Sample records for depth point stacked

  1. On depth and deep points: a calculus Ivan Mizera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizera, Ivan

    of Tukey's median) plays a fundamental role similar to that of linear functions in the mathematical (1929) and Chamberlin (1933). For multivariate location, the proposal of Tukey (1975) was developed halfspace or Tukey's depth; for other brands of depth in multivariate location see Liu, Parelius and Singh

  2. Computing a Maximal Depth Point in the Plane Stefan Langerman # William Steiger +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerman, Stefan

    ], [7],[10],[11]. One of the more familiar ones was proposed by John Tukey [12], a natural extension to d > 1 of the notion in (1). Given a set S = {P 1 , . . . , Pn} of n points in R d , the Tukey depth is a point µ of maximal depth, and we write # # = #(S) for the Tukey depth of a median. For integer k > 0 let

  3. X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking Tom Aldcroft SAO/CXC #12;X-ray Stacking 2008 analysis for a sample Stacking ­ mean properties of sample Chandra X-ray data (faint point sources) are photon-limited with low background => stacking in X-rays is very effective #12;X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22

  4. Stack Height Requirements (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides regulations for stacks for industrial facilities. Stack means any chimney, flue, conduit or duct...

  5. THE FERNALD DOSIMETRY RECONSTRUCTION Task 1: Identification of Release Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fires, spills, and UF6 leaks and releases. The Stack Release Points and Other Release Points are located

  6. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  7. AN IN-DEPTH VIEW OF THE MID-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF POINT SOURCES AND THE DIFFUSE ISM IN THE SMC GIANT H II REGION, N66

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, David G.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Lebouteiller, Vianney [Laboratoire AIM, CEA, Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, Bat. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Galliano, Frederic [Service d'Astrophysique-Laboratoire AIM, CEA/Saclay, L'Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Peeters, Els [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo [IAS, Universite Paris-Sud 11, Bat. 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Brandl, Bernhard R., E-mail: dww7v@astro.virginia.edu, E-mail: kej7a@virginia.edu, E-mail: ri3e@virginia.edu, E-mail: vianney.lebouteiller@cea.fr, E-mail: frederic.galliano@cea.fr, E-mail: epeeters@uwo.ca, E-mail: jeronimo.bernard-salas@ias.u-psud.fr, E-mail: brandl@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this work is to study mid-infrared point sources and the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) in the low-metallicity ({approx}0.2 Z{sub Sun }) giant H II region N66 in order to determine properties that may shed light on star formation in these conditions. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph, we study polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), dust continuum, silicate, and ionic line emission from 14 targeted infrared point sources as well as spectra of the diffuse ISM that is representative of both the photodissociation regions (PDRs) and the H II regions. Among the point source spectra, we spectroscopically confirm that the brightest mid-infrared point source is a massive embedded young stellar object, we detect silicates in emission associated with two young stellar clusters, and we see spectral features of a known B[e] star that are commonly associated with Herbig Be stars. In the diffuse ISM, we provide additional evidence that the very small grain population is being photodestroyed in the hard radiation field. The 11.3 {mu}m PAH complex emission exhibits an unexplained centroid shift in both the point source and ISM spectra that should be investigated at higher signal-to-noise and resolution. Unlike studies of other regions, the 6.2 {mu}m and 7.7 {mu}m band fluxes are decoupled; the data points cover a large range of I{sub 7.7}/I{sub 11.3} PAH ratio values within a narrow band of I{sub 6.2}/I{sub 11.3} ratio values. Furthermore, there is a spread in PAH ionization, being more neutral in the dense PDR where the radiation field is relatively soft, but ionized in the diffuse ISM/PDR. By contrast, the PAH size distribution appears to be independent of local ionization state. Important to unresolved studies of extragalactic low-metallicity star-forming regions, we find that emission from the infrared-bright point sources accounts for only 20%-35% of the PAH emission from the entire region. These results make a comparative data set to other star-forming regions with similarly hard and strong radiation fields.

  8. G-1 Stack Pattern 1: Instrument Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D ExplorationsFuture25, 2010Stack

  9. 293-F Stack Reduction Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Demoltion of the 293-F Stack. A look at the environmental management at the Savannah River Site. Training and experience benefits for employees and better management of environmental safety.

  10. Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

  11. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  12. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  13. Cone Depth and the Center Vertex Theorem Gary L. Miller Todd Phillips Don Sheehy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Gary L.

    Abstract We generalize the Tukey depth to use cones instead of halfspaces. We prove a generalization of the most enduring definitions of data depth is the Tukey depth, also known as the half-space depth. The Tukey depth of a point p relative to a point set S is defined as the minimum number of points on one

  14. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative all modes failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  15. Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pat

    Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems David Bremner University of New de Bruxelles Pat Morin Carleton University Abstract The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p halfspace that contains p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions

  16. Utility stack opacity troubleshooting guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeth, R.J. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (USA). Stearns-Roger Div.); Balfour, D.A.; Meserole, F.M.; Defries, T. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (USA))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack plume visibility, otherwise defined as plume opacity, has become a concern to the utility industry. This concern stems from the fact that some coal-fired stations with operating FGD systems have been cited for opacity in excess of the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) even though the particulate mass emissions are within regulated limits. Postulated causes for the unacceptable opacities include scrubber-generated particulate matter, condensible particulate matter such as sulfuric acid mist, fine particles penetrating the particulate control device, and/or colored gases such as nitrogen dioxide in the flue gas. It is important that the underlying cause of the plume opacity be identified to determine if it is possible to reduce plume opacity. This report presents a troubleshooting methodology developed during field tests at four utilities experiencing high stack opacities. Results from these field tests are presented as case studies to demonstrate how this methodology can be applied by a utility to determine the cause of their plume opacity. 10 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Manifold seal for fuel cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitten, Phillip F. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assembly for sealing a manifold to a stack of fuel cells includes a first resilient member for providing a first sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. A second resilient member provides a second sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. The first and second resilient members are retained in such a manner as to define an area therebetween adapted for retaining a sealing composition.

  18. Patent Hold-Up and Royalty Stacking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemley, Mark A; Shapiro, Carl

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calculated. Patent Hold-Up and Royalty Stacking, Page 51336, 347 (2005) (If a royalty is based on the whole productpart, the appropriate royalty rate should be correspondingly

  19. Mechanical Reliability of Piezo-Stack Actuators

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review Guidelines Mechanical Reliability of Piezo-Stack Actuators (Agreement 13329) Andrew A. Wereszczak, Hong Wang, and Hua-Tay Lin Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN...

  20. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  1. Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The stack characterization system (SCS) is a tele-operated remote system that collects samples and data to characterize the quantitativeand qualitative levels of contamination inside off-gas stacks...

  2. Turing Impossibility Properties for Stack Machine Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergstra, J A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong, intermediate, and weak Turing impossibility properties are introduced. Some facts concerning Turing impossibility for stack machine programming are trivially adapted from previous work. Several intriguing questions are raised about the Turing impossibility properties concerning different method interfaces for stack machine programming.

  3. Fuel Cell Stack Components BipolarPlate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cell Stack Components Fuel Processor BipolarPlate Cathode+ Anode- Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN · Low-Platinum and Platinum-Free Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction at PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes · Low-Platinum-Loading Catalysts for Fuel Cells · Scale-Up of Carbon/Carbon Composite Bipolar Plates #12;Stack Component Projects

  4. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

  5. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  6. Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP Applications Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP...

  7. StackOverview 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    17 Web #12;Web Web 81% Web Web Web Web StackOverview #12;1 1 2 Web 3 2.2.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 Web 6 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3

  8. Patent Hold-Up and Royalty Stacking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemley, Mark A; Shapiro, Carl

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have been calculated. Patent Hold-Up and Royalty Stacking,Ragesh K. Tangri, Ending Patent Laws Willfulness Game, 18to Challenge and Defend Patents: Why Litigation Wont

  9. High-resolution SIMS depth profiling of nanolayers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baryshev, S. V.; Zinovev, A. V.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Peng, Q.; Elam, J. W.; Veryovkin, I. V. (Energy Systems); ( MSD)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the fundamental physical limits for depth resolution of secondary ion mass spectrometry are well understood in theory, the experimental work to achieve and demonstrate them is still ongoing. We report results of high-resolution TOF SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) depth profiling experiments on a nanolayered structure, a stack of 16 alternating MgO and ZnO {approx}5.5 nm layers grown on a Si substrate by atomic layer deposition. The measurements were performed using a newly developed approach implementing a low-energy direct current normally incident Ar{sup +} ion beam for ion milling (250 eV and 500 eV energy), in combination with a pulsed 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at 60{sup o} incidence for TOF SIMS analysis. By this optimized arrangement, a noticeably improved version of the dual-beam (DB) approach to TOF SIMS depth profiling is introduced, which can be dubbed gentleDB. The mixing-roughness-information model was applied to detailed analysis of experimental results. It revealed that the gentleDB approach allows ultimate depth resolution by confining the ion beam mixing length to about two monolayers. This corresponds to the escape depth of secondary ions, the fundamental depth resolution limitation in SIMS. Other parameters deduced from the measured depth profiles indicated that a single layer thickness is equal to 6 nm so that the 'flat' layer thickness d is 3 nm and the interfacial roughness {sigma} is 1.5 nm, thus yielding d + 2{sigma} = 6 nm. We have demonstrated that gentleDB TOF SIMS depth profiling with noble gas ion beams is capable of revealing the structural features of a stack of nanolayers, resolving its original surface and estimating the roughness of interlayer interfaces, information which is difficult to obtain by traditional approaches.

  10. Development and characterization of a three-dimensional radiochromic film stack dosimeter for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCaw, Travis J., E-mail: mccaw@wisc.edu; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) dosimeters are particularly useful for verifying the commissioning of treatment planning and delivery systems, especially with the ever-increasing implementation of complex and conformal radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy. However, currently available 3D dosimeters require extensive experience to prepare and analyze, and are subject to large measurement uncertainties. This work aims to provide a more readily implementable 3D dosimeter with the development and characterization of a radiochromic film stack dosimeter for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry. Methods: A film stack dosimeter was developed using Gafchromic{sup } EBT2 films. The dosimeter consists of 22 films separated by 1 mm-thick spacers. A Virtual Water phantom was created that maintains the radial film alignment within a maximum uncertainty of 0.3 mm. The film stack dosimeter was characterized using simulations and measurements of 6 MV fields. The absorbed-dose energy dependence and orientation dependence of the film stack dosimeter were investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. The water equivalence of the dosimeter was determined by comparing percentage-depth-dose (PDD) profiles measured with the film stack dosimeter and simulated using Monte Carlo methods. Film stack dosimeter measurements were verified with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) microcube measurements. The film stack dosimeter was also used to verify the delivery of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) procedure. Results: The absorbed-dose energy response of EBT2 film differs less than 1.5% between the calibration and film stack dosimeter geometries for a 6 MV spectrum. Over a series of beam angles ranging from normal incidence to parallel incidence, the overall variation in the response of the film stack dosimeter is within a range of 2.5%. Relative to the response to a normally incident beam, the film stack dosimeter exhibits a 1% under-response when the beam axis is parallel to the film planes. Measured and simulated PDD profiles agree within a root-mean-square difference of 1.3%. In-field film stack dosimeter and TLD measurements agree within 5%, and measurements in the field penumbra agree within 0.5 mm. Film stack dosimeter and TLD measurements have expanded (k = 2) overall measurement uncertainties of 6.2% and 5.8%, respectively. Film stack dosimeter measurements of an IMRT dose distribution have 98% agreement with the treatment planning system dose calculation, using gamma criteria of 3% and 2 mm. Conclusions: The film stack dosimeter is capable of high-resolution, low-uncertainty 3D dose measurements, and can be readily incorporated into an existing film dosimetry program.

  11. Convective Cooling and Passive Stack Improvements in Motors (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL in convective cooling and passive stack improvements in motors.

  12. 26. 1% solar cell efficiency for Ge mechanically stacked under GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partain, L.D.; Kuryla, M.S.; Weiss, R.E.; Ransom, R.A.; McLeod, P.S.; Fraas, L.M.; Cape, J.A.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have processed a diffused Ge wafer into a Ge concentrator solar cell and mechanically stacked it under a GaAs cell fabricated by Varian. We measured this stack's efficiency to be 26.1% for terrestrial air mass 1.5 direct (AM1.5D) conditions at a 285 x concentration ratio. We showed that this efficiency is limited by optical absorption in the Varian GaAs cell caused by high 2--4 (10/sup 18/) cm/sup -3/ substrate doping. We used a 2 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ doped GaAs filter to estimate the stack efficiency as 27.4%, which would be achieved with the same Varian GaAs cell formed on a lower doped substrate. We project efficiencies assuming the best properties reported for a GaAs device. This gives a 29.6% efficiency for an improved, planar Ge cell and 31.6% efficiency for a proposed point contact geometry for the Ge cell. The corresponding space (AM0) efficiencies at a 159 x concentration ratio range from the 23.4% value we measured on the stack up to 28.4% projected for the point contact Ge place under the best GaAs cell. We showed that Ge cells give higher efficiencies than Si when stacked under GaAs.

  13. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  14. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  15. Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

  16. Battery Stack-on Process Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Robert E.

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Imagine yourself in a job in which you stack 10,000 batteries onto a conveyor for eight hours. Each battery weighs about 22 pounds. The work is completed in an acidic environment where temperatures can peak in the summer as high as 100 degrees...

  17. Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEAs Di-Jia Liu proprietary or confidential information #12;Objective To develop a novel aligned carbon nanotube (ACNT/mass transport and thermal conductivity through patterned nanotubes with micrometer-dimension flowfield

  18. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart.

  19. IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in local policy debates about fracking. This In-depth Report from Science for Environment Policy explores

  20. An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Timothy M.

    An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan Abstract We present the first optimal algorithm to compute the maximum Tukey depth (also known as location or halfspace depth , the Tukey depth of a point q IRd is defined as: min{|P | : over all halfspaces containing q}. We

  1. SOFC cells and stacks for complex fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward M. Sabolsky; Matthew Seabaugh; Katarzyna Sabolsky; Sergio A. Ibanez; Zhimin Zhong

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reformed hydrocarbon and coal (syngas) fuels present an opportunity to integrate solid oxide fuel cells into the existing fuel infrastructure. However, these fuels often contain impurities or additives that may lead to cell degradation through sulfur poisoning or coking. Achieving high performance and sulfur tolerance in SOFCs operating on these fuels would simplify system balance of plant and sequestration of anode tail gas. NexTech Materials, Ltd., has developed a suite of materials and components (cells, seals, interconnects) designed for operation in sulfur-containing syngas fuels. These materials and component technologies have been integrated into an SOFC stack for testing on simulated propane, logistic fuel reformates and coal syngas. Details of the technical approach, cell and stack performance is reported.

  2. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen (Pinole, CA)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  3. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: 1) holding individual chips for batch processing, 2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, 3) opening vias in the dielectric, 4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and 5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume.

  4. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malba, V.

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: (1) holding individual chips for batch processing, (2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, (3) opening vias in the dielectric, (4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and (5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume. 3 figs.

  5. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  6. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  7. Thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teske, C.; Jacoby, J.; Schweizer, W.; Wiechula, J. [Plasmaphysics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation has been developed and tested. The stack design includes a free wheeling diode assembly for current reversal. Triggering of the device is achieved by a high side biased, self supplied gate driver unit using gating energy derived from a local snubber network. The structure guarantees a hard firing gate pulse for the required high dI/dt application. A single fiber optic command is needed to achieve a simultaneous turn on of the thyristors. The stack assembly is used for switching a series resonant circuit with a ringing frequency of 30 kHz. In the prototype pulsed power system described here an inductive discharge has been generated with a pulse duration of 120 {mu}s and a pulse energy of 50 J. A maximum power transfer efficiency of 84% and a peak power of 480 kW inside the discharge were achieved. System tests were performed with a purely inductive load and an inductively generated plasma acting as a load through transformer action at a voltage level of 4.1 kV, a peak current of 5 kA, and a current switching rate of 1 kA/{mu}s.

  8. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  9. Transport in PEMFC Stacks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel Processor for'Cell Stacks |in PEMFC

  10. The role of loop stacking in the dynamics of DNA hairpin formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majid Mosayebi; Flavio Romano; Thomas E. Ouldridge; Ard A. Louis; Jonathan P. K. Doye

    2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of DNA hairpin formation using oxDNA, a nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of DNA. In particular, we explore the effects of the loop stacking interactions and non-native base pairing on the hairpin closing times. We find a non-monotonic variation of the hairpin closing time with temperature, in agreement with the experimental work of Wallace et al. [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2001, 98, 5584-5589]. The hairpin closing process involves the formation of an initial nucleus of one or two bonds between the stems followed by a rapid zippering of the stem. At high temperatures, typically above the hairpin melting temperature, an effective negative activation enthalpy is observed because the nucleus has a lower enthalpy than the open state. By contrast, at low temperatures, the activation enthalpy becomes positive mainly due to the increasing energetic cost of bending a loop that becomes increasingly highly stacked as the temperature decreases. We show that stacking must be very strong to induce this experimentally observed behavior, and that the existence of just a few weak stacking points along the loop can substantially suppress it. Non-native base pairs are observed to have only a small effect, slightly accelerating hairpin formation.

  11. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Neutzler, Jay K. (Peoria, AZ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. The fuel distribution manifold is formed from a hydrophilic-like material to redistribute water produced by fuel and oxygen reacting at the cathode. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  12. Cassette less SOFC stack and method of assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meinhardt, Kerry D

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A cassette less SOFC assembly and a method for creating such an assembly. The SOFC stack is characterized by an electrically isolated stack current path which allows welded interconnection between frame portions of the stack. In one embodiment electrically isolating a current path comprises the step of sealing a interconnect plate to a interconnect plate frame with an insulating seal. This enables the current path portion to be isolated from the structural frame an enables the cell frame to be welded together.

  13. Co-flow planar SOFC fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell stack with an integral, internal manifold and a casing/holder to separately seal the cell. This construction improves sealing and gas flow, and provides for easy manifolding of cell stacks. In addition, the stack construction has the potential for an improved durability and operation with an additional increase in cell efficiency. The co-flow arrangement can be effectively utilized in other electrochemical systems requiring gas-proof separation of gases.

  14. Conceptual design report for Project W-420, stack monitoring upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, D.T., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Conceptual Design for the upgrade of seven designated Tank Farm stacks to meet NESHAP Title 40, CFR, Part 61, Sub-part H requirements.

  15. W-026, operational test report isokenetic stack effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottenus, R.J.

    1997-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operational Test Report was performed to assure the Isokinetic Stack Effluent Monitoring System (ISEMS) operates in accordance with system design and specifications.

  16. activation foil stack: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tang, Z; Chou, Weiren; Kostin, Mikhail; Tang, Zhijing 2006-01-01 14 Retrospective radon progeny measurements through measurements of 210 activities on glass objects using stacked...

  17. Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Margaret Wickens; Louis, Renee Pualani

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURE AND RESEARCH JOURNAL 32:3 (2008) 107126 107 Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place MARGARET WICKENS PEARCE AND RENEE PUALANI LOUIS INTRODUCTION Indigenous communities have successfully used Western geospatial technolo- gies (GT... of geog- raphy at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Renee Pualani Louis is Hawaiian and recently completed her doctorate in geography at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii. Published as M. Pearce and R. Louis. Mapping Indigenous depth...

  18. Primal--Dual Algorithms for Data Depth David Bremner, Komei Fukuda, and Vera Rosta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremner, David

    as the generalization of the median of S by Tukey. The computation of the halfspace depth of a point is equivalent as multivariate generalizations of ranks to complement classical multivariate analysis, by Tukey (1974), Oja (1983 out that the halfspace depth of Tukey and the regression depth of Rousseeuw and Hu­ bert have all

  19. OUTPUT-SENSITIVE ALGORITHMS FOR TUKEY DEPTH AND RELATED PROBLEMS David Bremner Dan Chen John Iacono Stefan Langerman Pat Morin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremner, David

    OUTPUT-SENSITIVE ALGORITHMS FOR TUKEY DEPTH AND RELATED PROBLEMS David Bremner Dan Chen John Iacono Stefan Langerman Pat Morin ABSTRACT. The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p with respect to a finite p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions are considered

  20. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, G.T.

    1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  1. FAQs Manhattanville Campus Central Energy Plant Boiler Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    FAQs Manhattanville Campus Central Energy Plant Boiler Stacks Installation Frequently Asked Questions What is happening? Columbia University is installing two (2) boiler stacks on top of the Jerome L, a below-grade facility which will consist four (4) 45,000 lbs/hr steam boilers and related equipment

  2. An Experimental Survey of Energy Management Across the Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that effective parallelization and compiler optimiza- tions have the potential to save far more energy than LinuxAn Experimental Survey of Energy Management Across the Stack Melanie Kambadur Columbia University for energy-efficient computation has spurred research at all levels of the stack, from devices to microarchi

  3. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Stack Air Sampling System Qualification Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents tests that were conducted to verify that the air monitoring system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility ventilation exhaust stack meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of the air sampling probe, sample transport, and stack flow measurement accuracy.

  4. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, George T. (15 Cherry Hills Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An off-gas stack for a melter comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes pervents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  5. Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Reply Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley** & Carl Shapiro*** We argued in our article, Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking,1 that the threat to obtain a permanent injunction can greatly enhance a patent holder's negotiating power, leading to royalty rates that exceed a benchmark level based

  6. Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiser, C.A.; Maricle, D.L.

    1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack. 6 figs.

  7. Field-amplified sample stacking and focusing in nanofluidic channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sustarich, Jess M.; Pennathur, Sumita [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Storey, Brian D. [Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, Needham, Massachusetts 02492 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluidic technology is gaining popularity for bioanalytical applications due to advances in both nanofabrication and design. One major obstacle in the widespread adoption of such technology for bioanalytical systems is efficient detection of samples due to the inherently low analyte concentrations present in such systems. This problem is exacerbated by the push for electronic detection, which requires an even higher sensor-local sample concentration than optical detection. This paper explores one of the most common preconcentration techniques, field-amplified sample stacking, in nanofluidic systems in efforts to alleviate this obstacle. Holding the ratio of background electrolyte concentrations constant, the parameters of channel height, strength of electric field, and concentration are varied. Although in micron scale systems, these parameters have little or no effect on the final concentration enhancement achieved, nanofluidic experiments show strong dependencies on each of these parameters. Further, nanofluidic systems demonstrate an increased concentration enhancement over what is predicted and realized in microscale counterparts. Accordingly, a depth-averaged theoretical model is developed that explains these observations and furthermore predicts a novel focusing mechanism that can explain the increased concentration enhancement achieved. Specifically, when the electric double layer is sufficient in size relative to the channel height, negatively charged analyte ions are repelled from negatively charged walls, and thus prefer to inhabit the centerline of the channels. The resulting induced pressure gradients formed due to the high and low electrical conductivity fluids in the channel force the ions to move at a slower velocity in the low-conductivity region, and a faster velocity in the high-conductivity region, leading to focusing. A simple single-channel model is capable of predicting key experimental observations, while a model that incorporates the details of the fluid inlet and outlet ports allows for more detailed comparisons between model and experiment.

  8. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  9. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scaling the passive stack diameter with house size (floora single-story house ventilated by a passive stack with andTable 1: Passive stack diameters scaling with house size

  10. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Balance of Plant and Stack Component Integration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Balance of Plant and Stack Component Integration Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Balance of Plant and Stack Component Integration Presentation by Acumentrics...

  11. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  12. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  13. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  14. Visualization of stacking faults in fcc crystals in plastic deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeshi Kawasaki; Akira Onuki

    2011-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the dynamics of stacking faults in fcc crystals in uniaxial stretching in a Lennard-Jones binary mixture composed of 4096 particles in three dimensions. We visualize stacking faults using a disorder variable $D_j(t)$ for each particle $j$ constructed from local bond order parameters based on spherical harmonics (Steinhardt order parameters). Also introducing a method of bond breakage, we examine how stacking faults are formed and removed by collective particle motions. These processes are relevant in plasticity of fcc crystals.

  15. Fabrication of high gradient insulators by stack compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, John Richardson; Sanders, Dave; Hawkins, Steven Anthony; Norona, Marcelo

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Individual layers of a high gradient insulator (HGI) are first pre-cut to their final dimensions. The pre-cut layers are then stacked to form an assembly that is subsequently pressed into an HGI unit with the desired dimension. The individual layers are stacked, and alignment is maintained, using a sacrificial alignment tube that is removed after the stack is hot pressed. The HGI's are used as high voltage vacuum insulators in energy storage and transmission structures or devices, e.g. in particle accelerators and pulsed power systems.

  16. Assessment of the Revised 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to support the air emissions permit for the 3410 Building, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a series of tests in the exhaust air discharge from the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The objective was to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring meets the applicable regulatory criteria governing such effluent monitoring systems. In particular, the capability of the air sampling probe location to meet the acceptance criteria of ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 , Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities was determined. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks address 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity of tracer particle concentration. Testing was performed to conform to the quality requirements of NQA-1-2000. Fan configurations tested included all fan combinations of any two fans at a time. Most of the tests were conducted at the normal flow rate, while a small subset of tests was performed at a slightly higher flow rate achieved with the laboratory hood sashes fully open. The qualification criteria for an air monitoring probe location are taken from ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 and are paraphrased as follows with key results summarized: 1. Angular FlowThe average air velocity angle must not deviate from the axis of the stack or duct by more than 20. Our test results show that the mean angular flow angles at the center two-thirds of the ducts are smaller than 4.5? for all testing conditions. 2. Uniform Air VelocityThe acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ? 20% across the center two thirds of the area of the stack. Our results show that the COVs of the air velocity across the center two-thirds of the stack are smaller than 2.9% for all testing conditions. 3. Uniform Concentration of Tracer GasesThe uniformity of the concentration of potential contaminants is first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The tracer is injected downstream of the fan outlets and at the junction downstream fan discharges meet. The acceptance criteria are that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. Our test results show that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is < 2.9% for all test conditions and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >6.5%. 4. Uniform Concentration of Tracer ParticlesTracer particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter are used for the second demonstration of concentration uniformity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ? 20% across the center two thirds of the sampling plane. Our test results indicate that the COV of particle concentration is <9.9% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane among all testing conditions. Thus, the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack was determined to meet the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside the bounds described in this report (e.g., exhaust stack velocity changes, relocation of sampling probe, and addition of fans) may require re-testing or re-evaluation to determine compliance.

