blocks for interfacial structures that lead to efficient free carrier generation in high-performing organic photovoltaic systems.« less

  14. Magnetic Oscillation of Optical Phonon in ABA- and ABC-Stacked Trilayer Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, Chunxiao; Cao, Bingchen; Qiu, Caiyu; Shen, Xiaonan; Ferreira, Aires; Adam, Shaffique; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    We present a comparative measurement of the G-peak oscillations of phonon frequency, Raman intensity and linewidth in the Magneto-Raman scattering of optical E2g phonons in mechanically exfoliated ABA- and ABC-stacked trilayer graphene (TLG). Whereas in ABA-stacked TLG, we observe magnetophonon oscillations consistent with single-bilayer chiral band doublets, the features are flat for ABC-stacked TLG up to magnetic fields of 9 T. This suppression can be attributed to the enhancement of band chirality that compactifies the spectrum of Landau levels and modifies the magnetophonon resonance properties. The drastically different coupling behaviour between the electronic excitations and the E2g phonons in ABA- and ABC-stacked TLG reflects their different electronic band structures and the electronic Landau level transitions and thus can be another way to determine the stacking orders and to probe the stacking-order-dependent electronic structures. In addition, the sensitivity of the magneto-Raman scattering to the...

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Collie, Jeffrey C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

  16. Modeling the Air Flow in the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Barnett, J. M.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2013-01-23

    Additional ventilation capacity has been designed for the 3410 Building filtered exhaust stack system. The updated system will increase the number of fans from two to three and will include ductwork to incorporate the new fan into the existing stack. Stack operations will involve running various two-fan combinations at any given time. The air monitoring system of the existing two-fan stack was previously found to be in compliance with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, however it is not known if the modified (three-fan) system will comply. Subsequently, a full-scale three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the modified stack system has been created to examine the sampling location for compliance with the standard. The CFD modeling results show good agreement with testing data collected from the existing 3410 Building stack and suggest that velocity uniformity and flow angles will remain well within acceptance criteria when the third fan and associated ductwork is installed. This includes two-fan flow rates up to 31,840 cfm for any of the two-fan combinations. For simulation cases in which tracer gas and particles are introduced in the main duct, the model predicts that both particle and tracer gas coefficients of variance (COVs) may be larger than the acceptable 20 percent criterion of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard for each of the two-fan, 31,840 cfm combinations. Simulations in which the tracers are introduced near the fans result in improved, though marginally acceptable, COV values for the tracers. Due to the remaining uncertainty that the stack will qualify with the addition of the third fan and high flow rates, a stationary air blender from Blender Products, Inc. is considered for inclusion in the stack system. A model of the air blender has been developed and incorporated into the CFD model. Simulation results from the CFD model that includes the air blender show striking improvements in tracer gas mixing and tracer particle dispersion. The results of these simulations suggest the air blender should be included in the stack system to ensure qualification of the stack.

  17. Assessment of the Group 5-6 (LB C2, LB S2, LV S1) Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2011-03-11

    This document reports on a series of tests to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 5-6 exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LB-C2, LV-S1, and LB S2 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 5-6) because the common factor in their design is that the last significant flow disturbance upstream of the air sampling probe is a reduction in duct diameter. Federal regulations( ) require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The testing on scale models of the stacks conducted for this project was part of the River Protection Project—Waste Treatment Plant Support Program under Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 according to the statement of work issued by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI, 24590-QL-SRA-W000-00101, N13.1-1999 Stack Monitor Scale Model Testing and Qualification, Revision 1, 9/12/2007) and Work Authorization 09 of Memorandum of Agreement 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task is 53024, Work for Hanford Contractors Stack Monitoring. The testing described in this document was further guided by the Test Plan Scale Model Testing the Waste Treatment Plant LB-C2, LB-S2, and LV-S1 (Test Group 5-6) Stack Air Sampling Positions (TP-RPP-WTP-594). The tests conducted by PNNL during 2009 and 2010 on the Group 5-6 scale model systems are described in this report. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross-section at the designed sampling probe locations and at five duct diameters up and downstream from the design location to accommodate potential construction variability. The tests were done only at the design sampling probe location on the scale model of LB-S2 because that ductwork was already constructed. The ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 criteria and the corresponding results of the test series on the scale models are summarized in this report.

  18. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for medical point of care diagnostics and drug delivery Ronen Polsky Department of Biosensors and Nanomaterials February 25, 2015 Sandia MedTech Showcase Sandia National...

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System (RapiDx) * Portable microfluidic in vitro diagnostic instrument for cancer and infectious disease biomarkers in human biological samples * Point-of-Care...

  1. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optic links will replace many hardwire connections - Remotely programmable set-points and monitoring for each klystron cart - Klystron collector over-temperature protection will...

  2. Web points of interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Web points of interest ... JUGGLING CLUB; The Lafayette Citizens Band Home Page; Harold Boas' incredible list of math and life resources on the WEB.

  3. Optimized scalable stack of fluorescent solar concentrator systems with bifacial silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martínez Díez, Ana Luisa, E-mail: a.martinez@itma.es [Fundación ITMA, Parque Empresarial Principado de Asturias, C/Calafates, Parcela L-3.4, 33417 Avilés (Spain); Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Gutmann, Johannes; Posdziech, Janina; Rist, Tim; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Plaza, David Gómez [Fundación ITMA, Parque Empresarial Principado de Asturias, C/Calafates, Parcela L-3.4, 33417 Avilés (Spain)

    2014-10-21

    In this paper, we present a concentrator system based on a stack of fluorescent concentrators (FCs) and a bifacial solar cell. Coupling bifacial solar cells to a stack of FCs increases the performance of the system and preserves its efficiency when scaled. We used an approach to optimize a fluorescent solar concentrator system design based on a stack of multiple fluorescent concentrators (FC). Seven individual fluorescent collectors (20 mm×20 mm×2 mm) were realized by in-situ polymerization and optically characterized in regard to their ability to guide light to the edges. Then, an optimization procedure based on the experimental data of the individual FCs was carried out to determine the stack configuration that maximizes the total number of photons leaving edges. Finally, two fluorescent concentrator systems were realized by attaching bifacial silicon solar cells to the optimized FC stacks: a conventional system, where FC were attached to one side of the solar cell as a reference, and the proposed bifacial configuration. It was found that for the same overall FC area, the bifacial configuration increases the short-circuit current by a factor of 2.2, which is also in agreement with theoretical considerations.

  4. Numerical simulation of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. I. Unsteady adiabatic flow around the stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worlikar, A.S.; Knio, O.M.

    1996-09-01

    A low Mach-number compressible flow model for the simulation of acoustically driven flow in a thermoacoustic stack is constructed. The model is based on the assumption that the acoustic wavelength is much larger than the characteristic hydrodynamic lengthscale. Thus, a simplified description of the flow is obtained which still retains the essential features of acoustically induced velocity oscillations near solid boundaries. A vorticity-based formulation of the governing equation is derived which relies on the Helmholtz decomposition of the velocity vector into irrotational and divergence-free components. Irrotational motion is used to represent the action of acoustic waves. Meanwhile the divergence-free velocity component is used to capture the nonlinear vortical perturbations due to no-slip boundaries. A simplified version of the model is applied to analyze unsteady flow in the neighborhood of an idealized thermo-acoustic stack which consists of a periodic array of thin plates placed in an acoustic standing wave. Computed results are used to analyze, for different stack configurations, the nonlinear response of the flow to different acoustic driving amplitudes and frequencies. In particular, it is shown that the flow is dominated by the motion of vortices which result from the shedding of boundary layers from the edges of the stack. The dependence of energy losses on stack configuration and operating conditions is also examined. 28 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Micro-electroforming metallic bipolar electrodes for mini-DMFC stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, R F; Lee, J -H

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of metallic bipolar plate fabrication using micro-electroforming process for mini-DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell) stacks. Ultraviolet (UV) lithography was used to define micro-fluidic channels using a photomask and exposure process. Micro-fluidic channels mold with 300 micrometers thick and 500 micrometers wide were firstly fabricated in a negative photoresist onto a stainless steel plate. Copper micro-electroforming was used to replicate the micro-fluidic channels mold. Following by sputtering silver (Ag) with 1.2 micrometers thick, the metallic bipolar plates were completed. The silver layer is used for corrosive resistance. The completed mini-DMFC stack is a 2x2 cm2 fuel cell stack including a 1.5x1.5 cm2 MEA (membrane electrode assembly). Several MEAs were assembly into mini-DMFC stacks using the completed metallic bipolar plates. All test results showed the metallic bipolar plates suitable for mini-DMFC stacks. The maximum output power density is 9.3mW/cm2 and curren...

  6. Degree of polarization and source counts of faint radio sources from Stacking Polarized intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stil, J. M.; George, S. J.; Keller, B. W.; Taylor, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    We present stacking polarized intensity as a means to study the polarization of sources that are too faint to be detected individually in surveys of polarized radio sources. Stacking offers not only high sensitivity to the median signal of a class of radio sources, but also avoids a detection threshold in polarized intensity, and therefore an arbitrary exclusion of sources with a low percentage of polarization. Correction for polarization bias is done through a Monte Carlo analysis and tested on a simulated survey. We show that the nonlinear relation between the real polarized signal and the detected signal requires knowledge of the shape of the distribution of fractional polarization, which we constrain using the ratio of the upper quartile to the lower quartile of the distribution of stacked polarized intensities. Stacking polarized intensity for NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources down to the detection limit in Stokes I, we find a gradual increase in median fractional polarization that is consistent with a trend that was noticed before for bright NVSS sources, but is much more gradual than found by previous deep surveys of radio polarization. Consequently, the polarized radio source counts derived from our stacking experiment predict fewer polarized radio sources for future surveys with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders.

  7. Revealing the Preferred Interlayer Orientations and Stackings of Two-Dimensional Bilayer Gallium Selenide Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xufan; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0 or 60 interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale and the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. The combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.

  8. Rapid and Nondestructive Identification of Polytypism and Stacking Sequences in Few-Layer Molybdenum Diselenide by Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Xin; Utama, M. Iqbal Bakti; Lin, Junhao; Luo, Xin; Zhao, Yanyuan; Zhang, Jun; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Quek, Su Ying; Xiong, Qihua

    2015-07-02

    Various combinations of interlayer shear modes emerge in few-layer molybdenum diselenide grown by chemical vapor deposition depending on the stacking configuration of the sample. Raman measurements may also reveal polytypism and stacking faults, as supported by first principles calculations and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Thus, Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in probing stacking-dependent properties in few-layer 2D materials.

  9. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies More Documents & Publications Good Practice Guide on Firewall Deployment for SCADA and Process Control Networks Mitigations for...

  10. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  11. Breakthrough Flow Battery Cell Stack: Transformative Electrochemical Flow Storage System (TEFSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-09

    GRIDS Project: UTRC is developing a flow battery with a unique design that provides significantly more power than today's flow battery systems. A flow battery is a cross between a traditional battery and a fuel cell. Flow batteries store their energy in external tanks instead of inside the cell itself. Flow batteries have traditionally been expensive because the battery cell stack, where the chemical reaction takes place, is costly. In this project, UTRC is developing a new stack design that achieves 10 times higher power than today’s flow batteries. This high power output means the size of the cell stack can be smaller, reducing the amount of expensive materials that are needed. UTRC’s flow battery will reduce the cost of storing electricity for the electric grid, making widespread use feasible.

  12. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

    2011-01-01

    Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

  13. 4 kW Test of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new test stand has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for multi-kW testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. This test stand will initially be operated at the 4 KW scale. The 4 kW tests will include two 60-cell stacks operating in parallel in a single hot zone. The stacks are internally manifolded with an inverted-U flow pattern and an active area of 100 cm2 per cell. Process gases to and from the two stacks are distributed from common inlet/outlet tubing using a custom base manifold unit that also serves as the bottom current collector plate. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells and electrode gases. Sealing is accomplished with compliant mica-glass seals. A spring-loaded test fixture is used for mechanical stack compression. Due to the power level and the large number of cells in the hot zone, process gas flow rates are high and heat recuperation is required to preheat the cold inlet gases upstream of the furnace. Heat recuperation is achieved by means of two inconel tube-in-tube counter-flow heat exchangers. A current density of 0.3 A/cm2 will be used for these tests, resulting in a hydrogen production rate of 25 NL/min. Inlet steam flow rates will be set to achieve a steam utilization value of 50%. The 4 kW test will be performed for a minimum duration of 1000 hours in order to document the long-term durability of the stacks. Details of the test apparatus and initial results will be provided.

  14. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1994-08-09

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  15. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Kachmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1995-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  16. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  17. Real Time Head Pose Estimation from Consumer Depth Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    for estimating location and orientation of a person's head, from depth data acquired by a low quality device. OurReal Time Head Pose Estimation from Consumer Depth Cameras Gabriele Fanelli1 , Thibaut Weise2 and the variance of the head position and orientation. We evaluate three different approaches to jointly take

  18. Instrument for Determining Depth of Dehydration of Frozen Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This report describes the design, construction, and operation of a de- hydration depth gauge to measure the degree of dehydration in frozen seafoods. Design The dehydration depth gauge adopts the principle was modified by using a heavier gauge blade having a narrow cutting edge extending I mm below the plane's flat

  19. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  20. Type A verification report for the high flux beam reactor stack and grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpenau, Evan M.

    2012-01-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The HFBR Stack and Grounds surveys began in June 2011 and were completed in September 2011. Survey activities by BSA included gamma walkover scans and sampling of the as-left soils in accordance with the BSA Work Procedure (BNL 2010a). The Field Sampling Plan - Stack and Remaining HFBR Outside Areas (FSP) stated that gamma walk-over surveys would be conducted with a bare sodium iodide (NaI) detector, and a collimated detector would be used to check areas with elevated count rates to locate the source of the high readings (BNL 2010b). BSA used the Mult- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) principles for determining the classifications of each survey unit. Therefore, SUs 6 and 7 were identified as Class 1 and SU 8 was deemed Class 2 (BNL 2010b). Gamma walkover surveys of SUs 6, 7, and 8 were completed using a 2?2 NaI detector coupled to a data-logger with a global positioning system (GPS). The 100% scan surveys conducted prior to the final status survey (FSS) sampling identified two general soil areas and two isolated soil locations with elevated radioactivity. The general areas of elevated activity identified were investigated further with a collimated NaI detector. The uncollimated average gamma count rate was less than 15,000 counts per minute (cpm) for the SU 6, 7, and 8 composite area (BNL 2011a). Elevated count rates were observed in portions of each survey unit. The general areas of elevated counts near the Building 801 ventilation and operations and the entry to the Stack were determined to be directly related to the radioactive processes in those structures. To compensate for this radioactive shine, a collimated or shielded detector was used to lower the background count rate (BNL 2011b and c). This allowed the surveyor(s) to distinguish between background and actual radioactive contamination. Collimated gamma survey count rates in these shine affected areas were below 9,000 cpm (BNL 2011a). The average background count rate of 7,500 cpm was reported by BSA for uncollimated NaI detectors (BNL 2011d). The average collimated background ranged from 4,500-6,500 cpm in the westernmost part of SU 8 and from 2,000-3,500 cpm in all other areas (BNL 2011e). Based on these data, no further investigations were necessary for these general areas. SU 8 was the only survey unit that exhibited verified elevated radioactivity levels. The first of two isolated locations of elevated radioactivity had an uncollimated direct measurement of 50,000 cpm with an area background of 7,500 cpm (BNL 2011f). The second small area exhibiting elevated radiation levels was identified at a depth of 6 inches from the surface. The maximum reported count rate of 28,000 cpm was observed during scanning (BNL 2011g). The affected areas were remediated, and the contaminated soils were placed in an intermodal container for disposal. BSA's post-remediation walkover surveys were expanded to include a 10-foot radius around the excavated locations, and it was determined that further investigation was not required for these areas (BNL 2011 f and g). The post-remediation soil samples were collected and analyzed with onsite gamma spectroscopy equipment. These samples were also included with the FSS s

