National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for depth point stacked

  1. Single point aerosol sampling: Evaluation of mixing and probe performance in a nuclear stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, J.C.; Fairchild, C.I.; Wood, G.O.; Ortiz, C.A.; Muyshondt, A.; McFarland, A.R. |

    1994-12-31

    Alternative Reference Methodologies (ARMS) have been developed for sampling of radionuclide; from stacks and ducts that differ from the methods required by the US EPA. The EPA methods are prescriptive in selection of sampling locations and in design of sampling probes whereas the alternative methods are performance driven. Tests were conducted in a stack at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the efficacy of the ARMS. Coefficients of variation of the velocity tracer gas, and aerosol particle profiles were determined at three sampling locations. Results showed numerical criteria placed upon the coefficients of variation by the ARMs were met at sampling stations located 9 and 14 stack diameters from flow entrance, but not at a location that is 1.5 diameters downstream from the inlet. Experiments were conducted to characterize the transmission of 10 {mu}m aerodynamic equivalent diameter liquid aerosol particles through three types of sampling probes. The transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the concentration in the free stream) was 107% for a 113 L/min (4-cfm) an isokinetic shrouded probe, but only 20% for an isokinetic probe that follows the EPA requirements. A specially designed isokinetic probe showed a transmission ratio of 63%. The shrouded probe performance would conform to the ARM criteria; however, the isokinetic probes would not.

  2. Single point aerosol sampling: Evaluation of mixing and probe performance in a nuclear stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, J.C.; Fairchild, C.I.; Wood, G.O.; Ortiz, C.A.; Muyshondt, A.

    1996-01-01

    Alternative reference methodologies have been developed for sampling of radionuclides from stacks and ducts, which differ from the methods previously required by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. These alternative reference methodologies have recently been approved by the U.S. EPA for use in lieu of the current standard techniques. The standard EPA methods are prescriptive in selection of sampling locations and in design of sampling probes whereas the alternative reference methodologies are performance driven. Tests were conducted in a stack at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the efficacy of some aspects of the alternative reference methodologies. Coefficients of variation of velocity, tracer gas, and aerosol particle profiles were determined at three sampling locations. Results showed that numerical criteria placed upon the coefficients of variation by the alternative reference methodologies were met at sampling stations located 9 and 14 stack diameters from the flow entrance, but not at a location that was 1.5 diameters downstream from the inlet. Experiments were conducted to characterize the transmission of 10 {mu}m aerodynamic diameter liquid aerosol particles through three types of sampling probes. The transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the concentration in the free stream) was 107% for a 113 L min{sup {minus}1} (4-cfm) anistokinetic shrouded probe, but only 20% for an isokinetic probe that follows the existing EPA standard requirements. A specially designed isokinetic probe showed a transmission ratio of 63%. The shrouded probe performance would conform to the alternative reference methodologies criteria; however, the isokinetic probes would not. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Fuel cell stack arrangements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA); Somers, Edward V. (Murrysville, PA)

    1982-01-01

    Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

  4. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  5. PAM stack test utility

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-08-22

    The pamtest utility calls the normal PAM hooks using a service and username supplied on the command line. This allows an administratory to test any one of many configured PAM stacks as any existing user on the machine.

  6. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  7. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  8. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  9. Porous coolant tube holder for fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT)

    1981-01-01

    A coolant tube holder for a stack of fuel cells is a gas porous sheet of fibrous material adapted to be sandwiched between a cell electrode and a nonporous, gas impervious flat plate which separates adjacent cells. The porous holder has channels in one surface with coolant tubes disposed therein for carrying coolant through the stack. The gas impervious plate is preferably bonded to the opposite surface of the holder, and the channel depth is the full thickness of the holder.

  10. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Peter M. (Hamburg, NY); Reger, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  11. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  12. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  13. Thermoacoustic pin stacks. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keolian, R.M.

    1994-07-06

    The construction and testing of a new stack geometry for thermoacoustic engines, called a pin stack, has been started. The stack is at the heart of a class of heat engines that use sound to deliver refrigeration, or use a temperature difference to generate sound. Calculations show that the pin stack should make useful improvements in engine efficiency. About 2000 wires will be hand sewn in a hexagonal lattice between the hot and cold heat exchangers in a sound source using low pressure neon gas between 300 K and 77 K. Thermoacoustics, Refrigeration, Acoustic source, Heat pump.

  14. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  15. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  16. bgq_stack | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0000001dbfffbe40 0000000000000000 ---STACK The call stack contains a list of instruction addresses. For these to be useful, the addresses need to be translated back to a...

  17. Adiabatic Fuel Cell Stack - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adiabatic Fuel Cell Stack Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryAdiabatic fuel cell stacks are simple, low-cost and...

  18. 293-F Stack Reduction Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Demoltion of the 293-F Stack. A look at the environmental management at the Savannah River Site. Training and experience benefits for employees and better management of environmental safety.

  19. Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks The stack characterization system (SCS) is a tele-operated remote system that collects samples and data to characterize the quantitative and qualitative levels of contamination inside off-gas stacks protecting workers from the physical, radiological and chemical hazards of deteriorating contaminated stacks. PDF icon

  20. Pressurized electrolysis stack with thermal expansion capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Richard Scott

    2015-07-14

    The present techniques provide systems and methods for mounting an electrolyzer stack in an outer shell so as to allow for differential thermal expansion of the electrolyzer stack and shell. Generally, an electrolyzer stack may be formed from a material with a high coefficient of thermal expansion, while the shell may be formed from a material having a lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion may lead to damage to the electrolyzer stack as the shell may restrain the thermal expansion of the electrolyzer stack. To allow for the differences in thermal expansion, the electrolyzer stack may be mounted within the shell leaving a space between the electrolyzer stack and shell. The space between the electrolyzer stack and the shell may be filled with a non-conductive fluid to further equalize pressure inside and outside of the electrolyzer stack.