  17. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Schuster, George J. (Kennewick, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  18. Computing the center of planar point sets Ji r' i Matou sek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matousek, Jiri

    in the plane can be found within the same time bound, and a point of greatest Tukey depth (Tukey median the Tukey depth (or depth for short) of x as the minimum number of points of P contained in a closed depth is called a Tukey median of P . The Tukey median is one of many possible generalizations

  19. Adiabatic Fuel Cell Stack - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T opAddress: ~~. . ~L~CUDA Fortran

  20. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beverly, Claude R. (Paducah, KY); Ernstberger, Harold G. (Paducah, KY)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases.

  1. Progress Update: P&R Reactor Stacks Demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October 2010 progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The demolition of nuclear reactor stacks and filling the reactors with grout to reduce the site footprint.

  2. A liquid water management strategy for PEM fuel cell stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nguyen, Trung; Knobbe, M. W.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a PEM fuel cell stack. Previous experimentation had found, and this experimentation confirms, that one very effective method of achieving proper gas and water management is the use...

  3. An implementation and analysis of a randomized distributed stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Dustin Charles

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an algorithm for a randomized distributed stack, a coded simulator for examining its behavior, and an analysis of data collected from simulations configured to investigate its performance in particular situations...

  4. Progress Update: P&R Reactor Stacks Demolition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    October 2010 progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The demolition of nuclear reactor stacks and filling the reactors with grout to reduce the site footprint.

  5. QR Codes in the Stacks: The Little Project that Could

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bussmann, Jeffra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Largely dependent on QR codes entering and being accepted incontinue to use & embed QR codes until the next technologyQR Codes in the Stacks: The Little Project That Could This

  6. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, E.G.

    1985-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases. 1 fig.

  7. Talking Points

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.security Tag:ResidentialNewTakingPoints

  8. High pressure low heat rate phosphoric acid fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wertheim, R.J.

    1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure phosphoric acid fuel cell stack assembly is described comprising: (a) a stack of fuel cells for producing electricity, the stack including cathode means, anode means, and heat exchange means; (b) means for delivering pressurized air to the cathode means; (c) means for delivering a hydrogen rich fuel gas to the anode means for electrochemically reacting with oxygen in the pressurized air to produce electricity and water; (d) first conduit means connected to the cathode means for exhausting a mixture of oxygen-depleted air and reaction water from the cathode means; (e) second conduit means connected to the first conduit means for delivering a water fog to the first conduit means for entrainment in the mixture of oxygen-depleted air and reaction water to form a two phase coolant having a gaseous air phase and an entrained water droplet phase; (f) means for circulating the coolant to the heat exchange means to cool the stack solely through vaporization of the water droplet phase in the heat exchange means whereby a mixed gas exhaust of air and water vapor is exhausted from the heat exchange means; and (g) means for heating the mixed gas exhaust and delivering the heated mixed gas exhaust at reformer reaction temperatures to an autothermal reformer in the stack assembly for autothermal reaction with a raw fuel to form the hydrogen rich fuel.

  9. Traveling water waves with point vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffer Varholm

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct small-amplitude solitary traveling gravity-capillary water waves with a finite number of point vortices along a vertical line, on finite depth. This is done using a local bifurcation argument. The properties of the resulting waves are also examined: We find that they depend significantly on the position of the point vortices in the water column.

  10. To Stack or Not to Stack: Spectral Energy Distribution Properties of Lya-Emitting Galaxies at z=2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas, Carlos J; Acquaviva, Viviana; Gawiser, Eric; Finkelstein, Steven L; Ciardullo, Robin; Ashby, Matthew L N; Feldmeier, John; Ferguson, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Guaita, Lucia; Hagen, Alex; Koekemoer, Anton; Kurczynski, Peter; Newman, Jeffrey A; Padilla, Nelson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) GOODS-S multi-wavelength catalog to identify counterparts for 20 Lya Emitting (LAE) galaxies at z=2.1. We build several types of stacked Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of these objects. We combine photometry to form average and median flux-stacked SEDs, and postage stamp images to form average and median image-stacked SEDs. We also introduce scaled flux stacks that eliminate the influence of variation in overall brightness. We use the SED fitting code SpeedyMC to constrain the physical properties of individual objects and stacks. Our LAEs at z = 2.1 have stellar masses ranging from 2x10^7 Sollar Masses - 8x10^9 Solar Masses (median = 3x10^8 Solar Masses), ages ranging from 4 Myr to 500 Myr (median =100 Myr), and E(B-V) between 0.02 and 0.24 (median = 0.12). We do not observe strong correlations between Lya equivalent width (EW) and stellar mass, age, or E(B-V). The Lya radiative transfer (q) factors of our sample are pre...

  11. The modeling of RF stacking of protons in the Accumulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Phil S.; /Fermilab /Rochester U.; McGinnis, David P.; Chou, Weiren; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Run2 collider program is terminated in 2009, the present pbar source will be available for other usages. One possible application is to convert the Antiproton Accumulator to a proton accumulator so that the beam power from the Main Injector could be greatly enhanced [1]. The Accumulator has the unique feature of very large momentum acceptance. It is possible to stack 3-4 Booster batches in the longitudinal phase space before transferring them to the Main Injector or Recycler. This note shows the simulation of RF stacking using the code ESME [2].

  12. Predicting temperatures of stacked heat sinks with a shroud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, T.W.; Bajabir, A.A. (Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (USA)); Petrie, D.J. (Eaton Corporation, Milwaukee, WI (USA))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air cooling of enclosed electrical and electronic equipment is a common application for natural convection heat sinks. Space restrictions lead to stacking of the sinks into vertical arrays. A need for mechanical and electrical isolation leads to placement of a shroud over the array. The result is a complicated heat transfer situation. This paper reports on the first step toward development of analytical design procedures for stacked heat sink arrays with a shroud. It explores the use of a one-dimensional model based on available semi-empirical free convection correlations. These correlations do not yield air temperatures within the sink array.

  13. New depths with mobile rig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magee-Poole Drilling Company, a drilling contractor operating out of the south Texas drilling center of Alice, claims it operates the largest mobile drilling rig in the world. That is, it's the only wheel mounted portable rig that drills to 16,000 feet with 4 1/2-inch drill pipe - at least 3000 feet deeper than the previous mobile drilling rig ratings. The unit is designated the Ingersoll-Rand 1500 Series. What's more significant, according to co-owner Don Magee, is that the rig's portability gets the rotary table turning to the right sooner; it drills more footage per year. It rigs up in 1 1/2 days versus 3 to 4 days for a conventional skid type rig normally used at these depths. The unit's compact arrangement, with more components combined into single loads, makes possible its higher mobility. A conventional skid rig might require 25 to 30 truckloads to move the rig components, mud system, fuel and water tank, houses for utilities, storage and crew change, generators, and drill pipe. The new rig moves in anywhere from four to nine loads less. Further, the rig components weigh less without sacrificing durability.

  14. Stack Sizing for Optimal Current Drivability in Subthreshold Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    consuming orders of magnitude less power than in the normal strong-inversion region. The operating frequencyStack Sizing for Optimal Current Drivability in Subthreshold Circuits John Keane, Hanyong Eom, Tae to be a successful alternative when ultra-low power consumption is paramount. However, the characteristics of MOS

  15. SINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman Energy Performance of Buildings Group Energy, Office of Buildings and Community Systems Building Systems Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;2 NOMENCLATURE Neutral level [-]s ELA Effective leakage

  16. Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems DE-FC02-99EE50587 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge in the development of fuel cell system technologies by providing cost and manufacturing analysis. · To develop ­ Presented results to the fuel cell industry for feedback and incorporated this into a revised baseline cost

  17. Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohac, C.E.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. Energy Economizer for Low Temperature Stack Gas: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipton, J. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it to preheat air for boiler operation. The system incorporated a heat pipe heat exchanger flanged in a stack by-pass loop that would efficiently capture and transfer heat at low temperature differences (?T 350-5000 F). After reclaiming heat from this source...

  19. Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley** & Carl Shapiro*** We study several interconnected problems that arise under the current U.S. patent system when a patent covers one component using bargaining theory that the threat to obtain a permanent injunction greatly enhances the patent

  20. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for AP-40 exhauster stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Davis, W.E.; Bussell, J.H.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as applied to the AP-40 exhauster stack, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/AP-40 system meets all applicable performance criteria. The contaminant mixing tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the wind tunnel facility, 331-H Building, using a mockup of the actual stack. The particle sample transport tests were conducted by PNNL at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The AP-40 stack is typical of several 10-in. diameter stacks that discharge the filtered ventilation air from tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles. Unrelated to the performance criteria, it was found that the record sample filter holder exhibited symptoms of sample bypass around the particle collection filter. This filter holder should either be modified or replaced with a different type. 10 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY: STACKED IMAGES AND CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwyn, Stephen D. J., E-mail: Stephen.Gwyn@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Canadian Astronomy Data Centre, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the image stacks and catalogs of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey produced using the MegaPipe data pipeline at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre. The Legacy Survey is divided into two parts. The Deep Survey consists of four fields each of 1 deg{sup 2}, with magnitude limits (50% completeness for point sources) of u = 27.5, g = 27.9, r = 27.7, i = 27.4, and z = 26.2. It contains 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} sources. The Wide Survey consists of 150 deg{sup 2} split over four fields, with magnitude limits of u = 26.0, g = 26.5, r = 25.9, i = 25.7, and z = 24.6. It contains 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} sources. This paper describes the calibration, image stacking, and catalog generation process. The images and catalogs are available on the web through several interfaces: normal image and text file catalog downloads, a 'Google Sky' interface, an image cutout service, and a catalog database query service.

  2. Carbon/Ternary Alloy/Carbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CarbonTernary AlloyCarbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical Data Storage Medium to Potentially Replace Magnetic Tape. CarbonTernary AlloyCarbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an...

  3. Three-dimensional nanostructures fabricated by stacking pre-patterned monocrystalline silicon nanomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucetola, Corey Patrick

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers the viability of nanomembrane handling and stacking approaches to enable the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nano-structured materials. Sequentially stacking previously-patterned membranes to ...

  4. Design, fabrication and testing of a stacked variable-reluctance motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Kai, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of variable-reluctance motor with axially stacked stator and rotor plates is explored in this thesis. This stacked variable-reluctance motor (SVRM) has mechanically parallel air gaps, carrying magnetic flux in ...

  5. Cell Equalization In Battery Stacks Through State Of Charge Estimation Polling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    stack storage capacity, shortening the battery lifetime and, eventually, permanently damaging the cellsCell Equalization In Battery Stacks Through State Of Charge Estimation Polling Carmelo Speltino but it reduces the computational load of multiple EKF for every cell in the stack. Keywords: Battery Equalization

  6. Modeling and simulation of a reformate supplied PEM fuel cell stack, application to fault detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling and simulation of a reformate supplied PEM fuel cell stack, application to fault detection exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are the main type of fuel cell developed for ground vehicle applications tool for thermal characteristic and fault detection of a PEM fuel cell stack. The fuel cell stack model

  7. Preparation and Characterization of [pi]-Stacking Quinodimethane Oligothiophenes. Predicting Semiconductor Behavior and Bandwidths from Crystal Structures and Molecular Orbital Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janzen, Daron E.; Burand, Michael W.; Ewbank, Paul C.; Pappenfus, Ted M.; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; da Silva, Demetrio A.; Young, Victor G.; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Mann, Kent R. (GIT); (Minnesota); (Toyama)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of new quinodimethane-substituted terthiophene and quaterthiophene oligomers has been investigated for comparison with a previously studied quinoid oligothiophene that has demonstrated high mobilities and ambipolar transport behavior in thin-film transistor devices. Each new quinoidal thiophene derivative shows a reversible one-electron oxidation between 0.85 and 1.32 V, a quasi-reversible one-electron second oxidation between 1.37 and 1.96 V, and a reversible two-electron reduction between -0.05 and -0.23 V. The solution UV-vis-NIR spectrum of each compound is dominated by an intense epsilon congruent with 100,000 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1} low energy pi-pi transition that has a lambda(max) ranging between 648 and 790 nm. All X-ray crystal structures exhibit very planar quinoidal backbones and short intermolecular pi-stacking distances (3.335-3.492 A). Structures exhibit a single pi-stacking distance with parallel cofacial stacking (sulfur atoms of equivalent rings pointed in the same direction) or with alternating distances and antiparallel cofacial stacking (sulfur atoms of equivalent rings pointed in the opposite direction). Examples of the layered and herringbone-packing motifs are observed for both the parallel and the antiparallel cofacial stacking. Analysis of the X-ray structures and molecular orbital calculations indicates that all of these compounds have one-dimensional electronic band structures as a result of the pi-stacking. For structures with a unique pi-stacking distance, a simple geometric overlap parameter calculated from the shape of the molecule and the slip from perfect registry in the pi-stack correlates well with the transfer integrals (t) calculated using molecular orbital theory. The calculated valence (633 meV) and conduction (834 meV) bandwidths for a quinoid quaterthiophene structure are similar to those calculated for the benchmark pentacene and indicate that both hole and electron mobilities could be significant.

  8. Stacking-dependent electronic structure of bilayer silicene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Huixia; Zhang, Jin; Ding, Zijing; Li, Hui, E-mail: huili8@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn; Meng, Sheng, E-mail: huili8@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bilayer silicene (BLS) is a class of material that possibly holds both topological and superconducting properties; however, its structure is not fully understood. By scanning stacking modes and lattice constants using first principles calculations, several meta-stable configurations are identified, including a slightly faulted-AA packing structure, named slide-2AA. Different from the metallic properties of conventional AA and AB stacking forms, band structure of slide-2AA bilayer presents a sizeable indirect energy gap of ?1.16?eV. A metal-semiconductor phase transition along the sliding pathway with a small energy barrier is also observed, indicating its electronic properties can be easily tuned by applying small shear force along the BLS surface plane. Such unique quantitative relationship of structure and electronic properties has profound implications in nanoelectronics and electromechanical devices.

  9. Controllable stacked disk morphologies of charged diblock copolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Monojoy [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to demonstrate the controlled stacking of charged block copolymer disk morphologies that can be obtained under certain thermodynamic conditions. We examine a partially charged block copolymer where 75% of the blocks are neutral and 25% of the blocks are charged. The presence of strong electrostatic interactions promotes charge agglomeration thereby changing morphologies in these systems. This study relates different thermodynamic quantities for which disk-like stackings can be obtained. The long-range order can be sustained even if hydrophobicity is increased albeit with lower dimensional structures. Our simulation results agree very well with recent experiments and are consistent with theoretical observations of counterion adsorption on flexible polyelectrolytes.

  10. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  11. Scaled Tests and Modeling of Effluent Stack Sampling Location Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barnett, J. M.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code to evaluate the mixing at a sampling system location of a research and development facility. The facility requires continuous sampling for radioactive air emissions. Researchers sought to determine whether the location would meet the criteria for uniform air velocity and contaminant concentration as prescribed in the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standard, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requires that the sampling location be well-mixed and stipulates specific tests (e.g., velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity and cyclonic flow angle) to verify the extent of mixing.. The exhaust system for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory was modeled with a CFD code to better understand the flow and contaminant mixing and to predict mixing test results. The CFD results were compared to actual measurements made at a scale-model stack and to the limited data set for the full-scale facility stack. Results indicated that the CFD code provides reasonably conservative predictions for velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity. Cyclonic flow predicted by the code is less than that measured by the required methods. In expanding from small to full scale, the CFD predictions for full-scale measurements show similar trends as in the scale model and no unusual effects. This work indicates that a CFD code can be a cost-effective aid in design or retrofit of a facilitys stack sampling location that will be required to meet Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999.

  12. Availability Analysis of the Ventilation Stack CAM Interlock System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, J

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ventilation Stack Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) Interlock System failure modes, failure frequencies, and system availability have been evaluated for the RPP. The evaluation concludes that CAM availability is as high as assumed in the safety analysis and that the current routine system surveillance is adequate to maintain this availability credited in the safety analysis, nor is such an arrangement predicted to significantly improve system availability.

  13. Abstract--The five point method (FPM) for approximating Laplacian potentials sharply attenuates the potentials due to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besio, Walter G.

    characteristics of the FPM and nine point method (NPM) since the nine points cover more space than the five points. As a result the FPM and NPM behave differently for a dipole source at any specific depth giving rise

  14. Evaluation of a stack: A concrete chimney with brick liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R.; Amin, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, West Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200 ft. tall stack, consisting of a concrete chimney with an independent acid proof brick liner built in the 1950`s, serving the Separations facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), was evaluated for the performance category 3 (PC3) level of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) effects. The inelastic energy absorption capacity of the concrete chimney was considered in the evaluation of the earthquake resistance, in particular, to compute the F{sub {mu}} factor. The calculated value of F{sub {mu}} exceeded 3.0, while the seismic demand for the PC3 level, using an F{sub {mu}} value of 1.5, was found to be less than the capacity of the concrete chimney. The capacity formulation of ACI 307 was modified to incorporate the effect of an after design opening on the tension side. There are considerable uncertainties in determining the earthquake resistance of the independent brick liner. The critical liner section, located at the bottom of the breeching opening, does not meet the current recommendations. A discussion is provided for the possible acceptable values for the ``Moment Reduction Factor``, R{sub w} or F{sub {mu}} for the liner. Comments are provided on the comparison of stack demands using response spectra (RS) versus time history (TH) analysis, with and without soil structure interaction (SSI) effects.

  15. Improved Stack-Slide Searches for Gravitational-Wave Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curt Cutler; Iraj Gholami; Badri Krishnan

    2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate and optimize a computational search strategy for detecting gravitational waves from isolated, previously-unknown neutron stars (that is, neutron stars with unknown sky positions, spin frequencies, and spin-down parameters). It is well known that fully coherent searches over the relevant parameter-space volumes are not computationally feasible, and so more computationally efficient methods are called for. The first step in this direction was taken by Brady & Creighton (2000), who proposed and optimized a two-stage, stack-slide search algorithm. We generalize and otherwise improve upon the Brady-Creighton scheme in several ways. Like Brady & Creighton, we consider a stack-slide scheme, but here with an arbitrary number of semi-coherent stages and with a coherent follow-up stage at the end. We find that searches with three semi-coherent stages are significantly more efficient than two-stage searches (requiring about 2-5 times less computational power for the same sensitivity) and are only slightly less efficient than searches with four or more stages. We calculate the signal-to-noise ratio required for detection, as a function of computing power and neutron star spin-down-age, using our optimized searches.

  16. Final Report - MEA and Stack Durability for PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yandrasits, Michael A.

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are expected to change the landscape of power generation over the next ten years. For this to be realized one of the most significant challenges to be met for stationary systems is lifetime, where 40,000 hours of operation with less than 10% decay is desired. This project conducted fundamental studies on the durability of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and fuel cell stack systems with the expectation that knowledge gained from this project will be applied toward the design and manufacture of MEAs and stack systems to meet DOEs 2010 stationary fuel cell stack systems targets. The focus of this project was PEM fuel cell durability understanding the issues that limit MEA and fuel cell system lifetime, developing mitigation strategies to address the lifetime issues and demonstration of the effectiveness of the mitigation strategies by system testing. To that end, several discoveries were made that contributed to the fundamental understanding of MEA degradation mechanisms. (1) The classically held belief that membrane degradation is solely due to end-group unzipping is incorrect; there are other functional groups present in the ionomer that are susceptible to chemical attack. (2) The rate of membrane degradation can be greatly slowed or possibly eliminated through the use of additives that scavenge peroxide or peroxyl radicals. (3) Characterization of GDL using dry gases is incorrect due to the fact that fuel cells operate utilizing humidified gases. The proper characterization method involves using wet gas streams and measuring capillary pressure as demonstrated in this project. (4) Not all Platinum on carbon catalysts are created equally the major factor impacting catalyst durability is the type of carbon used as the support. (5) System operating conditions have a significant impact of lifetime the lifetime was increased by an order of magnitude by changing the load profile while all other variables remain the same. (6) Through the use of statistical lifetime analysis methods, it is possible to develop new MEAs with predicted durability approaching the DOE 2010 targets. (7) A segmented cell was developed that extend the resolution from ~ 40 to 121 segments for a 50cm2 active area single cell which allowed for more precise investigation of the local phenomena in a operating fuel cell. (8) The single cell concept was extended to a fuel size stack to allow the first of its kind monitoring and mapping of an operational fuel cell stack. An internal check used during this project involved evaluating the manufacturability of any new MEA component. If a more durable MEA component was developed in the lab, but could not be scaled-up to high speed, high volume manufacturing, then that component was not selected for the final MEA-fuel cell system demonstration. It is the intent of the team to commercialize new products developed under this project, but commercialization can not occur if the manufacture of said new components is difficult or if the price is significantly greater than existing products as to make the new components not cost competitive. Thus, the end result of this project is the creation of MEA and fuel cell system technology that is capable of meeting the DOEs 2010 target of 40,000 hours for stationary fuel cell systems (although this lifetime has not been demonstrated in laboratory or field testing yet) at a cost that is economically viable for the developing fuel cell industry. We have demonstrated over 2,000 hours of run time for the MEA and system developed under this project.

  17. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  18. Source depth for solar p-modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

    2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretically calculated power spectra are compares with observed solar p-mode velocity power spectra over a range of mode degree and frequency. The depth for the sources responsible for exciting p-modes of frequency 2.0 mHz is determined from the asymmetry of their power spectra and found to be about 800 km below the photosphere for quadrupole sources and 150 km if sources are dipole. The source depth for high frequency oscillations of frequency greater than about 6 mHz is 180 (50) km for quadrupole (dipole) sources.

  19. Fabrication of submicron La$_{2-x}$Sr$_{x}$CuO$_{4}$ intrinsic Josephson junction stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kubo, Yuimaru; Tanaka, Takayoshi; Ueda, Shinya; Ishii, Satoshi; Tsuda, Shunsuke; Islam, A T M Nazmul; Tanaka, Isao; Takano, Yoshihiko; 10.1063/1.3544037

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stacks of cuprate superconductors have potential to be implemented as intrinsic phase qubits working at relatively high temperatures. We report success in fabricating submicron La$_{2-x}$Sr$_{x}$CuO$_{4}$ (LSCO) IJJ stacks carved out of single crystals. We also show a new fabrication method in which argon ion etching is performed after focused ion beam etching. As a result, we obtained an LSCO IJJ stack in which resistive multi-branches appeared. It may be possible to control the number of stacked IJJs with an accuracy of a single IJJ by developing this method.

  20. U-207: Pidgin 'mxit_show_message()' Function Stack-Based Buffer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pidgin Multiple Vulnerabilities T-527: OpenSC Smart Card Serial Number Multiple Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities U-202: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities...

  1. Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pat

    Absolute Approximation of Tukey Depth: Theory and Experiments Dan Chen School of Computer Science¨ur Theoretische Informatik Abstract A Monte Carlo approximation algorithm for the Tukey depth problem in high. Keywords: Tukey depth, computational geometry 1. Introduction Tukey depth is also known as location depth

  2. Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Jo Ann

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed...

  3. Exocentric pointing in depth Jan J. Koenderink *, Andrea J. van Doorn, Astrid M.L. Kappers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, James T.

    , Michelle J.A. Doumen, James T. Todd Department of Physics & Astronomy, Buys Ballot Laboratory, Utrecht him took it for granted (Foley, 1972; Suppes, 1977; Wagner, 1985; Zajaczkowska, 1956). One of the cen for a ``contextual geome- try'' (Ehrenstein, 1977; Foley, 1972; Suppes, 1977) or even for a ``momentary geometry

  4. Depth and Depth-Color Coding using Shape-Adaptive Wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Minh N.

    -view autostereoscopic displays, 3D-TV is expected to be the next evolution of television after high definition. Three Abstract We present a novel depth and depth-color codec aimed at free-viewpoint 3D-TV. The proposed codec is implemented by shape-adaptive lifting, which enables fast computations and perfect reconstruction. We derive

  5. Africa Aerosol Optical Depth Obtained From MISR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    OpticalDepth Central African Republic Chad Djibouti Egypt Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa Ethiopia Libya Kenya Somalia Sudan Uganda #12;Southern Africa 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Mean Seasonal

  6. Collision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    ; compute distances between the obstacles and the robot; optionally project the results in the CartesianCollision Avoidance in Depth Space I. INTRODUCTION When humans and robots share the same work space, safety is the primary issue of concern [8]. Secondary but not negligible is to prevent robot damages due

  7. Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Keri Marie

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

  8. FEASIBILITY OF A STACK INTEGRATED SOFC OPTICAL CHEMICAL SENSOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed during the UCR Innovative Concepts phase I program was designed to demonstrate the chemical sensing capabilities of nano-cermet SPR bands at solid oxide fuel cell operating conditions. Key to this proposal is that the materials choice used a YSZ ceramic matrix which upon successful demonstration of this concept, will allow integration directly onto the SOFC stack. Under the Innovative Concepts Program the University at Albany Institute for Materials (UAIM)/UAlbany School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering synthesized, analyzed and tested Pa, and Au doped YSZ nano-cermets as a function of operating temperature and target gas exposure (hydrogen, carbon monoxide and 1-dodecanethiol). During the aforementioned testing procedure the optical characteristics of the nano-cermets were monitored to determine the sensor selectivity and sensitivity.