  1. Pulse-stacked cavity ring-down spectroscopy E. R. Crosson, P. Haar, G. A. Marcus, and H. A. Schwettman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulse-stacked cavity ring-down spectroscopy E. R. Crosson, P. Haar, G. A. Marcus, and H. A, California 94305-5080 Received 22 September 1998; accepted for publication 23 October 1998 Pulse stacking. Using an ultrashort pulse, high repetition rate laser source we have shown that it is possible

  2. P-129 / J. X. Sun P-129: Highly Efficient Stacked OLED Employing New Anode-Cathode Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    light emitting diode (OLED) [1], much development has been made to improve this device for applicationsP-129 / J. X. Sun P-129: Highly Efficient Stacked OLED Employing New Anode-Cathode Layer J. X. Sun Highly efficient stacked OLEDs have been fabricated using a new anode-cathode-layer (ACL) that connects

  3. A communication stack over PLC for multi physical layer IPv6 Networking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Inc. and CITI Insa-Lyon / INRIA, France Bernard Tourancheau: CITI Insa-Lyon / INRIA and LIP UMR 5668 interoperability features regarding others media with a robust and reliable communication stack for smart metering the main grid power supply. However, power consumption is still relevant to keep the global power overhead

  4. Logistical Networking Research and the Network Storage Stack James S. Plank Micah Beck Terry Moore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plank, Jim

    Logistical Networking Research and the Network Storage Stack James S. Plank Micah Beck Terry Moore Logistical Computing and Internetworking Lab Department of Computer Science, University of Tennessee years, the Logistical Computing and Iinternetworking (LoCI) project at the University of Tennessee has

  5. From the World Wide Web to digital library stacks: preserving the French web archives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    From the World Wide Web to digital library stacks: preserving the French web archives Clément Oury nationale de France Bibliographic and Digital Information Department sebastien.peyrard@bnf.fr ABSTRACT The National Library of France is mandated by French law to collect and preserve the French Internet. It is now

  6. '. stacking power MOSFETs for use in high speed instrumentation R. J. Baker and B. P. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R. Jacob

    '. stacking power MOSFETs for use in high speed instrumentation R. J. Baker and B. P. Johnson of power MOSFETs in the design of instrumentation has been their hold off volt- age (the maximum voltage reportedl-3 for use in high speed instrumentation. These reported meth

  7. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  8. Density Functional Theory investigations of titanium gamma-surfaces and stacking faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Magali; Morillo, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Properties of hcp-Ti such as elastic constants, stacking faults and gamma-surfaces are computed using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and two central force Embedded Atom interaction Models (EAM). The results are compared to previously published calculations and to predicting models. Their implications on the plastic properties of hcp-Ti are discussed.

  9. Energy-Efficient Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling in 3D Stacked Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    in comparison to air. Our focus in this work is developing energy- and performance-efficient thermal management1 Energy-Efficient Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling in 3D Stacked Architectures Ayse K. Coskun , David. In this work, we first propose a framework for detailed thermal modeling of the microchannels embedded between

  10. Journal of Power Sources 167 (2007) 1117 Voltage reversal during microbial fuel cell stack operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    forms of biodegradable organic matter, even human and animal wastewaters [1­4]. The power producedJournal of Power Sources 167 (2007) 11­17 Voltage reversal during microbial fuel cell stack polarity of one or more cells and a loss of power generation. We investigated the causes of charge reversal

  11. Steam Production from Waste Stack Gases in a Carbon Black Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istre, R. I.

    1981-01-01

    Waste stack gases from carbon black plant bag filters are used as fuel to produce superheated steam - G25 PSIG and 7500F. This steam is out into a steam header that serves Conoco plants in the Lake Charles, Louisiana area. Combustion of the waste...

  12. P0906-090-Chnani Macroscopic Model of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 P0906-090-Chnani Macroscopic Model of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack for Integrating in a Generator fuel cell (SOFC) with the aim to perform a simulation of the whole generator. Three sub-models have at the catalytic sites and gas flows at fuel cell input and output. The electrical response is based

  13. Enhanced water desalination efficiency in an air-cathode stacked microbial electrodeionization cell (SMEDIC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    less electrical energy [2,3]. Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) have recently drawn atten- tion as a low-energy method of water desalination. The simplest MDC is a microbial fuel cell (MFCEnhanced water desalination efficiency in an air-cathode stacked microbial electrodeionization cell

  14. Post-test evaluation of oxygen electrodes from solid oxide electrolysis stacks5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    by water-splitting using electricity and heat from an advanced nuclear power plant [1,2]. The process of steam and hydrogen as the feed gas. The ``stacking'' of cells provides for a reasonable electrolysis form 15 July 2008 Accepted 15 July 2008 Available online 10 October 2008 Keywords: Steam electrolysis

  15. Building Application Stack (BAS) Andrew Krioukov, Gabe Fierro, Nikita Kitaev, David Culler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Building Application Stack (BAS) Andrew Krioukov, Gabe Fierro, Nikita Kitaev, David Culler Computer.fierro@berkeley.edu, kitaev@berkeley.edu, culler@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract Many commercial buildings have digital controls, detecting faults, improving comfort, etc. However, buildings are custom designed, lead- ing to differences

  16. Liquid Crystal Pretilt and Azimuth Angle Study of Stacked Alignment Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    angles for the liquid crystal. It is based on stacking both photo- aligned polymer and rubbed polyimide comprise of both photo-aligned horizontal polymer and rubbed vertical polyimide. The advantage alignment polyimide JALS2021 form JSR Corporation is spin coated on the substrate. Then it is baked inside

  17. Waste Heat Recovery From Stacks Using Direct-Contact Condensing Heat Exchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorn, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    . ... ... '" ... ... ... ,.. 100 .. nUl GAl nM!"ElU.TUM, -,. I Figure A-3. Enthalpy of Dry Air at I ATM/14.6~6 psia i For this example, a 400 0 F original stack temperature has been assumed and the recoveries possible with a conventional economizer and a direct...

  18. A Poisoning-Resilient TCP Stack Amit Mondal and Aleksandar Kuzmanovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    A Poisoning-Resilient TCP Stack Amit Mondal and Aleksandar Kuzmanovic Northwestern University {a-mondal, akuzma}@cs.northwestern.edu Abstract-- We treat the problem of large-scale TCP poisoning: an attacker of mitigating large-scale poisoning attacks. We show, by means of analytical modeling, simulations, and Internet

  19. TSV Stress-Aware ATPG for 3D Stacked ICs Sergej Deutsch, Krishnendu Chakrabarty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Sung Kyu

    TSV Stress-Aware ATPG for 3D Stacked ICs Sergej Deutsch, Krishnendu Chakrabarty Department--Thermo-mechanical stress due to TSV fabrication pro- cesses is a major concern in 3D integration. TSV stress not only are generated with TSV stress-oblivious circuit models. We evaluate the impact on TSV stress on delay testing

  20. Algorithms for an Optimal A* Search and Linearizing the Search in the Stack Decoder.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is just a sorted list which supports the operations: pop the best entry, insert new entries ac- cording to find the most likely path (rec- ognized sentence) while extending the minimum number of stack entries linearizes the search at the cost of approximating some of the path likelihoods. Introduction Speech

  1. Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Stack System Identification and Control A Systematic Recipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.

    Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Stack System Identification and Control A Systematic Recipe Borhan M. Sanandaji, Tyrone L. Vincent, Andrew Colclasure, and Robert J. Kee Colorado Fuel Cell Center (CFCC) Division of Engineering Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 USA Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (MIMO) Systems Are... fuel

  2. 48 OCTOBER 2013 VOL. 38 NO. 5 www.usenix.org Drilling Network Stacks with packetdrill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    48 OCTOBER 2013 VOL. 38 NO. 5 www.usenix.org Drilling Network Stacks with packetdrill N E A L C A R to support these and other protocols. #12;www.usenix.org OCTOBER 2013 VOL. 38 NO. 5 49 PROGRAMMING Drilling

  3. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gard, Eric (San Francisco, CA); Riot, Vincent (Oakland, CA); Coffee, Keith (Diablo Grande, CA); Woods, Bruce (Livermore, CA); Tobias, Herbert (Kensington, CA); Birch, Jim (Albany, CA); Weisgraber, Todd (Brentwood, CA)

    2011-11-22

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  4. Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices Michael) 23 October 2008 Abstract We develop a fundamental model for spot electricity prices, based on stochastic processes for underlying factors (fuel prices, power demand and generation capacity availability

  5. Low-frequency Raman 'fingerprints' of two-dimensional metal dichalcogenide layer stacking configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Liang, Liangbo; Li, Xufan; Xiao, Kai; Wang, Kai; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Geohegan, David B

    2015-01-01

    Stacked monolayers of two-dimensional (2D) materials present a new class of hybrid materials with tunable optoelectronic properties determined by their stacking orientation, order, and atomic registry. Atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (AR-Z-STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used to determine the exact atomic registration between different layers, in few-layer 2D stacks, however fast optical characterization techniques are essential for rapid development of the field. Here, using two- and three-layer MoSe2 and WSe2 crystals synthesized by chemical vapor deposition we show that the generally unexplored low frequency (LF) Raman modes (< 50 cm-1) that originate from interlayer vibrations can serve as fingerprints to characterize not only the number of layers, but also their stacking configurations. Ab initio calculations and group theory analysis corroborate the experimental assignments determined by AR-Z-STEM and show that the calculated LF mode fingerprints are related to the 2D crystal symmetries.

  6. Cell Equalization In Battery Stacks Through State Of Charge Estimation Polling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Cell Equalization In Battery Stacks Through State Of Charge Estimation Polling Carmelo Speltino, Anna Stefanopoulou and Giovanni Fiengo Abstract-- Battery packs are charged and discharged as a single battery, therefore it is possible that differences between cells (i.e. chemical characteristics, operating

  7. Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-08-27

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

  8. Computation of Texture and Stereoscopic Depth in Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahle, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    The computation of texture and of stereoscopic depth is limited by a number of factors in the design of the optical front-end and subsequent processing stages in humans and machines. A number of limiting factors in ...

  9. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

  10. In-Depth Temperature Profiles in Pyrolyzing Wood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reszka, Pedro

    The move towards performance-based design of the fire resistance of structures requires more accurate design methods. An important variable in the fire performance of timber structures is the in-depth temperature distribution, as wood is weakened...

  11. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  12. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2014-02-18

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  13. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley; Dana A. (New Milford, CT), Farooque; Mohammad (Danbury, CT), Davis; Keith (Southbury, CT)

    2007-10-02

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  14. Loading containers on double-stack cars: Multi-objective optimization models and solution algorithms for improved safety and reduced maintenance cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xuesong

    1 Loading containers on double-stack cars: Multi-objective optimization models and solution-stack cars: Multi-objective optimization models and solution algorithms for improved safety and reduced maintenance cost Abstract To improve safety measures of loading containers on double-stack rail cars

  15. Joint stochastic inversion of 3D pre-stack seismic data and well logs for high-resolution reservoir characterization and petrophysical modeling: application to deepwater hydrocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Joint stochastic inversion of 3D pre-stack seismic data and well logs for high-resolution reservoir of migrated 3D pre-stack seismic data. The inversion algorithm is based on a Bayesian statistical search of elastic and petrophysical properties we resorted to amplitude information of 3D pre-stack seismic data

  16. Assessing the value of 3D post-stack seismic amplitude data in forecasting fluid production from a deepwater Gulf-of-Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    complex hydrocarbon reservoir models constructed with the use of 3D post-stack seismic amplitude data consideration, the joint stochastic inversion of well logs and 3D post- stack seismic amplitude data1 Assessing the value of 3D post-stack seismic amplitude data in forecasting fluid production from

  17. 184 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 26, NO. 1, MARCH 2011 PEM Fuel Cell Stack Modeling for Real-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    184 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 26, NO. 1, MARCH 2011 PEM Fuel Cell Stack Modeling, IEEE Abstract--In this paper, a multiphysical proton exchange mem- brane fuel cell stack model, which, fluidic, and thermal. A Ballard 1.2 kW 47 cells fuel cell stack model is introduced. The corresponding

  18. Progress in Multi-Batch Slip Stacking in the Fermilab Main Injector and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiya, K.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    The multi-batch slip stacking has been used for operations since January, 2008 and effectively increased proton intensity to the NuMI target by 50% in a Main Injector (MI) cycle. The MI accepts 11 batches at injection energy from the Booster, and sends two batches to antiproton production and nine to the NuMI beam line. The total beam power in a cycle was increased to 340 kW on average. We have been doing beam studies in order to increase the beam power to 400 kW and to control the beam loss. We will also discuss 12 batch slip stacking scheme which is going to be used for future neutrino experiments.

  19. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kachmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1995-02-28

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device is described, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  20. Numerical simulation of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. 2: Stratified flow around the stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worlikar, A.S.; Knio, O.M.; Klein, R.

    1998-08-10

    The unsteady, two-dimensional, thermally stratified flow in the neighborhood of an idealized thermoacoustic stack is analyzed using a low-Mach-number model that extends the adiabatic flow scheme developed in part 1 (Journal of Computational Physics 127, 424 (1996)). The extension consists of incorporation of numerical solvers for the energy equations in the fluid and the stack plates, and construction and implementation of fast Poisson solver for the velocity potential based on a domain decomposition/boundary Green`s function technique. The unsteady computations are used to predict the steady-state, acoustically generated temperature gradient across a two-dimensional couple and to analyze its dependence on the amplitude of the prevailing resonant wave. Computed results are compared to theoretical predictions and experimental data.

  1. A simplified model for heat transfer in heat exchangers and stack plates for thermoacoustic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.; Herman, C.

    1999-07-01

    A simplified model of heat transfer in heat exchangers and stack plates of thermoacoustic devices was developed. The model took advantage of previous results regarding the thermal behavior of the thermoacoustic core for investigations of the performance of heat exchangers attached to the core. Geometrical and operational parameters as well as thermophysical properties of the heat exchangers, the plate, and the working medium were organized into dimensionless groups that allowed to account for their impact on the performance of the heat exchangers. Numerical simulations with the model were carried out. Nonlinear temperature distributions and heat fluxes near the edge of the stack plate were observed. Effects of different parameters on the thermal performance of the heat exchangers were investigated.

  2. Four-Terminal Mechanically Stacked GaAs/Si Tandem Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan, S

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates a four-terminal mechanically stacked double junction photovoltaic device based on GaAs as a top subcell and Si as a bottom subcell. Unlike two terminal monolithically series connected double junction photovoltaics, four-terminal mechanically stacked devices benefit from the ability to choose a combination of materials that are not constrained to lattice matching condition. GaAs top subcell is the best sensitive to visible light and Si bottom subcell is chosen to be grown on Si substrate which has relatively low cost. Moreover, the carriers generated by each subcell is collected independently to the external circuit. This electrical isolation of the subcells ensures higher efficiency, where no current matching nor tunnel junctions and related losses exist. A conversion efficiency of the device with a thickness in the order of 10 microns surpassed 27%.

  3. Stacked white OLED having separate red, green and blue sub-elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, Stephen; Qi, Xiangfei; Slootsky, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The present invention relates to efficient organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The devices employ three emissive sub-elements, typically emitting red, green and blue, to sufficiently cover the visible spectrum. Thus, the devices may be white-emitting OLEDs, or WOLEDs. Each sub-element comprises at least one organic layer which is an emissive layer--i.e., the layer is capable of emitting light when a voltage is applied across the stacked device. The sub-elements are vertically stacked and are separated by charge generating layers. The charge-generating layers are layers that inject charge carriers into the adjacent layer(s) but do not have a direct external connection.