  9. Vibration-based energy harvesting with stacked piezoelectrets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pondrom, P., E-mail: ppondrom@nt.tu-darmstadt.de [Institute for Telecommunications Technology, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany); System Reliability and Machine Acoustics SzM, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Magdalenenstr. 4, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Hillenbrand, J.; Sessler, G. M. [Institute for Telecommunications Technology, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Bs, J.; Melz, T. [System Reliability and Machine Acoustics SzM, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Magdalenenstr. 4, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration-based energy harvesters with multi-layer piezoelectrets (ferroelectrets) are presented. Using a simple setup with nine layers and a seismic mass of 8?g, it is possible to generate a power up to 1.3?W at 140?Hz with an input acceleration of 1g. With better coupling between seismic mass and piezoelectret, and thus reduced damping, the power output of a single-layer system is increased to 5?W at 700?Hz. Simulations indicate that for such improved setups with 10-layer stacks, utilizing seismic masses of 80?g, power levels of 0.1 to 1 mW can be expected below 100?Hz.

  10. Neutral-ionic transitions in organic mixed-stack compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruinsma, R.; Bak, P.; Torrance, J.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Torrance et al. have made the interesting observation that several mixed-stack organic compounds undergo transitions from neutral states to ionic states as the temperature or pressure is varied. We examine a simple model of such transitions including Coulomb interaction and hybridization of neutral and ionic states. In the limit of weak hybridization and long-range repulsive interaction between ionic planes, it is proven that there is a complete devil's staircase where the degree of ionicity assumes an infinity of rational values. For attractive interactions between ionic planes, the neutral-ionic transition is shown to be first order for weak hybridization. Comparison with experiment indicates that this situation applies to tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) chloranil. For strong hybridization the transition is continuous but goes through a metallic phase. It is shown, for the first time, that the spectrum of the charge-transfer Hamiltonian contains both a bound spectrum, the observed charge-transfer excitations, and a continuum.

  11. A novel micro-Raman technique to detect and characterize 4H-SiC stacking faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piluso, N., E-mail: nicolo.piluso@imm.cnr.it; Camarda, M.; La Via, F. [IMM-CNR, stradale primo sole, 50, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel Micro-Raman technique was designed and used to detect extended defects in 4H-SiC homoepitaxy. The technique uses above band-gap high-power laser densities to induce a local increase of free carriers in undoped epitaxies (n?stacking faults; the obtained morphologies were found to be in excellent agreement with those provided by standard photoluminescence techniques. The results show that the detection of defects via i-LOPC spectroscopy is totally independent from the stacking fault photoluminescence signals that cover a large energy range up to 0.7?eV, thus allowing for a single-scan simultaneous determination of any kind of stacking fault. Combining the i-LOPC method with the analysis of the transverse optical mode, the micro-Raman characterization can determine the most important properties of unintentionally doped film, including the stress status of the wafer, lattice impurities (point defects, polytype inclusions) and a detailed analysis of crystallographic defects, with a high spectral and spatial resolution.

  12. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in...

  13. Vertically Loaded Anchor: Drag Coefficient, Fall Velocity, and Penetration Depth using Laboratory Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cenac, William

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    anchor point. Values such as drag coefficient and terminal velocity are vital in predicting embedment depth to obtain the mooring capacity required by the floating facility. Two scaled models of the Mark I OMNI-Max anchor were subjected to a series...

  14. Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices Michael) 23 October 2008 Abstract We develop a fundamental model for spot electricity prices, based prices with observed data. Keywords: electricity, bid stack, fundamental, margin, demand, natural gas 1

  15. Analysis of free-space optical interconnects for the three-dimensional optoelectronic stacked processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esener, Sadik C.

    Analysis of free-space optical interconnects for the three-dimensional optoelectronic stacked of free-space optical interconnect for the three-dimensional optoelectronic stacked processor (3DOESP) has VLSI; Optoelectronics; VCSELs 1. Introduction Current electronic interconnection technology cannot keep

  16. Fluxon Dynamics and Radiation Emission in Twofold Long Josephson Junction Stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo, Degiorgi

    Fluxon Dynamics and Radiation Emission in Twofold Long Josephson Junction Stacks Andreas Wallraff¨ulich (KFA) January 27, 1997 #12;#12; Contents Introduction 1 1 Basic properties of Josephson junctions 5 2 Electrodynamics in long Josephson junctions 11 3 Radiation emission by stacked flux­flow oscillators 29 1

  17. Journal of Power Sources 167 (2007) 1117 Voltage reversal during microbial fuel cell stack operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Power Sources 167 (2007) 1117 Voltage reversal during microbial fuel cell stack February 2007; accepted 9 February 2007 Available online 20 February 2007 Abstract Microbial fuel cells Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Microbial fuel cell; Voltage reversal; Stack; Direct electron

  18. First-principles calculations of twin-boundary and stacking-fault energies in magnesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    First-principles calculations of twin-boundary and stacking-fault energies in magnesium Y. Wang and stacking faults in metal magnesium have been calculated using first-principles supercell approach. Four. Keywords: Magnesium; Interfaces; Twinning; First-principles calculation Magnesium alloys are increasingly

  19. AURORA Program Overview Topic 4A. Transport within the PEM Stack / Transport Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cost High power density (>1.0 W/cm2) Open-flowfield stack Base metals stack architecture Incumbent (%) --- Coolant Inlet temperature --- Flowrate --- Heat Capacity --- Other Parameters --- + Model umidity cell test fixtures have two shortcomings for the program: mass transfer limitations and gradient

  20. A communication stack over PLC for multi physical layer IPv6 Networking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A communication stack over PLC for multi physical layer IPv6 Networking Cedric Chauvenet: Watteco a communication stack for powerline communication (PLC) based on open standards. Our aim is to provide.15.4 standard protocol over PLC. It is constrained by the low-power, lossy and low data-rate context

  1. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Energy and air quality implications of passive stack in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however

  2. X-Ray Production Using Stacked Pyroelectric Crystals Andrew Kovanen, Yaron Danon, Don Gillich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    X-Ray Production Using Stacked Pyroelectric Crystals Andrew Kovanen, Yaron Danon, Don Gillich crystals spaced apart with opposite z-faces across from each other produced x-rays with an endpoint energy by stacking LiTaO3 crystals. This research also investigates how different materials between crystals affect x-ray

  3. Mutual synchronization of two stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors, which naturally realize a stack of Josephson junctions, thus can be used to generate electromagnetic waves in the terahertz region. A plate-like single crystal with 10{sup 4} junctions without cavity resonance was proposed to achieve strong radiation. For this purpose, it is required to synchronize the Josephson plasma oscillation in all junctions. In this work, we propose to use two stacks of junctions shunted in parallel to achieve synchronization. The two stacks are mutually synchronized in the whole IV curve, and there is a phase shift between the plasma oscillation in the two stacks. The phase shift is nonzero when the number of junctions in different stacks is the same, while it can be arbitrary when the number of junctions is different. This phase shift can be tuned continuously by applying a magnetic field when all the junctions are connected by superconducting wires.

  4. Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization of membrane stack configuration for efficient hydrogen production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis 2013 Keywords: Microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell Ammonium bicarbonate Hydrogen reverse electrodialysis (RED) stack into the MEC, which was called a microbial reverse-electrodialysis

  5. Design of Stripline-Fed Dual Polarization Aperture-Coupled Stacked Microstrip Patch Phased Array Antenna for Wideband Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, David G.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    solution for various systems such as traffic control and collision avoidance radar systems. The goal of this work is to design and implement a dual-linear polarization stacked microstrip patch phased array antenna. Single stacked microstrip patch antenna...

  6. CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC POINT AND SPACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC POINT AND SPACE GROUPS Andy Elvin June 10, 2013 #12;Contents Point and Space no reflection axes #12;Cube and Octahedron are dual Symmetries under Oh #12;Space Groups Subgroups of E(3) Point Group + Translation { R | 0 }{ E | t }a = { R | t }a = Ra + t 230 Space Groups 73 symmorphic space

  7. RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: STACK TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X, Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; J. J. Hartvigsen; G. Tao; N. Petigny

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology for efficient sustainable large-scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) are able to utilize high temperature heat and electric power from advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors or renewable sources to generate carbon-free hydrogen at large scale. However, long term durability of SOECs needs to be improved significantly before commercialization of this technology. A degradation rate of 1%/khr or lower is proposed as a threshold value for commercialization of this technology. Solid oxide electrolysis stack tests have been conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate recent improvements in long-term durability of SOECs. Electrolytesupported and electrode-supported SOEC stacks were provided by Ceramatec Inc., Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI), and Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain), respectively for these tests. Long-term durability tests were generally operated for a duration of 1000 hours or more. Stack tests based on technology developed at Ceramatec and MSRI have shown significant improvement in durability in the electrolysis mode. Long-term degradation rates of 3.2%/khr and 4.6%/khr were observed for MSRI and Ceramatec stacks, respectively. One recent Ceramatec stack even showed negative degradation (performance improvement) over 1900 hours of operation. A three-cell short stack provided by St. Gobain, however, showed rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Improvements on electrode materials, interconnect coatings, and electrolyteelectrode interface microstructures contribute to better durability of SOEC stacks.

  8. Test Plan for Long-Term Operation of a Ten-Cell High Temperature Electrolysis Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines a test plan for a long-term (2500 Hour) test of a ten-cell high-temperature electrolysis stack to be performed at INL during FY09 under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This test was originally planned for FY08, but was removed from our work scope as a result of the severe budget cuts in the FY08 NHI Program. The purpose of this test is to evaluate stack performance degradation over a relatively long time period and to attempt to identify some of the degradation mechanisms via post-test examination. This test will be performed using a planar ten-cell Ceramatec stack, with each cell having dimensions of 10 cm 10 cm. The specific makeup of the stack will be based on the results of a series of shorter duration ten-cell stack tests being performed during FY08, funded by NGNP. This series of tests was aimed at evaluating stack performance with different interconnect materials and coatings and with or without brazed edge rails. The best performing stack from the FY08 series, in which five different interconnect/coating/edge rail combinations were tested, will be selected for the FY09 long-term test described herein.

  9. Evaluation of flow fields on bubble removal and system performance in an ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reverse electrodialysis stack Marta C. Hatzell a , Bruce E. Logan b,n a Department of Mechanical form 11 June 2013 Accepted 15 June 2013 Available online 21 June 2013 Keywords: Reverse electrodialysis solution for energy generation in reverse electrodialysis (RED) stacks. However, operating RED stacks

  10. Analysis of NSTX Upgrade OH Magnet and Center Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Zolfaghari, P. Titus, J. Chrzanowski, A. Salehzadeh, F. Dahlgren

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The new ohmic heating (OH) coil and center stack for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) upgrade are required to meet cooling and structural requirements for operation at the enhanced 1 Tesla toroidal field and 2 MA plasma current. The OH coil is designed to be cooled in the time between discharges by water flowing in the center of the coil conductor. We performed resistive heating and thermal hydraulic analyses to optimize coolant channel size to keep the coil temperature below 100 C and meet the required 20 minute cooling time. Coupled electromagnetic, thermal and structural FEA analyses were performed to determine if the OH coil meets the requirements of the structural design criteria. Structural response of the OH coil to its self-field and the field from other coils was analyzed. A model was developed to analyze the thermal and electromagnetic interaction of centerstack components such as the OH coil, TF inner legs and the Bellville washer preload mechanism. Torsional loads from the TF interaction with the OH and poloidal fields are transferred through the TF flag extensions via a torque transfer coupling to the rest of the tokamak structure. A 3D FEA analysis was performed to qualify this design. The results of these analyses, which will be presented in this paper, have led to the design of OH coil and centerstack components that meet the requirements of the NSTX-upgrade structural design criteria.

  11. Pulsar Emission above the Spectral Break - A Stacked Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCann, Andrew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NASA's Fermi space telescope has provided us with a bountiful new population of gamma-ray sources following its discovery of 150 new gamma-ray pulsars. One common feature exhibited by all of these pulsars is the form of their spectral energy distribution, which can be described by a power law followed by a spectral break occurring between $\\sim$1 and $\\sim$8 GeV. The common wisdom is that the break is followed by an exponential cut-off driven by radiation/reaction-limited curvature emission. The discovery of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab pulsar, the only pulsar so far detected at very high energies (E$>$100GeV), contradicts this "cutoff" picture. Here we present a new stacked analysis with an average of 4.2 years of data on 115 pulsars published in the 2nd LAT catalog of pulsars. This analysis is sensitive to low-level $\\sim$100 GeV emission which cannot be resolved in individual pulsars but can be detected from an ensemble.

  12. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  13. System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J; Weissman, Jeffrey G

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for adding sulfur to a reformate stream feeding a fuel cell stack, having a sulfur source for providing sulfur to the reformate stream and a metering device in fluid connection with the sulfur source and the reformate stream. The metering device injects sulfur from the sulfur source to the reformate stream at a predetermined rate, thereby providing a conditioned reformate stream to the fuel cell stack. The system provides a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

  14. A note on finite abelian gerbes over toric Deligne-Mumford stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yunfeng

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Mumford stack are again toric Deligne-Mumford stacks. 1. Introduction Let ? := (N, ?, ?) be a stacky fan of rank(N) = d as defined in [4]. If there are n one-dimensional cones in the fan ?, then modelling the construction of toric varieties [5], [6], the toric....2. From Proposition 4.6 in [3], any Deligne-Mumford stack is a ?-gerbe over an orbifold for a finite group ?. Our results are the toric case of that general result. In particular, given a stacky fan ? = (N, ?, ?), let ?red = (N, ?, ?) be the reduced stacky...

  15. Accurate hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,; Bower, R. W. (Robert W.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique to convert reflection elastic recoil detection analysis spectra to depth profiles, the channel-depth conversion, was introduced by Verda, et al [1]. But the channel-depth conversion does not correct for energy spread, the unwanted broadening in the energy of the spectra, which can lead to errors in depth profiling. A work in progress introduces a technique that corrects for energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, the energy spread correction [2]. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion comprise an accurate and convenient hydrogen depth profiling method.

  16. Novel stacked folded cores for blast-resistant sandwich beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenk, M.; Guest, S. D.; McShane, G. J.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    the hinge lines is likely to be large, and therefore the material will be susceptible to damage and thermal softening in practice. This would in turn influence the compressive strength of the cellular material. However, we opt to omit these details... depth (Dc) and n2 = 25 along the core length (Lc). There are a total of s = 5 layers across the width of the core (Wc), with n3 = 2 pairs of layers A and B (Fig. 1). For a fixed core envelope, specifying the number of unit cells n1, n2 and n3...

  17. Fail-Safe, Inexpensive Electrochemical Device Stack Design - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES6FYRANDOMOverview The Savannah

  18. Air-Breathing Fuel Cell Stack - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011OversupplyPlasmaAir-Breathing Fuel Cell

  19. Sedimentation stacking diagram of binary colloidal mixtures and bulk phases in the plane of chemical potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel de las Heras; Matthias Schmidt

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a full account of a recently proposed theory that explicitly relates the bulk phase diagram of a binary colloidal mixture to its phase stacking phenomenology under gravity [Soft Matter 9, 8636 (2013)]. As we demonstrate, the full set of possible phase stacking sequences in sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium originates from straight lines (sedimentation paths) in the chemical potential representation of the bulk phase diagram. From the analysis of various standard topologies of bulk phase diagrams, we conclude that the corresponding sedimentation stacking diagrams can be very rich, even more so when finite sample height is taken into account. We apply the theory to obtain the stacking diagram of a mixture of nonadsorbing polymers and colloids. We also present a catalog of generic phase diagrams in the plane of chemical potentials in order to facilitate the practical application of our concept, which also generalizes to multi component mixtures.

  20. Limestone/adipic acid FGD and stack opacity reduction pilot plant tests at Big Rivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laslo, D.; Bakke, E.; Chisholm, E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big Rivers Electric Corporation (BREC) contracted Peabody Process Systems, Inc. (PPSI) to install a flue gas cleaning (FGC) pilot plant at the BREC R.D. Green Station Unit No. 2 located at Sebree, KY. A six month test program was completed demonstrating technology for: alternatives to using lime as an alkali; methods for improving cake dewatering; identification of the causes of high stack opacity; and methods for the reduction of high stack opacity. This paper presents highlights extracted from the reports submitted by PPSI to BREC on this test program. BREC was primarily interested in reduction of operating costs, if possible, by using an alkali less expensive than lime, and by improving the poor dewatering characteristic inherent in a dolomitic lime system. BREC was also within compliance for particulate emissions and opacity in the duct after the dry electrostatic precipitator, but not in compliance with the stack opacity regulation, and therefore wanted to investigate methods for stack opacity reduction.

  1. An efficient drive, sensing, and actuation system using PZT stack actuator cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barragn, Patrick R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PZT cellular actuator developed in the MIT d'Arbeloff Laboratory utilizes small-strain, high-force PZT stack actuators in a mechanical flexure system to produce a larger-strain, lower-force actuator useful in robotic ...

  2. Thermal and Electrochemical Performance of a High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. O'Brien; C. Stoots; G. Hawkes; J. Hartvigsen

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. We are conducting a progression of electrolysis stack testing activities, at increasing scales, along with a continuation of supporting research activities in the areas of materials development, single-cell testing, detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and systems modeling. This paper will present recent experimental results obtained from testing of planar solid-oxide stacks operating in the electrolysis mode. The hydrogen-production and electrochemical performance of these stacks will be presented, over a range of operating conditions. In addition, internal stack temperature measurements will be presented, with comparisons to computational fluid dynamic predictions.

  3. An evaluation of parallel optimization for OpenSolaris Network Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Hongbo; Wu, Wenji; /Fermilab; Sun, Xian-He; /IIT, Chicago; DeMar, Phil; Crawford, Matt; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computing is now shifting towards multiprocessing. The fundamental goal of multiprocessing is improved performance through the introduction of additional hardware threads or cores (referred to as 'cores' for simplicity). Modern network stacks can exploit parallel cores to allow either message-based parallelism or connection-based parallelism as a means to enhance performance. OpenSolaris has redesigned and parallelized to better utilize additional cores. Three special technologies, named Softring Set, Soft ring and Squeue are introduced in OpenSolaris for stack parallelization. In this paper, we study the OpenSolaris packet receiving process and its core parallelism optimization techniques. Experiment results show that these techniques allow OpenSolaris to achieve better network I/O performance in multiprocessing environments; however, network stack parallelization has also brought extra overheads for system. An effective and efficient network I/O optimization in multiprocessing environments is required to cross all levers of the network stack from network interface to application.

  4. Effect of Hydrogen Inlets on Planar μPEM Fuel Cell Stacks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Jian-liang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Planar μPEM Fuel Cell Stacks are designed and fabricated in-house through a deep UV lithography technique, with SU 8 photoresist used as the microstructure mold (more)

  5. Photonic band gap of a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yuancheng [Ames Laboratory; Wei, Zeyong [Tongji University; Li, Hongqiang [Tongji University; Chen, Hong [Tongji University; Soukoulis, Costas M [Ames Laboratory

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we present a mechanism for tailoring the photonic band structure of a quarter-wave stack without changing its physical periods by embedding conductive sheets. Graphene is utilized and studied as a realistic, two-dimensional conductive sheet. In a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack, the synergic actions of Bragg scattering and graphene conductance contributions open photonic gaps at the center of the reduced Brillouin zone that are nonexistent in conventional quarter-wave stacks. Such photonic gaps show giant, loss-independent density of optical states at the fixed lower-gap edges, of even-multiple characteristic frequency of the quarter-wave stack. The conductive sheet-induced photonic gaps provide a platform for the enhancement of light-matter interactions.

  6. Contemporary Trends power point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nalbandian, John

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power point slides guiding presentation on closing the gap between political acceptability and administrative sustainability as a prerequisite for effective governance. Leadership challenges are described

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for cancer and infectious disease biomarkers in human biological samples * Point-of-Care diagnostics amenable to health clinics and field sensing applications * Integrated...

  8. Parametric wear tests for drilling in thermoplastic fiber composites/metal stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hriscu, Iosif

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the study traditional tool wear tests were conducted on stacks of thermoplastic composite (APC2/PEEK) over aluminum and titanium backup re- spectively. The variables measured were thrust force, torque, tool wear, hole diameter variation, and burr height.... Another conclusion is that the level of thrust force can possibly predict the drill bit wear in the case of composite/titanium stack. The results of the wear tests were applied in a machining optimization program by Hough and Chang (1990). Overall...

  9. Feasibility of an alpha particle gas densimeter for stack sampling applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Randall Mark

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEASIBILITY OF AN ALPHA PARTICLE GAS DENSIMETER FOR STACK SAMPLING APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RANDALL ~ JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May l983 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering FEASIBILITY OF AN ALPHA PARTICLE GAS DENSIMETER FOR STACK SAMPLING APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RANDALL MARK JO HN SON Approved as to style and content by: Ro ert A. F3e d (Ch irman of Committee...

  10. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. A central objective of a LANL/Industry collaborative effort supported by the Hydrogen Program is to integrate PEM fuel cell and novel stack designs at LANL with stack technology of H-Power Corporation (H-Power) in order to develop a manufacturable, low-cost/high-performance hydrogen/air fuel cell stack for stationary generation of electric power. A LANL/H-Power CRADA includes Tasks ranging from exchange, testing and optimization of membrane-electrode assemblies of large areas, development and demonstration of manufacturable flow field, backing and bipolar plate components, and testing of stacks at the 3-5 cell level and, finally, at the 4-5 kW level. The stack should demonstrate the basic features of manufacturability, overall low cost and high energy conversion efficiency. Plans for future work are to continue the CRADA work along the time line defined in a two-year program, to continue the LANL activities of developing and testing stainless steel hardware for longer term stability including testing in a stack, and to further enhance air cathode performance to achieve higher energy conversion efficiencies as required for stationary power application.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Collie, Jeffrey C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

  13. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

  14. Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barclay, David Readshaw

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical noise directional density function versus depth. 93 Measured and acoustically estimated wind speeds.

  15. Overview o floating point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biagioni, Edoardo S.

    condition codes and branches are same as for single-precision o absolute value and negation can Co-processor o Integer, BCD, and floating point representations o floating point have sign instructions) or even popped twice (FCOMPP) o tests set condition codes: - C0: less or unordered

  16. Modeling the Air Flow in the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Barnett, J. M.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional ventilation capacity has been designed for the 3410 Building filtered exhaust stack system. The updated system will increase the number of fans from two to three and will include ductwork to incorporate the new fan into the existing stack. Stack operations will involve running various two-fan combinations at any given time. The air monitoring system of the existing two-fan stack was previously found to be in compliance with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, however it is not known if the modified (three-fan) system will comply. Subsequently, a full-scale three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the modified stack system has been created to examine the sampling location for compliance with the standard. The CFD modeling results show good agreement with testing data collected from the existing 3410 Building stack and suggest that velocity uniformity and flow angles will remain well within acceptance criteria when the third fan and associated ductwork is installed. This includes two-fan flow rates up to 31,840 cfm for any of the two-fan combinations. For simulation cases in which tracer gas and particles are introduced in the main duct, the model predicts that both particle and tracer gas coefficients of variance (COVs) may be larger than the acceptable 20 percent criterion of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard for each of the two-fan, 31,840 cfm combinations. Simulations in which the tracers are introduced near the fans result in improved, though marginally acceptable, COV values for the tracers. Due to the remaining uncertainty that the stack will qualify with the addition of the third fan and high flow rates, a stationary air blender from Blender Products, Inc. is considered for inclusion in the stack system. A model of the air blender has been developed and incorporated into the CFD model. Simulation results from the CFD model that includes the air blender show striking improvements in tracer gas mixing and tracer particle dispersion. The results of these simulations suggest the air blender should be included in the stack system to ensure qualification of the stack.

  17. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the worlds first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STARs spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  18. Assessment of the Group 5-6 (LB C2, LB S2, LV S1) Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on a series of tests to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 5-6 exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LB-C2, LV-S1, and LB S2 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 5-6) because the common factor in their design is that the last significant flow disturbance upstream of the air sampling probe is a reduction in duct diameter. Federal regulations( ) require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The testing on scale models of the stacks conducted for this project was part of the River Protection ProjectWaste Treatment Plant Support Program under Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 according to the statement of work issued by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI, 24590-QL-SRA-W000-00101, N13.1-1999 Stack Monitor Scale Model Testing and Qualification, Revision 1, 9/12/2007) and Work Authorization 09 of Memorandum of Agreement 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task is 53024, Work for Hanford Contractors Stack Monitoring. The testing described in this document was further guided by the Test Plan Scale Model Testing the Waste Treatment Plant LB-C2, LB-S2, and LV-S1 (Test Group 5-6) Stack Air Sampling Positions (TP-RPP-WTP-594). The tests conducted by PNNL during 2009 and 2010 on the Group 5-6 scale model systems are described in this report. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross-section at the designed sampling probe locations and at five duct diameters up and downstream from the design location to accommodate potential construction variability. The tests were done only at the design sampling probe location on the scale model of LB-S2 because that ductwork was already constructed. The ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 criteria and the corresponding results of the test series on the scale models are summarized in this report.

  19. The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffelfinger, G.S.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

  20. An energy spread correction for ERDA hydrogen depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis called the channel-depth conversion was introduced by Verda, et al.' However, the energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, which causes a broadening in the energy range and leads to errors in depth profiling, was not addressed by this technique. Here we introduce a technique to addresses this problem, called the energy spread correction. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion techniques comprise the depth profiling method presented in this work.

  1. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  2. Some intriguing properties of Tukey's half-space depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Subhajit; Chaudhuri, Probal; 10.3150/10-BEJ322

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For multivariate data, Tukey's half-space depth is one of the most popular depth functions available in the literature. It is conceptually simple and satisfies several desirable properties of depth functions. The Tukey median, the multivariate median associated with the half-space depth, is also a well-known measure of center for multivariate data with several interesting properties. In this article, we derive and investigate some interesting properties of half-space depth and its associated multivariate median. These properties, some of which are counterintuitive, have important statistical consequences in multivariate analysis. We also investigate a natural extension of Tukey's half-space depth and the related median for probability distributions on any Banach space (which may be finite- or infinite-dimensional) and prove some results that demonstrate anomalous behavior of half-space depth in infinite-dimensional spaces.

  3. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    be formatted to fit on 8.5 x 11 inch paper with margins not less than one inch on every side. Use Times New Roman typeface, a black font color, and a font size of 12 point or...

  4. MODIFYING A 60 YEAR OLD STACK SAMPLING SYSTEM TO MEET ANSI N13.1-1999 EQUIVALENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The 291-T-1 stack was constructed in 1944 to support ongoing missions associated with the Hanford Project. Recent changes in the plant mission required a revision to the existing license of the stack that was operating as a minor emission unit. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Health (WDOH) deemed this revision to be a significant modification, thereby requiring the stack to operate to the ANSI N13.1-1999 sampling and monitoring requirements. Because the stack is similar to other stacks on the Hanford site, allowance was made by EPA to demonstrate equivalency to the ANSI standard via calculations in lieu of actual testing. Calculations were allowed for determining the deposition, nozzle transmission and aspiration ratios, but measurements were required for the stack flow coefficient of variation (COV). The equivalency determination was to be based on the requirements of Table 6 of the ANSI N13.1-1999 Standard.

  5. Optimized scalable stack of fluorescent solar concentrator systems with bifacial silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martnez Dez, Ana Luisa, E-mail: a.martinez@itma.es [Fundacin ITMA, Parque Empresarial Principado de Asturias, C/Calafates, Parcela L-3.4, 33417 Avils (Spain); Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Gutmann, Johannes; Posdziech, Janina; Rist, Tim; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Plaza, David Gmez [Fundacin ITMA, Parque Empresarial Principado de Asturias, C/Calafates, Parcela L-3.4, 33417 Avils (Spain)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a concentrator system based on a stack of fluorescent concentrators (FCs) and a bifacial solar cell. Coupling bifacial solar cells to a stack of FCs increases the performance of the system and preserves its efficiency when scaled. We used an approach to optimize a fluorescent solar concentrator system design based on a stack of multiple fluorescent concentrators (FC). Seven individual fluorescent collectors (20?mm??20?mm??2?mm) were realized by in-situ polymerization and optically characterized in regard to their ability to guide light to the edges. Then, an optimization procedure based on the experimental data of the individual FCs was carried out to determine the stack configuration that maximizes the total number of photons leaving edges. Finally, two fluorescent concentrator systems were realized by attaching bifacial silicon solar cells to the optimized FC stacks: a conventional system, where FC were attached to one side of the solar cell as a reference, and the proposed bifacial configuration. It was found that for the same overall FC area, the bifacial configuration increases the short-circuit current by a factor of 2.2, which is also in agreement with theoretical considerations.

  6. Interplay between intrinsic and stacking-fault magnetic domains in bi-layered manganites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, M.A; Burkhardt, Mark H.; Sarkar, S.; Ohldag, H.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Scholl, A.; Young, A.T.; Doran, A.; Dessau, D.S.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J.F.; Durr, H.A.; Stohr, J.

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a low temperature X-ray photoemission electron microscopy study of the bi-layered manganite compound La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} (BL-LSMO) to investigate the influence of stacking faults, which are structurally and magnetically different from the bi-layered host. In BL-LSMO small magnetic moment persists to T* = 300K, well above the Curie temperature of 120K (T{sub C}). Our magnetic images show that 3D stacking faults are responsible for the T* transition. Furthermore, close to the T{sub C}, stacking faults are well coupled to the bi-layered host with latter magnetic domains controlling the spin direction of the stacking faults. Contrary to recent reports, we find that stacking faults do not seed magnetic domains in the host via an exchange spring mechanism and the intrinsic T{sub C} of the BL-LSMO is not lower than 120K.

  7. Resonant electromagnetic emission from intrinsic Josephson-junction stacks with laterally modulated Josephson critical current.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshelev, A. E.; Bulaevskii, L. N.; Materials Science Division; LANL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrinsic Josephson-junction stacks realized in mesas fabricated out of high-temperature superconductors may be used as sources of coherent electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range. The major challenge is to synchronize Josephson oscillations in all junctions in the stack to get significant radiation out of the crystal edge parallel to the c axis. We suggest a simple way to solve this problem via artificially prepared lateral modulation of the Josephson critical current identical in all junctions. In such a stack, phase oscillations excite the in-phase Fiske mode when the Josephson frequency matches the Fiske-resonance frequency which is set by the stack lateral size. The powerful, almost standing electromagnetic wave is excited inside the crystal in the resonance. This wave is homogeneous across the layers, meaning that the oscillations are synchronized in all junctions in the stack. We evaluate behavior of the I-V characteristics and radiated power near the resonance for arbitrary modulation and find exact solutions for several special cases corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric modulations of the critical current.

  8. Material Point Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImports 5.90 4.86 4.77of PolarMaterial

  9. Appendix B - Control Points

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes LaboratoryAntonyaAppeals AppealsU.S.Appendix AUD-2014B

  10. Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    AbstractThe gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature, the most dominating factor of increasing the overall efficiency of the combine cycle power plant is the stack temperature.

  11. Breakthrough Flow Battery Cell Stack: Transformative Electrochemical Flow Storage System (TEFSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    GRIDS Project: UTRC is developing a flow battery with a unique design that provides significantly more power than today's flow battery systems. A flow battery is a cross between a traditional battery and a fuel cell. Flow batteries store their energy in external tanks instead of inside the cell itself. Flow batteries have traditionally been expensive because the battery cell stack, where the chemical reaction takes place, is costly. In this project, UTRC is developing a new stack design that achieves 10 times higher power than todays flow batteries. This high power output means the size of the cell stack can be smaller, reducing the amount of expensive materials that are needed. UTRCs flow battery will reduce the cost of storing electricity for the electric grid, making widespread use feasible.

  12. Identification of critical stacking faults in thin-film CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Su-Hyun; Walsh, Aron, E-mail: a.walsh@bath.ac.uk [Global E3 Institute, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Butler, Keith T. [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Soon, Aloysius [Global E3 Institute, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Abbas, Ali; Walls, John M., E-mail: j.m.wall@loughborough.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology, School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is a p-type semiconductor used in thin-film solar cells. To achieve high light-to-electricity conversion, annealing in the presence of CdCl{sub 2} is essential, but the underlying mechanism is still under debate. Recent evidence suggests that a reduction in the high density of stacking faults in the CdTe grains is a key process that occurs during the chemical treatment. A range of stacking faults, including intrinsic, extrinsic, and twin boundary, are computationally investigated to identify the extended defects that limit performance. The low-energy faults are found to be electrically benign, while a number of higher energy faults, consistent with atomic-resolution micrographs, are predicted to be hole traps with fluctuations in the local electrostatic potential. It is expected that stacking faults will also be important for other thin-film photovoltaic technologies.

  13. Determination of Fire Enviroment in Stacked Cargo Containers with Radioactive Materials Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arviso, M.; Bobbe, J.G.; Dukart, R.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a Fire Test with a three-by-three stack of standard 6 m long International Standards Organization shipping containers containing combustible fuels and empty radioactive materials packages are reported and discussed. The stack is intended to simulate fire conditions that could occur during on-deck stowage on container cargo ships. The fire is initated by locating the container stack adjacent to a 9.8 x 6 m pool fire. Temperatures of both cargoes (empty and simulated radioactive materials packages) and containers are recorded and reported. Observations on the duration, intensity and spread of the fire are discussed. Based on the results, models for simulation of fire exposure of radioactive materials packages in such fires are suggested.

  14. 4 kW Test of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new test stand has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for multi-kW testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. This test stand will initially be operated at the 4 KW scale. The 4 kW tests will include two 60-cell stacks operating in parallel in a single hot zone. The stacks are internally manifolded with an inverted-U flow pattern and an active area of 100 cm2 per cell. Process gases to and from the two stacks are distributed from common inlet/outlet tubing using a custom base manifold unit that also serves as the bottom current collector plate. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells and electrode gases. Sealing is accomplished with compliant mica-glass seals. A spring-loaded test fixture is used for mechanical stack compression. Due to the power level and the large number of cells in the hot zone, process gas flow rates are high and heat recuperation is required to preheat the cold inlet gases upstream of the furnace. Heat recuperation is achieved by means of two inconel tube-in-tube counter-flow heat exchangers. A current density of 0.3 A/cm2 will be used for these tests, resulting in a hydrogen production rate of 25 NL/min. Inlet steam flow rates will be set to achieve a steam utilization value of 50%. The 4 kW test will be performed for a minimum duration of 1000 hours in order to document the long-term durability of the stacks. Details of the test apparatus and initial results will be provided.

  15. aes depth profile: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California eScholarship Repository Summary: al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical...

  16. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  17. Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen Depth Profiling Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry? Are Cluster Ion Analysis Beams Good Choices for Hydrogen...

  18. Fiber optic coupling of a microlens conditioned, stacked semiconductor laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Mills, Steven T. (Antioch, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The output radiation from the two-dimensional aperture of a semiconductor laser diode array is efficiently coupled into an optical fiber. The two-dimensional aperture is formed by stacking individual laser diode bars on top of another in a "rack and stack" configuration. Coupling into the fiber is then accomplished using individual microlenses to condition the output radiation of the laser diode bars. A lens that matches the divergence properties and wavefront characteristics of the laser light to the fiber optic is used to focus this conditioned radiation into the fiber.

  19. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  20. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  1. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Kachmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  2. Project of Aerosol Optical Depth Change in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Paraguay Uruguay #12;Statistics of Aerosol M ean D ec 01 to 06 Mean Month AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela

  3. Depth, and Motion inVision CMSC 436/636

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Penny

    , perceived depth related #12;Head Motion Parallax Bruce and Green 90, p. 231. Kinetic Depth Effect Bruce displacement) #12;Structure from Motion Bruce and Green 90, pg. 328. #12;Image Segmentation Discontinuities Representation techniques parameters #12;Experimental Findings Control necessary for development Held

  4. SEU sensitive depth in a submicron SRAM technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detcheverry, C.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J. [Univ. Montpellier II (France)] [Univ. Montpellier II (France); Ecoffet, R. [CNES, Toulouse (France)] [CNES, Toulouse (France); Duzellier, S. [DERTS, Toulouse (France)] [DERTS, Toulouse (France); Barak, J.; Lifshitz, Y. [Soreq NRC, Yahvne (Israel)] [Soreq NRC, Yahvne (Israel)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work determines experimentally and by simulation the SEU sensitive depth in a 0.6 {micro}m SRAM technology. A good correlation is obtained between the two studies in the case of heavy ions deposing energy close to the critical energy. Other simulation results complete the first investigation by studying the minimum sensitive depth for ions deposing higher energies (at greater LET).

  5. A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    A Depth Space Approach to Human-Robot Collision Avoidance Fabrizio Flacco Torsten Kr is presented for safe human-robot coexistence. The main contribution is a fast method to evaluate distances between the robot and possibly moving obstacles (including humans), based on the concept of depth space

  6. Can fusion coefficients be calculated from the depth rule ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Kirillov; P. Mathieu; D. Senechal; M. Walton

    1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth rule is a level truncation of tensor product coefficients expected to be sufficient for the evaluation of fusion coefficients. We reformulate the depth rule in a precise way, and show how, in principle, it can be used to calculate fusion coefficients. However, we argue that the computation of the depth itself, in terms of which the constraints on tensor product coefficients is formulated, is problematic. Indeed, the elements of the basis of states convenient for calculating tensor product coefficients do not have a well-defined depth! We proceed by showing how one can calculate the depth in an `approximate' way and derive accurate lower bounds for the minimum level at which a coupling appears. It turns out that this method yields exact results for $\\widehat{su}(3)$ and constitutes an efficient and simple algorithm for computing $\\widehat{su}(3)$ fusion coefficients.

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care

  8. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602099 Competitive Hydrogen Bonding in p-Stacked Oligomers**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochefort, Alain

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602099 Competitive Hydrogen Bonding in p-Stacked Oligomers** By Alain, such as light-emitting diodes, field- effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells.[1] Although such mate- rials by multiple amide functional groups with the ability to form hydrogen bonds.[5] Thus, one can sig- nificantly

  9. Simulations of Quantum Turing Machines by Quantum Multi-Stack Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daowen Qiu

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    As was well known, in classical computation, Turing machines, circuits, multi-stack machines, and multi-counter machines are equivalent, that is, they can simulate each other in polynomial time. In quantum computation, Yao [11] first proved that for any quantum Turing machines $M$, there exists quantum Boolean circuit $(n,t)$-simulating $M$, where $n$ denotes the length of input strings, and $t$ is the number of move steps before machine stopping. However, the simulations of quantum Turing machines by quantum multi-stack machines and quantum multi-counter machines have not been considered, and quantum multi-stack machines have not been established, either. Though quantum counter machines were dealt with by Kravtsev [6] and Yamasaki {\\it et al.} [10], in which the machines count with $0,\\pm 1$ only, we sense that it is difficult to simulate quantum Turing machines in terms of this fashion of quantum computing devices, and we therefore prove that the quantum multi-counter machines allowed to count with $0,\\pm 1,\\pm 2,...,\\pm n$ for some $n>1$ can efficiently simulate quantum Turing machines. Therefore, our mail goals are to establish quantum multi-stack machines and quantum multi-counter machines with counts $0,\\pm 1,\\pm 2,...,\\pm n$ and $n>1$, and particularly to simulate quantum Turing machines by these quantum computing devices.

  10. P0906-090-Chnani Macroscopic Model of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 P0906-090-Chnani Macroscopic Model of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack for Integrating in a Generator fuel cell (SOFC) with the aim to perform a simulation of the whole generator. Three sub-models have at the catalytic sites and gas flows at fuel cell input and output. The electrical response is based

  11. Electric-field-induced plasmon in AA-stacked bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Y.C., E-mail: yingchih.chuang@gmail.com; Wu, J.Y., E-mail: yarst5@gmail.com; Lin, M.F., E-mail: mflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective excitations in AA-stacked bilayer graphene for a perpendicular electric field are investigated analytically within the tight-binding model and the random-phase approximation. Such a field destroys the uniform probability distribution of the four sublattices. This drives a symmetry breaking between the intralayer and interlayer polarization intensities from the intrapair band excitations. A field-induced acoustic plasmon thus emerges in addition to the strongly field-tunable intrinsic acoustic and optical plasmons. At long wavelengths, the three modes show different dispersions and field dependence. The definite physical mechanism of the electrically inducible and tunable mode can be expected to also be present in other AA-stacked few-layer graphenes. -- Highlights: The analytical derivations are performed by the tight-binding model. An electric field drives the non-uniformity of the charge distribution. A symmetry breaking between the intralayer and interlayer polarizations is illustrated. An extra plasmon emerges besides two intrinsic modes in AA-stacked bilayer graphene. The mechanism of a field-induced mode is present in AA-stacked few-layer graphenes.

  12. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  13. Ultra Low Power 2-tier 3D Stacked Sub-threshold H.264 Intra Frame Encoder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Sung Kyu

    longer battery life and do not demand a fast frequency of operation. Sub-threshold cir- cuits beneficial to such unattended sensor networks by extending their battery life. Sub- threshold design helps us in-house tools to handle TSVs and 3D stacking. The standard cells were sized with Cadence Virtuoso

  14. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gard, Eric (San Francisco, CA); Riot, Vincent (Oakland, CA); Coffee, Keith (Diablo Grande, CA); Woods, Bruce (Livermore, CA); Tobias, Herbert (Kensington, CA); Birch, Jim (Albany, CA); Weisgraber, Todd (Brentwood, CA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  15. Impact of local stacking on the graphene-impurity interaction: theory and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Impact of local stacking on the graphene-impurity interaction: theory and experiments F. Hiebel, P (Dated: January 16, 2014) We investigate the graphene-impurity interaction problem by combining impurity model and density functional theory (DFT) calculations - techniques. We use graphene on the Si

  16. Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report 113 V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1 A. High-Performance, Matching PEM Fuel Cell Components and Integrated Pilot Manufacturing Processes Mark K polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell components and pilot manufacturing processes to facilitate

  17. CONTROL-ORIENTED MODEL OF AN INTEGRATED FUEL CELL STACK AND FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    CONTROL-ORIENTED MODEL OF AN INTEGRATED FUEL CELL STACK AND FUEL PROCESSOR SYSTEM 1 Jay T feed to the PEM-FC. Cost and performance requirements of the total powertrain typically lead to highly and conditions. Keywords: Fuel Cell, Fuel Processor, Multivariable Feedback, Linear Control, Partial Oxidation 1

  18. Energy Efficient Single Stack Exhaust Fan Systems (E3S3F)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper first investigates the fan energy performance of a constant air volume exhaust system. Two single stack energy efficient exhaust fan systems (E3S3F) are presented. The E3S3F-I has the static pressure sensor located at the inlet...

  19. Energy-Efficient Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling in 3D Stacked Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    1 Energy-Efficient Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling in 3D Stacked Architectures Ayse K. Coskun , David not fully utilized. Thus, it is not energy-efficient to adjust the coolant flow rate based on the worst-case conditions, as this would cause an excess in pump power. For energy-efficient cooling, we propose a novel

  20. Self-Assembly of Regioregular, Amphiphilic Polythiophenes into Highly Ordered -Stacked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullough, Richard D.

    Self-Assembly of Regioregular, Amphiphilic Polythiophenes into Highly Ordered -Stacked Conjugated of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon UniVersity Pittsburgh, PennsylVania 15213 ReceiVed March 31, 1998 Molecular self-assembly of supramolecular structure. In the area of conjugated (or conducting) organic polymers, self-assembly has been used

  1. A Lock-Free, Concurrent, and Incremental Stack Scanning for Garbage Collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrank, Erez

    A Lock-Free, Concurrent, and Incremental Stack Scanning for Garbage Collectors Gabriel Kliot Bjarne.Steensgaard@microsoft.com Abstract Two major efficiency parameters for garbage collectors collectors with as short as possible pause times. Pause lengths have decreased significantly during the years

  2. Post-test evaluation of oxygen electrodes from solid oxide electrolysis stacks5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    utilizes multiple ceramic cells arranged in ``stacks'', which are identical to solid oxide fuel cell, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 21 April 2008 Received in revised bond layer, which serves to bond the cell to the flow field and inter- connect. This is caused

  3. Efficient light harvesting in multiple-device stacked structure for polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    high efficiency in these polymer PV devices, it is important that the solar radiation is absorbed is solution processed, spincoating multiple layers in tandem can result in significant damage to the bottom on the optical and electrical properties is utilized in our multiple- device stacked structure. The most

  4. Building Application Stack (BAS) Andrew Krioukov, Gabe Fierro, Nikita Kitaev, David Culler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Building Application Stack (BAS) Andrew Krioukov, Gabe Fierro, Nikita Kitaev, David Culler Computer.fierro@berkeley.edu, kitaev@berkeley.edu, culler@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract Many commercial buildings have digital controls, detecting faults, improving comfort, etc. However, buildings are custom designed, lead- ing to differences

  5. Water diffusion and fracture in organosilicate glass film stacks Youbo Lin a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with an analytical model that combines water diffusion with subcritical crack growth. Fracture experi- ments showWater diffusion and fracture in organosilicate glass film stacks Youbo Lin a , Ting Y. Tsui b. OSG is very brittle and it is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking in water

  6. Lanthanum silicate gate dielectric stacks with subnanometer equivalent oxide thickness utilizing an interfacial silica consumption reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Lanthanum silicate gate dielectric stacks with subnanometer equivalent oxide thickness utilizing-8087 Received 13 April 2005; accepted 6 June 2005; published online 26 July 2005 A silicate reaction between process route to interface elimination, while producing a silicate dielectric with a higher temperature

  7. A critical review of cooling techniques in proton exchange membrane fuel cell stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Review A critical review of cooling techniques in proton exchange membrane fuel cell stacks of a cooling system. To promote the development of effective cooling strategies, cooling techniques reported, challenges and progress of various cooling techniques, including (i) cooling with heat spreaders (using high

  8. Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

  9. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drug delivery

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drug delivery8,

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drug delivery8,SWL

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drug

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drugMark Dixson

  15. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drugMark

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drugMark7/2006 1

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drugMark7/2006 1

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drugMark7/2006

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drugMark7/200611

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  1. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of careUpdated Oscillation Results

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  1. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of careUpdated OscillationNuFactEventν

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of careUpdated

  3. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of careUpdated2007 FNAL Users' Meeting

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  6. PowerPoint Presentation

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  7. PowerPoint Presentation

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  9. PowerPoint Presentation

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  10. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of careUpdated2007Supply Chain &th

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point of careUpdated2007Supply Chain &thpH

  12. A point of order 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semjon Adlaj

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A formula expressing a point of order 8 on an elliptic curve, in terms of the roots of the associated cubic polynomial, is given. Doubling such a point yields a point of order 4 distinct from the well-known points of order 4 given in standard references such as "A course of Modern Analysis" by Whittaker and Watson.

  13. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley; Dana A. (New Milford, CT), Farooque; Mohammad (Danbury, CT), Davis; Keith (Southbury, CT)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  14. Variations in microbial community composition through two soil depth profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    35% of the total quantity of microbial biomass found in the top 2 m of soil is found below a depth: Microbial diversity; Phospholipid fatty acid; Soil profile; Community composition; Microbial biomass 1

  15. Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  17. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of silicon supersaturated with sulfur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabbri, Filippo

    We investigate the luminescence of Si supersaturated with S (Si:S) using depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy as the S concentration is varied over 2 orders of magnitude ...

  18. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  19. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facilitys ground-based facilities.

  20. aerosol optical depths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

  1. aerosol optical depth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERONET, AVHRR and 3 MODIS 4 A. Hauser, D. Oesch have been used to 9 retrieve the spatial distribution of aerosol optical depth for 10 central Europe. At eight AERONET sites,...

  2. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepist, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leivisk, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  3. Burial depth and stratigraphic controls on shale diagenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, David Wesley

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - layer illite/smectite in Gulf Coast sediments at a shallow depth is a randomly-interstratified illite/smectite with proportions of 804 smectite and 20% illite (Perry and Hower, 1972). Many authors (Dunoyer de Segonzac, 1970; Perry and Hower, 1970..., 1972; Hower et al. , 1976; Foscolos and Kodama, 1974) have noted the increase in illite with concurrent decrease of smectite in the mixed-layer illite/smec- tite with increasing depth and temperature. The conversion of smectite into illite resulting...

  4. Prediction of sinkage depth of footings on soft marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Shihchieh

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PREDICTION OF SINKAGE DEPTH OF FOOTINGS ON SOFT MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by SHIHCHIEH YEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PREDICTION OF SINKAGE DEPTH OF FOOTINGS ON SOFI' MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by Approved as to style and content by: ayne A. Dunla (Chair of Committee) Derek V. Morr (Member) William R. Bry nt (Member...

  5. 184 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 26, NO. 1, MARCH 2011 PEM Fuel Cell Stack Modeling for Real-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    184 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 26, NO. 1, MARCH 2011 PEM Fuel Cell Stack Modeling membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack itself cannot be used directly as an en- ergy supply and require stack. In addition, fuel cell test costs (hydrogen consumption and the need of safety installations) are still

  6. System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukerjee, Subhasish (Pittsford, NY); Haltiner, Jr., Karl J (Fairport, NY); Weissman, Jeffrey G. (West Henrietta, NY)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack, having a reformer adapted to reform a hydrocarbon fuel stream containing sulfur contaminants, thereby providing a reformate stream having sulfur; a sulfur trap fluidly coupled downstream of the reformer for removing sulfur from the reformate stream, thereby providing a desulfurized reformate stream; and a metering device in fluid communication with the reformate stream upstream of the sulfur trap and with the desulfurized reformate stream downstream of the sulfur trap. The metering device is adapted to bypass a portion of the reformate stream to mix with the desulfurized reformate stream, thereby producing a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

  7. Cassettes for solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and methods of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack assembly designs are consistently investigated to develop an assembly that provides optimal performance, and durability, within desired cost parameters. A new design includes a repeat unit having a SOFC cassette and being characterized by a three-component construct. The three components include an oxidation-resistant, metal window frame hermetically joined to an electrolyte layer of a multi-layer, anode-supported ceramic cell and a pre-cassette including a separator plate having a plurality of vias that provide electrical contact between an anode-side collector within the pre-cassette and a cathode-side current collector of an adjacent cell. The third component is a cathode-side seal, which includes a standoff that supports a cathode channel spacing between each of the cassettes in a stack. Cassettes are formed by joining the pre-cassette and the window frame.

  8. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kachmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device is described, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  9. Control of nitric acid plant stack opacity during start-up and shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.B.; Gasper, J.A.; Stash, P.J.