  4. System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukerjee, Subhasish (Pittsford, NY); Haltiner, Jr., Karl J (Fairport, NY); Weissman, Jeffrey G. (West Henrietta, NY)

    2012-03-06

    A system for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack, having a reformer adapted to reform a hydrocarbon fuel stream containing sulfur contaminants, thereby providing a reformate stream having sulfur; a sulfur trap fluidly coupled downstream of the reformer for removing sulfur from the reformate stream, thereby providing a desulfurized reformate stream; and a metering device in fluid communication with the reformate stream upstream of the sulfur trap and with the desulfurized reformate stream downstream of the sulfur trap. The metering device is adapted to bypass a portion of the reformate stream to mix with the desulfurized reformate stream, thereby producing a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

  5. Cassettes for solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and methods of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2012-10-23

    Solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack assembly designs are consistently investigated to develop an assembly that provides optimal performance, and durability, within desired cost parameters. A new design includes a repeat unit having a SOFC cassette and being characterized by a three-component construct. The three components include an oxidation-resistant, metal window frame hermetically joined to an electrolyte layer of a multi-layer, anode-supported ceramic cell and a pre-cassette including a separator plate having a plurality of vias that provide electrical contact between an anode-side collector within the pre-cassette and a cathode-side current collector of an adjacent cell. The third component is a cathode-side seal, which includes a standoff that supports a cathode channel spacing between each of the cassettes in a stack. Cassettes are formed by joining the pre-cassette and the window frame.

  6. Development of MnCoO Coating with New Aluminizing Process for Planar SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, K. Scott; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-03-22

    Low-cost, chromia-forming steels find widespread use in SOFCs at operating temperatures below 800°C, because of their low thermal expansion mismatch and low cost. However, volatile Cr-containing species originating from this scale poison the cathode material in the cells and subsequently cause power degradation in the devices. To prevent this, a conductive manganese cobaltite coating has been developed. However, this coating is not compatible with forming hermetic seals between the interconnect or window frame component and ceramic cell. This coating reacts with sealing materials. Thus, a new aluminizing process has been developed for the sealing regions in these parts, as well as for other metallic stack and balance-of-plant components. From this development, the sealing performance and SOFC stack performance became very stable.

  7. Prediction of crack propagation paths in the unit cell of SOFC stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joulaee, N.; Makradi, A.; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2009-08-01

    Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) stacks are multi-material layered systems with different thermo-mechanical properties. Due to their severe thermal loading, these layers have to meet high demands to preserve their mechanical integrity without initiation and propagation of fracture. Here, we focus on a typical unit cell of the stack which consists of positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN). Based on the mechanical properties of each layer and their interfaces, an energy criterion as a function of crack length is used for the prediction of possible crack extensions in the PEN. This criterion is a pure local criterion, independent of applied loads and geometry of the specimen. An analysis of the competition between crack deflections in the interfaces and crack penetration in layers is presented.

  8. ARM - Point Reyes News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSAProductsMergedProductsVaisala CL51CaliforniaPoint

  9. An optimally designed stack effluent sampling system with transpiration for active transmission enhancement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Troy J.

    1995-01-01

    probe design using 10 iim liquid particles in a free stream velocity of 20 m/s indicated the design (when attached to the elbow assembly inentioned below) to have a transmission ratio of 107, 7% with a standard deviation of 2. 9%. When placed in field...AN OPTIMALLY DESIGNED STACK EFFLUENT SAMPLING SYSTEM WITH TRANSPIRATION FOR ACTIVE TRANSMISSION ENHANCEMENT TROY J. SCHROEDER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  10. Energy Efficient Single Stack Exhaust Fan Systems (E3S3F) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01

    exhaust airflow. 1 Patent application pending Stack height is a critical issue in preventing local toxic air contamination. Design rules and criteria have been developed based on recent research.... Therefore, most exhaust systems are designed as constant volume systems with exit velocity of 3,000 fpm. A constant speed fan is typically used. When the airflow from the fume hood is less than the design volume, a make-up air damper at the inlet of the fan...

  11. Stacked switchable element and diode combination with a low breakdown switchable element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Ward, James Scott (Englewood, CO); Hu, Jian (Englewood, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2012-06-19

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship. The semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a low-density forming current and/or a low voltage.

  12. The Clapping Book: Wind-Driven Oscillations in a Stack of Elastic Sheets P. Buchak,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    mass per unit length phW ¼ 0:021 g=cm and bending stiffness BW ¼ 8:2 � 10�6 N m2 , where p is the paper's density, B ¼ Eh3 =12ð1 � 2 � the bending modulus, E the Young's modulus, and the Poisson ratio. We clamp under aerodynamic loading. Our clapping book consists of a stack of paper, clamped at the downstream end

  13. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL); Mawdsley, Jennifer R. (Woodridge, IL); Niyogi, Suhas (Woodridge, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Santos, Lilia (Lombard, IL)

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  14. The development and presentation of a short course on stack sampling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentzen, Gordon Warren

    1975-01-01

    . These initial statements emphasized the general objectives of the course and the tentative date of presentation. Inquiries from interested persons were directed to the Chemical Engineering Department. The major source of publicity, however, was a brochure... ~ 1975 Major Subjects Chemical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENTATION OF A SHORT COURSE ON STACK SAMPLiNG A Thesis by GORDON WARREN BENTZEN, JR. Approved as to sty1e and content by& Chairman of Committee Head of Department Member Member...

  15. Review of the Physical Science Facility Stack Air Sampling Probe Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2007-09-30

    This letter report reviews compliance of the current design of the Physical Science Facility (PSF) stack air sampling locations with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard. The review was based on performance criteria used for locating air sampling probes, the design documents provided and available information on systems previously tested for compliance with the criteria. Recommendations are presented for ways to bring the design into compliance with the requirements for the sampling probe placement.

  16. Resonant Combinatorial Frequency Generation Induced by a PT-symmetric Periodic Layered Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shramkova, Oksana V

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction of waves in PT-symmetric periodic stacks with an embedded nonlinear anisotropic dielectric layer illuminated by plane waves of two tones is examined. The three-wave interaction technique is applied to study the nonlinear processes. It is shown that the intensity of the three-wave mixing process can be significantly enhanced in resonant cavities based on PT-symmetric periodic structures, especially as the pumping wave frequency is near the coherent perfect absorber-lasing resonances. The main mechanisms and properties of the combinatorial frequency generation and emission from the stacks are illustrated by the simulation results and the effect of the layer arrangement in PT-symmetric walls of resonator on the stack nonlinear response is discussed. The enhanced efficiency of the frequency conversion at Wolf-Bragg resonances is demonstrated. It has been shown that Wolf-Bragg resonances of very high orders may lead to the global maxima and nulls of the scattered field. The analysis of th...

  17. Internal electrolyte supply system for reliable transport throughout fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA); Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); King, Robert B. (Westlake, OH)

    1988-01-01

    An improved internal electrolyte supply system in a fuel cell stack employs a variety of arrangements of grooves and passages in bipolar plates of the multiplicity of repeating fuel cells to route gravity-assisted flowing electrolyte throughout the stack. The grooves route electrolyte flow along series of first paths which extend horizontally through the cells between the plates thereof. The passages route electrolyte flow along series of second paths which extend vertically through the stack so as to supply electrolyte to the first paths in order to expose the electrolyte to the matrices of the cells. Five different embodiments of the supply system are disclosed. Some embodiments employ wicks in the grooves for facilitating transfer of the electrolyte to the matrices as well as providing support for the matrices. Additionally, the passages of some embodiments by-pass certain of the grooves and supply electrolyte directly to other of the grooves. Some embodiments employ single grooves and others have dual grooves. Finally, in some embodiments the passages are connected to the grooves by a step which produces a cascading electrolyte flow.

  18. Effect of interconnect creep on long-term performance of SOFC of one cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-02-01

    Creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 1073oK. High temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and CTE compatibility with other SOFC components. Since the melting temperature of most stainless steel is around 1800oK, possible creep deformation of IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of interconnect creep behavior on stack geometry change and stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the fuel and air channel geometry changes due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel interconnect, therefore indicating possible SOFC performance change under long term operations. IC creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long term steady state operating temperature. It is found that creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel and the air flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  19. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-04-08

    Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

  20. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  1. Enhancement of thermal stability and water resistance in yttrium-doped GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Cimang, E-mail: cimang@adam.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Hyun Lee, Choong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Nishimura, Tomonori; Nagashio, Kosuke; Toriumi, Akira [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST, CREST, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    We have systematically investigated the material and electrical properties of yttrium-doped GeO{sub 2} (Y-GeO{sub 2}) on Germanium (Ge). A significant improvement of both thermal stability and water resistance were demonstrated by Y-GeO{sub 2}/Ge stack, compared to that of pure GeO{sub 2}/Ge stack. The excellent electrical properties of Y-GeO{sub 2}/Ge stacks with low D{sub it} were presented as well as enhancement of dielectric constant in Y-GeO{sub 2} layer, which is beneficial for further equivalent oxide thickness scaling of Ge gate stack. The improvement of thermal stability and water resistance are discussed both in terms of the Gibbs free energy lowering and network modification of Y-GeO{sub 2}.

  2. Fresnel zone plate stacking in the intermediate field for high efficiency focusing in the hard X-ray regime

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Wojcik, Michael; Liu, Jie; Roehrig, Chris; Cummings, Marvin; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Li, Kenan; Lai, Barry; Shu, Deming; Vogt, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    Focusing efficiency of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) for X-rays depends on zone height, while the achievable spatial resolution depends on the width of the finest zones. FZPs with optimal efficiency and sub-100-nm spatial resolution require high aspect ratio structures which are difficult to fabricate with current technology especially for the hard X-ray regime. A possible solution is to stack several zone plates. To increase the number of FZPs within one stack, we first demonstrate intermediate-field stacking and apply this method by stacks of up to five FZPs with adjusted diameters. Approaching the respective optimum zone height, we maximized efficiencies formore »high resolution focusing at three different energies, 10, 11.8, and 25 keV.« less

  3. Design and Analysis of 3D-MAPS: A Many-Core 3D Processor with Stacked Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

    . Only recently has the increasing cost of continuing process technology shrinks and the incredible vias heat sink wirebond molding Fig. 1. Side view of the final stacked dies based on Tezzaron's F2F

  4. Mass-related inversion symmetry breaking and phonon self-energy renormalization in isotopically labeled AB-stacked bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, Paulo Antonio Trinidade

    A mass-related symmetry breaking in isotopically labeled bilayer graphene (2LG) was investigated during in-situ electrochemical charging of AB stacked (AB-2LG) and turbostratic (t-2LG) layers. The overlap of the two ...

  5. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE STACKS WITH ELECTRODE-SUPPORTED CELLS OPERATING IN THE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. Tao; B. J. Butler

    2011-11-01

    Performance characterization and durability testing have been completed on two five-cell high-temperature electrolysis stacks constructed with advanced cell and stack technologies. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. The per-cell active area is 100 cm2. The stack is internally manifolded with compliant mica-glass seals. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells. Stack compression is accomplished by means of a custom spring-loaded test fixture. Initial stack performance characterization was determined through a series of DC potential sweeps in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes of operation. Results of these sweeps indicated very good initial performance, with area-specific resistance values less than 0.5 ?.cm2. Long-term durability testing was performed with A test duration of 1000 hours. Overall performance degradation was less than 10% over the 1000-hour period. Final stack performance characterization was again determined by a series of DC potential sweeps at the same flow conditions as the initial sweeps in both electrolysis and fuel cell modes of operation. A final sweep in the fuel cell mode indicated a power density of 0.356 W/cm2, with average per-cell voltage of 0.71 V at a current of 50 A.

  6. Noise Analysis and Synthesis for 3D Laser Depth Scanners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Noise Analysis and Synthesis for 3D Laser Depth Scanners Xianfang Sun a,b,, Paul L. Rosin a , Ralph the noise present in range data measured by a Konica Minolta Vivid 910 scanner, in order to better characterise real scanner noise. Methods for denoising 3D mesh data have often assumed the noise to be Gaussian

  7. Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Unknown Bridge Foundation Depth Determination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjwech, Rungroj

    2012-02-14

    as suitable to investigate unknown bridge foundations. The objective of the present study is to apply advanced 2D electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in order to identify depth of unknown bridge foundations. A survey procedure is carried out in mixed terrain...

  8. Depth Energy Image for Gait Symmetry Quantification Caroline Rougier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignotte, Max

    Depth Energy Image for Gait Symmetry Quantification Caroline Rougier1 , Edouard Auvinet1 , Jean´erationnelle, Universit´e de Montr´eal, Canada {rougierc, auvinet, meunier, mignotte}@iro.umontreal.ca 2 Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Universit´e de Montr´eal, ETS, Canada jacques

  9. Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

  10. Lower Bounds on Interactive Compressibility by Constant-Depth Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Lower Bounds on Interactive Compressibility by Constant-Depth Circuits Arkadev Chattopadhyay to prove the first lower bounds on general probabilistic multi-round instance compression. We show, and strengthens results of Dubrov and Ishai [DI06]. We also show that a similar lower bound holds for Majority. We

  11. 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M extend from the northern margins of the Amazon rain for- ests to outliers on the southern borders metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

  12. Dual-depth adapted irreducible formal multizeta values Leila Schneps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneps, Leila

    , and the relations between them. Consider the following diagram, in which the four top spaces are Hopf algebras the double shuffle Lie algebra, equipped with the standard weight grading and depth filtration; we write ds = n3dsn and denote the filtration by ds1 ds2 · · ·. The double shuffle Lie algebra is dual

  13. Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Ronghai; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Carl, Jr., Ralph James; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Lopez, Fulton Jose

    2010-04-06

    An electrical machine includes a rotor with an inner rotor portion and an outer rotor portion, and a double-sided yokeless stator. The yokeless stator includes modular lamination stacks and is configured for radial magnetic flux flow. The double-sided yokeless stator is concentrically disposed between the inner rotor portion and the outer rotor portion of the electrical machine. Examples of particularly useful embodiments for the electrical machine include wind turbine generators, ship propulsion motors, switch reluctance machines and double-sided synchronous machines.

  14. Monte-Carlo study of the phase transition in the AA-stacked bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Nikolaev; M. V. Ulybyshev

    2014-12-04

    Tight-binding model of the AA-stacked bilayer graphene with screened electron-electron interactions has been studied using the Hybrid Monte Carlo simulations on the original double-layer hexagonal lattice. Instantaneous screened Coulomb potential is taken into account using Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. G-type antiferromagnetic ordering has been studied and the phase transition with spontaneous generation of the mass gap has been observed. Dependence of the antiferromagnetic condensate on the on-site electron-electron interaction is examined.

  15. T-556: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stack-based buffer overflow in BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon for in Performance Analysis for Servers, Performance Assurance for Servers, and Performance Assurance for Virtual Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; Performance Analyzer and Performance Predictor for Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; and Capacity Management Essentials 1.2.00 (7.4.15) allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted length value in a BGS_MULTIPLE_READS command to TCP port 6768.

  16. Triple stack glass-to-glass anodic bonding for optogalvanic spectroscopy cells with electrical feedthroughs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daschner, R.; Kübler, H.; Löw, R.; Pfau, T., E-mail: t.pfau@physik.uni-stuttgart.de [5. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Baur, H.; Frühauf, N. [Institut für Großflächige Mikroelektronik, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate the use of an anodic bonding technique for building a vacuum tight vapor cell for the use of Rydberg spectroscopy of alkali atoms with thin film electrodes on the inside of the cell. The cell is fabricated by simultaneous triple stack glass-to-glass anodic bonding at 300?°C. This glue-free, low temperature sealing technique provides the opportunity to include thin film electric feedthroughs. The pressure broadening is only limited by the vapor pressure of rubidium and the lifetime is at least four months with operating temperatures up to 230?°C.

  17. Broadband enhanced transmission through the stacked metallic multi-layers perforated with coaxial annular apertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Zeyong; Fan, Yuancheng; Yu, Xing; Li, Hongqiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper theoretically and experimentally presents a first report on broadband enhanced transmission through stacked metallic multi-layers perforated with coaxial annular apertures (CAAs). Different from previous studies on extraordinary transmission that occurs at a single frequency, the enhanced transmission of our system with two or three metallic layers can span a wide frequency range with a bandwidth about 60% of the central frequency. The phenomena arise from the excitation and hybridization of guided resonance modes in CAAs among different layers. Measured transmission spectra are in good agreement with calculations semi-analytically resolved by modal expansion method.