    1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for the production of nitric acid wherein air and ammonia are mixed and combusted in an ammonia burner to produce an effluent containing nitrogen oxides. The effluent is cooled, condensed and separated into a liquid weak acid stream and gas stream. The liquid weak acid and vapor streams are fed into an absorber tower wherein they are countercurrently contacted with water to produce a nitric acid stream and an overhead with a reduced nitrogen oxides content. The overhead is combusted with a fuel in the presence of a catalyst in a catalytic combustor to produce a combustor exhaust, work expanded in an expander to recover energy and vented to the atmosphere as stack exhaust. The improvement involves controlling the opacity of the stack opacity during shutdown of the process.

  10. Alternating dynamic state in intrinsic Josephson-junction stacks self-generated by internal resonance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshelev, A. E.; Materials Science Division

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrinsic Josephson-junction stacks realized in high-temperature superconductors provide a very attractive base for developing coherent sources of electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz frequency range. A promising way to synchronize phase oscillations in all the junctions is to excite an internal cavity resonance. We demonstrate that this resonance promotes the formation of an alternating coherent state, in which the system spontaneously splits into two subsystems with different phase-oscillation patterns. There is a static phase shift between the oscillations in the two subsystems, which changes from 0 to 2 in a narrow region near the stack center. The oscillating electric and magnetic fields are almost homogeneous in all the junctions. The formation of this state promotes efficient pumping of the energy into the cavity resonance leading to strong resonance features in the current-voltage dependence.

  11. Development of MnCoO Coating with New Aluminizing Process for Planar SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, K. Scott; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-cost, chromia-forming steels find widespread use in SOFCs at operating temperatures below 800C, because of their low thermal expansion mismatch and low cost. However, volatile Cr-containing species originating from this scale poison the cathode material in the cells and subsequently cause power degradation in the devices. To prevent this, a conductive manganese cobaltite coating has been developed. However, this coating is not compatible with forming hermetic seals between the interconnect or window frame component and ceramic cell. This coating reacts with sealing materials. Thus, a new aluminizing process has been developed for the sealing regions in these parts, as well as for other metallic stack and balance-of-plant components. From this development, the sealing performance and SOFC stack performance became very stable.

  12. Stacked white OLED having separate red, green and blue sub-elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Qi, Xiangfei; Slootsky, Michael

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to efficient organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The devices employ three emissive sub-elements, typically emitting red, green and blue, to sufficiently cover the visible spectrum. Thus, the devices may be white-emitting OLEDs, or WOLEDs. Each sub-element comprises at least one organic layer which is an emissive layer--i.e., the layer is capable of emitting light when a voltage is applied across the stacked device. The sub-elements are vertically stacked and are separated by charge generating layers. The charge-generating layers are layers that inject charge carriers into the adjacent layer(s) but do not have a direct external connection.

  13. Sampling of power plant stacks for air toxic emissions: Topical report for Phases 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract with the US Department of Energy (DE-AC22-92PCO0367), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Radian Corporation has conducted a test program to collect and analyze size-fractionated stack gas particulate samples for selected inorganic hazardous air pollutants (HAPS). Specific goals of the program are (1) the collection of one-gram quantities of size-fractionated stack gas particulate matter for bulk (total) and surface chemical charactization, and (2) the determination of the relationship between particle size, bulk and surface (leachable) composition, and unit load. The information obtained from this program identifies the effects of unit load, particle size, and wet FGD system operation on the relative toxicological effects of exposure to particulate emissions.

  14. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL); Mawdsley, Jennifer R. (Woodridge, IL); Niyogi, Suhas (Woodridge, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Santos, Lilia (Lombard, IL)

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  15. Review of the Physical Science Facility Stack Air Sampling Probe Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report reviews compliance of the current design of the Physical Science Facility (PSF) stack air sampling locations with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard. The review was based on performance criteria used for locating air sampling probes, the design documents provided and available information on systems previously tested for compliance with the criteria. Recommendations are presented for ways to bring the design into compliance with the requirements for the sampling probe placement.

  16. Assessment of the Building 3430 Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a demonstration to determine the acceptable location in which to place an air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3430 Building Filtered Pathway Stack . The method was to adopt the results of a previously performed test series for a system of similar configuration, followed by a partial test on the actual system to verify the applicability of previously performed tests. The qualification criteria included 1) a uniform air velocity, 2) an average flow angle that does not deviate from the axis of the duct by more than 20, 3) a uniform concentration of tracer gases, and 4) a uniform concentration of tracer particles. Section 1 provides background information for the demonstration, and Section 2 describes the test strategy, including the criteria for the applicability of model results and the test matrix. Section 3 describes the flow angle test and the velocity uniformity test, Section 4 provides the test results, and Section 5 provides the conclusions. Appendix A includes the test data sheets, and Appendix B gives applicable qualification results from the previously tested model stack. The data from the previously tested and similarly designed stack was demonstrated to be applicable to the current design for the 3430 Building Filtered Pathway stack. Therefore, this new system also meets the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside of the bounds of this report (e.g., exhaust velocity increases, relocation of sample probe) will require retesting/reevaluation to determine compliance to the requirements.

  17. Stacked switchable element and diode combination with a low breakdown switchable element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Ward, James Scott (Englewood, CO); Hu, Jian (Englewood, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship. The semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a low-density forming current and/or a low voltage.

  18. Algorithms and Automated Material Handling Systems Design for Stacking 3D Irregular Stone Pieces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Ming-Cheng

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ALGORITHMS AND AUTOMATED MATERIAL HANDLING SYSTEMS DESIGN FOR STACKING 3D IRREGULAR STONE PIECES A Thesis by MING-CHENG KO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Sheng-Jen (?Tony?) Hsieh Committee Members, Sai C...

  19. St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to allow you to recycle the following materials: To find your nearest Recycling Point please visit www.fifedirect.org.uk/wasteaware or call the Recycling Helpline on 08451 55 00 22. R&A GOLF CLUB OLD COURSE HOTEL UNIVERSITY NORTH HAUGH

  20. Effect of interconnect creep on long-term performance of SOFC of one cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 1073oK. High temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and CTE compatibility with other SOFC components. Since the melting temperature of most stainless steel is around 1800oK, possible creep deformation of IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of interconnect creep behavior on stack geometry change and stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the fuel and air channel geometry changes due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel interconnect, therefore indicating possible SOFC performance change under long term operations. IC creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long term steady state operating temperature. It is found that creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel and the air flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  1. Metal-gate-induced reduction of the interfacial layer in Hf oxide gate stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharova, L. V.; Dalponte, M.; Gustafsson, T.; Celik, O.; Garfunkel, E.; Lysaght, P. S.; Bersuker, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Rd., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Rd., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); SEMATECH, 2705 Montopolis Dr., Austin, Texas 78741 (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of high-{kappa} metal oxide gate stacks are often determined in the final processing steps following dielectric deposition. We report here results from medium energy ion scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of oxygen and silicon diffusion and interfacial layer reactions in multilayer gate stacks. Our results show that Ti metallization of HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si stacks reduces the SiO{sub 2} interlayer and (to a more limited extent) the HfO{sub 2} layer. We find that Si atoms initially present in the interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer incorporate into the bottom of the high-{kappa} layer. Some evidence for Ti-Si interdiffusion through the high-{kappa} film in the presence of a Ti gate in the crystalline HfO{sub 2} films is also reported. This diffusion is likely to be related to defects in crystalline HfO{sub 2} films, such as grain boundaries. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and corresponding electron energy loss spectroscopy scans show aggressive Ti-Si intermixing and oxygen diffusion to the outermost Ti layer, given high enough annealing temperature. Thermodynamic calculations show that the driving forces exist for some of the observed diffusion processes.

  2. Memory functions of nanocrystalline cadmium selenide embedded ZrHfO high-k dielectric stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Chi-Chou; Kuo, Yue [Thin Film Nano and Microelectronics Research Laboratory, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3122 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors made of the nanocrystalline cadmium selenide nc-CdSe embedded Zr-doped HfO{sub 2} high-k stack on the p-type silicon wafer have been fabricated and studied for their charge trapping, detrapping, and retention characteristics. Both holes and electrons can be trapped to the nanocrystal-embedded dielectric stack depending on the polarity of the applied gate voltage. With the same magnitude of applied gate voltage, the sample can trap more holes than electrons. A small amount of holes are loosely trapped at the nc-CdSe/high-k interface and the remaining holes are strongly trapped to the bulk nanocrystalline CdSe site. Charges trapped to the nanocrystals caused the Coulomb blockade effect in the leakage current vs. voltage curve, which is not observed in the control sample. The addition of the nanocrystals to the dielectric film changed the defect density and the physical thickness, which are reflected on the leakage current and the breakdown voltage. More than half of the originally trapped holes can be retained in the embedded nanocrystals for more than 10 yr. The nanocrystalline CdSe embedded high-k stack is a useful gate dielectric for this nonvolatile memory device.

  3. Internal electrolyte supply system for reliable transport throughout fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA); Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); King, Robert B. (Westlake, OH)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved internal electrolyte supply system in a fuel cell stack employs a variety of arrangements of grooves and passages in bipolar plates of the multiplicity of repeating fuel cells to route gravity-assisted flowing electrolyte throughout the stack. The grooves route electrolyte flow along series of first paths which extend horizontally through the cells between the plates thereof. The passages route electrolyte flow along series of second paths which extend vertically through the stack so as to supply electrolyte to the first paths in order to expose the electrolyte to the matrices of the cells. Five different embodiments of the supply system are disclosed. Some embodiments employ wicks in the grooves for facilitating transfer of the electrolyte to the matrices as well as providing support for the matrices. Additionally, the passages of some embodiments by-pass certain of the grooves and supply electrolyte directly to other of the grooves. Some embodiments employ single grooves and others have dual grooves. Finally, in some embodiments the passages are connected to the grooves by a step which produces a cascading electrolyte flow.

  4. Stability of dynamic coherent states in intrinsic Josephson-junction stacks near internal cavity resonance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshelev, A. E.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions in the resistive state can by efficiently synchronized by the internal cavity mode resonantly excited by the Josephson oscillations. We study the stability of dynamic coherent states near the resonance with respect to small perturbations. Three states are considered: the homogeneous and alternating-kink states in zero magnetic field and the homogeneous state in the magnetic field near the value corresponding to half flux quantum per junction. We found two possible instabilities related to the short-scale and long-scale perturbations. The homogeneous state in modulated junction is typically unstable with respect to the short-scale alternating phase deformations unless the Josephson current is completely suppressed in one half of the stack. The kink state is stable with respect to such deformations and homogeneous state in the magnetic field is only stable within a certain range of frequencies and fields. Stability with respect to the long-range deformations is controlled by resonance excitations of fast modes at finite wave vectors and typically leads to unstable range of the wave vectors. This range shrinks with approaching the resonance and increasing the in-plane dissipation. As a consequence, in finite-height stacks the stability frequency range near the resonance increases with decreasing the height.

  5. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  6. Group Response System Turning Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · But more often I do use it within a slide show. Somewhat more difficult to manage. But some great uses-Add-in for Power Point. · Some "Clicking" practice. #12;Make A Slide-Add to this file. · Esc, click on TurningPoint add-in · Pick Insert Slide in Turning Point bar and insert a Turning Point slide after this slide

  7. IEEE MICROWAVE AND GUIDED WAVE LETTERS, VOL. 7, NO. 10, OCTOBER 1997 329 Air-Gap Stacked Spiral Inductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    Inductor Seung Won Paek and Kwang Seok Seo Abstract--In this letter, we propose an air-gap stacked spiral and Materials Laboratory, LG Corporate Institute of Technology, Seoul 137-140, Korea. K. S. Seo

  8. Mass-related inversion symmetry breaking and phonon self-energy renormalization in isotopically labeled AB-stacked bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, Paulo Antonio Trinidade

    A mass-related symmetry breaking in isotopically labeled bilayer graphene (2LG) was investigated during in-situ electrochemical charging of AB stacked (AB-2LG) and turbostratic (t-2LG) layers. The overlap of the two ...

  9. Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

    2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

  10. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE STACKS WITH ELECTRODE-SUPPORTED CELLS OPERATING IN THE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. Tao; B. J. Butler

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance characterization and durability testing have been completed on two five-cell high-temperature electrolysis stacks constructed with advanced cell and stack technologies. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. The per-cell active area is 100 cm2. The stack is internally manifolded with compliant mica-glass seals. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells. Stack compression is accomplished by means of a custom spring-loaded test fixture. Initial stack performance characterization was determined through a series of DC potential sweeps in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes of operation. Results of these sweeps indicated very good initial performance, with area-specific resistance values less than 0.5 ?.cm2. Long-term durability testing was performed with A test duration of 1000 hours. Overall performance degradation was less than 10% over the 1000-hour period. Final stack performance characterization was again determined by a series of DC potential sweeps at the same flow conditions as the initial sweeps in both electrolysis and fuel cell modes of operation. A final sweep in the fuel cell mode indicated a power density of 0.356 W/cm2, with average per-cell voltage of 0.71 V at a current of 50 A.

  11. 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    , and so risks of water shortage appear. The preservation of these resources is important because73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

  12. Steady periodic waves bifurcating for fixed-depth rotational flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -current interactions [29, 37] or flows generated by wind-shear [30] (see [6] for a comprehensive discussion than the mass-flux. It is important to note that fixing the mass-flux p0 does not fix the depth d

  13. Parameterised structured light imaging for depth edge detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    , [amin, amax], from the projector/camera', `width of horizontal stripes, w', and `minimum detectable depth difference, rmin'. As can be seen in Fig. 1a, amax and rmin are given as the input parameters of [amin, amax] are guaranteed to be detected. However, awkwardly enough, amin is found at a later step

  14. WaveCurrent Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    Wave­Current Interactions in Finite Depth JEROME A. SMITH Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La (Longuet-Higgins 1969; Hasselmann 1971; Garrett and Smith 1976; and many others). In particular, Hassel) changes in wave momentum that absorb some of the radiation stress gradients. Garrett and Smith (1976

  15. Correction to Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

  16. Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

  17. 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

  18. Nitrogen oxide stack sampling at the U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Steam Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.V. Gibson, jr.; M.P. Humphreys; J.M. Skinner

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 7, 1997, the EPA proposed a Nitrogen Oxides State Implementation Plan Call (NO{sub x} SIP Call) for 22 states in the Eastern US which included the state of Tennessee. This initial proposal was followed by proposed statewide NO{sub x} budgets in the May 11, 1998, Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. In the development of the NO{sub x} SIP Call, EPA performed a number of air quality analyses and determined that NO{sub x} emissions from Tennessee should be reduced. Industrial boilers, turbines, stationary internal combustion engines, and cement manufacturing are the only non-electric generating unit sources for which reductions are assumed in the budget calculation. Emission reductions are required if specific source heat input capacity is greater than 250 million Btu per hour. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes pulverized coal fired boilers each rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 298 million Btu per hour, and will therefore be impacted by these regulatory actions. Each boiler is equipped with two pulverizing mills. Coal or natural gas or a combination of these two fuels may be fired. This paper provides the results of NO{sub x} emission stack testing conducted June 15--21, 1999, on the Y-12 Steam Plant Boilers 1 and 2. Measurements of oxygen (O{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and stack gas flow were also performed. Information gained from these stack tests will be used to determine NO{sub x} emission control strategies for the steam plant for compliance with future emission requirements resulting from the NO{sub x} SIP Call.

  19. Population Studies of Gamma Ray Sources Using Stacking Analysis at Low Galactic Latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cillis, Analia N.; /NASA, Goddard; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Torres, Diego F.; /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the problem of the treatment of uncertainties in the diffuse gamma radiation apparent in stacking analysis of EGRET data at low Galactic latitudes for several classes of sources like PSRs. For those classes of sources we co-added maps of counts, exposure and diffuse background, and residuals, in varying numbers for different sub-categories. Finally we tested for gamma-ray excess emission in those maps and attempt to quantify the systematic biases in such approach. Such kinds of analysis will support and provide confidence in the classification processes of sources and source populations in the GLAST era.

  20. Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Ronghai; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Carl Jr., Ralph James; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Lopez, Fulton Jose

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical machine includes a rotor with an inner rotor portion and an outer rotor portion, and a double-sided yokeless stator. The yokeless stator includes modular lamination stacks and is configured for radial magnetic flux flow. The double-sided yokeless stator is concentrically disposed between the inner rotor portion and the outer rotor portion of the electrical machine. Examples of particularly useful embodiments for the electrical machine include wind turbine generators, ship propulsion motors, switch reluctance machines and double-sided synchronous machines.

  1. Collimation system for beam loss localization with slip stacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Bruce C.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip stacking injection for high intensity operation of the Fermilab Main Injector produces a small fraction of beam which is not captured in buckets and accelerated. A collimation system has been implemented with a thin primary collimator to define the momentum aperture at which this beam is lost and four massive secondary collimators to capture the scattered beam. The secondary collimators define tight apertures and thereby capture a fraction of other lost beam. The system was installed in 2007 with commissioning continuing in 2008. The collimation system will be described including simulation, design, installation, and commissioning. Successful operation and operational limitations will be described.

  2. T-556: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stack-based buffer overflow in BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon for in Performance Analysis for Servers, Performance Assurance for Servers, and Performance Assurance for Virtual Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; Performance Analyzer and Performance Predictor for Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; and Capacity Management Essentials 1.2.00 (7.4.15) allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted length value in a BGS_MULTIPLE_READS command to TCP port 6768.

  3. Pinning-modulated non-collective Josephson-vortex motion in stacked Josephson junctions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Y.-D.; Lee, G.-H.; Lee, H.-J.; Bae, M.-H.; Koshelev, A. E.; Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology; Univ. of Illinois

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Josephson vortices in naturally stacked Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} tunneling junctions display rich dynamic behavior that derives from the coexistence of three basic states: static Josephson vortex lattice, coherently moving lattice, and incoherent quasiparticle tunneling state. The rich structure of hysteretic branches observed in the current-voltage characteristics can be understood as combinatorial combinations of these three states which are realized in different junctions and evolve separately with magnetic field and bias current. In particular, the multiple Josephson vortex flow branches at low-bias currents arise from the individual depinning of Josephson vortex rows in each junction.

  4. Monte-Carlo study of the phase transition in the AA-stacked bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaev, A A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tight-binding model of the AA-stacked bilayer graphene with screened electron-electron interactions has been studied using the Hybrid Monte Carlo simulations on the original double-layer hexagonal lattice. Instantaneous screened Coulomb potential is taken into account using Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. G-type antiferromagnetic ordering has been studied and the phase transition with spontaneous generation of the mass gap has been observed. Dependence of the antiferromagnetic condensate on the on-site electron-electron interaction is examined.

  5. Monte-Carlo study of the phase transition in the AA-stacked bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Nikolaev; M. V. Ulybyshev

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Tight-binding model of the AA-stacked bilayer graphene with screened electron-electron interactions has been studied using the Hybrid Monte Carlo simulations on the original double-layer hexagonal lattice. Instantaneous screened Coulomb potential is taken into account using Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. G-type antiferromagnetic ordering has been studied and the phase transition with spontaneous generation of the mass gap has been observed. Dependence of the antiferromagnetic condensate on the on-site electron-electron interaction is examined.

  6. Fuel Cell Animation - Fuel Cell Stack (Text Version) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen Telescope Looks to Ends101 FuelStack

  7. ASCR X-Stack Portfolio | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,BiosScience (SC)Supply andofJune 27-28,4ASCR X-Stack

  8. Florida Nuclear Profile - Turkey Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turkey Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

  10. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  11. Eight-year Climatology of Dust Optical Depth on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montabone, L; Millour, E; Wilson, R J; Lewis, S R; Cantor, B A; Kass, D; Kleinboehl, A; Lemmon, M; Smith, M D; Wolff, M J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have produced a multiannual climatology of airborne dust from Martian year 24 to 31 using multiple datasets of retrieved or estimated column optical depths. The datasets are based on observations of the Martian atmosphere from April 1999 to July 2013 made by different orbiting instruments: the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The procedure we have adopted consists of gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. Our gridding method calculates averages and uncertainties on a regularly spaced, but possibly incomplete, spatio-temporal grid, using an iterative procedure weighted in space, time, and retrieval uncertainty. In order to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the resulting gridded maps, we validat...

  12. Drilling/producing depths; Two records and a revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that record depths for natural gas or oil well drilling or producing continue to be rare occurrences, although one or two still come in each year. Records fell in Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) District 9 and in the California area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in 1990. Deep drilling and production has traditionally been defined as well depths greater than 15,000 ft. Smith Tool reported that 9.4% of all active rotary rigs were dedicated to targets below 15,000 ft at the beginning of 1991. Deep rigs had dropped to 8.1% by year-end 1991, but remained above the 1989 and 1990 levels of 8.4 and 7.6%, respectively. In 1988 about 11% of active rigs were drilling deep at any given time.

  13. Application of Derrick Corporation's stack sizer technology for slimes reduction in 6 inch clean coal hydrocyclone circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzik, P.

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses the successful introduction of Derrick Corporation's Stack Sizer technology for removing minus 200 mesh slimes from 6-inch coal hydrocyclone underflow prior to froth flotation or dewatering by screen bowl centrifuges. In 2006, the James River Coal Company selected the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 150 micron and 100 micron urethane screen panels for removal of the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits. After this application proved successful, Derrick Corporation introduced new 75 micron urethane screen panels for use on the Stack Sizer. Evaluation of feed slurry to flotation cells and screen bowl centrifuges showed significant amounts of minus 75 micron that could potentially be removed by efficient screening technology. Removal of the minus 75 micron fraction was sought to reduce ash and moisture content of the final clean coal product. Full-scale lab tests confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 75 micron urethane screen panels consistently reduced the minus 75 micron percentage in coal slurry from 6-inch clean coal hydrocyclone underflow that is approximately 15 to 20% solid by-weight and 30 to 60% minus 75 micron to a clean coal fraction that is approximately 13 to 16% minus 75 micron. As a result total ash is reduced from approximately 36 to 38% in the hydrocyclone underflow to 14 to 16% in the oversize product fraction form the Stack Sizers. 1 fig., 2 tabs., 5 photos.

  14. Self-humidified proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Operation of larger cells and fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhar, H.P.; Lee, J.H.; Lewinski, K.A. [BCS Technology, Inc., Bryan, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The PEM fuel cell is promising as the power source for use in mobile and stationary applications primarily because of its high power density, all solid components, and simplicity of operation. For wide acceptability of this power source, its cost has to be competitive with the presently available energy sources. The fuel cell requires continuous humidification during operation as a power source. The humidification unit however, increases fuel cell volume, weight, and therefore decreases its overall power density. Great advantages in terms of further fuel cell simplification can be achieved if the humidification process can be eliminated or minimized. In addition, cost reductions are associated with the case of manufacturing and operation. At BCS Technology we have developed a technology of self-humidified operation of PEM fuel cells based on the mass balance of the reactants and products and the ability of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) to retain water necessary for humidification under the cell operating conditions. The reactants enter the fuel cell chambers without carrying any form of water, whether in liquid or vapor form. Basic principles of self-humidified operation of fuel cells as practiced by BCS Technology, Inc. have been presented previously in literature. Here, we report the operation of larger self-humidified single cells and fuel cell stacks. Fuel cells of areas Up to 100 cm{sup 2} have been operated. We also show the self-humidified operation of fuel cell stacks of 50 and 100 cm{sup 2} electrode areas.

  15. Treatability test of a stacked-tray air stripper for VOC in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pico, T., LLNL

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common strategy for hydraulic containment and mass removal at VOC contaminated sites is `pump and treat (P&T)`. In P&T operations, contaminated ground water is pumped from wells, treated above ground, and discharged. Many P&T remediation systems at VOC sites rely on air stripping technology because VOCs are easily transferred to the vapor phase. In stacked-tray air strippers, contaminated water is aerated while it flows down through a series of trays. System operations at LLNL are strictly regulated by the California and federal Environmental Protection Agencies (Cal/EPA and EPA), the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). These agencies set discharge limits, require performance monitoring, and assess penalties for non-compliance. National laboratories are also subject to scrutiny by the public and other government agencies. This extensive oversight makes it necessary to accurately predict field treatment performance at new extraction locations to ensure compliance with all requirements prior to facility activation. This paper presents treatability test results for a stacked- tray air stripper conducted at LLNL and compares them to the vendor`s modeling software results.

  16. Nonlinear modelling of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack using nonlinear cancellation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barus, R. P. P., E-mail: rismawan.ppb@gmail.com [Engineering Physics, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung and Centre for Material and Technical Product, Jalan Sangkuriang No. 14 Bandung (Indonesia); Tjokronegoro, H. A.; Leksono, E. [Engineering Physics, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Ismunandar [Chemistry Study, Faculty of Mathematics and Science, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cells are promising new energy conversion devices that are friendly to the environment. A set of control systems are required in order to operate a fuel cell based power plant system optimally. For the purpose of control system design, an accurate fuel cell stack model in describing the dynamics of the real system is needed. Currently, linear model are widely used for fuel cell stack control purposes, but it has limitations in narrow operation range. While nonlinear models lead to nonlinear control implemnetation whos more complex and hard computing. In this research, nonlinear cancellation technique will be used to transform a nonlinear model into a linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics. The transformation is done by replacing the input of the original model by a certain virtual input that has nonlinear relationship with the original input. Then the equality of the two models is tested by running a series of simulation. Input variation of H2, O2 and H2O as well as disturbance input I (current load) are studied by simulation. The error of comparison between the proposed model and the original nonlinear model are less than 1 %. Thus we can conclude that nonlinear cancellation technique can be used to represent fuel cell nonlinear model in a simple linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics and therefore retain the wide operation range.