  18. Fuel Cell Stacks Still Going Strong After 5,000 Hours | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing Tool Fits theSunShot Prize: RaceEnergy Fuel Cell Stacks

  19. Fuel Cell Animation - Fuel Cell Stack (Text Version) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDan O"HaganTalley,Surrogate NormalStack (Text

  20. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

    2008-12-22

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  1. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

    2008-12-23

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  2. Superconducting Coherence Length and Magnetic Penetration Depth of a p-wave Holographic Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua-Bi Zeng; Zhe-Yong Fan; Hong-Shi Zong

    2010-04-16

    A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in 3+1 dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in 2+1 dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we study the perturbation of the gravity theory analytically. The superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ is found to be proportional to $(1-T/T_c)^{-1/2}$ near the critical temperature $T_c$. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth $\\lambda\\propto(T_c-T)^{1/2}$ by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  3. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  4. 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgeon, Richard W.

    2012-06-27

    This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

  5. Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1994-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

  6. A depth-derived Pleistocene age model: Uncertainty estimates, sedimentation variability, and nonlinear climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    A depth-derived Pleistocene age model: Uncertainty estimates, sedimentation variability. To avoid biasing this ``depth-derived'' age estimate, the depth scale is first corrected for the effects sediment accumulation rates are estimated and modeled as an autocorrelated stochastic process. Depth-derived

  7. Application of Derrick Corporation's stack sizer technology for slimes reduction in 6 inch clean coal hydrocyclone circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzik, P.

    2009-04-15

    The article discusses the successful introduction of Derrick Corporation's Stack Sizer technology for removing minus 200 mesh slimes from 6-inch coal hydrocyclone underflow prior to froth flotation or dewatering by screen bowl centrifuges. In 2006, the James River Coal Company selected the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 150 micron and 100 micron urethane screen panels for removal of the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits. After this application proved successful, Derrick Corporation introduced new 75 micron urethane screen panels for use on the Stack Sizer. Evaluation of feed slurry to flotation cells and screen bowl centrifuges showed significant amounts of minus 75 micron that could potentially be removed by efficient screening technology. Removal of the minus 75 micron fraction was sought to reduce ash and moisture content of the final clean coal product. Full-scale lab tests confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 75 micron urethane screen panels consistently reduced the minus 75 micron percentage in coal slurry from 6-inch clean coal hydrocyclone underflow that is approximately 15 to 20% solid by-weight and 30 to 60% minus 75 micron to a clean coal fraction that is approximately 13 to 16% minus 75 micron. As a result total ash is reduced from approximately 36 to 38% in the hydrocyclone underflow to 14 to 16% in the oversize product fraction form the Stack Sizers. 1 fig., 2 tabs., 5 photos.

  8. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site. Part 1: Dose assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-06-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health (WAC 246-247) on the Hanford Site. Stacks that have the potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1} must be monitored continuously for radionuclide emissions. Five methods were approved by EPA, Region 10 for performing the assessments: Release Fractions from Appendix D of 40 CFR 61, Back Calculations Using A HEPA Filtration Factor, Nondestructive Assay of HEPA Filters, A Spill Release Fraction, and Upstream of HEPA Filter Air Concentrations. The first two methods were extremely conservative for estimating releases. The third method which used a state-of-the-art portable gamma spectrometer, yielded surprising results from the distribution of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. All five methods are described.

  9. Nonlinear modelling of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack using nonlinear cancellation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barus, R. P. P.; Tjokronegoro, H. A.; Leksono, E.; Ismunandar

    2014-09-25

    Fuel cells are promising new energy conversion devices that are friendly to the environment. A set of control systems are required in order to operate a fuel cell based power plant system optimally. For the purpose of control system design, an accurate fuel cell stack model in describing the dynamics of the real system is needed. Currently, linear model are widely used for fuel cell stack control purposes, but it has limitations in narrow operation range. While nonlinear models lead to nonlinear control implemnetation whos more complex and hard computing. In this research, nonlinear cancellation technique will be used to transform a nonlinear model into a linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics. The transformation is done by replacing the input of the original model by a certain virtual input that has nonlinear relationship with the original input. Then the equality of the two models is tested by running a series of simulation. Input variation of H2, O2 and H2O as well as disturbance input I (current load) are studied by simulation. The error of comparison between the proposed model and the original nonlinear model are less than 1 %. Thus we can conclude that nonlinear cancellation technique can be used to represent fuel cell nonlinear model in a simple linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics and therefore retain the wide operation range.

  10. Documentation of Short Stack and Button Cell Experiments Performed at INL and Ceramatec during FY07

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; J. S. Herring

    2007-09-01

    This report provides documentation of experimental research activities performed at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Ceramatec, Inc. during FY07 under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, High Temperature Electrolysis Program. The activities discussed in this report include tests on single (button) cells, short planar stacks and tubular cells. The objectives of these small-scale tests are to evaluate advanced electrode, electrolyte, and interconnect materials, alternate modes of operation (e.g., coelectrolysis), and alternate cell geometries over a broad range of operating conditions, with the aim of identifying the most promising material et, cell and stack geometry, and operating conditions for the high-temperature electrolysis application. Cell performance is characterized in erms of initial area-specific resistance and long-term stability in the electrolysis mode. Some of the tests were run in the coelectrolysis mode. Research into coelectrolysis was funded by Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). Coelectrolysis simultaneously converts steam to hydrogen and carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. This process is complicated by the reverse shift reaction. An equilibrium model was developed to predict outlet compositions of steam, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide resulting from coelectrolysis. Predicted ompositions were compared to measurements obtained with a precision micro-channel gas chromatograph.

  11. Rich magneto-absorption spectra in AAB-stacked trilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Thi-Nga; Chang, Cheng-Pong; Lin, Chiun-Yan; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2015-01-01

    The generalized tight-binding model is developed to investigate the feature-rich magneto-optical properties of AAB-stacked trilayer graphene. Three intragroup and six intergroup inter-Landau-level (inter-LL) optical excitations largely enrich the magneto-absorption peaks. In general, the former are much higher than the latter, depending on the phases and amplitudes of LL wavefunctions. The absorption spectra exhibit the single- or twin-peak structures which are determined by the quantum modes, LL energy spectra and Fermion distribution. The splitting LLs, with different localization centers (2/6 and 4/6 positions in a unit cell), can generate very distinct absorption spectra. There exist extra single peaks because of LL anticrosings. AAB, AAA, ABA, and ABC stackings quite differ from one another in terms of the inter-LL category, frequency, intensity, and structure of absorption peaks. The main characteristics of LL wavefunctions and energy spectra and the Fermi-Dirac function are responsible for the configur...

  12. Airborne Effluent Monitoring System Certification for New Canister Storage Building Ventilation Exhaust Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1999-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted three of the six tests needed to verify that the effluent monitoring system for the new Canister Storage Building ventilation exhaust stack meets applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the location for the air-sampling probe and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering the location for the air-sampling probe ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample-transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in this report. The tests reported here cover the contaminant tracer uniformity and particle delivery performance criteria. These criteria were successfully met. The other three tests were conducted by the start-up staff of Duke Engineering and Services Hanford Inc. (DESH) and reported elsewhere. The Canister Storage Building is located in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The new air-exhaust system was built under the W379 Project. The air sampling system features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and a filter holder to collect the sample.

  13. Chesapeake Bay Site Sand Point, NC site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culver, Stephen J.

    210Pb penetration agricultural horizon 210Pb and pollen (above 150 cm depth) age = 1.724 x depth (r2 = 0.99) 14C dated shell and forams (below 150 cm) age = 71.319 e ^(0.0096 x depth) (r2 = 0, and Atlantic Climate Siddhartha Mitra1,*, Andrew R. Zimmerman2 , Nidhi Patel1, David Mallinson1, Glendon B

  14. Florida Nuclear Profile - Turkey Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turkey Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  15. Extremely scaled high-k/In?.??Ga?.??As gate stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chobpattana, Varistha; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhang, Jack Y.; Mates, Thomas E.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2014-09-28

    Highly scaled gate dielectric stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities are required for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology with III-V semiconductor channels. Here, we show that a novel pre-deposition technique, consisting of alternating cycles of nitrogen plasma and tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium, allows for HfO? and ZrO? gate stacks with extremely high accumulation capacitance densities of more than 5 ?F/cm? at 1 MHz, low leakage current, low frequency dispersion, and low midgap interface trap densities (10¹²cm?²eV?¹range). Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the interface contains TiO? and small quantities of In?O?, but no detectable Ga- or As-oxides, or As-As bonding. The results allow for insights into the microscopic mechanisms that control leakage and frequency dispersion in high-k/III-V gate stacks.

  16. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas ReservesAlabamaAboutTotal Energy GlossaryDepth of Crude

  17. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink, K.; Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von; Looe, H. K.; Harder, D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the collecting electrode radius and the width of the guard ring are reflecting the deep radial penetration of the electron transport processes into the gas-filled cavities and the need for appropriate corrections of the chamber reading. New values for these corrections have been established in two forms, one converting the indicated value into the absorbed dose to water in the front plane of the chamber, the other converting it into the absorbed dose to water at the depth of the effective point of measurement of the chamber. In the Appendix, the in–out imbalance of electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary is demonstrated in the approximation of classical small-angle multiple scattering theory. Conclusions: The in–out electron transport imbalance at the lateral boundaries of parallel-plate chambers in electron beams has been studied with Monte Carlo simulation over a range of depth in water, and new correction factors, covering all depths and implementing the effective point of measurement concept, have been developed.

  18. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

    2011-07-19

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic is minimized while still offering the desired low temperature coefficient of resistance compared to sodium thiosulfate. The characterization experiments and comparison with the sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors will be fully discussed and the final design described.

  19. Scalable stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror for astronomy and laser processing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L. Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Bryce, Emma; Hutson, David; Kirk, Katherine; Schwartz, Noah; Atkinson, David; Beard, Steven; Baillie, Tom; Parr-Burman, Phil; Strachan, Mel; UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ

    2014-02-15

    A prototype of a scalable and potentially low-cost stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror (SA-PDM) with 35 active elements is presented in this paper. This prototype is characterized by a 2 ?m maximum actuator stroke, a 1.4 ?m mirror sag (measured for a 14 mm × 14 mm area of the unpowered SA-PDM), and a ±200 nm hysteresis error. The initial proof of concept experiments described here show that this mirror can be successfully used for shaping a high power laser beam in order to improve laser machining performance. Various beam shapes have been obtained with the SA-PDM and examples of laser machining with the shaped beams are presented.

  20. Basic criteria for formation of growth twins in high stacking fault energy metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K. Y.; Zhang, X. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bufford, D.; Chen, Y.; Liu, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Wang, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2013-10-28

    Nanotwinned metals received significant interest lately as twin boundaries may enable simultaneous enhancement of strength, ductility, thermal stability, and radiation tolerance. However, nanotwins have been the privilege of metals with low-to-intermediate stacking fault energy (SFE). Recent scattered studies show that nanotwins could be introduced into high SFE metals, such as Al. In this paper, we examine several sputter-deposited, (111) textured Ag/Al, Cu/Ni, and Cu/Fe multilayers, wherein growth twins were observed in Al, Ni, and face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe. The comparisons lead to two important design criteria that dictate the introduction of growth twins in high SFE metals. The validity of these criteria was then examined in Ag/Ni multilayers. Furthermore, another twin formation mechanism in high SFE metals was discovered in Ag/Ni system.

  1. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; de Ruette, N; Stützel, J; Savin, D W; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of $\\sim$7.4\\% for H$^-$ at a beam energy of 10\\,keV and $\\sim$3.7\\% for C$^-$ at 28\\,keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975\\,nm and 808\\,nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2\\,kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table.

  2. Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prommapan, Plegchart

    2011-08-15

    A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

  3. RIEMANN-ROCH FOR ALGEBRAIC STACKS:II Abstract. In this paper we establish Riemann-Roch and Lefschtez-Riemann-Roch theorems for arbitrary proper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    theories for algebraic spaces and yet capture information from the residual gerbes when applied fundamental classes, the Bredon-style homology theories introduced in [J-5] were for dg-stacks and the Riemann-Roch theorem is established as a natural transformation between the G-theory of algebraic stacks and Bredon

  4. RIEMANNROCH FOR ALGEBRAIC STACKS:II Abstract. In this paper we establish RiemannRoch and LefschtezRiemannRoch theorems for arbitrary proper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    theories for algebraic spaces and yet capture information from the residual gerbes when applied fundamental classes, the Bredon­style homology theories introduced in [J­5] were for dg­stacks and the Riemann­Roch theorem is established as a natural transformation between the G­theory of algebraic stacks and Bredon

  5. Pre-stack inversion of a Gulf of Thailand OBC data set Indrajit G. Roy, Mrinal K. Sen, Carlos Torres-Verdin, and Omar J. Varela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    by these attribute sections. Introduction Full waveform pre-stack seismic inversion as an aid for reservoir. Travel time inversion or even migration of seismic wave field in pre-stack domain provides an estimate for reservoir characterization. Forward Problem and Optimization In our inversion we make use of data

  6. FIRING STABILITY OF SiNy / SiNx SURFACE PASSIVATION STACKS FOR CRYSTALLINE SILICON SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRING STABILITY OF SiNy / SiNx SURFACE PASSIVATION STACKS FOR CRYSTALLINE SILICON SOLAR CELLS S of solar cells using p-type boron-doped Cz- and FZ-silicon wafers. After local laser ablation of the dielectrics and full-area metallization of the rear we achieve energy conversion efficiencies up to 19

  7. PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE LETTERS, 1996, VOL. 73, NO. 6, 289 297 On the energy of terminated stacking faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Paulo J.

    if the ideal SFE is low and the SF strain is large. A numerical example is given for austenitic stainless steel twinning and stress-induced martensite formation. The separation width of the dislocations thereby plays martensitic lath. We shall call it a stacking fault phase (SFP). It has been found experimentally

  8. Modeling and Control for PEM Fuel Cell Stack System I Jay T. Pukrushpan, Anna G. Stefanopoulou, Huei Peng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    Modeling and Control for PEM Fuel Cell Stack System I Jay T. Pukrushpan, Anna G. Stefanopoulou~umich, edu, hpeng@umich, edu Abstract A nonlinear fuel cell system dynamic model that is suit- able, the reactant partial pres- sures. Characterization of the Fuel Cell polarization curves based on time varying

  9. System and Circuit Level Power Modeling of Energy-Efficient 3D-Stacked Wide I/O DRAMs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power and energy consump- tion. With the industry pushing for both high-performance and green computingSystem and Circuit Level Power Modeling of Energy-Efficient 3D-Stacked Wide I/O DRAMs Karthik- tecture, design, features and timing behavior. With improved performance/power trade-offs over previous

  10. Role of hydrogen in Ge/HfO2/Al gate stacks subjected to negative bias temperature instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Durgamadhab "Durga"

    Role of hydrogen in Ge/HfO2/Al gate stacks subjected to negative bias temperature instability N 2007; published online 17 January 2008 This work investigates the role of hydrogen and nitrogen in a Ge. Virtually unchanged interface state density as a function of NBTI indicates no atomic hydrogen release from

  11. Fault-Tolerance in the Network Storage Stack Scott Atchley Stephen Soltesz James S. Plank Micah Beck Terry Moore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plank, Jim

    unconven- tional view that storage can be used to augment data transmission as part of a unified networkFault-Tolerance in the Network Storage Stack Scott Atchley Stephen Soltesz James S. Plank Micah addresses the issue of fault-tolerance in ap- plications that make use of network storage. A network storage

  12. P-55 / J. X. Sun P-55: Bright and Efficient Stacked White Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P-55 / J. X. Sun P-55: Bright and Efficient Stacked White Organic Light-emitting Diodes J. X. Sun N mCP N NN N N N TPBi FirPic Alq3 N O N O N O Al EuroDisplay 2005 · 397 #12;P-55 / J. X. Sun

  13. 23.2 / J. X. Sun 23.2: An Efficient Stacked OLED with Double-Sided Light Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    23.2 / J. X. Sun 23.2: An Efficient Stacked OLED with Double-Sided Light Emission J. X. Sun, X. L;23.2 / J. X. Sun 2. Experimental Details The SOLED were fabricated on 75nm-ITO coated glass with a sheet

  14. OXIDE / LPCVD NITRIDE STACKS ON SILICON: THE EFFECTS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENTS ON BULK LIFETIME AND ON SURFACE PASSIVATION.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Sustainable Energy Systems, Engineering Department, The Australian National University, Acton 0200, Australia. ABSTRACT: Silicon dioxide / silicon nitride stacks are potentially useful for solar cell applications due significantly increased process flexibility and hence the realisation of novel cell structures. We used LPCVD

  15. Sensitivity analysis of data-related factors controlling AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data: Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Chevron Energy Technology Company, Earth Sciences Technology Department, Reservoir Characterization Unit of the seismic amplitude data. P-wave impedance is the most accurate of the inverted properties, followed by S via multiple single-angle stacks, 2 correcting the P-wave velocity field used for calculating angles

  16. Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in microbial reverse reduced ammonia crossover and improved hydrogen production. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history improve the MREC process, making it a more efficient method for renewable hydrogen gas production. Ó 2013

  17. Points

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (Fluidic Energy, Inc.) 5,133,150 Tempe, AZ Energy Storage A new class of metal-air batteries using ionic liquids, with many times the energy density of today's lithium-ion...

  18. Take Home Points Horticultural Prospective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    HLB Take Home Points Horticultural Prospective Stephen H. Futch Extension Agent, Multi County Co plants, ACP adults preferentially light on infected within first 48 hour but on uninfected after 7 days

  19. Join Point Encapsulation David Larochelle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    , behavior observation and modification are possible. We believe that it is undesirable to make all join points nec- essarily subject to behavioral observation and modification by aspects. To do so

  20. Vertically Loaded Anchor: Drag Coefficient, Fall Velocity, and Penetration Depth using Laboratory Measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cenac, William

    2011-08-08

    The offshore oilfield industry is continuously developing unique and break-through technologies and systems to extract hydrocarbons from ever increasing ocean depths. Due to the extreme depths being explored presently, large anchors are being...

  1. A Convex Hull Peeling Depth Approach to Nonparametric Massive Multivariate Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    A Convex Hull Peeling Depth Approach to Nonparametric Massive Multivariate Data Analysis) and Multivariate Data Analysis Definitions on CHP Data Depth (Ordering Multivariate Data) Quantiles and Density with CHP Multivariate Median Skewness and Kurtosis of a Multivariate Distribution Outlier Detection

  2. Seismic evidence for thermal runaway during intermediate-depth earthquake rupture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Sarah A.

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes occur at depths where temperatures and pressures exceed those at which brittle failure is expected. There are two leading candidates for the physical mechanism behind these earthquakes: ...

  3. Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband December 2011. [1] A Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) was developed and deployed) through an optically thin cloud (optical depth

  4. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  5. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  6. Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    by a blue light-emitting diode, the x and x depth profiles were reconstructed from photothermal radiometric

  7. Depth-fighting Aware Methods for Multi-fragment Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fudos, Ioannis

    of self crossing surfaces, and wireframe ren- dering in conjunction with transparency and translu- cency and overlap, (iii) non-convergent surfaces due to the fixed-point round-off errors of perspective projection-sensitive applications (see Figure 2), from non-photorealistic rendering (e.g. or- der independent transparency [3

  8. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in orthorhombic velocity models with differently rotated tensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in orthorhombic velocity models with differently rotated tensors use the ray-based Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple with a differently rotated tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to single

  9. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy with simpler the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to the calculation of migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with different types of anisotropy

  10. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration Karel #20; Z#19;a#20;cek Department of Geophysics, Faculty depth migration. The main advantage of our method over the methods based on Gaussian beams is a direct. Thus, the Gaussian packet prestack depth migration is especially suitable for a target-oriented imaging

  11. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated images in simple anisotropic homogeneous velocity of the tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to correct single

  12. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without vertical gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without vertical gradients-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary The Kirchhoff prestack depth migration is used to calculate. The bottom layer is isotropic and homogeneous. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to both

  13. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate is limited to P-waves. Keywords 3-D Kirchhoff prestack depth migration, anisotropic velocity model, rotation

  14. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in triclinic velocity models with differently rotated tensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in triclinic velocity models with differently rotated tensors use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic rotations of the tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to single- layer

  15. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 3: Simple 2-D models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 3: Simple 2-D models V#19;aclav Bucha Department Republic, E-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.m#11;.cuni.cz Summary Gaussian packet prestack depth migration is used. Keywords Gaussian packets, Gaussian beams, prestack depth migration, Gabor transform, 2-D velocity model

  16. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic is isotropic and homogeneous. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to both heterogeneous

  17. Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf-surface layer with mean daytime bottom depth of 43740 m (night: 61738 m), and a main migrating layer with mean bottom depth of 333776 m (night: 54727 m). Diel vertical migration rates for dusk ascents reached

  18. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY WENDY ANN BRAZENEC ENTITLED EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING

  19. PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL) STATIONS IN COLORADO AND WYOMING, UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL) STATIONS IN COLORADO Laituri Mazdak Arabi #12;ii ABSTRACT PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL. These stations measure snow depth (SD), snow water equivalent (SWE), air temperature and precipitation. To assess

  20. Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1 David G. Tarboton,1 June 2009; published 29 October 2009. [1] Soil depth is an important input parameter in hydrological and ecological modeling. Presently, the soil depth data available in national soil databases (STATSGO and SSURGO

  1. Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport COLM independent parameter- izations that use ocean color to estimate the penetration depth of shortwave radiation. This study offers a way to evaluate the changes in irradiance penetration depths in coupled ocean

  2. Please cite this article in press as: S. Shimpalee, et al., Experimental and numerical studies of portable PEMFC stack, Electrochim. Acta (2008), doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2008.11.008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Zee, John W.

    2008-01-01

    of portable PEMFC stack, Electrochim. Acta (2008), doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2008.11.008 ARTICLE IN PRESSG Model of portable PEMFC stack S. Shimpaleea, , M. Ohashia , J.W. Van Zeea , C. Zieglerb , C. Stoeckmannc , C November 2008 Accepted 7 November 2008 Available online xxx Keywords: PEMFC stack CFD fuel cell simulation

  3. Effect of stacking sequence on crystallization in Al/a-Ge bilayer thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Tianwei; Zhang, Weilin; Ma, Fei, E-mail: mafei@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Huang, Yuhong [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710062 (China); Xu, Kewei, E-mail: mafei@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China and Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi'an University of Arts and Science, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710065 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Two types of bilayer thin films with different deposition sequences, i.e., amorphous Ge under Al (a-Ge/Al) and the inverse (Al/a-Ge), were prepared by magnetron sputtering at room temperature. In-situ and ex-situ thermal annealing were compared to study the effect of the stacking sequence on crystallization of amorphous Ge. Although metal-induced crystallization occurred in both cases at low temperature, layer exchange was observed only in a-Ge/Al. In fact, compressive stress could usually be produced when Ge atoms diffused into Al grain boundaries and crystallized there. In the a-Ge/Al system, the stress could be released through diffusion of Al atoms onto the surface and formation of hillocks. Thus, grain boundary (GB) mediated crystallization was dominant in the whole process and layer exchange occurred. However, in the Al/a-Ge system, it was difficult for stress to be relaxed because the Ge sublayer and substrate restricted the diffusion of Al atoms. GB-mediated crystallization was, therefore, considerably suppressed and interface-mediated crystallization was preferred without layer exchange. This leads to distinct morphologies of dendrites in the two systems.

  4. Optical control of electron phase space in plasma accelerators with incoherently stacked laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalmykov, S. Y. Shadwick, B. A.; Davoine, X.; Lehe, R.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2015-05-15

    It is demonstrated that synthesizing an ultrahigh-bandwidth, negatively chirped laser pulse by incoherently stacking pulses of different wavelengths makes it possible to optimize the process of electron self-injection in a dense, highly dispersive plasma (n{sub 0}?10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}). Avoiding transformation of the driving pulse into a relativistic optical shock maintains a quasi-monoenergetic electron spectrum through electron dephasing and boosts electron energy far beyond the limits suggested by existing scaling laws. In addition, evolution of the accelerating bucket in a plasma channel is shown to produce a background-free, tunable train of femtosecond-duration, 35–100?kA, time-synchronized quasi-monoenergetic electron bunches. The combination of the negative chirp and the channel permits acceleration of electrons beyond 1?GeV in a 3?mm plasma with 1.4?J of laser pulse energy, thus offering the opportunity of high-repetition-rate operation at manageable average laser power.

  5. Stacking weak lensing signals of SZ clusters to constrain cluster physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolyn Sealfon; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2006-01-12

    We show how to place constraints on cluster physics by stacking the weak lensing signals from multiple clusters found through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For a survey that covers about 200 sq. deg. both in SZ and weak lensing observations, the slope and amplitude of the mass vs. SZ luminosity relation can be measured with few percent error for clusters at z~0.5. This can be used to constrain cluster physics, such as the nature of feedback. For example, we can distinguish a pre-heated model from a model with a decreased accretion rate at more than 5sigma. The power to discriminate among different non-gravitational processes in the ICM becomes even stronger if we use the central Compton parameter y_0, which could allow one to distinguish between models with pre-heating, SN feedback and AGN feedback, for example, at more than 5sigma. Measurement of these scaling relations as a function of redshift makes it possible to directly observe e.g., the evolution of the hot gas in clusters. With this approach the mass-L_SZ relation can be calibrated and its uncertainties can be quantified, leading to a more robust determination of cosmological parameters from clusters surveys. The mass-L_SZ relation calibrated in this way from a small area of the sky can be used to determine masses of SZ clusters from very large SZ-only surveys and is nicely complementary to other techniques proposed in the literature.

  6. Hydrogen influence on generalized stacking fault of zirconium basal plane: First-principles calculation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Songjun, Hou; Zhi, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The infuence of hydrogen on the generalized stacking fault (GSF) energy of the basal plane along the and directions in the hcp Zr were investigated by using the first-principles calculation method. The modification of the GSF energy were studied with respect to the different distances of H atoms away from the slip plane and hydrogen content there. The calculation results have shown that the GSF energy along the direction drastically reduces when H atoms locate nearby the slip plane. But H atoms slightly decrease the GSF barrier for the slipping case. Meanwhile, with the increase of hydrogen density around the slip plane, the GSF energies along both the shift directions further reduced. The physical origin of the reduction of GSF energy due to the existence of hydrogen atoms in Zr was analyzed based on the Bader charge method. It is interpreted by the Coulomb repulsion of the Zr atoms besides of the slip plane due to the charge transfer from Zr to H atoms.

  7. STUDYING INTERCLUSTER GALAXY FILAMENTS THROUGH STACKING gmBCG GALAXY CLUSTER PAIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yuanyuan; Dietrich, Joerg P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Nguyen, Alex T. Q.; Sheldon, Erin S.

    2013-08-20

    We present a method to study the photometric properties of galaxies in filaments by stacking the galaxy populations between pairs of galaxy clusters. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, this method can detect the intercluster filament galaxy overdensity with a significance of {approx}5{sigma} out to z = 0.40. Using this approach, we study the g - r color and luminosity distribution of filament galaxies as a function of redshift. Consistent with expectation, filament galaxies are bimodal in their color distribution and contain a larger blue galaxy population than clusters. Filament galaxies are also generally fainter than cluster galaxies. More interestingly, the observed filament population seems to show redshift evolution at 0.12 < z < 0.40: the blue galaxy fraction has a trend to increase at higher redshift; such evolution is parallel to the ''Butcher-Oemler effect'' of galaxy clusters. We test the dependence of the observed filament density on the richness of the cluster pair: richer clusters are connected by higher density filaments. We also test the spatial dependence of filament galaxy overdensity: this quantity decreases when moving away from the intercluster axis between a cluster pair. This method provides an economical way to probe the photometric properties of filament galaxies and should prove useful for upcoming projects like the Dark Energy Survey.

  8. The operation principle of the well in quantum dot stack infrared photodetector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jheng-Han; Wu, Zong-Ming [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Liao, Yu-Min; Wu, Yuh-Renn [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shih-Yen [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115299, Taiwan (China); Lee, Si-Chen, E-mail: sclee@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-28

    The well in the quantum dot stack infrared photodetector (WD-QDIP) is proposed which can be operated at high temperature ?230?K. The operation principle of this device is investigated, including the carrier transport and the enhancement in the photocurrent. The WD-QDIPs with different well numbers are fabricated to study the mechanisms. It is realized that the carrier transport from the emitter to the collector in traditional quantum dot infrared photodetectors consists of two channels deduced from current-voltage characteristics and dark current activation energy at different temperatures. At temperatures below 77?K, the current transports through the InAs quantum dot channel, whereas at temperatures higher than 77?K, the current is dominated by the GaAs leakage channel. In addition, the non-equilibrium situation at low temperatures is also observed owing to the presence of photovoltaic phenomenon. The carrier distribution inside the QDs is simulated to investigate the reasons for the increase of photocurrent. Based on the simulation and the photocurrent response, the hot carrier (electron) scattering effect by the insertion of a quantum well layer is inferred as the most probable reason that lead to the enhancement of the response and regarded as the key factor to achieve high- temperature operation.

  9. Fast concurrent array-based stacks, queues and deques using fetch-and-increment-bounded, fetch-and-decrement-bounded and store-on-twin synchronization primitives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alana; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert

    2014-09-16

    Implementation primitives for concurrent array-based stacks, queues, double-ended queues (deques) and wrapped deques are provided. In one aspect, each element of the stack, queue, deque or wrapped deque data structure has its own ticket lock, allowing multiple threads to concurrently use multiple elements of the data structure and thus achieving high performance. In another aspect, new synchronization primitives FetchAndIncrementBounded (Counter, Bound) and FetchAndDecrementBounded (Counter, Bound) are implemented. These primitives can be implemented in hardware and thus promise a very fast throughput for queues, stacks and double-ended queues.

  10. A method to determine fault vectors in 4H-SiC from stacking sequences observed on high resolution transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Fangzhen; Wang, Huanhuan; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Mueller, Stephan G.; Chung, Gil; Sanchez, Edward K.; Hansen, Darren; Loboda, Mark J.; Zhang, Lihua; Su, Dong; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric

    2014-09-14

    A new method has been developed to determine the fault vectors associated with stacking faults in 4H-SiC from their stacking sequences observed on high resolution TEM images. This method, analogous to the Burgers circuit technique for determination of dislocation Burgers vector, involves determination of the vectors required in the projection of the perfect lattice to correct the deviated path constructed in the faulted material. Results for several different stacking faults were compared with fault vectors determined from X-ray topographic contrast analysis and were found to be consistent. This technique is expected to applicable to all structures comprising corner shared tetrahedra.

  11. Magnetic and Electronic Structure study of Fe/MgO/Fe/Co Multilayer Stack Deposited by E-Beam Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jitendra Pal Singh; Sanjeev Gautam; Braj Bhusan Singh; M. Raju; S. Chaudhary; D. Kabiraj; D. Kanjilal; Jenn-Min Lee; Jin-Ming Chen; K. Asokan; Keun Hwa Chae

    2013-05-13

    Present work investigates the magnetic and electronic structure of MgO/Fe/MgO/Fe/Co/Au multilayer stack grown on Si(100) substrates by electron beam evaporation method. X-ray diffraction study depicts polycrystalline nature of the multilayers. Results obtained from vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra (NEXAFS) at Fe & Co L- and Mg & O K-edges are applied to understand the magnetic and electronic properties of this stack and its interface properties. While the spectral features of Fe L-edge spectrum recorded by surface sensitive total electron yield (TEY) mode shows the formation of FeOx at the Fe/MgO interface, the bulk sensitive total fluorescence yield (TFY), shows Fe in metallic nature. Co L-edge spectrum reveals the presence of metallic nature of cobalt in both TEY and TFY modes. Above results are well correlated with X-ray reflectometry.