  17. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created for detailed analysis of a high-temperature electrolysis stack (solid oxide fuel cells operated as electrolyzers). Inlet and outlet plenum flow distributions are discussed. Maldistribution of plena flow show deviations in per-cell operating conditions due to non-uniformity of species concentrations. Models have also been created to simulate experimental conditions and for code validation. Comparisons between model predictions and experimental results are discussed. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the electrolysis mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution, and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition.

  18. Remote System for Characterizing, Monitoring and Inspecting the Inside of Contaminated Nuclear Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Mario [Florida International University, Miami] [Florida International University, Miami; Mendez, William [Florida International University, Miami] [Florida International University, Miami; Lagos, Dr. Leonel [Florida International University, Miami] [Florida International University, Miami; Lind, Randall F [ORNL] [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL] [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL] [ORNL; Noakes, Mark W [ORNL] [ORNL; Pin, Francois G [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stack Characterization System (SCS) is a collaborative project with the Robotics and Energetic Systems Group (RESG) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU). The SCS is a robotic system that will be deployed into off-gas stacks located around the central campus at ORNL. The system will consists of surveying equipment capable of taking surface contamination samples, radiation readings, core samples and transmit live video to its operators. Trade studies were conducted on varying concrete materials to determine the best way of retrieving loose contamination from the surface. The studies were performed at the ARC facility by DOE Fellows, where traditional cloth wipes were compared to adhesive material. The adhesive material was tested on the RESG s smear sampler to record how much loose surface material could be retrieved. The DOE Fellows completed a summer internship during which conceptual designs were created for a deployable radiation detector and core drill capable of retrieving multiple core samples.

  19. Source Apportionment of Stack Emissions from Research and Development Facilities Using Positive Matrix Factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions from research and development (R&D) facilities are difficult to characterize due to the wide variety of processes used, changing nature of research, and large number of chemicals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations measured in the main exhaust stacks of four different R&D buildings to identify the number and composition of major contributing sources. PMF identified from 9-11 source-related factors contributing to the stack emissions depending on the building. The factors that were similar between buildings were major contributors to trichloroethylene (TCE), acetone, and ethanol emissions. Several other factors had similar profiles for two or more buildings but not for all four. One factor for each building was a combination of p/m-xylene, o-xylene and ethylbenzene. At least one factor for each building was identified that contained a broad mix of many species and constraints were used in PMF to modify the factors to resemble more closely the off-shift concentration profiles. PMF accepted the constraints with little decrease in model fit. Although the PMF model predicted the profiles of the off-shift samples, the percent of total emissions was under-predicted by the model versus the measured data.

  20. Sampling of power plant stacks for air toxic emissions: Final report for Phases 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program to collect and analyze size-fractionated stack gas particulate samples for selected inorganic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) was conducted . Specific goals of the program are (1) the collection of one-gram quantities of size-fractionated stack gas particulate matter for bulk (total) and surface chemical characterization, and (2) the determination of the relationship between particle size, bulk and surface (leachable) composition, and unit load. The information obtained from this program identifies the effects of unit load, particle size, and wet FGD system operation on the relative toxicological effects of exposure to particulate emissions. Field testing was conducted in two phases. The Phase I field program was performed over the period of August 24 through September 20, 1992, at the Tennessee Valley Authority Widows Creek Unit 8 Power Station, located near Stevenson (Jackson County), Alabama, on the Tennessee River. Sampling activities for Phase II were conducted from September 11 through October 14, 1993. Widows Creek Unit 8 is a 575-megawatt plant that uses bituminous coal averaging 3.7% sulfur and 13% ash. Downstream of the boiler, a venture wet scrubbing system is used for control of both sulfur dioxide and particulate emissions. There is no electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in this system. This system is atypical and represents only about 5% of the US utility industry. However, this site was chosen for this study because of the lack of information available for this particulate emission control system.

  1. Depth Profile Analysis of New Materials in Hollow Cathode Discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djulgerova, R.; Mihailov, V.; Gencheva, V.; Popova, L.; Panchev, B. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Michaylova, V. [Technical University of Sofia, 1797 Sofia (Bulgaria); Szytula, A.; Gondek, L.; Dohnalik, T.M. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics - Jagellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Petrovic, Z.Lj. [Institute of Physics, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review the possibility of hollow cathode discharge for depth profile analysis is demonstrated for several new materials: planar optical waveguides fabricated by Ag+-Na+ ion exchange process in glasses, SnO2 thin films for gas sensors modified by hexamethildisilazane after rapid thermal annealing, W- and WC- CVD layers deposited on Co-metalloceramics and WO3- CVD thin films deposited on glass. The results are compared with different standard techniques.

  2. Colour videos with depth : acquisition, processing and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardt, Christian

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    approach is a sensor fusion system which combines data Time-of-flight sensor fusionfrom a noisy, low-resolution time-of-flight camera and a high-resolution colour video camera into a coherent, noise-free video with depth. The system consists of a three... of Computer Graphics International (Short Papers), May 2009 Proteus semi-automatic interactive structure-from-motion Malte Schwarzkopf and Christian Richardt Poster at the Vision, Modeling, and Visualization Workshop (VMV), November 2009 Layered photo...

  3. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, Moscow, 117036 (Russian Federation); Baker Hughes, Inc, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX, 77073 (United States)

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  4. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis,Technologies Available Site

  5. Superconducting coherence length and magnetic penetration depth of a p-wave holographic superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng Huabi; Fan Zheyong [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zong Hongshi [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in (3+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in (2+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconducting coherence length {xi} of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we make a perturbative study of the gravity theory analytically. The superconducting coherence length {xi} is found to be proportional to (1-T/T{sub c}){sup -1/2} near the critical temperature T{sub c}. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth {lambda}{proportional_to}(T{sub c}-T){sup 1/2} by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  6. Superconducting Coherence Length and Magnetic Penetration Depth of a p-wave Holographic Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua-Bi Zeng; Zhe-Yong Fan; Hong-Shi Zong

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A classical SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory in 3+1 dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime is believed to be dual to a p-wave superconductor in 2+1 dimensional flat spacetime. In order to calculate the superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ of the holographic superconductor near the superconducting phase transition point, we study the perturbation of the gravity theory analytically. The superconductiong coherence length $\\xi$ is found to be proportional to $(1-T/T_c)^{-1/2}$ near the critical temperature $T_c$. We also obtain the magnetic penetration depth $\\lambda\\propto(T_c-T)^{1/2}$ by adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field. The results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  7. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  8. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  9. Fabrication of submicron La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} intrinsic Josephson junction stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo, Yuimaru; Takano, Yoshihiko [Superconducting Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Takahide, Yamaguchi; Ueda, Shinya; Ishii, Satoshi; Tsuda, Shunsuke [Superconducting Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Tanaka, Takayoshi [Material Manufacture and Engineering Station, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Islam, ATM Nazmul; Tanaka, Isao [Center for Crystal Science and Technology, University of Yamanashi, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stacks of cuprate superconductors have potential to be implemented as intrinsic phase qubits working at relatively high temperatures. We report success in fabricating submicron La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (LSCO) IJJ stacks carved out of single crystals. We also show a new fabrication method in which argon ion etching is performed after focused ion beam etching. As a result, we obtained an LSCO IJJ stack in which resistive multibranches appeared. It may be possible to control the number of stacked IJJs with an accuracy of a single IJJ by developing this method.

  10. Highly uniform, multi-stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatebayashi, J., E-mail: tatebaya@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ota, Y. [NanoQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ishida, S.; Nishioka, M.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y. [NanoQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a highly uniform, dense stack of In{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures in a single GaAs nanowire (NW). The size (and hence emission energy) of individual QD is tuned by careful control of the growth conditions based on a diffusion model of morphological evolution of NWs and optical characterization. By carefully tailoring the emission energies of individual QD, dot-to-dot inhomogeneous broadening of QD stacks in a single NW can be as narrow as 9.3?meV. This method provides huge advantages over traditional QD stack using a strain-induced Stranski-Krastanow growth scheme. We show that it is possible to fabricate up to 200 uniform QDs in single GaAs NWs using this growth technique without degradation of the photoluminescence intensity.

  11. Points

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket |21, 2015 7:00AM to 10:30AMPlayPlug-inProject

  12. A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po, Lai-Man

    A NEW MULTIDIRECTIONAL EXTRAPOLATION HOLE-FILLING METHOD FOR DEPTH-IMAGE-BASED RENDERING Lai-Man Po School of Peking University, Shenzhen, China ABSTRACT Depth-Image-Based Rendering (DIBR) is widely used synthesis with high-quality depth map. Index Terms - Depth-Image-Based-Rendering, DIBR, Hole

  13. Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information Resourses Management Division Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information Resourses Management...

  14. Influence of the SiO{sub 2} interlayer thickness on the density and polarity of charges in Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacks as studied by optical second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terlinden, N. M.; Dingemans, G.; Vandalon, V.; Bosch, R. H. E. C.; Kessels, W. M. M., E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    By accurately tuning the SiO{sub 2} interlayer thickness the density and polarity of charges in Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacks can be controlled. We report on the number density, polarity, and physical location of charges present in the stacks as studied by optical second-harmonic generation (SHG). Depending on the SiO{sub 2} interlayer thickness (1150?nm) the effective charge density in the Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacks ranges from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}?cm{sup ?2} for both n- and p-type silicon. The polarity of the charges switches from negative to positive around a SiO{sub 2} interlayer thickness of 510?nm at which point the effective charge density in the stacks is negligible. This switch in polarity is apparent from spectroscopic, time-dependent, and azimuthal SHG measurements. The observed trends in charge density and polarity can be explained by tunneling of electrons into defect states at the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface as well as the presence of fixed and bulk charges at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface and in the SiO{sub 2}, respectively. This charge mechanism appears to hold generally for Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacks as similar results were observed for SiO{sub 2} films prepared by various techniques.

  15. Depth-Profiling and Quantitative Characterization of the Size, Composition,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density, and Morphology of Fine Particles |

  16. Erosion Rate Variations during XPS Sputter Depth Profiling of Nanoporous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 ton Stanat rolling millEricErnestErnieFilms. |

  17. Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthor Jump to: navigation,AvgReservoirDepth Jump

  18. Property:AvgWellDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open EnergyAuthor Jump to: navigation,AvgReservoirDepth

  19. Property:FirstWellDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProcedures Jump to: navigation,JumpFirstWellDepth Jump to:

  20. Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of a MolecularAssemblythe

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - Fiore_EPS_Invited_04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland Operations OfficeFinalModule8.ppt Microsoft PowerPoint

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Fiveyr2003_AT.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland Operations OfficeFinalModule8.ppt Microsoft PowerPoint

  3. Scalable stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror for astronomy and laser processing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L., E-mail: K.L.Wlodarczyk@hw.ac.uk; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Bryce, Emma; Hutson, David; Kirk, Katherine [School of Engineering and Science, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering and Science, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Schwartz, Noah; Atkinson, David; Beard, Steven; Baillie, Tom; Parr-Burman, Phil [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Strachan, Mel [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom) [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype of a scalable and potentially low-cost stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror (SA-PDM) with 35 active elements is presented in this paper. This prototype is characterized by a 2 ?m maximum actuator stroke, a 1.4 ?m mirror sag (measured for a 14 mm 14 mm area of the unpowered SA-PDM), and a 200 nm hysteresis error. The initial proof of concept experiments described here show that this mirror can be successfully used for shaping a high power laser beam in order to improve laser machining performance. Various beam shapes have been obtained with the SA-PDM and examples of laser machining with the shaped beams are presented.

  4. Doping efficiency of single and randomly stacked bilayer graphene by iodine adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, HoKwon; Renault, Olivier; Rouchon, Denis; Mariolle, Denis; Chevalier, Nicolas [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tyurnina, Anastasia; Simonato, Jean-Pierre; Dijon, Jean [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, LITEN, Minatec Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the efficiency and thermal stability of p-doping by iodine on single and randomly stacked, weakly coupled bilayer polycrystalline graphene, as directly measured by photoelectron emission microscopy. The doping results in work function value increase of 0.40.5?eV, with a higher degree of iodine uptake by the bilayer (2%) as compared to the single layer (1%) suggesting iodine intercalation in the bilayer. The chemistry of iodine is identified accordingly as I{sub 3}{sup ?} and I{sub 5}{sup ?} poly iodide anionic complexes with slightly higher concentration of I{sub 5}{sup ?} in bilayer than monolayer graphene, likely attributed to differences in doping mechanisms. Temperature dependent in-situ annealing of the doped films demonstrated that the doping remains efficient up to 200?C.

  5. Numerical analysis of the coherent radiation emission by two stacked Josephson flux-flow oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallraff, A.; Goldobin, E.; Ustinov, A.V. [Institute of Thin Film and Ion Technology, Research Center Juelich (KFA), D-52425 (Germany)] [Institute of Thin Film and Ion Technology, Research Center Juelich (KFA), D-52425 (Germany)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerical investigation of the radiation emission by a system of two magnetically coupled, long Josephson junctions is reported. Time-dependent synchronized voltage response in the flux-flow regime is analyzed for the case of in-phase and out-of-phase oscillations in the junctions. Simulations show that Josephson junctions operating in the in-phase flux-flow mode may generate rf radiation power by a factor of more than 4 larger than that of a single Josephson junction. The radiation in the out-of-phase flux-flow mode is characterized by nearly completely suppressed amplitudes of odd harmonics and considerably damped even harmonics as compared to that of a single barrier junction. The dependence of the radiation power on the parameter spread between the junctions is investigated. The advantages of using stacked Josephson junctions as oscillators for the sub-mm wave band are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. A NOVEL INTEGRATED STACK APPROACH FOR REALIZING MECHANICALLY ROBUST SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Barnett; Tammy Lai; Jiang Liu

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOFCs are a very promising energy conversion technology for utilization of fossil fuels. The proposed project is to improve the viability of SOFCs by introducing a novel stacking geometry. The geometry involved has all active SOFC components and the interconnect deposited as thin layers on an electrically insulating support. This allows the choice of a support material that provides optimal mechanical toughness and thermal shock resistance. The supports are in the form of flattened tubes, providing relatively high strength, high packing densities, and minimizing the number of seals required. The integration of SOFCs and interconnects on the same support has several other advantages including the reduction of electrical resistances associated with pressure contacts between the cells and interconnects, relaxation of fabrication tolerances required for pressure contacts, reduction of ohmic losses, and reduction of interconnect conductivity requirements. In this report, we describe the processing methodologies that have been developed for fabricating the integrated solid oxide fuel cell (ISOFC), along with results on characterization of the component materials: support, electrolyte, anode, cathode, and interconnect. Screen printing was the primary processing method developed. A centrifugal casting technique was also developed for depositing thin 8 mol % yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte layers on porous NiO-YSZ anode substrates. Dense pinhole-free YSZ coatings were obtained by co-sintering the bi-layers at 1400 C. After depositing La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM)-YSZ cathodes, single SOFCs produced near-theoretical open-circuit voltages and power densities of 0.55 W/cm{sup 2} at 800 C. Initial stack operation results are also described.

  7. Magnetic Flares and the Observed Optical Depth in Seyfert Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

    1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We here consider the pressure equilibrium during an intense magnetic flare above the surface of a cold accretion disk. Under the assumption that the heating source for the plasma trapped within the flaring region is an influx of energy transported inwards with a group velocity close to $c$, e.g., by magnetohydrodynamic waves, this pressure equilibrium can constrain the Thomson optical depth $\\tau_T$ to be of order unity. We suggest that this may be the reason why $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ in Seyfert Galaxies. We also consider whether current data can distinguish between the spectrum produced by a single X-ray emitting region with $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ and that formed by many different flares spanning a range of $\\tau_T$. We find that the current observations do not yet have the required energy resolution to permit such a differentiation. Thus, it is possible that the entire X-ray/$\\gamma$-ray spectrum of Seyfert Galaxies is produced by many independent magnetic flares with an optical depth $0.5<\\tau_T<2$.

  8. Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1PlanARM A. Gannet HallarCRSP

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Cygan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1PlanARMAqueousCreating

  11. Argonne PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2 (CRACApril 22-23, 2011 ATLASMarchFragment

  12. Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power by Thomas Schmeister B.Sc., University to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power by Thomas Schmeister B.Sc., University of Colorado, 1991 cells as a heat and electrical power source for residential combined heat and power (CHP

  13. Modeling and Control for PEM Fuel Cell Stack System I Jay T. Pukrushpan, Anna G. Stefanopoulou, Huei Peng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    Modeling and Control for PEM Fuel Cell Stack System I Jay T. Pukrushpan, Anna G. Stefanopoulou~umich, edu, hpeng@umich, edu Abstract A nonlinear fuel cell system dynamic model that is suit- able, the reactant partial pres- sures. Characterization of the Fuel Cell polarization curves based on time varying

  14. A thermally self-sustained micro solid-oxide fuel-cell stack with high power density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    A thermally self-sustained micro solid-oxide fuel-cell stack with high power density Zongping Shao1 for portable power generation1,2 . Accordingly, polymer-electrolyte direct- methanol fuel cells design challenges and cannot operate with hydrocarbon fuels of higher energy density. Solid-oxide fuel

  15. AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data for the spatial delineation of lithology and fluid units of deepwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    AVA simultaneous inversion of partially stacked seismic amplitude data for the spatial delineation application of ampli- tude-versus-angle AVA inversion of prestack-seismic am- plitude data to detect-log data. Standard techniques such as crossplot analysis, Biot-Gass- mann fluid substitution, AVA

  16. Effects of liquid conductivity differences on multi-component sample injection, pumping and stacking in microfluidic chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Effects of liquid conductivity differences on multi-component sample injection, pumping-chip processing, or by design. The two situations studied here are sample pumping (where bulk transport in a straight-cross channel configuration is applied here to both pumping and stacking cases. A key

  17. Exploring Phase Change Memory and 3D Die-Stacking for Power/Thermal Friendly, Fast and Durable Memory Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    Exploring Phase Change Memory and 3D Die-Stacking for Power/Thermal Friendly, Fast and Durable) as a promising candidate to achieve scalable, low power and thermal friendly memory system architecture leakages and retention time. DRAM-based main memory is also consuming an increasing proportion of the power

  18. ZAKKAROFF et al.: RECOVERY OF SLICE ROTATIONS IN CARDIAC MR SERIES 1 Recovery of Slice Rotations with the Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Derek

    ZAKKAROFF et al.: RECOVERY OF SLICE ROTATIONS IN CARDIAC MR SERIES 1 Recovery of Slice Rotations with the Stack Alignment Transform in Cardiac MR Series Constantine Zakkaroff1 mnkz@leeds.ac.uk Aleksandra Radjenovic2 a.radjenovic@leeds.ac.uk John Greenwood3 j.greenwood@leeds.ac.uk Derek Magee1 d

  19. Mechanically-exfoliated stacks of thin films of Bi2Te3 topological insulators with enhanced thermoelectric performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanically-exfoliated stacks of thin films of Bi2Te3 topological insulators with enhanced; published online 1 October 2010 The authors report on "graphene-like" mechanical exfoliation of single can be used to mechanically exfoliate the ultrathin films of Bi2Te3 with the thickness down

  20. Experimental study and modeling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Experimental study and modeling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP://www.iet.aau.dk ­ * Corresponding author: mpn@iet.aau.dk Abstract: Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems monitored during experiments. Introduction Fuel cell based combined heat and power production (CHP) systems

  1. Size distribution of fine Particles in Stack emissions of a 600-MWe coal-fired Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Size distribution of fine Particles in Stack emissions of a 600-MWe coal-fired Power Plant I coal-fired power plant. Aknowledgements: French environment agency ADEME (Contract number 04-74-C0018 that was carried out in March 2006 at a 600-MWe coal-fired power plant. 51 ineris-00973267,version1-4Apr2014 Author

  2. Jitter-Free Co-Processing on a Prototype Exascale Storage Stack john.bent@emc.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jitter-Free Co-Processing on a Prototype Exascale Storage Stack John Bent john.bent@emc.com Sorin Faibish sfaibish@emc.com Jim Ahrens ahrens@lanl.gov Gary Grider ggrider@lanl.gov John Patchett patchett@lanl.gov Percy Tzelnic tzelnic@emc.com Jon Woodring woodring@lanl.gov Abstract In the petascale era, the storage

  3. Trapping in deep defects under substrate hot electron stress in TiN/Hf-silicate based gate stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Durgamadhab "Durga"

    Trapping in deep defects under substrate hot electron stress in TiN/Hf-silicate based gate stacks N. Zaslavsky Abstract Substrate hot electron stress was applied on n+ -ringed n-channel MOS capacitors with TiN/Hf-silicate. Introduction Hafnium silicate based high-j gate dielectrics have been put forth as the leading candidates

  4. 23.2 / J. X. Sun 23.2: An Efficient Stacked OLED with Double-Sided Light Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    23.2 / J. X. Sun 23.2: An Efficient Stacked OLED with Double-Sided Light Emission J. X. Sun, X. L;23.2 / J. X. Sun 2. Experimental Details The SOLED were fabricated on 75nm-ITO coated glass with a sheet

  5. Role of hydrogen in Ge/HfO2/Al gate stacks subjected to negative bias temperature instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Durgamadhab "Durga"

    Role of hydrogen in Ge/HfO2/Al gate stacks subjected to negative bias temperature instability N 2007; published online 17 January 2008 This work investigates the role of hydrogen and nitrogen in a Ge. Virtually unchanged interface state density as a function of NBTI indicates no atomic hydrogen release from

  6. Depth to bedrock using gravimetry in the Reno and Carson City, Nevada, basins Robert E. Abbott and John N. Louie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of geothermal wells, and one wildcat oil well. Depths in Carson City are consistent with depths from existing

  7. Multi-dimensional trimming based on projection depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Yijun

    by the robustness and efficiency considerations, Tukey in 1948 introduced trimmed means in real data analysis parameters [see, e.g., Tukey and Mclaughlin (1963), Bickel (1965), Huber (1972), Bickel and Lehmann (1975-dimensional observations; see Tukey (1975), Liu (1990) and Zuo and Serfling (2000), for example. Points deep inside a data

  8. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink, K., E-mail: klemens.zink@kmub.thm.de [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390 (Germany); Looe, H. K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg D-26129, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg D-26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Gttingen D-37073 (Germany)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known inscattering effect, whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the inout balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the inout balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the collecting electrode radius and the width of the guard ring are reflecting the deep radial penetration of the electron transport processes into the gas-filled cavities and the need for appropriate corrections of the chamber reading. New values for these corrections have been established in two forms, one converting the indicated value into the absorbed dose to water in the front plane of the chamber, the other converting it into the absorbed dose to water at the depth of the effective point of measurement of the chamber. In the Appendix, the inout imbalance of electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary is demonstrated in the approximation of classical small-angle multiple scattering theory. Conclusions: The inout electron transport imbalance at the lateral boundaries of parallel-plate chambers in electron beams has been studied with Monte Carlo simulation over a range of depth in water, and new correction factors, covering all depths and implementing the effective point of measurement concept, have been developed.

  9. Shared Communications: Volume 2. In-Depth Systems Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truett, LF

    2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second of two documents that examine the literature for actual examples of organizations and agencies that share communications resources. While the primary emphasis is on rural, intelligent transportation system (ITS) communications involving transit, examples will not be limited to rural activities, nor to ITS implementation, nor even to transit. In addition, the term ''communication'' will be broadly applied to include all information resources. The first document of this series, ''Shared Communications: Volume I. A Summary and Literature Review'', defines the meaning of the term ''shared communication resources'' and provides many examples of agencies that share resources. This document, ''Shared Communications: Volume II. In-Depth Systems Research'', reviews attributes that contributed to successful applications of the sharing communication resources concept. A few examples of each type of communication sharing are provided. Based on the issues and best practice realworld examples, recommendations for potential usage and recommended approaches for field operational tests are provided.

  10. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing defense-in-depth strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  11. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing defense-in-depth strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  12. End points for facility deactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilagyi, A.P. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Negin, C.A. [Oak Technologies, Washington Grove, MD (United States); Stefanski, L.D. [Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE`s Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization mission includes deactivating surplus nuclear facilities. Each deactivation project requires a systematic and explicit specification of the conditions to be established. End Point methods for doing so have been field developed and implemented. These methods have worked well and are being made available throughout the DOE establishment.

  13. Bar Mar field Point field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Bone Spring Seay Nance Regional Study (Cimarex Energy) West Texas (Various Counties) West Texas Yates Seay Nance Regional Study (Lynx Production) West Texas (Various Counties) #12;Bar Mar field Umbrella Point field Nuare field East Texas field Copano Bay Bar Mar field Umbrella

  14. CenterPoint November 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    CenterPoint November 2009 The Center for Academic Enrichment & Outreach Newsletter ONLINE ARTICLES (which is housed in the Center for Academic Enrichment and Outreach (CAEO)) assisted parents is committed to working with families and students to provide challenging academic classes, as well as social

  15. DEPTH OF PLEATED SURFACES IN TOROIDAL CUSPS OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ying-Qing

    DEPTH OF PLEATED SURFACES IN TOROIDAL CUSPS OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS Ying-Qing Wu1 Abstract. Let F 0203394 1 #12;2 YING-QING WU The following theorem gives an estimation of the depth of closed essential

  16. Numerical simulation of the flow over a coastal structure in depth-limited conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginting, Victor Eralingga

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of detailed measurements of irregular wave transformation in front of the structure in depth-limited conditions. The second data set consists of several test runs to study the irregular wave reflection and runup on the coastal structure in depth...