  12. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarczyk, M., E-mail: mateusz.tokarczyk@fuw.edu.pl; Kowalski, G.; K?pa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabi?ska, A. [University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Strupi?ski, W. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (Poland)

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  13. Comprehensive study and design of scaled metal/high-k/Ge gate stacks with ultrathin aluminum oxide interlayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asahara, Ryohei; Hideshima, Iori; Oka, Hiroshi; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji; Ogawa, Shingo; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden

    2015-06-08

    Advanced metal/high-k/Ge gate stacks with a sub-nm equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) and improved interface properties were demonstrated by controlling interface reactions using ultrathin aluminum oxide (AlO{sub x}) interlayers. A step-by-step in situ procedure by deposition of AlO{sub x} and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) layers on Ge and subsequent plasma oxidation was conducted to fabricate Pt/HfO{sub 2}/AlO{sub x}/GeO{sub x}/Ge stacked structures. Comprehensive study by means of physical and electrical characterizations revealed distinct impacts of AlO{sub x} interlayers, plasma oxidation, and metal electrodes serving as capping layers on EOT scaling, improved interface quality, and thermal stability of the stacks. Aggressive EOT scaling down to 0.56?nm and very low interface state density of 2.4?×?10{sup 11?}cm{sup ?2}eV{sup ?1} with a sub-nm EOT and sufficient thermal stability were achieved by systematic process optimization.

  14. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Risk and Decision Analysis Dept.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Geologic Integration Group; Di Sanza, F. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA`s 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE`s actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA`s requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health.

  15. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  16. Detection of an unidentified emission line in the stacked X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulbul, Esra; Foster, Adam; Smith, Randall K.; Randall, Scott W.; Markevitch, Maxim; Loewenstein, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We detect a weak unidentified emission line at E = (3.55-3.57) ± 0.03 keV in a stacked XMM-Newton spectrum of 73 galaxy clusters spanning a redshift range 0.01-0.35. When the full sample is divided into three subsamples (Perseus, Centaurus+Ophiuchus+Coma, and all others), the line is seen at >3? statistical significance in all three independent MOS spectra and the PN 'all others' spectrum. It is also detected in the Chandra spectra of the Perseus Cluster. However, it is very weak and located within 50-110 eV of several known lines. The detection is at the limit of the current instrument capabilities. We argue that there should be no atomic transitions in thermal plasma at this energy. An intriguing possibility is the decay of sterile neutrino, a long-sought dark matter particle candidate. Assuming that all dark matter is in sterile neutrinos with m{sub s} = 2E = 7.1 keV, our detection corresponds to a neutrino decay rate consistent with previous upper limits. However, based on the cluster masses and distances, the line in Perseus is much brighter than expected in this model, significantly deviating from other subsamples. This appears to be because of an anomalously bright line at E = 3.62 keV in Perseus, which could be an Ar XVII dielectronic recombination line, although its emissivity would have to be 30 times the expected value and physically difficult to understand. Another alternative is the above anomaly in the Ar line combined with the nearby 3.51 keV K line also exceeding expectation by a factor of 10-20. Confirmation with Astro-H will be critical to determine the nature of this new line.

  17. Starting Points | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (M&O) Contract Competition Starting Points Starting Points Kansas City Plant Related Web Pages Summary Kansas City Plant Home Page Kansas City Plant Contracts DOE Directives...

  18. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  19. Weighted exponential regression for characterizing radionuclide concentrations in soil depth profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.P.Oertel; J.R.Giles

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles requires accurate evaluation of the depth distribution of the concentrations as measured by gamma emissions. An ongoing study based on 137Cs activity has shown that such concentration data generally follow an exponential trend when the fraction of radioactivity below depth is plotted against the depth. The slope of the exponential regression fit is defined as alpha/rho, the depth profile parameter. A weighted exponential regression procedure has been developed to compute a mean ??? for a group of related soil samples. Regression results from different areas or from different time periods can be used to compare representative radionuclide concentrations for the specified groupings.

  20. The depth of pseudotachylyte formation from detailed thermochronology and constraints on coseismic stress drop variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, James D.; Dobson, Kate J.; Brodsky, Emily E.; Mark, Darren F.; Shipton, Zoe K.

    2012-01-01

    Subnormal Cenozoic geothermal gradients in the extinctC. E. Manning (2003), Geothermal gradients in con- tinentalkm under typical geothermal gradients. At these depths, the

  1. The impact of remineralization depth on the air–sea carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, EY; Primeau, F; Sarmiento, JL

    2009-01-01

    on the air–sea carbon balance Eun Young Kwon 1 * , Françoistion depth—depends on the balance between particle sinkingfactors can affect this balance, including temperature 1 ,

  2. Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  3. Plant Water Use in Owens Valley, CA: Understanding the Influence of Climate and Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pataki, Diane E

    2008-01-01

    plant responses to water stress, plant chemical composition,Phreatophytes (Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1423).T. E. Dawson. 2006. Depth of water acquisition by invading

  4. Breaking Points in Quartic Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Romera; G. Pastor; M. -F. Danca; A. Martin; A. B. Orue; F. Montoya

    2014-12-18

    Dynamical systems, whether continuous or discrete, are used by physicists in order to study non-linear phenomena. In the case of discrete dynamical systems, one of the most used is the quadratic map depending on a parameter. However, some phenomena can depend alternatively of two values of the same parameter. We use the quadratic map $x_{n+1} =1-ax_{n}^{2} $ when the parameter alternates between two values during the iteration process. In this case, the orbit of the alternate system is the sum of the orbits of two quartic maps. The bifurcation diagrams of these maps present breaking points where abruptly change their evolution.

  5. Capital Point | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas: EnergyCounty,NewHatteras ElecPoint Jump to:

  6. Points of Contact - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformancePi Day Pi Day Pi DayPlasmaandAbout UsPoints of

  7. A gene stacking approach leads to engineered plants with highly increased galactan levels in Arabidopsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gondolf, Vibe M.; Stoppel, Rhea; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten; Liwanag, April J.M.; Loqué, Dominique; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2014-12-10

    Background: Engineering of plants with a composition of lignocellulosic biomass that is more suitable for downstream processing is of high interest for next-generation biofuel production. Lignocellulosic biomass contains a high proportion of pentose residues, which are more difficult to convert into fuels than hexoses. Therefore, increasing the hexose/pentose ratio in biomass is one approach for biomass improvement. A genetic engineering approach was used to investigate whether the amount of pectic galactan can be specifically increased in cell walls of Arabidopsis fiber cells, which in turn could provide a potential source of readily fermentable galactose. Results: First it was tested ifmore »overexpression of various plant UDP-glucose 4-epimerases (UGEs) could increase the availability of UDP-galactose and thereby increase the biosynthesis of galactan. Constitutive and tissue-specific expression of a poplar UGE and three Arabidopsis UGEs in Arabidopsis plants could not significantly increase the amount of cell wall bound galactose. We then investigated co-overexpression of AtUGE2 together with the ?-1,4-galactan synthase GalS1. Co-overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 led to over 80% increase in cell wall galactose levels in Arabidopsis stems, providing evidence that these proteins work synergistically. Furthermore, AtUGE2 and GalS1 overexpression in combination with overexpression of the NST1 master regulator for secondary cell wall biosynthesis resulted in increased thickness of fiber cell walls in addition to the high cell wall galactose levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that the increased galactose was present as ?-1,4-galactan in secondary cell walls. Conclusions: This approach clearly indicates that simultaneous overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 increases the cell wall galactose to much higher levels than can be achieved by overexpressing either one of these proteins alone. Moreover, the increased galactan content in fiber cells while improving the biomass composition had no impact on plant growth and development and hence on the overall biomass amount. Thus, we could show that the gene stacking approach described here is a promising method to engineer advanced feedstocks for biofuel production.« less

  8. A gene stacking approach leads to engineered plants with highly increased galactan levels in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gondolf, Vibe M.; Stoppel, Rhea; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten; Liwanag, April J.M.; Loqué, Dominique; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2014-12-10

    Background: Engineering of plants with a composition of lignocellulosic biomass that is more suitable for downstream processing is of high interest for next-generation biofuel production. Lignocellulosic biomass contains a high proportion of pentose residues, which are more difficult to convert into fuels than hexoses. Therefore, increasing the hexose/pentose ratio in biomass is one approach for biomass improvement. A genetic engineering approach was used to investigate whether the amount of pectic galactan can be specifically increased in cell walls of Arabidopsis fiber cells, which in turn could provide a potential source of readily fermentable galactose. Results: First it was tested if overexpression of various plant UDP-glucose 4-epimerases (UGEs) could increase the availability of UDP-galactose and thereby increase the biosynthesis of galactan. Constitutive and tissue-specific expression of a poplar UGE and three Arabidopsis UGEs in Arabidopsis plants could not significantly increase the amount of cell wall bound galactose. We then investigated co-overexpression of AtUGE2 together with the ?-1,4-galactan synthase GalS1. Co-overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 led to over 80% increase in cell wall galactose levels in Arabidopsis stems, providing evidence that these proteins work synergistically. Furthermore, AtUGE2 and GalS1 overexpression in combination with overexpression of the NST1 master regulator for secondary cell wall biosynthesis resulted in increased thickness of fiber cell walls in addition to the high cell wall galactose levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that the increased galactose was present as ?-1,4-galactan in secondary cell walls. Conclusions: This approach clearly indicates that simultaneous overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 increases the cell wall galactose to much higher levels than can be achieved by overexpressing either one of these proteins alone. Moreover, the increased galactan content in fiber cells while improving the biomass composition had no impact on plant growth and development and hence on the overall biomass amount. Thus, we could show that the gene stacking approach described here is a promising method to engineer advanced feedstocks for biofuel production.

  9. Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films profiling of polymer films and multilayers using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Deuterium substitution has traditionally been used in depth profiling of polymers but can affect the phase behavior

  10. Full-wave-equation depth extrapolation for migration Kristian Sandberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beylkin, Gregory

    Full-wave-equation depth extrapolation for migration Kristian Sandberg1 and Gregory Beylkin2 ABSTRACT Most of the traditional approaches to migration by down- ward extrapolation suffer from laterally varying background. If the background veloci- ty is only depth dependent, then the spectral

  11. Prediction of end-depth ratio in open channels using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    for channels with other cross sections. This global expression not only outperforms other expressions) and can be used for channels with any cross-section and any flow regime. Key words | data modelling in the form of hc ¼ AheeB ffiffiffi S0 p is found for calculating the critical depth (hc) and end-depth ratio

  12. Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression airborne particles that both reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation and whose effect on the Earth the satellite measure- ments, the common objective is prediction of Aerosol Opti- cal Depth (AOD). An important

  13. SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW TELEMETRY STATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW TELEMETRY STATIONS Much of the Western United States relies heavily on spring snow melt runoff to meet its industrial, agricultural

  14. Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen H.

    Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

  15. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lijun

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G Handling Editor: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused

  16. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused by the viscous

  17. Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania A. Jardin1, F Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania -- The challenge of seismic exploration in fold and thrust belt settings compte plus importante des données géologiques. Abstract -- Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural

  18. Two weight system for measuring depth and sediment in slurry-supported excavations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deming, P.; Good, D.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a two weight system using bar and flat shaped weights for measuring depth and detecting sediment at the bottom of slurry-supported excavations. Currently there are no standard depth measurement weights or methods for reliably identifying bottom sediment. Two weights and a procedural system for using the weights is described. Details suitable for manufacture are provided.

  19. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  20. Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements Seema C. Shah sediment load calculations on the basis of depth-integrated sediment concentration measurements for channels with significant sediment transport in suspension. The series expansion of the modified Einstein

  1. Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest of microbial consumption of mineral N were reduced relative to production. Overall, up to 60% of potential gross N mineralization and 100% of potential net N mineralization occurred below 15 cm depth

  2. Decollement depth versus accretionary prism dimension in the Apennines and the Barbados

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De´collement depth versus accretionary prism dimension in the Apennines and the Barbados Sabina] Along representative cross sections of the Apennines and the Northern Barbados accretionary prisms, we´collement than the oceanic sections of the Northern Barbados, 6­10 km depth and

  3. Realtime and Robust Hand Tracking from Depth Chen Qian1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgs, Christian

    Realtime and Robust Hand Tracking from Depth Chen Qian1,2 Xiao Sun1 Yichen Wei1 Xiaoou Tang2 Jian Sun1 1 Microsoft Research 2 Chinese University of Hong Kong {v-xiasun,yichenw,jiansun}@microsoft.com {qc012,xtang}@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract We present a realtime hand tracking system using a depth sensor

  4. Hydrochemical evidence of the depth of penetration of anthropogenic recharge in sandstone aquifers underlying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Hydrochemical evidence of the depth of penetration of anthropogenic recharge in sandstone aquifers of anthropogenic solutes (major ions, trace metals) in Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifers underlying two mature of anthropogenic solutes to depths of between 30 and 47 m below ground in the unconfined sandstone and confirm

  5. Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR Isaac Cho UNC Charlotte, USA but less for so volumetric data. Volumetric data is characterized by a heavy presence of transparency- ing perception of depth in volumetric data. Our study also suggests that familiarity with 3D games

  6. Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR Isaac Cho Wenwen Dou Zachary volumetric data. This poster present results of an initial formal experiment that examines the effectiveness of various display conditions on depth perception of volumetric data. There is an overall benefit

  7. An Evaluation of Depth Perception on Volumetric Displays Tovi Grossman, Ravin Balakrishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    An Evaluation of Depth Perception on Volumetric Displays Tovi Grossman, Ravin Balakrishnan.toronto.edu ABSTRACT We present an experiment that compares volumetric displays to existing 3D display techniques space, volumetric displays allow viewers to use their natural physiological mechanisms for depth

  8. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Karacheban; K. Afanaciev; M. Hempel; H. Henschel; W. Lange; J. L. Leonard; I. Levy; W. Lohmann; S. Schuwalow

    2015-07-15

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitors at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Currently artificial diamond sensors are widely used. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm^2 size and 525 micro m thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the detector was studied in a 5 GeV electron beam. The charge collection efficiency measured as a function of the bias voltage rises with the voltage, reaching about 10 % at 950 V. The signal size obtained from electrons crossing the stack at this voltage is about 22000 e, where e is the unit charge. The signal size is measured as a function of the hit position, showing variations of up to 20 % in the direction perpendicular to the beam and to the electric field. The measurement of the signal size as a function of the coordinate parallel to the electric field confirms the prediction that mainly electrons contribute to the signal. Also evidence for the presence of a polarisation field was observed.

  9. Effect of Creep of Ferritic Interconnect on Long-Term Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-08-01

    High-temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) compatibility with other components for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . However, creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature exceeds or even is less than half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the SOFCs under development are around 1,073 K. With around 1,800 K of the melting temperature for most stainless steel, possible creep deformation of ferritic IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of IC creep behavior on stack geometry change and the stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the changes in fuel- and air-channel geometry due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel IC, therefore indicating possible changes in SOFC performance under long-term operations. The ferritic IC creep model was incorporated into software SOFC-MP and Mentat-FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long-term steady-state operating temperature. It was found that the creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel- and the air-flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  10. Thermodynamic Depth of Causal States: When Paddling around in Occam's Pool Shallowness Is a Virtue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. Crutchfield; Cosma Rohilla Shalizi

    1998-08-13

    Thermodynamic depth is an appealing but flawed structural complexity measure. It depends on a set of macroscopic states for a system, but neither its original introduction by Lloyd and Pagels nor any follow-up work has considered how to select these states. Depth, therefore, is at root arbitrary. Computational mechanics, an alternative approach to structural complexity, provides a definition for a system's minimal, necessary causal states and a procedure for finding them. We show that the rate of increase in thermodynamic depth, or {\\it dive}, is the system's reverse-time Shannon entropy rate, and so depth only measures degrees of macroscopic randomness, not structure. To fix this we redefine the depth in terms of the causal state representation---$\\epsilon$-machines---and show that this representation gives the minimum dive consistent with accurate prediction. Thus, $\\epsilon$-machines are optimally shallow.

  11. Building a Parallel Cloud Storage System using OpenStack’s Swift Object Store and Transformative Parallel I/O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Andrew J.; Lora, Kaleb D.; Martinez, Esteban; Shorter, Martel L.

    2012-07-30

    Our project consists of bleeding-edge research into replacing the traditional storage archives with a parallel, cloud-based storage solution. It used OpenStack's Swift Object Store cloud software. It's Benchmarked Swift for write speed and scalability. Our project is unique because Swift is typically used for reads and we are mostly concerned with write speeds. Cloud Storage is a viable archive solution because: (1) Container management for larger parallel archives might ease the migration workload; (2) Many tools that are written for cloud storage could be utilized for local archive; and (3) Current large cloud storage practices in industry could be utilized to manage a scalable archive solution.

  12. End plate assembly having a two-phase fluid-filled bladder and method for compressing a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlstrom, Jr., Charles M. (Clifton Park, NY)

    2001-01-01

    An end plate assembly is disclosed for use in a fuel cell assembly in which the end plate assembly includes a housing having a cavity, and a bladder receivable in the cavity and engageable with the fuel cell stack. The bladder includes a two-phase fluid having a liquid portion and a vapor portion. Desirably, the two-phase fluid has a vapor pressure between about 100 psi and about 600 psi at a temperature between about 70 degrees C. to about 110 degrees C.

  13. Experimental characterization of glass-ceramic seal properties and their constitutive implementation in solid oxide fuel cell stack models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Vetrano, John S.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Chou, Y. S.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-09-05

    This paper discusses experimental determination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) glass-ceramic seal material properties and seal/interconnect interfacial properties to support development and optimization of SOFC designs through modeling. Material property experiments such as dynamic resonance, dilatometry, flexure, creep, tensile, and shear tests were performed on PNNL’s glass-ceramic sealant material, designated as G18, to obtain property data essential to constitutive and numerical model development. Characterization methods for the physical, mechanical, and interfacial properties of the sealing material, results, and their application to the constitutive implementation in SOFC stack modeling are described.

  14. Segregation At Stacking Faults Within The ?' Phase Of Two Ni-base Superalloys Following Intermediate Temperature Creep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, G. B.; Shi, R.; Genc, Arda; Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Rae, C.M. F.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art energy dispersive spectroscopy, it has been established for the first time that there exists significant compositional variation (enrichment of Co and Cr and deficiency of Ni and Al) associated with superlattice intrinsic stacking faults created in the ordered ?' precipitates following intermediate temperature deformation of two commercial superalloys. The results indicate that long range diffusion of these elements is intimately involved in the precipitate shearing process and is therefore closely linked to the time-dependent deformation of the alloys.

  15. Project W420 Air Sampler Probe Placement Qualification Tests for Four 6-Inch Diameter Stacks: 296-A-25, 296-B-28, 296-S-22, and 296-T-18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maughan, A.D.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1998-09-30

    The W420 project covers the upgrading of effluent monitoring systems at six ventilation exhaust stacks in tank-farm facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The discharge stacks of five of the six systems will be completely replaced. Four of these (296-A-25, 296-B-28, 296-S-22, and 296-T-18) will be of the same size, 6-inches in diameter and about 12-ft high. This report documents tests that were conducted to verify that these four stacks meet the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of the air sampling probe. These criteria ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the location of the probe such that the extracted sample represents the whole. There are also criteria addressing the transport of the sample to the collection device. These are not covered in this report, but will need to be addressed later. These tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on a full-scale model of the 6-inch stick. The sequence of tests addresses the acceptability of the flow angle relative to the probe and the uniformity of air velocity and gaseous and particle tracers in the cross section of the stack. All tests were successful, and all acceptance criteria were met.

  16. Interlayer Water Regulates the Bio-nano Interface of a \\b{eta}-sheet Protein stacking on Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenping Lv; Guiju Xu; Hongyan Zhang; Xin Li; Shengju Liu; Huan Niu; Dongsheng Xu; Renan Wu

    2014-12-03

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated an integrated bio-nano interface consisting of a \\b{eta}-sheet protein stacked onto graphene. We found that the stacking assembly of the model protein on graphene could be controlled by water molecules. The interlayer water filled within interstices of the bio-nano interface could suppress the molecular vibration of surface groups on protein, and could impair the CH...{\\pi} interaction driving the attraction of the protein and graphene. The intermolecular coupling of interlayer water would be relaxed by the relative motion of protein upon graphene due to the interaction between water and protein surface. This effect reduced the hindrance of the interlayer water against the assembly of protein on graphene, resulting an appropriate adsorption status of protein on graphene with a deep free energy trap. Thereby, the confinement and the relative sliding between protein and graphene, the coupling of protein and water, and the interaction between graphene and water all have involved in the modulation of behaviors of water molecules within the bio-nano interface, governing the hindrance of interlayer water against the protein assembly on hydrophobic graphene. These results provide a deep insight into the fundamental mechanism of protein adsorption onto graphene surface in water.

  17. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karacheban, O; Hempel, M; Henschel, H; Lange, W; Leonard, J L; Levy, I; Lohmann, W; Schuwalow, S

    2015-01-01

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitoring systems at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Artificial diamond sensors are currently widely used as sensors in these systems. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm^2 size and 525 micrometer thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the dete...

  18. Influence of relative sea level on facies, stacking patterns and reservoir heterogeneity: Middle Jurassic Brent group, UK North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennette, D.C. (Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (United States))

    1996-01-01

    The lower Brent Group, above the genetically distinct lowstand deposits of the Broom Formation, is a progradational sequence set made up of the lower- shoreface Rannoch, the upper-shoreface and beach-plain Etive, and the back-barrier Lower Ness Formations. Much of the reservoir heterogeneity in this sandstone-rich succession can be attributed to facies and stacking-pattern variations within higher frequency systems tracts. Highstand systems tracts have strongly offlapping progradational geometries. Sweep efficiency is influenced by: (1) seaward-dipping, mica-rich bed-sets; (2) high-quality ebb tidal-delta sandstone bodies; and (3) the sharp increase in reservoir quality at the sub-horizontal base of the upper shoreface. The increased permeability leads water in the Etive to overrun oil in the Rannoch. Horizontal wells are targeting unswept reserves in the lower-permeability facies. Relative falls in sea level punctuated highstand progradation and led to the subaerial erosion of the Etive and Rannoch formations. Lowstand deposits are contained within incised valleys and consist of fluvial sandstones, coastal-plain mudstones and coal. Well-performance anomalies and abrupt variations in sandstone thickness are associated with the heterogeneous valley-fills. Shoreface sedimentation resumed during transgressive systems tracts. High sediment flux enabled the nearshore system to stack aggradationally. Diachronous lithostratigraphy, aggradation of the heterolithic back-barrier Ness Formation, interbedding of Rannoch facies in the lower Etive and increased carbonate cement in the lower shoreface Rannoch mark this systems tract.

  19. Influence of relative sea level on facies, stacking patterns and reservoir heterogeneity: Middle Jurassic Brent group, UK North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennette, D.C. [Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The lower Brent Group, above the genetically distinct lowstand deposits of the Broom Formation, is a progradational sequence set made up of the lower- shoreface Rannoch, the upper-shoreface and beach-plain Etive, and the back-barrier Lower Ness Formations. Much of the reservoir heterogeneity in this sandstone-rich succession can be attributed to facies and stacking-pattern variations within higher frequency systems tracts. Highstand systems tracts have strongly offlapping progradational geometries. Sweep efficiency is influenced by: (1) seaward-dipping, mica-rich bed-sets; (2) high-quality ebb tidal-delta sandstone bodies; and (3) the sharp increase in reservoir quality at the sub-horizontal base of the upper shoreface. The increased permeability leads water in the Etive to overrun oil in the Rannoch. Horizontal wells are targeting unswept reserves in the lower-permeability facies. Relative falls in sea level punctuated highstand progradation and led to the subaerial erosion of the Etive and Rannoch formations. Lowstand deposits are contained within incised valleys and consist of fluvial sandstones, coastal-plain mudstones and coal. Well-performance anomalies and abrupt variations in sandstone thickness are associated with the heterogeneous valley-fills. Shoreface sedimentation resumed during transgressive systems tracts. High sediment flux enabled the nearshore system to stack aggradationally. Diachronous lithostratigraphy, aggradation of the heterolithic back-barrier Ness Formation, interbedding of Rannoch facies in the lower Etive and increased carbonate cement in the lower shoreface Rannoch mark this systems tract.

  20. Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsing, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Strategies and Point-Source Photometry Johan Samsing DARK-The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends onobjects in a single source photometry (Lauer 1999a) and the

  1. VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floater, Michael S.

    VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS Tim Volodine KULeuven, Department: meshing, surface reconstruction, volumetric grid, contouring, point clouds. Abstract: We propose, a volumetric method that does not rely on a signed distance function was proposed recently by Hornung

  2. Other Purdue Web points of Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Other Purdue Web points of interest. Purdue University Home Page --- Schedule of Classes · Graduate School · Agronomy · Computer Science --- CS & E ...

  3. CenterPoint Energy New Homes Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program is only available to electric Customers in CenterPoint Energy's service territory (greater Houston area, Texas).

  4. Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

    2013-01-01

    The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

  5. Apparatus and methods for aligning holes through wheels and spacers and stacking the wheels and spacers to form a turbine rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, Robert Randolph (Greenville, SC); Palmer, Gene David (Clifton Park, NY); Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor stacking fixture includes upstanding bolts for reception in aligned bolt holes in superposed aft disk, wheels and spacers and upstanding alignment rods received in openings of the disk, wheels and spacers during the rotor stacking assembly. The axially registering openings enable insertion of thin-walled tubes circumferentially about the rim of the rotor, with tight tolerances to the openings to provide supply and return steam for cooling buckets. The alignment rods have radial dimensions substantially less than their dimensions in a circumferential direction to allow for radial opening misalignment due to thermal expansion, tolerance stack-up and wheel-to-spacer mismatch due to rabbet mechanical growth. The circumferential dimension of the alignment rods affords tightly toleranced alignment of the openings through which the cooling tubes are installed.

  6. Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

    2013-02-01

    This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  7. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R.; Kusdiantara, Rudy Puspita, Dila Sidarto, Kuntjoro A. Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y.

    2014-03-24

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  8. Learning Predictive Models of a Depth Camera & Manipulator from Raw Execution Traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guestrin, Carlos

    can accurately predict future depth camera observations in response to sequences of motor commands. I. We approach this difficult problem from a machine learn- ing perspective. We dispense with problem

  9. High-Resolution Depth for Binocular Image-Based Modelling David Blumenthal-Barby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisert, Peter

    applications like image-based modelling, photo relighting, or the fabrication of physical mod- els with 3D printing require detailed surface geometry rather than depth layering of cluttered scenes. Surface meshes

  10. The Visual Word Recognition and Orthography Depth in Second Language Acquisition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Yunchun

    2011-10-01

    The study investigated whether the orthographic depth of first language (L1) affects the word recognition in second language (L2) learning. Fifteen native Chinese speakers and fifteen Greek native speakers were recruited to test their English naming...

  11. ORNL/TM-2014/218 In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    ORNL/TM-2014/218 In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE's Roof or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2014/218 Energy

  12. Uranium-series isotope and thermal constraints on the rate and depth of silicic magma genesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Uranium-series isotope and thermal constraints on the rate and depth of silicic magma genesis A Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK Abstract: Uranium-series isotopes provide

  13. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16

    Factors related to operations of a well that impact drilling uncertainties in the shallow water region of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) can be directly linked to the site specific issues; such as water depth and local geological ...

  14. Constraining water table depth simulations in a land surface model using estimated baseflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, MH; Yeh, PJF; Famiglietti, JS

    2008-01-01

    northeastern Kansas. Adv Water Resour 2002;25:221–38. [68]ing between runoff and soil water storage and differentcycles of base?ow and water table depth show signif- icant

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

  16. Development of a bioengineered tissue model and its application in the investigation of the depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Development of a bioengineered tissue model and its application in the investigation of the depth the development of a bioengineered connective tissue model fabricated by the combination of scaffolding and cross

  17. Solid-State Fault Current Limiter Development : Design and Testing Update of a 15kV SSCL Power Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ram Adapa; Mr. Dante Piccone

    2012-04-30

    ABSTRACT The Solid-State Fault Current Limiter (SSCL) is a promising technology that can be applied to utility power delivery systems to address the problem of increasing fault currents associated with load growth. As demand continues to grow, more power is added to utility system either by increasing generator capacity or by adding distributed generators, resulting in higher available fault currents, often beyond the capabilities of the present infrastructure. The SSCL is power-electronics based equipment designed to work with the present utility system to address this problem. The SSCL monitors the line current and dynamically inserts additional impedance into the line in the event of a fault being detected. The SSCL is based on a modular design and can be configured for 5kV through 69kV systems at nominal current ratings of 1000A to 4000A. Results and Findings This report provides the final test results on the development of 15kV class SSCL single phase power stack. The scope of work included the design of the modular standard building block sub-assemblies, the design and manufacture of the power stack and the testing of the power stack for the key functional tests of continuous current capability and fault current limiting action. Challenges and Objectives Solid-State Current Limiter technology impacts a wide spectrum of utility engineering and operating personnel. It addresses the problems associated with load growth both at Transmission and Distribution class networks. The design concept is pioneering in terms of developing the most efficient and compact power electronics equipment for utility use. The initial test results of the standard building blocks are promising. The independent laboratory tests of the power stack are promising. However the complete 3 phase system needs rigorous testing for performance and reliability. Applications, Values, and Use The SSCL is an intelligent power-electronics device which is modular in design and can provide current limiting or current interrupting capabilities. It can be applied to variety of applications from distribution class to transmission class power delivery grids and networks. It can also be applied to single major commercial and industrial loads and distributed generator supplies. The active switching of devices can be further utilized for protection of substation transformers. The stress on the system can be reduced substantially improving the life of the power system. It minimizes the voltage sag by speedy elimination of heavy fault currents and promises to be an important element of the utility power system. DOE Perspective This development effort is now focused on a 15kV system. This project will help mitigate the challenges of increasing available fault current. DOE has made a major contribution in providing a cost effective SSCL designed to integrate seamlessly into the Transmission and Distribution networks of today and the future. Approach SSCL development program for a 69kV SSCL was initiated which included the use of the Super GTO advanced semiconductor device which won the 2007 R&D100 Award. In the beginning, steps were identified to accomplish the economically viable design of a 69kV class Solid State Current Limiter that is extremely reliable, cost effective, and compact enough to be applied in urban transmission. The prime thrust in design and development was to encompass the 1000A and the 3000A ratings and provide a modular design to cover the wide range of applications. The focus of the project was then shifted to a 15kV class SSCL. The specifications for the 15kV power stack are reviewed. The design changes integrated into the 15kV power stack are discussed. In this Technical Update the complete project is summarized followed by a detailed test report. The power stack independent high voltage laboratory test requirements and results are presented. Keywords Solid State Current Limiter, SSCL, Fault Current Limiter, Fault Current Controller, Power electronics controller, Intelligent power-electronics Device, IED

  18. A simplified mechanistic rut depth prediction procedure for low-volume roads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapa, Kashyapa A.S.

    1988-01-01

    A SIMPLIFIED MECHANISTIC RUT DEPTH PREDICTION PROCEDURE FOR LOW-UOLUME ROADS A Thesis by KASHYAPA ABEYSIRIWARDHANA SENARATH YAPA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... rt L. Lytt ( an of Committee) D as . Li tie ( ember) Walter L. Bradley (Member) Ja T. . Yao (Head of De tment) December 1988 ABSTRACT A Simplified Mechanistic Rut Depth Prediction Procedure for Low-volume Roads. (December 1988) Kashyapa...