  17. Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    neutrino and proton decay experiments, as well as dark matter searches even though often at greater depth for cold dark matter 3 , and is presently at shallow depth; muon-induced neutrons repre- sent a major at a shallow depth of 32 meters of water equivalent has been measured. The Palo Verde neutrino detector

  18. Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

  19. ALFALFA HI Data Stacking II. HI content of the host galaxies of AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabello, S; Catinella, B; Giovanelli, R; Haynes, M P; Heckman, T M; Schiminovich, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a stacking technique to measure the average HI content of a volume-limited sample of 1871 AGN host galaxies from a parent sample of galaxies selected from the SDSS and GALEX imaging surveys with stellar masses greater than 10^10 M_sun and redshifts in the range 0.025ALFALFA) survey. In previous work, we found that the HI gas fraction in galaxies correlates most strongly with the combination of optical/UV colour and stellar surface mass density. We therefore build a control sample of non-AGN matched to the AGN hosts in these two properties. We study trends in HI gas mass fraction (M(HI)/M_*), where M_* is the stellar mass) as a function of black hole accretion rate indicator L[OIII]/M(BH). We find no significant difference in HI content between AGN and control samples at all values of black hole accretion rate probed by the galaxies in our sample. This indicates that AGN do not influence the large-scale gaseous properties of galaxie...

  20. SENSITIVITY OF STACKED IMAGING DETECTORS TO HARD X-RAY POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muleri, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo, E-mail: fabio.muleri@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of multi-layer optics which allow to focus photons up to 100 keV and more promises an enormous jump in sensitivity in the hard X-ray energy band. This technology is already planned to be exploited by future missions dedicated to spectroscopy and imaging at energies >10 keV, e.g., Astro-H and NuSTAR. Nevertheless, our understanding of the hard X-ray sky would greatly benefit from carrying out contemporaneous polarimetric measurements, because the study of hard spectral tails and of polarized emission are often two complementary diagnostics of the same non-thermal and acceleration processes. At energies above a few tens of keV, the preferred technique to detect polarization involves the determination of photon directions after a Compton scattering. Many authors have asserted that stacked detectors with imaging capabilities can be exploited for this purpose. If it is possible to discriminate those events which initially interact in the first detector by Compton scattering and are subsequently absorbed by the second layer, then the direction of scattering is singled out from the hit pixels in the two detectors. In this paper, we give the first detailed discussion of the sensitivity of such a generic design to the X-ray polarization. The efficiency and the modulation factor are calculated analytically from the geometry of the instruments and then compared with the performance as derived by means of Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Compression-induced stacking fault tetrahedra around He bubbles in Al

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Jian-Li, E-mail: shao-jianli@iapcm.ac.cn; Wang, Pei; He, An-Min [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Classic molecular dynamics methods are used to simulate the uniform compression process of the fcc Al containing He bubbles. The formation of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) during the collapse of He bubbles is found, and their dependence on the initial He bubble size (0.66?nm in diameter) is presented. Our simulations indicate only elastic deformation in the samples for the He bubble size not more than 2?nm. Instead, increasing the He bubble size, we detect several small SFTs forming on the surface of the He bubble (3?nm), as well as the two intercrossed SFTs around the He bubbles (46?nm). All these SFTs are observed to be stable under further compression, though there may appear some SF networks outside the SFTs (56?nm). Furthermore, the dynamic analysis on the SFTs shows that the yield pressure keeps a near-linear increase with the initial He bubble pressure, and the potential energy of Al atoms inside the SFTs is lower than outside because of their gliding inwards. In addition, the pressure increments of 26?nm He bubbles with strain are less than that of Al, which just provides the opportunity for the He bubble collapse and the SFTs formation. Note that the current work only focuses on the case that the number ratio between He atoms and Al vacancies is 1:1.

  2. STUDYING INTERCLUSTER GALAXY FILAMENTS THROUGH STACKING gmBCG GALAXY CLUSTER PAIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yuanyuan; Dietrich, Joerg P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Nguyen, Alex T. Q. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to study the photometric properties of galaxies in filaments by stacking the galaxy populations between pairs of galaxy clusters. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, this method can detect the intercluster filament galaxy overdensity with a significance of {approx}5{sigma} out to z = 0.40. Using this approach, we study the g - r color and luminosity distribution of filament galaxies as a function of redshift. Consistent with expectation, filament galaxies are bimodal in their color distribution and contain a larger blue galaxy population than clusters. Filament galaxies are also generally fainter than cluster galaxies. More interestingly, the observed filament population seems to show redshift evolution at 0.12 < z < 0.40: the blue galaxy fraction has a trend to increase at higher redshift; such evolution is parallel to the ''Butcher-Oemler effect'' of galaxy clusters. We test the dependence of the observed filament density on the richness of the cluster pair: richer clusters are connected by higher density filaments. We also test the spatial dependence of filament galaxy overdensity: this quantity decreases when moving away from the intercluster axis between a cluster pair. This method provides an economical way to probe the photometric properties of filament galaxies and should prove useful for upcoming projects like the Dark Energy Survey.

  3. Video Lessons, PowerPoints, and Outlines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS, VIDEO LESSONS AND OUTLINES ... 6/11. Lesson 1 PowerPoint (Part A) Lesson 1 PowerPoint (Part B) Lesson 1 Video.

  4. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  5. Starting Points | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (M&O) Contract Competition Starting Points Starting Points Kansas City Plant Related Web Pages Summary Kansas City Plant Home Page Kansas City Plant Contracts DOE Directives...

  6. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Optical Depth from EROS-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hamadache; L. Le Guillou; P. Tisserand; C. Afonso; J. N. Albert; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; E. Aubourg; P. Bareyre; J. P. Beaulieu; X. Charlot; C. Coutures; R. Ferlet; P. Fouqu; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Gould; D. Graff; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; J. de Kat; E. Lesquoy; C. Loup; C. Magneville; J. B. Marquette; E. Maurice; A. Maury; A. Milsztajn; M. Moniez; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; Y. R. Rahal; J. Rich; M. Spiro; A. Vidal-Madjar; L. Vigroux; S. Zylberajch

    2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new EROS-2 measurement of the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic Bulge. Light curves of $5.6\\times 10^{6}$ clump-giant stars distributed over $66 \\deg^2$ of the Bulge were monitored during seven Bulge seasons. 120 events were found with apparent amplifications greater than 1.6 and Einstein radius crossing times in the range $5 {\\rm d}

  7. Fast concurrent array-based stacks, queues and deques using fetch-and-increment-bounded, fetch-and-decrement-bounded and store-on-twin synchronization primitives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alana; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation primitives for concurrent array-based stacks, queues, double-ended queues (deques) and wrapped deques are provided. In one aspect, each element of the stack, queue, deque or wrapped deque data structure has its own ticket lock, allowing multiple threads to concurrently use multiple elements of the data structure and thus achieving high performance. In another aspect, new synchronization primitives FetchAndIncrementBounded (Counter, Bound) and FetchAndDecrementBounded (Counter, Bound) are implemented. These primitives can be implemented in hardware and thus promise a very fast throughput for queues, stacks and double-ended queues.

  8. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-H-1, 116-H Reactor Stack Burial Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-053

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The 132-H-1 waste site includes the 116-H exhaust stack burial trench and the buried stack foundation (which contains an embedded vertical 15-cm (6-in) condensate drain line). The 116-H reactor exhaust stack and foundation were decommissioned and demolished using explosives in 1983, with the rubble buried in situ beneath clean fill at least 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  9. TRS-80 in-stack opacity computer programs: user and programmer manual. Report for April 1982-June 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowen, S.J.; Ensor, D.S.; Sparks, L.E.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual describes a microcomputer program written to estimate instack opacity from ducted sources. Input data required to run the program are the particle-size distribution, particle refractive index, mass emission concentration, wavelength of light, particle density, and stack diameter. The particle-size distribution may be entered either as a histogram of particle diameter and fraction-greater-than-stated diameter or as log normal particle size distribution. The program calculates and displays the in-stack opacity. The program is written in the BASIC computer language and is specifically designed for the TRS-80 Model I, II, and IV computers. A moderate effort will be required to convert the programs to the IBM-PC and similar computers.

  10. Interfacial Layer Growth Condition Dependent Carrier Transport Mechanisms in HfO2/SiO2 Gate Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Misra, D.

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature and field dependent leakage current in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} gate stack for in situ steam grown and chemical interfacial layers (ILs) are studied in the temperature range of 20 C to 105 C. Poole-Frenkel mechanism in high field whereas Ohmic conduction in low field region are dominant for both devices. Leakage current decreases whereas both trap energy level ({phi}{sub t}) and activation energy (E{sub a}) increase for chemically grown IL devices. The trap level energy, ({phi}{sub t}) -0.2 eV, indicates that doubly charged oxygen vacancies (V{sup 2-}) are the active electron traps which contribute to the leakage current in these gate stacks.

  11. Influence of beam parameters on percentage depth dose in electron arc therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pla, M.; Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of rotational or arc electron beam percentage depth doses on the depth of isocenter di and nominal beam field width w is presented. A characteristic angle beta, which uniquely depends on w and di, is defined and the dependence of the radial percentage depth doses on angle beta discussed. It is shown that the characteristic angle beta concept can be used in clinical situations to predict the shape of the percentage depth dose curve when w and di are known, or, more importantly, it can be used to determine the appropriate w when di and the percentage depth dose characteristics are known.

  12. Mechanisms for plasma etching of HfO{sub 2} gate stacks with Si selectivity and photoresist trimming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoeb, Juline; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To minimize leakage currents resulting from the thinning of the insulator in the gate stack of field effect transistors, high-dielectric constant (high-k) metal oxides, and HfO{sub 2} in particular, are being implemented as a replacement for SiO{sub 2}. To speed the rate of processing, it is desirable to etch the gate stack (e.g., metal gate, antireflection layers, and dielectric) in a single process while having selectivity to the underlying Si. Plasma etching using Ar/BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} mixtures effectively etches HfO{sub 2} while having good selectivity to Si. In this article, results from integrated reactor and feature scale modeling of gate-stack etching in Ar/BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} plasmas, preceded by photoresist trimming in Ar/O{sub 2} plasmas, are discussed. It was found that BCl{sub n} species react with HfO{sub 2}, which under ion impact, form volatile etch products such as B{sub m}OCl{sub n} and HfCl{sub n}. Selectivity to Si is achieved by creating Si-B bonding as a precursor to the deposition of a BCl{sub n} polymer which slows the etch rate relative to HfO{sub 2}. The low ion energies required to achieve this selectivity then challenge one to obtain highly anisotropic profiles in the metal gate portion of the stack. Validation was performed with data from literature. The effect of bias voltage and key reactant probabilities on etch rate, selectivity, and profile are discussed.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of a Pt-based Heat Exchanger Methanol Reformer for a HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    ) Included in this reaction is the decomposition of methanol, which produces CO: CH3OH CO + 2H2 (90.5 kJ mol a picture of the methanol reformer which has been designed to produce hydrogen for a 1 kWe HTPEM fuel cellExperimental Evaluation of a Pt-based Heat Exchanger Methanol Reformer for a HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack

  14. ALFALFA HI Data Stacking I. Does the Bulge Quench Ongoing Star Formation in Early-Type Galaxies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabello, Silvia; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Haynes, Martha P; Heckman, Timothy M; Schiminovich, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out an HI stacking analysis of a volume-limited sample of ~5000 galaxies with imaging and spectroscopic data from GALEX and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which lie within the current footprint of the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) Survey. Our galaxies are selected to have stellar masses greater than 10^10 Msun and redshifts in the range 0.0252.6 and with light profiles that are well fit by a De Vaucouleurs model. We then stack HI line spectra extracted from the ALFALFA data cubes at the 3-D positions of the galaxies from these two samples in bins of stellar mass, stellar mass surface density, central velocity dispersion, and NUV-r colour. We use the stacked spectra to estimate the average HI gas fractions M_HI/M_* of the galaxies in each bin. Our main result is that the HI content of a galaxy is not influenced by its bulge. The average HI gas fractions of galaxies in both our samples correlate most strongly with NUV-r colour and with stellar surface density. The relation between average HI...

  15. PEM fuel cell stack performance using dilute hydrogen mixture. Implications on electrochemical engine system performance and design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inbody, M.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Tafoya, J.I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Onboard fuel processing to generate a hydrogen-rich fuel for PEM fuel cells is being considered as an alternative to stored hydrogen fuel for transportation applications. If successful, this approach, contrasted to operating with onboard hydrogen, utilizes the existing fuels infrastructure and provides required vehicle range. One attractive, commercial liquid fuels option is steam reforming of methanol. However, expanding the liquid methanol infrastructure will take both time and capital. Consequently technology is also being developed to utilize existing transportation fuels, such as gasoline or diesel, to power PEM fuel cell systems. Steam reforming of methanol generates a mixture with a dry gas composition of 75% hydrogen and 25% carbon dioxide. Steam reforming, autothermal reforming, and partial oxidation reforming of C{sub 2} and larger hydrocarbons produces a mixture with a more dilute hydrogen concentration (65%-40%) along with carbon dioxide ({approx}20%) and nitrogen ({approx}10%-40%). Performance of PEM fuel cell stacks on these dilute hydrogen mixtures will affect the overall electrochemical engine system design as well as the overall efficiency. The Los Alamos Fuel Cell Stack Test facility was used to access the performance of a PEM Fuel cell stack over the range of gas compositions chosen to replicate anode feeds from various fuel processing options for hydrocarbon and alcohol fuels. The focus of the experiments was on the anode performance with dilute hydrogen mixtures with carbon dioxide and nitrogen diluents. Performance with other anode feed contaminants, such as carbon monoxide, are not reported here.

  16. Dr Robert J Stack | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnal CycleDonald1 Jul 20022 In the» Dr.

  17. Carbon/Ternary Alloy/Carbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed RouteNanotube TemplatedStorage Medium to Potentially

  18. Hole in one: Technicians smoothly install the center stack in the NSTX-U

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in theinPlasticsreductionCuln(1-x)GaxSe2 Solarvacuum

  19. On the electrical stress-induced oxide-trapped charges in thin HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} gate dielectric stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samanta, Piyas; Zhu Chunxiang; Chan, Mansun [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxide charge buildup and its generation kinetics during constant voltage stress in TaN/HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si structures have been experimentally investigated. From the oxide charge relaxation experiments, nature and energy location of the as-fabricated intrinsic hole traps in the gate stack have also been determined. Our measurement results indicate that the dispersive proton transport through the interfacial SiO{sub 2} contributes larger than hole trapping in positive charge buildup in the stack. From the bias temperature stress measurement results in both control oxide and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} stacks, we have identified overcoordinated [Si{sub 2}=OH]{sup +} centers as the proton-induced defects located in the interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer of the stack. Finally, an empirical equation is proposed to explain the stress-induced oxide positive charge buildup.

  20. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  1. On the interest of carbon-coated plasma reactor for advanced gate stack etching processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, R.; Cunge, G.; Joubert, O. [Freescale Semiconductor Inc., 850 Rue Jean Monnet, 38921 Crolles Cedex (France) and Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS, 17 Rue des Martyrs (c/o CEA-LETI), 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS, 17 Rue des Martyrs (c/o CEA-LETI), 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In integrated circuit fabrication the most wide spread strategy to achieve acceptable wafer-to-wafer reproducibility of the gate stack etching process is to dry-clean the plasma reactor walls between each wafer processed. However, inherent exposure of the reactor walls to fluorine-based plasma leads to formation and accumulation of nonvolatile fluoride residues (such as AlF{sub x}) on reactor wall surfaces, which in turn leads to process drifts and metallic contamination of wafers. To prevent this while keeping an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reactor wall material, a coating strategy must be used, in which the reactor is coated by a protective layer between wafers. It was shown recently that deposition of carbon-rich coating on the reactor walls allows improvements of process reproducibility and reactor wall protection. The authors show that this strategy results in a higher ion-to-neutral flux ratio to the wafer when compared to other strategies (clean or SiOCl{sub x}-coated reactors) because the carbon walls load reactive radical densities while keeping the same ion current. As a result, the etching rates are generally smaller in a carbon-coated reactor, but a highly anisotropic etching profile can be achieved in silicon and metal gates, whose etching is strongly ion assisted. Furthermore, thanks to the low density of Cl atoms in the carbon-coated reactor, silicon etching can be achieved almost without sidewall passivation layers, allowing fine critical dimension control to be achieved. In addition, it is shown that although the O atom density is also smaller in the carbon-coated reactor, the selectivity toward ultrathin gate oxides is not reduced dramatically. Furthermore, during metal gate etching over high-k dielectric, the low level of parasitic oxygen in the carbon-coated reactor also allows one to minimize bulk silicon reoxidation through HfO{sub 2} high-k gate dielectric. It is then shown that the BCl{sub 3} etching process of the HfO{sub 2} high-k material is highly selective toward the substrate in the carbon-coated reactor, and the carbon-coating strategy thus allows minimizing the silicon recess of the active area of transistors. The authors eventually demonstrate that the carbon-coating strategy drastically reduces on-wafer metallic contamination. Finally, the consumption of carbon from the reactor during the etching process is discussed (and thus the amount of initial deposit that is required to protect the reactor walls) together with the best way of cleaning the reactor after a silicon etching process.

  2. High-energy x-ray diffractometer for nondestructive strain depth profile measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shorman, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, 21163 Irbid (Jordan); Jensen, T. C.; Gray, J. N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a lab-based high-energy x-ray diffraction system and a new approach to nondestructively measuring strain profiles in polycrystalline samples. This technique utilizes the tungsten K{sub ?1} characteristic radiation from a standard industrial x-ray tube. We introduce a simulation model that is used to determine strain values from data collected with this system. Examples of depth profiling are shown for shot peened aluminum and titanium samples. Profiles to 1 mm depth in aluminum and 300 ?m depth in titanium with a depth resolution of 20 ?m are presented.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustable penetration depth Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MgB2 single crystals CATALIN MARTIN, MATTHEW VAN... , Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland -- Magnetic penetration depth was studied... on ns, thus on...

  4. A depth-16 circuit for the AES S-box joan@imada.sdu.dk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    metric (gate count, depth, energy consumption, etc.). In practice, no known techniques can reliably find. Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Southern Denmark. Partially sup- ported

  5. BROUWER'S FIXED POINT THEOREM JASPER DEANTONIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    BROUWER'S FIXED POINT THEOREM JASPER DEANTONIO Abstract. In this paper we prove Brouwer's Fixed be used to make three sequences which all have p as their limit point. Date: July 27, 2009. 1 #12;2 JASPER

  6. Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the Impact on the Redox Chemistry of TiO2(110). Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the...

  7. Other Purdue Web points of Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Other Purdue Web points of interest. Purdue University Home Page --- Schedule of Classes Graduate School Agronomy Computer Science --- CS & E...

  8. Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

  9. AN INTERIOR POINT METHOD FOR MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. Interior point methods for nonlinear programs (NLP) are adapted for solution of mathematical programs with complementarity constraints (MPCCs).

  10. Effect of Creep of Ferritic Interconnect on Long-Term Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) compatibility with other components for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . However, creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature exceeds or even is less than half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the SOFCs under development are around 1,073 K. With around 1,800 K of the melting temperature for most stainless steel, possible creep deformation of ferritic IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of IC creep behavior on stack geometry change and the stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the changes in fuel- and air-channel geometry due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel IC, therefore indicating possible changes in SOFC performance under long-term operations. The ferritic IC creep model was incorporated into software SOFC-MP and Mentat-FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long-term steady-state operating temperature. It was found that the creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel- and the air-flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  11. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Karacheban; K. Afanaciev; M. Hempel; H. Henschel; W. Lange; J. L. Leonard; I. Levy; W. Lohmann; S. Schuwalow

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitoring systems at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Artificial diamond sensors are currently widely used as sensors in these systems. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm^2 size and 525 micrometer thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the detector was studied in a 5 GeV electron beam. The charge collection efficiency of the sensors was measured as a function of the bias voltage. It rises with the voltage, reaching about 10 % at 950 V. The signal size obtained from an electron crossing the stack at this voltage is about 22000 e, where e is the unit charge. Using the EUDET beam telescope, beam electrons trajectories where reconstructed, allowing to determine the position of the hits on the detector. The signal size is measured as a function of the hit position, showing variations of up to 20 % in the direction perpendicular to the beam and to the electric field. The measurement of the signal size as a function of the coordinate parallel to the electric field confirms the prediction that mainly electrons contribute to the signal. Also evidence for the presence of a polarization field was observed.

  12. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north?central Oklahoma: 19922008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Denn, Frederick; Flynn, Connor J.; Hodges, G. B.; Kiedron, Piotr; Koontz, Annette S.; Schlemmer, James; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow?band, interference?filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloudscreening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Suns elevation is greater than 9.25. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month?by?month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

  13. Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

  14. Differential Point Rendering Aravind Kalaiah Amitabh Varshney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Amitabh

    Differential Point Rendering Aravind Kalaiah Amitabh Varshney University of Maryland1 Abstract. We present a novel point rendering primitive, called Differential Point (DP), that captures the local-based models. This information is used to efficiently render the surface as a collection of local neighborhoods

  15. Nesting points in the sphere Dan Archdeacon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archdeacon, Dan

    Nesting points in the sphere Dan Archdeacon Dept. of Computer Science University of Vermont) Abstract Let G be a graph embedded in the sphere. A k-nest of a point x not in G is a collection C 1 nested if each point not on the graph has a k-nest. In this paper we

  16. Building a Parallel Cloud Storage System using OpenStacks Swift Object Store and Transformative Parallel I/O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Andrew J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lora, Kaleb D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shorter, Martel L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Our project consists of bleeding-edge research into replacing the traditional storage archives with a parallel, cloud-based storage solution. It used OpenStack's Swift Object Store cloud software. It's Benchmarked Swift for write speed and scalability. Our project is unique because Swift is typically used for reads and we are mostly concerned with write speeds. Cloud Storage is a viable archive solution because: (1) Container management for larger parallel archives might ease the migration workload; (2) Many tools that are written for cloud storage could be utilized for local archive; and (3) Current large cloud storage practices in industry could be utilized to manage a scalable archive solution.

  17. Measurement of the Tracer Gradient and Sampling System Bias of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Air Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes tracer gas uniformity and bias measurements made in the exhaust air discharge of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at Idaho National Laboratory. The measurements were a follow-up on earlier measurements which indicated a lack of mixing of the two ventilation streams being discharged via a common stack. The lack of mixing is detrimental to the accuracy of air emission measurements. The lack of mixing was confirmed in these new measurements. The air sampling probe was found to be out of alignment and that was corrected. The suspected sampling bias in the air sample stream was disproved.

  18. Segregation At Stacking Faults Within The ?? Phase Of Two Ni-base Superalloys Following Intermediate Temperature Creep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, G. B.; Shi, R.; Genc, Arda; Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Rae, C.M. F.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using state-of-the-art energy dispersive spectroscopy, it has been established for the first time that there exists significant compositional variation (enrichment of Co and Cr and deficiency of Ni and Al) associated with superlattice intrinsic stacking faults created in the ordered c0 precipitates following intermediate temperature deformation of two commercial superalloys. The results indicate that long range diffusion of these elements is intimately involved in the precipitate shearing process and is therefore closely linked to the time-dependent deformation of the alloys.

  19. Application of a generalized methodology for quantitative thermal diffusivity depth profile reconstruction in manufactured inhomogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Application of a generalized methodology for quantitative thermal diffusivity depth profile of the thermal diffusivity of inhomogeneous solids. In the depth profile reconstruction algorithm three channels Institute of Physics. S0021-8979 98 04305-9 I. INTRODUCTION Thermal diffusivity which depends

  20. Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Bernard

    Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal-thermal model to evaluate the use of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for depth profiling of port wine the desired effect. A diagnostic measurement of the distribution of laser energy deposition and ensuing

  1. On the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In nite Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bath, University of

    function which satis#12;ed the correct kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions for water waves of steady water waves on ows with #12;nite depth. The inde- pendent variable was a periodic functionOn the Symmetry Theory for Stokes Waves of Finite and In#12;nite Depth J.F. Toland 1 Background

  2. Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements Seema C. Shah sediment load calculations on the basis of depth-integrated sediment concentration measurements for channels with significant sediment transport in suspension. The series expansion of the modified Einstein

  3. Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1002, U.S.A. ABSTRACT. A lightweight, portable drilling system for coring up to 500 m depths has been developed and field-tested. The drilling system includes four major components

  4. Spectroscopic photothermal radiometry as a deep subsurface depth profilometric technique in semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    aspects for three-dimensional infrared PTR for a strongly absorbed incident radiation have been optical penetration depth is presented. Numerical simulations of the PTR response to the electronic transport parameters and the optical penetration depth of the excitation source are presented. Intensity

  5. Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    -surface structures and damage in materials, well beyond the optical penetration depth of illu- mination sources, iLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail and Manufacturing Ontario, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ont, Canada M5S 3G8 Abstract Laser Infrared Photothermal

  6. Discussion of "Location-Scale Depth" by I. Mizera and C. H. Muller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    the distance from zi (or any monotonic function of the distance) recovers the classical no- tion of Tukey depth to Tukey depth in hyperbolic space School of Information & Computer Science, Univ. of California, Irvine. By standard techniques for modeling hyperbolic space in Euclidean spaces, all the previous machinery of Tukey

  7. Ecient computation of location depth contours by methods of computational geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souvaine, Diane

    , and the center of the deepest contour is called the Tukey median. The only available implemented algorithms for the depth contours and the Tukey median are slow, which limits their usefulness. In this paper we describe practice. Keywords: Bagplot, Bivariate Median, Graphical Display, Robust Estimation, Tukey Depth 1

  8. A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

  9. Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district] Peat deposits contain on the order of 1/6 of the Earth's terrestrial fixed carbon (C), but uncertainty in peat depth precludes precise estimates of peat C storage. To assess peat C in the Northern Highlands

  10. Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen H.

    Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

  11. Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface mobility-Hames, and Thomas P. Quinn Abstract: Bed scour, egg pocket depths, and alteration of stream-bed surfaces by spawning chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) were measured in two Pacific Northwest gravel-bedded streams. Close

  12. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R. [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Kusdiantara, Rudy, E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Puspita, Dila, E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Sidarto, Kuntjoro A., E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y. [Department of Mathematics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  13. Project W420 Air Sampler Probe Placement Qualification Tests for Four 6-Inch Diameter Stacks: 296-A-25, 296-B-28, 296-S-22, and 296-T-18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maughan, A.D.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The W420 project covers the upgrading of effluent monitoring systems at six ventilation exhaust stacks in tank-farm facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The discharge stacks of five of the six systems will be completely replaced. Four of these (296-A-25, 296-B-28, 296-S-22, and 296-T-18) will be of the same size, 6-inches in diameter and about 12-ft high. This report documents tests that were conducted to verify that these four stacks meet the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of the air sampling probe. These criteria ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the location of the probe such that the extracted sample represents the whole. There are also criteria addressing the transport of the sample to the collection device. These are not covered in this report, but will need to be addressed later. These tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on a full-scale model of the 6-inch stick. The sequence of tests addresses the acceptability of the flow angle relative to the probe and the uniformity of air velocity and gaseous and particle tracers in the cross section of the stack. All tests were successful, and all acceptance criteria were met.

  14. Relationship of fly ash composition, refractive index, and density to in-stack opacity. Final report, June 1981-May 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowen, S.J.; Ensor, D.S.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report gives results of an investigation of the refractive index, density, and composition of fly ash from coal-fired boilers, aimed at determining: (1) the interrelationship of refractive index and composition, and (2) the significance of ash properties on in-stack plume opacity. A survey was made of 14 ash samples representing a wide range of coals. Light absorption was measured using the Integrating Plate Method, which compares light absorption through a clean filter to that through a filter with a single layer of aerosol. Only absorption is measured, while scattered light is integrated equally for both cases. This technique requires fine particles (volume absorbers) for easy interpretation of results. The technique was calibrated using an aerosol, methylene blue, with known absorption characteristics. The real part of the refractive index was measured by an oil immersion technique. The real refractive index and density were found to be highly correlated with composition with a multilinear regression equation. The absorbing refractive index was well correlated with ash carbon content. The modeling of in-stack opacity showed a weak dependence on ash optical properties for the range of ashes studied. The effect of the real part of the refractive index on opacity tends to be counterbalanced by particle density effects. Furthermore, most fly ash absorbs relatively little light.

  15. Tunneling magnetoresistance tuned by a vertical electric field in an AA-stacked graphene bilayer with double magnetic barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dali, E-mail: wangdali@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Center for Nano Science and Technology, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jin, Guojun, E-mail: gjin@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of a vertical electric field on the electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in an AA-stacked graphene bilayer modulated by the double magnetic barriers with parallel or antiparallel configuration. The results show that the electronic transmission properties in the system are sensitive to the magnetic-barrier configuration and the bias voltage between the graphene layers. In particular, it is found that for the antiparallel configuration, within the low energy region, the blocking effect is more obvious compared with the case for the parallel configuration, and even there may exist a transmission spectrum gap which can be arbitrarily tuned by the field-induced interlayer bias voltage. We also demonstrate that the significant discrepancy between the conductance for both parallel and antiparallel configurations would result in a giant tunneling magnetoresistance ratio, and further the maximal magnetoresistance ratio can be strongly modified by the interlayer bias voltage. This leads to the possible realization of high-quality magnetic sensors controlled by a vertical electric field in the AA-stacked graphene bilayer.

  16. ALFALFA HI Data Stacking III. Comparison of environmental trends in HI gas mass fraction and specific star formation rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabello, Silvia; Catinella, Barbara; Li, Cheng; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that both the star formation rate and the cold gas content of a galaxy depend on the local density out to distances of a few Megaparsecs. In this paper, we compare the environmental density dependence of the atomic gas mass fractions of nearby galaxies with the density dependence of their central and global specific star formation rates. We stack HI line spectra extracted from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey centered on galaxies with UV imaging from GALEX and optical imaging/spectroscopy from SDSS. We use these stacked spectra to evaluate the mean atomic gas mass fraction of galaxies in bins of stellar mass and local density. For galaxies with stellar masses less than 10^10.5 M_sun, the decline in mean atomic gas mass fraction with density is stronger than the decline in mean global and central specific star formation rate. The same conclusion does not hold for more massive galaxies. We interpret our results as evidence for ram-pressure stripping of atomic gas from the outer disks of low ...

  17. Summary of recent experiments on focusing of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam with a stack of conducting foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, P. A. [Luxim Corporation, Sunnyvale, California 94024 (United States) [Luxim Corporation, Sunnyvale, California 94024 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California 94720 (United States); Alexander, N. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)] [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Barnard, J. J.; Lund, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a summary of recent experiments on focusing of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated (TNSA) proton beam with a stack of thin conducting foils. The experiments were performed using the Phelix laser (GSI-Darmstadt) and the Titan laser, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of TNSA protons were experimentally observed for the first time at the Phelix laser user facility, in a specially engineered structure ('lens') consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50??m vacuum gaps. Follow up experiments using the Titan laser obtained results consistent with the collimation/focusing observed in the initial experiments using the Phelix. The Titan experiments employed improved, 25??m- and 50??m-gap targets and the new fine mesh diagnostic. All the experiments were carried out in a passive environment, i.e., no external fields were applied, and no neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. A plausible interpretation of the observed phenomena is that the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the conducting foils inhibits radial expansion of the beam.

  18. Interlayer Water Regulates the Bio-nano Interface of a \\b{eta}-sheet Protein stacking on Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenping Lv; Guiju Xu; Hongyan Zhang; Xin Li; Shengju Liu; Huan Niu; Dongsheng Xu; Renan Wu

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated an integrated bio-nano interface consisting of a \\b{eta}-sheet protein stacked onto graphene. We found that the stacking assembly of the model protein on graphene could be controlled by water molecules. The interlayer water filled within interstices of the bio-nano interface could suppress the molecular vibration of surface groups on protein, and could impair the CH...{\\pi} interaction driving the attraction of the protein and graphene. The intermolecular coupling of interlayer water would be relaxed by the relative motion of protein upon graphene due to the interaction between water and protein surface. This effect reduced the hindrance of the interlayer water against the assembly of protein on graphene, resulting an appropriate adsorption status of protein on graphene with a deep free energy trap. Thereby, the confinement and the relative sliding between protein and graphene, the coupling of protein and water, and the interaction between graphene and water all have involved in the modulation of behaviors of water molecules within the bio-nano interface, governing the hindrance of interlayer water against the protein assembly on hydrophobic graphene. These results provide a deep insight into the fundamental mechanism of protein adsorption onto graphene surface in water.

  19. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karacheban, O; Hempel, M; Henschel, H; Lange, W; Leonard, J L; Levy, I; Lohmann, W; Schuwalow, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitoring systems at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Artificial diamond sensors are currently widely used as sensors in these systems. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm^2 size and 525 micrometer thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the dete...

  20. Correlation for the Vapor Pressure of Heavy Water From the Triple Point to the Critical Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Correlation for the Vapor Pressure of Heavy Water From the Triple Point to the Critical Point Allan the vapor pressure of heavy water (D2O) from its triple point to its critical point. This work takes Institute of Physics. Key words: D2O; heavy water; ITS-90; vapor pressure. Contents 1. Introduction

  1. GRADE NUMBER OF CREDITS FACTOR QUALITY POINTS HOW TO COMPUTE A GRADE POINT AVERAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    .00 = __________ TOTALS: _________ __________ CREDITS QUALITY PTS. Divide total credits into total quality pointsGRADE NUMBER OF CREDITS FACTOR QUALITY POINTS HOW TO COMPUTE A GRADE POINT AVERAGE A _________ x 4 and the result is the grade point average (GPA). QUALITY PTS. = GPA ____________ = CREDITS

  2. TI-59 programmable calculator programs for in-stack opacity, venturi scrubbers, and electrostatic precipitators. User manual Jul 78-Jul 79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowen, S.J.; Ensor, D.S.; Sparks, L.E.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report explains the basic concepts of in-stack opacity as measured by in-stack opacity monitors. Also included are calculator programs that model the performance of venturi scrubbers and electrostatic precipitators. The effect of particulate control devices on in-stack opacity can be predicted by using these programs. The size distribution data input can be either in lognormal or histogram format. The opacity is calculated using Deirmendjian's approximation to Mie series to obtain extinction efficiencies. An alternative opacity program employing the exact Mie series solution is also described. The running time for this program is about 8 hours; that for the approximation program is 30 minutes. The accuracy of these programs is as good as the measured data input.

  3. Apparatus and methods for aligning holes through wheels and spacers and stacking the wheels and spacers to form a turbine rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, Robert Randolph (Greenville, SC); Palmer, Gene David (Clifton Park, NY); Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine rotor stacking fixture includes upstanding bolts for reception in aligned bolt holes in superposed aft disk, wheels and spacers and upstanding alignment rods received in openings of the disk, wheels and spacers during the rotor stacking assembly. The axially registering openings enable insertion of thin-walled tubes circumferentially about the rim of the rotor, with tight tolerances to the openings to provide supply and return steam for cooling buckets. The alignment rods have radial dimensions substantially less than their dimensions in a circumferential direction to allow for radial opening misalignment due to thermal expansion, tolerance stack-up and wheel-to-spacer mismatch due to rabbet mechanical growth. The circumferential dimension of the alignment rods affords tightly toleranced alignment of the openings through which the cooling tubes are installed.

  4. Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  5. [0268] First Galley Proofs MULTIPLICITIES, BOUNDARY POINTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Tin-Yau

    , multiplicity, extreme point, sharp point, boundary point. c Ð , Zagreb Paper OaM-0268 1 #12;2 W.S. CHEUNG NUMERICAL RANGES WAI-SHUN CHEUNG, XUHUA LIU AND TIN-YAU TAM (Communicated by C.-K. Li) Abstract, XUHUA LIU AND T.Y. TAM Given W(A), Embry [8] introduced M = M (A) := {x Cn : x Ax = x x}. In general

  6. Agreement Between Local and Global Measurements of the London Penetration Depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippman, Thomas M.; Kalisky, Beena; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of the superconducting penetration depth in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} appeared to disagree on the magnitude and curvature of {delta}{lambda}{sub ab}(T), even near optimal doping. These measurements were carried out on different samples grown by different groups. To understand the discrepancy, we use scanning SQUID susceptometry and a tunnel diode resonator to measure the penetration depth in a single sample. The penetration depth observed by the two techniques is identical with no adjustments. We conclude that any discrepancies arise from differences between samples, either in growth or crystal preparation.

  7. Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

  8. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files DataADVANCESDepartmentDepartmentalDeploymentDepthDepth

  9. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  10. Effective Immediately - OASIS Reservation Points Suspended -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CommitteesTeams Customer Training Interconnection Notices Rates Standards of Conduct Tariff TF Web Based Training Notice: Effective Immediately - OASIS Reservation Points...

  11. Josephson phase qubit with an optimal point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosugi, Norihito; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Hatakenaka, Noriyuki [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Matsuo, Shigemasa [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current fluctuations in a Josephson phase qubit are considered to be a source of decoherence, especially for pure dephasing. One possible way of evading such decoherence is to employ an optimal operation point as used in flux and charge qubits, where the qubit is insensitive to the bias fluctuations. However, there is no optimal point in a phase qubit since qubit energy splitting becomes monotonically smaller with increasing the bias current. Here we propose a phase qubit with an optimal point by introducing qubit energy splitting that depends nonmonotonically on the current bias realized in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions. The effect of junction asymmetry on the optimal point is also investigated.

  12. Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Prairie Pointe Townhomes in Greensburg, Kansas.

  13. Homework/Program #1 Solutions a) ( 1 point for each Hello*.java files (3 points), 1 point for each Hello*.class file (3 points)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Philip M.

    Homework/Program #1 Solutions 1. a) ( 1 point for each Hello*.java files (3 points), 1 point for each Hello*.class file (3 points) -rw-r--r--. 1 cs11xyz cs11sxyz 718 Oct 2 21:47 Hello2.class -rw-r--r--. 1 cs11xyz cs11sxyz 938 Oct 2 21:22 Hello2.java -rw-r--r--. 1 cs11xyz cs11sxyz 427 Oct 2 21:47 Hello

  14. Inexact and accelerated proximal point algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saverio Salzo

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 10, 2011 ... Abstract: We present inexact accelerated proximal point algorithms for minimizing a proper lower semicon- tinuous and convex function.

  15. Computing proximal points of nonconvex functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This would provide a solid foundation on which future .... theoretical base for nonconvex proximal points has already begun in works such as [31], [32], [5], [6].

  16. Solid-State Fault Current Limiter Development : Design and Testing Update of a 15kV SSCL Power Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ram Adapa; Mr. Dante Piccone

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The Solid-State Fault Current Limiter (SSCL) is a promising technology that can be applied to utility power delivery systems to address the problem of increasing fault currents associated with load growth. As demand continues to grow, more power is added to utility system either by increasing generator capacity or by adding distributed generators, resulting in higher available fault currents, often beyond the capabilities of the present infrastructure. The SSCL is power-electronics based equipment designed to work with the present utility system to address this problem. The SSCL monitors the line current and dynamically inserts additional impedance into the line in the event of a fault being detected. The SSCL is based on a modular design and can be configured for 5kV through 69kV systems at nominal current ratings of 1000A to 4000A. Results and Findings This report provides the final test results on the development of 15kV class SSCL single phase power stack. The scope of work included the design of the modular standard building block sub-assemblies, the design and manufacture of the power stack and the testing of the power stack for the key functional tests of continuous current capability and fault current limiting action. Challenges and Objectives Solid-State Current Limiter technology impacts a wide spectrum of utility engineering and operating personnel. It addresses the problems associated with load growth both at Transmission and Distribution class networks. The design concept is pioneering in terms of developing the most efficient and compact power electronics equipment for utility use. The initial test results of the standard building blocks are promising. The independent laboratory tests of the power stack are promising. However the complete 3 phase system needs rigorous testing for performance and reliability. Applications, Values, and Use The SSCL is an intelligent power-electronics device which is modular in design and can provide current limiting or current interrupting capabilities. It can be applied to variety of applications from distribution class to transmission class power delivery grids and networks. It can also be applied to single major commercial and industrial loads and distributed generator supplies. The active switching of devices can be further utilized for protection of substation transformers. The stress on the system can be reduced substantially improving the life of the power system. It minimizes the voltage sag by speedy elimination of heavy fault currents and promises to be an important element of the utility power system. DOE Perspective This development effort is now focused on a 15kV system. This project will help mitigate the challenges of increasing available fault current. DOE has made a major contribution in providing a cost effective SSCL designed to integrate seamlessly into the Transmission and Distribution networks of today and the future. Approach SSCL development program for a 69kV SSCL was initiated which included the use of the Super GTO advanced semiconductor device which won the 2007 R&D100 Award. In the beginning, steps were identified to accomplish the economically viable design of a 69kV class Solid State Current Limiter that is extremely reliable, cost effective, and compact enough to be applied in urban transmission. The prime thrust in design and development was to encompass the 1000A and the 3000A ratings and provide a modular design to cover the wide range of applications. The focus of the project was then shifted to a 15kV class SSCL. The specifications for the 15kV power stack are reviewed. The design changes integrated into the 15kV power stack are discussed. In this Technical Update the complete project is summarized followed by a detailed test report. The power stack independent high voltage laboratory test requirements and results are presented. Keywords Solid State Current Limiter, SSCL, Fault Current Limiter, Fault Current Controller, Power electronics controller, Intelligent power-electronics Device, IED

  17. Modeling of Pressurized Electrochemistry and Steam-Methane Reforming in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and the Effects on Thermal and Electrical Stack Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes work done to extend the electrochemical performance and methane reforming submodels to include the effects of pressurization and to demonstrate this new modeling capability by simulating large stacks operating on methane-rich fuel under pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. Pressurized operation boosts electrochemical performance, alters the kinetics of methane reforming, and effects the equilibrium composition of methane fuels. This work developed constitutive submodels that couple the electrochemistry, reforming, and pressurization to yield an increased capability of the modeling tool for prediction of SOFC stack performance.

  18. Updated On: 11/7/2012 16:28 Teams: Off In The Gym points Bromuda Triangle Open points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Diamantides 0 #12;I Was Saying Boourns points Diesel points Faaantastic points Michael Chafetz - C 0 Steven Webber 0 Taylor Goudreau 0 Jared Lowe 0 #12;GREEDIANS points The Brown Bears points Wanna go Stetty West

  19. Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid...

  20. Depth inversion for nonlinear waves shoaling over a barred-beach 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    and calibrated for mild slopes are applied to the barred-beach. Expectedly, errors on depth prediction occur techniques such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), are still quite problematic under the current state

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

  2. Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 2. Prediction of bioluminescent source depth from spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Mark

    of a passive method (as opposed to active methods such as RADAR or LIDAR) to identify hostile ships, submarines this relative importance [Nealson, 1993]. Therefore the depth distribution of bioluminescent organisms is of eco

  3. Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Donita Lynn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and productivity (sustainability) of trees within terrestrial ecosystems. Tree planting depth, i.e. location of the root collar relative to soil grade, is of particular concern for tree growth, development, and performance in the landscape. A series of model...

  4. Shear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table earthquake site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    ..................................................................................................... 6 Summary of seismic refraction/reflection methodsShear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table ­ earthquake site response measurements for Valley County, Idaho Lee M. Liberty and Gabriel M. Gribler, Boise State University Center

  5. The Control Point Policy Stanley B. Gershwin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershwin, Stanley B.

    ://web.mit.edu/manuf-sys Massachusetts Institute of Technology Spring, 2012 The Control Point Policy 1/33 Copyright c 2012 Stanley B-time calculation. The purpose of real-time scheduling in a factory is to make decisions in response to random failures, change in demand, etc. The Control Point Policy 4/33 Copyright c 2012 Stanley B. Gershwin. All

  6. Form drag at Three Tree Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Sally

    form drag with bottom pressure sensors #12;Oscillatory dynamics tidal energy converted to internal waves, eddies and mixing no tidally averaged work done on system slack tide: background tilt flood & ebb Puget Sound, WA Point Three Tree Pressure sensors (PPODs) at Three Tree Point (TTP) PPODs #12;PPOD

  7. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1984-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  8. Infrared fixed point in quantum Einstein gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Nagy; J. Krizsan; K. Sailer

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed the renormalization group analysis of the quantum Einstein gravity in the deep infrared regime for different types of extensions of the model. It is shown that an attractive infrared point exists in the broken symmetric phase of the model. It is also shown that due to the Gaussian fixed point the IR critical exponent $\

  9. Partnering: an in-depth comparison of its elements to quality improvement principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozada, Anthony David

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIIrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Approved as to style and content by: Donald A...

  10. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

  11. Channeling of electron transport to improve collection efficiency in mesoporous titanium dioxide dye sensitized solar cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fakharuddin, Azhar; Ahmed, Irfan; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Jose, Rajan, E-mail: rjose@ump.edu.my, E-mail: joserajan@gmail.com [Nanostructured Renewable Energy Materials Laboratory, Faculty of Industrial Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, 26300 Pahang (Malaysia); Khalidin, Zulkeflee [Faculty of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, 26300 Pahang (Malaysia)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) modules are generally made by interconnecting large photoelectrode strips with optimized thickness (?14??m) and show lower current density (J{sub SC}) compared with their single cells. We found out that the key to achieving higher J{sub SC} in large area devices is optimized photoelectrode volume (V{sub D}), viz., thickness and area which facilitate the electron channeling towards working electrode. By imposing constraints on electronic path in a DSC stack, we achieved >50% increased J{sub SC} and ?60% increment in photoelectric conversion efficiency in photoelectrodes of similar V{sub D} (?3.36??10{sup ?4} cm{sup 3}) without using any metallic grid or a special interconnections.

  12. L-connect routing of die surface pads to the die edge for stacking in a 3D array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petersen, Robert W. (Dublin, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated circuit chips and method of routing the interface pads from the face of the chip or die to one or more sidewall surfaces of the die. The interconnection is routed from the face of the die to one or more edges of the die, then routed over the edge of the die and onto the side surface. A new pad is then formed on the sidewall surface, which allows multiple die or chips to be stacked in a three-dimensional array, while enabling follow-on signal routing from the sidewall pads. The routing of the interconnects and formation of the sidewall pads can be carried out in an L-connect or L-shaped routing configuration, using a metalization process such as laser pantography.

  13. High blue-near ultraviolet photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene-MoS{sub 2}-metal heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wi, Sungjin; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Liu, Amy C.; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan, E-mail: xiaoganl@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study on the photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures in which MoS{sub 2} layers are doped with various plasma species. In comparison with undoped heterostructures, such doped ones exhibit significantly improved quantum efficiencies in both photovoltaic and photoconductive modes. This indicates that plasma-doping-induced built-in potentials play an important role in photocurrent generation. As compared to indium-tin-oxide/ MoS{sub 2}/metal structures, the presented graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures exhibit greatly enhanced quantum efficiencies in the blue-near ultraviolet region, which is attributed to the low density of recombination centers at graphene/MoS{sub 2} heterojunctions. This work advances the knowledge for making photo-response devices based on layered materials.

  14. Recombination dynamics of a localized exciton bound at basal stacking faults within the m-plane ZnO film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, S.; Liu, W.-R. [Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Hsu, H. C., E-mail: hsuhc@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: wfhsieh@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, 701 Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lin, B. H.; Hsu, C.-H. [Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Kuo, C. C.; Hsieh, W. F., E-mail: hsuhc@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: wfhsieh@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Eriksson, M. O.; Holtz, P. O. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkping University, Linkping (Sweden)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the carrier dynamics near basal stacking faults (BSFs) in m-plane ZnO epitaxial film. The behaviors of the type-II quantum wells related to the BSFs are verified through time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence. The decay time of the emission of BSFs is observed to have a higher power law value and longer decay time than the emission of the donor-bound excitons. The spectral-dependent decay times reveal a phenomenon of carriers migrating among band tail states, which are related to the spatial distribution of the type-II quantum wells formed by the BSFs. A high density of excited carriers leads to a band bending effect, which in turn causes a blue-shift of the emission peak of BSFs with a broadened distribution of band tail states.

  15. Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hals, Kjetil M D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - USDOE-LANL Freeze Workshop.ppt

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    USDOE-LANL Freeze Workshop 1 Glenn Skala 01FEB05 Fuel Cell Activities Automotive PEM Stack Freeze Requirements & Suggested Fundamental Studies USDOE-LANL Freeze Workshop 2...

  17. S. Wasterlain, D. Candusso, F. Harel, X. Franois, D. Hissel. Development of test instruments and protocols for the diagnostic of fuel cell stacks. Accept dans Journal of Power Sources suite 12th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for the integration of fuel cell systems into real applications such as vehicles or stationary gensets and protocols for the diagnostic of fuel cell stacks. Accepté dans Journal of Power Sources suite à 12th Ulm for the diagnostic of fuel cell stacks Sébastien Wasterlain 1,2 , Denis Candusso 1,3,* , Fabien Harel 1,3 , Daniel

  18. Depth distribution of lithium in oxidized binary Al-Li alloys determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and neutron depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, K.K. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)); Williams, D.B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)); Newbury, D.E.; Chi, P.; Downing, R.G.; Lamaza, G. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidation of binary Al-Li alloys during short exposures at 530 C and long exposures at 200 C was studied with regard to the Li distribution. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to obtain quantitative Li depth profiles across the surface oxide layer and the underlying alloy. The underlying alloy was depleted in Li as a result of oxidation at 530 and 200 C. The SIMS and NDP results showed good mutual agreement and were used to evaluate the oxide thickness, the Li concentration at the oxide-ally interface, and the mass balance between oxide and alloy. The Li depletion profiles in the alloy were also calculated using the interdiffusion coefficients reported in the literature and compared with the measured profiles; the two profiles differed at 530 C but showed good agreement at 200 C.

  19. Direct observation of bias-dependence potential distribution in metal/HfO{sub 2} gate stack structures by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under device operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamashita, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science, Advanced Electric Materials Center, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, NIMS Beamline Station at SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, NIMS Beamline Station at SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Chikyo, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Advanced Electric Materials Center, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Although gate stack structures with high-k materials have been extensively investigated, there are some issues to be solved for the formation of high quality gate stack structures. In the present study, we employed hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in operating devices. This method allows us to investigate bias dependent electronic states, while keeping device structures intact. Using this method, we have investigated electronic states and potential distribution in gate metal/HfO{sub 2} gate stack structures under device operation. Analysis of the core levels shifts as a function of the bias voltage indicated that a potential drop occurred at the Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface for a Pt/HfO{sub 2} gate structure, while a potential gradient was not observed at the Ru/HfO{sub 2} interface for a Ru/HfO{sub 2} gate structure. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that a thicker SiO{sub 2} layer was formed at the Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface, indicating that the origin of potential drop at Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface is formation of the thick SiO{sub 2} layer at the interface. The formation of the thick SiO{sub 2} layer at the metal/high-k interface might concern the Fermi level pinning, which is observed in metal/high-k gate stack structures.

  20. Designing a 3-D optical multilayer due to merging the concepts of stacked and planar-integrated free-space optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Designing a 3-D optical multilayer due to merging the concepts of stacked and planar-integrated free-space optics M. Jarczynski, J. Jahns Optical interconnects aim to overcome the communication dimension [1]. For the optical implementation of 3-D setups suitable microoptics approaches are re- quired