  19. Modeling of Pressurized Electrochemistry and Steam-Methane Reforming in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and the Effects on Thermal and Electrical Stack Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-03-01

    Summarizes work done to extend the electrochemical performance and methane reforming submodels to include the effects of pressurization and to demonstrate this new modeling capability by simulating large stacks operating on methane-rich fuel under pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. Pressurized operation boosts electrochemical performance, alters the kinetics of methane reforming, and effects the equilibrium composition of methane fuels. This work developed constitutive submodels that couple the electrochemistry, reforming, and pressurization to yield an increased capability of the modeling tool for prediction of SOFC stack performance.

  20. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  1. Parity-time symmetry from stacking purely dielectric and magnetic slabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gear, James; Chu, S T; Rotter, Stefan; Li, Jensen

    2015-01-01

    We show that Parity-time symmetry in matching electric permittivity to magnetic permeability can be established by considering an effective Parity operator involving both mirror symmetry and coupling between electric and magnetic fields. This approach extends the discussion of Parity-time symmetry to the situation with more than one material potential. We show that the band structure of a one-dimensional photonic crystal with alternating purely dielectric and purely magnetic slabs can undergo a phase transition between propagation modes and evanescent modes when the balanced gain/loss parameter is varied. The cross-matching between different material potentials also allows exceptional points of the constitutive matrix to appear in the long wavelength limit where they can be used to construct ultrathin metamaterials with unidirectional reflection.

  2. PURE STRATEGY NASH EQUILIBRIUM POINTS AND THE LEFSCHETZ FIXED POINT THEOREM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    PURE STRATEGY NASH EQUILIBRIUM POINTS AND THE LEFSCHETZ FIXED POINT THEOREM by Leigh Tesfatsion of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 #12;ABSTRAcr A pure strategy Nash equilibrium point existence theorem cases of the existence theorem are also discussed. #12;PURE STRATEGY NASH EQUILIBRIUM POINTS

  3. Recombination dynamics of a localized exciton bound at basal stacking faults within the m-plane ZnO film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, S.; Liu, W.-R. [Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Hsu, H. C., E-mail: hsuhc@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: wfhsieh@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, 701 Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lin, B. H.; Hsu, C.-H. [Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Kuo, C. C.; Hsieh, W. F., E-mail: hsuhc@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: wfhsieh@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Eriksson, M. O.; Holtz, P. O. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-07-07

    We investigated the carrier dynamics near basal stacking faults (BSFs) in m-plane ZnO epitaxial film. The behaviors of the type-II quantum wells related to the BSFs are verified through time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence. The decay time of the emission of BSFs is observed to have a higher power law value and longer decay time than the emission of the donor-bound excitons. The spectral-dependent decay times reveal a phenomenon of carriers migrating among band tail states, which are related to the spatial distribution of the type-II quantum wells formed by the BSFs. A high density of excited carriers leads to a band bending effect, which in turn causes a blue-shift of the emission peak of BSFs with a broadened distribution of band tail states.

  4. High blue-near ultraviolet photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene-MoS{sub 2}-metal heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wi, Sungjin; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Liu, Amy C.; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan

    2014-06-09

    We present a study on the photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures in which MoS{sub 2} layers are doped with various plasma species. In comparison with undoped heterostructures, such doped ones exhibit significantly improved quantum efficiencies in both photovoltaic and photoconductive modes. This indicates that plasma-doping-induced built-in potentials play an important role in photocurrent generation. As compared to indium-tin-oxide/ MoS{sub 2}/metal structures, the presented graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures exhibit greatly enhanced quantum efficiencies in the blue-near ultraviolet region, which is attributed to the low density of recombination centers at graphene/MoS{sub 2} heterojunctions. This work advances the knowledge for making photo-response devices based on layered materials.

  5. Potential-induced degradation in solar cells: Electronic structure and diffusion mechanism of sodium in stacking faults of silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebarth, Benedikt Gumbsch, Peter; Mrovec, Matous; Elsässer, Christian

    2014-09-07

    Sodium decorated stacking faults (SFs) were recently identified as the primary cause of potential-induced degradation in silicon (Si) solar-cells due to local electrical short-circuiting of the p-n junctions. In the present study, we investigate these defects by first principles calculations based on density functional theory in order to elucidate their structural, thermodynamic, and electronic properties. Our calculations show that the presence of sodium (Na) atoms leads to a substantial elongation of the Si-Si bonds across the SF, and the coverage and continuity of the Na layer strongly affect the diffusion behavior of Na within the SF. An analysis of the electronic structure reveals that the presence of Na in the SF gives rise to partially occupied defect levels within the Si band gap that participate in electrical conduction along the SF.

  6. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  7. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  8. 1O.-ON THE INFLUENCE OF LIGHT ON THE PERIODICAL DEPTH-MIGRATIONS OF PELAGIC ANIMAIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1O.-ON THE INFLUENCE OF LIGHT ON THE PERIODICAL DEPTH- MIGRATIONS OF PELAGIC ANIMAIS BY JACQUES it certain that this periodical depth migration of sea animals is determitied to a certain extent at least and of freshawater lakes is confined chiefly to two regions, one extending from the surface of the sea to a depth

  9. DENOISING OF VOLUMETRIC DEPTH CONFIDENCE FOR VIEW Srinivas Parthasarathy, Akul Chopra, Emilie Baudin, Pravin Kumar Rana, and Markus Flierl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flierl, Markus

    DENOISING OF VOLUMETRIC DEPTH CONFIDENCE FOR VIEW RENDERING Srinivas Parthasarathy, Akul Chopra of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden ABSTRACT In this paper, we define volumetric depth confidence and pro- pose- perposition principle, we define a volumetric depth confidence de- scription of the underlying geometry

  10. Stereo and Motion Cues Effect on Depth Perception in Volumetric Data (Technical Report: CVC-UNCC-13-12,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Stereo and Motion Cues Effect on Depth Perception in Volumetric Data (Technical Report: CVC-UNCC-13 cues effect on depth judgment of volumetric data," Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXV (SD&A2014 on Depth Perception of Volumetric Data Isaac Cho, Zachary Wartell, Wenwen Dou, Xiaoyu Wang and William

  11. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  12. Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Prairie Pointe Townhomes in Greensburg, Kansas.

  13. VPP Points of Contact web version 07092015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Updated 792015 VPP POINTS OF CONTACT Organization DOE POC Contractor DOE Federal POC Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. (ATL)222-S Laboratory Analytical...

  14. SIMPLE EXPLICIT FORMULA FOR COUNTING LATTICE POINTS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-02-14

    by a simple formula involving the evaluation of ? zx over the integral points of those ... different) formula from a decomposition of the generating function into.

  15. HOLOMORPHIC ONE FORMS, INTEGRAL AND RATIONAL POINTS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-09-23

    Abstract The first goal of this paper is to study the question of finiteness of integral points on a cofinite non-compact complex two dimensional ball quotient ...

  16. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  17. New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indian Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  18. Wolf Point Substation, Roosevelt County, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western), an agency of the United States Department of Energy, is proposing to construct the 115-kV Wolf Point Substation near Wolf Point in Roosevelt County, Montana (Figure 1). As part of the construction project, Western's existing Wolf Point Substation would be taken out of service. The existing 115-kV Wolf Point Substation is located approximately 3 miles west of Wolf Point, Montana (Figure 2). The substation was constructed in 1949. The existing Wolf Point Substation serves as a Switching Station'' for the 115-kV transmission in the region. The need for substation improvements is based on operational and reliability issues. For this environmental assessment (EA), the environmental review of the proposed project took into account the removal of the old Wolf Point Substation, rerouting of the five Western lines and four lines from the Cooperatives and Montana-Dakota Utilities Company, and the new road into the proposed substation. Reference to the new proposed Wolf Point Substation in the EA includes these facilities as well as the old substation site. The environmental review looked at the impacts to all resource areas in the Wolf Point area. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Joint Inversion of Reservoir Production Measurements and 3D Pre-Stack Seismic Data: Proof Carlos Torres-Verdn, Zhan Wu, Omar J. Varela, Mrinal K. Sen, and Indrajit G. Roy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Joint Inversion of Reservoir Production Measurements and 3D Pre-Stack Seismic Data: Proof-stack seismic data and fluid production history. The production measurements and the seismic data problem associated with the inversion. Fluid production measurements are sensitive to initial fluid

  20. 3D-COSTAR: A Cost Model for 3D Stacked ICs Abstract--Selecting appropriate and efficient test flow for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , packaging and logistics (e.g. related to shipping wafers between a foundry and a test house); and provides-SIC by an Integrated Device Manufactures (IDM) and a fab-less company. For the fab-less company, we assume that each to their manufacturing process, 3D-SICs provide several test moments such as before stacking, during manufacturing

  1. Designing a 3-D optical multilayer due to merging the concepts of stacked and planar-integrated free-space optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Designing a 3-D optical multilayer due to merging the concepts of stacked and planar-integrated free-space optics M. Jarczynski, J. Jahns Optical interconnects aim to overcome the communication dimension [1]. For the optical implementation of 3-D setups suitable microoptics approaches are re- quired

  2. September 23, 2006 0:0 Proceedings Trim Size: 9in x 6in PSM06draft A STACKED GRAPHICAL MODEL FOR ASSOCIATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Robert F.

    September 23, 2006 0:0 Proceedings Trim Size: 9in x 6in PSM06draft A STACKED GRAPHICAL MODEL:0 Proceedings Trim Size: 9in x 6in PSM06draft Fig. 5. Double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy using mouse

  3. A study to assess the value of post-stack seismic amplitude data in forecasting fluid production from a Gulf-of-Mexico reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    the measured time record of flow rates of gas/water and shut-in well pressures. For the hydrocarbon field under of spatially complex hydrocarbon reservoir models constructed with the use of post-stack seismic amplitude data and well logs. Developments center about the interpretation of data acquired in an active hydrocarbon field

  4. Assessment of the LV-S2 & LV-S3 Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2014-09-30

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 1-2A exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LV-C2, LV-S2, and LV-S3 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 1-2A). This report only covers the results of LV-S2 and LV-S3; LV-C2 will be reported on separately. Federal regulations1 require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. 2 These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  5. Towards HPC-ABDS: An Initial High-Performance Big Data Stack , School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Towards HPC-ABDS: An Initial High-Performance Big Data Stack Judy Qiu , School of Informatics effectiveness hampered by the increasing volume, variety and rate of change (velocity) of big data ecosystem, resulting in an integrated system generically called high- performance big data system (HPBDS

  6. Science news doi:10.1038/nindia.2012.185; Published online 17 December 2012 Stacked panels boost solar energy production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    increase in efficiency as compared to a single layer solar panel," Pragya Sharma and Tirumalachetty station.1 They say that stacking up photovoltaic (PV) panels makes for more efficient generation of power by a small distance could work wonders. Our results of two-layer solar panels have shown about 75 per cent

  7. Model based detection of hydrogen leaks in a fuel cell stack Ari Ingimundarson and Anna G. Stefanopoulou and Denise McKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    will depend on the composition of the gas where the leak takes place. Two approaches are presented here but takes into account the natural leak of the stack and humidity. Hydrogen leak detection without using. Hydrogen has the lowest molecular weight and viscosity of any gas. Its properties make it have a faster

  8. 1136 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 39, NO. 4, JULY/AUGUST 2003 Simulation of Fuel-Cell Stacks Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    , especially for developing countries and schools in general. There are still some concerns about the FC of fuel-cell (FC) stacks by using a computer-controlled high-power converter, which drives actual electric, and the regimen of operation of the actual electrical load. Any type of FC of ordinary size can be simulated

  9. GEOC Andrew Stack Wednesday, March 19, 2014 131 Multiscale assessment of the kinetics and mechanisms of metal(loid) oxidation at the Mnoxide/water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    GEOC Andrew Stack Wednesday, March 19, 2014 131 Multiscale assessment of the kinetics in terrestrial and aquatic environments are powerful oxidants of contaminants such as As and Cr. While numerous studies have appeared on the kinetics of As(III) and Cr(III) oxidation on manganese oxides, the mechanisms

  10. On Robust Regression in Photogrammetric Point Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindler, Konrad

    On Robust Regression in Photogrammetric Point Clouds Konrad Schindler and Horst Bischof Institute,bischof}@icg.tu-graz.ac.at Abstract. Many applications in computer vision require robust linear regression on photogrammetrically for robust regression are based on distance measures from the regression surface to the points

  11. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1984-01-23

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  12. Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hals, Kjetil M D

    2012-01-01

    We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

  13. Depth-of-focus reduction for digital in-line holography of particle fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostinski, Alex

    - ness of the rings. Therefore restoring the ring bright- ness to the point source pattern may result

  14. Efficient use of execution resources in multicore processor architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVuyst, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    factor in migration time is stack depth—the deeper theStack depth has the greatest influence on migration cost in

  15. Depth profiling analysis of solar wind helium collected in diamond-like carbon film from Genesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bajo, Ken-ichi; Olinger, Chad T.; Jurewicz, Amy J.G.; Burnett, Donald S.; Sakaguchi, Isao; Suzuki, Taku; Itose, Satoru; Ishihara, Morio; Uchino, Kiichiro; Wieler, Rainer; et al

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of solar-wind ions in Genesis mission collectors, as determined by depth profiling analysis, constrains the physics of ion solid interactions involving the solar wind. Thus, they provide an experimental basis for revealing ancient solar activities represented by solar-wind implants in natural samples. We measured the first depth profile of ?He in a collector; the shallow implantation (peaking at more »is consistent with TRIM simulations using the observed ?He velocity distribution during the Genesis mission. It is therefore likely that all solar-wind elements heavier than H are completely intact in this Genesis collector and, consequently, the solar particle energy distributions for each element can be calculated from their depth profiles. Ancient solar activities and space weathering of solar system objects could be quantitatively reproduced by solar particle implantation profiles.« less

  16. ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2014-11-01

    Dual beam depth profiling strategy has been widely adopted in ToF-SIMS depth profiling, in which two basic operation modes, interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode, are commonly used. Generally, interlaced mode is recommended for conductive or semi-conductive samples, whereas non-interlaced mode is recommended for insulating samples, where charge compensation can be an issue. Recent publications, however, show that the interlaced mode can be used effectively for glass depth profiling, despite the fact that glass is an insulator. In this study, we provide a simple guide for choosing between interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode for insulator depth profiling. Two representative cases are presented: (1) depth profiling of a leached glass sample, and (2) depth profiling of a single crystal MgO sample. In brief, the interlaced mode should be attempted first, because (1) it may provide reasonable-quality data, and (2) it is time-saving for most cases, and (3) it introduces low H/C/O background. If data quality is the top priority and measurement time is flexible, non-interlaced mode is recommended because interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity and poor mass resolution. A big challenge is tracking trace H/C/O in a highly insulating sample (e.g., MgO), because non-interlaced mode may introduce strong H/C/O background but interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity. Meanwhile, a C or Au coating is found to be very effective to improve the signal intensity. Surprisingly, the best analyzing location is not on the C or Au coating, but at the edge (outside) of the coating.

  17. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  18. Depth Profiling Of Small Molecule Ingress Into Planar and Cylindrical Materials Using NRA and PIXE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Richard W.; Massingham, Gary; Clough, Anthony S. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-26

    The use of a 3He ion micro-beam technique to study the ingress/diffusion of water into a planar fibre optic grade glass and a cylindrical drug-release polymer is described. One-dimensional concentration profiles showing the depth of water ingress were produced. The depth of penetration of water into the glass was measured by fitting a gaussian function to the concentration profile. The ingress of water into the drug-release polymer was found to be Fickian and a cylindrical diffusion model used to obtain a diffusion coefficient.

  19. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting | Department|DepartmentalDay 49, 2010DepthDepth

  20. Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Donita Lynn

    2009-05-15

    .4 Effect of Planting Depth on Total Chlorophyll Concentration (A), Net Photosynthetic (Pn) Activity (B), and Pre-dawn Stem Water Potential (C) of Lacebark Elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.) after 200 d in 10.8 L Containers... Depth on Pre-dawn Stem Water Potential in Lacebark Elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.) When Initially Transplanted (10.8 L) 5 cm Above Soil Grade (A), at Soil Grade (B), or 5 cm Below Soil Grade (C) . 85 4.10 Effect of Date on Relative Growth Rate...