  1. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  2. ARM - Measurement - Snow depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send Measurement : Snow depth Snow depth measured at the surface Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  3. Thermoacoustics in pin-array stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W. ); Keolian, R.M. )

    1993-08-01

    A new thermoacoustic stack geometry, the pin array, is described. Analytical expressions for velocity and temperature in the pin array are derived, and potential advantages of the pin stack are demonstrated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative all modes failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  5. Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tennessee Florida Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks Challenge As part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Central Campus Closure Project, the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program must demolish the central gaseous waste system and associated facilities including the off-gas stacks and systems. These stacks range from 75 feet to 250 feet tall. Stacks are made of steel reinforced concrete

  6. Protections = Defenses in Depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protections = Defenses in Depth Protections = Defense in Depth We use a defense-in-depth strategy to protect the environment. August 1, 2013 Protections = Defense in Depth: Protection #1: Remove the source of contamination; Protection #2: Stabilize, retain or remove contaminated sediments; Protection #3: Sample for known and unexpected contaminants Clean the Past: Protections Protections: Cleanup Cleanup 101 Corrective Measures Process Protection #1: Remove the Source Example Cleanup: Removal of

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems PROJECT PROFILE: Mechanically Stacked Hybrid Photovoltaic Tandems Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $999,999 Tandem cell architectures present a path toward higher module efficiencies over single junction designs. This project will develop a gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) on silicon mechanically stacked voltage-matched

  8. Stack Characterization System Development and Testing (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Stack Characterization System Development and Testing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stack Characterization System Development and Testing Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as the rest of the U.S. Department of Energy community, has numerous off-gas stacks that need to be decommissioned, demolished, and packaged for disposal. Disposal requires a waste disposition determination phase. Process knowledge typically makes a worst-case scenario decision

  9. Manifold seal for fuel cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitten, Phillip F. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1989-01-01

    An assembly for sealing a manifold to a stack of fuel cells includes a first resilient member for providing a first sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. A second resilient member provides a second sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. The first and second resilient members are retained in such a manner as to define an area therebetween adapted for retaining a sealing composition.

  10. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  11. Control of electrode depth in electroslag remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Damkroger, Brian K.

    2002-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace by driving the electrode at a nominal speed based upon melting rate and geometry while making minor proportional adjustments based on a measured metric of the electrode immersion depth. Electrode drive speed is increased if a measured metric of electrode immersion depth differs from a set point by a predetermined amount, indicating that the tip is too close to the surface of a slag pool. Impedance spikes are monitored to adjust the set point for the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon one or more properties of the impedance spikes.

  12. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

    2010-07-13

    A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

  13. Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons from the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned.

  14. G-1 Stack Pattern 1: Instrument Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stack Pattern 1: Instrument Testing. The motivation for this flight is to test instruments and to evaluate characteristic values of key measurements at different heights in both clear air and in the presence of clouds. This will be one of the first flights to be done during the campaign. We would like to fly one stack of four (4) flight legs approximately 14 nm upwind of Will Rogers World Airport, followed by a single stack of six (6) horizontal flight legs approximately 14 nm downwind of this

  15. 2010sr30_Stacks_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Saturday, October 23, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 292-2484 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov Recovery Act to Fell Two Cold War Era Reactor Stacks Aiken, S.C. - Today, the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) removed two exhaust stacks from the Site's P & R reactors. With less than 40 pounds of dynamite and in a matter of seconds, the two 145-foot tall, 700-ton stacks that have towered over the P and R Reactors for more than 50 years came down. The demolition is

  16. Stacked vapor fed amtec modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sievers, Robert K. (North Huntingdon, PA)

    1989-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

  17. Novel PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEA Novel PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEA This project received DOE...

  18. Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP Applications Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP ...

  19. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE ...

  20. Stack sampling apparatus (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Stack sampling apparatus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stack sampling ... Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote ...

  1. Stack sampling apparatus (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Stack sampling apparatus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stack sampling apparatus An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, ...

  2. Transport in PEMFC Stacks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in PEMFC Stacks Transport in PEMFC Stacks Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 - October 1, 2009 PDF icon mittelsteadt_kickoff.pdf More Documents & Publications 2006 DOE Hydrogen Program Poly (p-phenylene Sulfonic Acid)s with Frozen-in Free Volume for use in High Temperature Fuel Cells Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells A Discussion on Improved HTMs

  3. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley, Dana A. (New Milford, CT); Farooque, Mohammad (Danbury, CT)

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  4. Convective Cooling and Passive Stack Improvements in Motors (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL in convective cooling and passive stack improvements in motors.

  5. Technical description of Stack 296-B-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridge, T.M.

    1994-11-15

    Of particular concern to facilities on the Hanford site is Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 40, Part 61, Subpart H, ``National emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.`` Assessments of facility stacks and potential radionuclide emissions determined whether these stacks would be subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. Stack 296-B-5 exhausts 221-BB building which houses tanks containing B Plant steam condensate and B Plant process condensate from the operation of the low-level waste concentrator. The assessment of potential radionuclide emissions from the 296-B-5 stack resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual of less than 0.1 millirem per year. Therefore, the stack is not subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. However, the sampling and monitoring system must be in compliance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5. Currently, 296-B-5 is sampled continuously with a record sampler and continuous air monitor (CAM).

  6. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meskanick, Gerald R. (Elizabeth, PA); Rosso, David T. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  7. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

    1993-04-13

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  8. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2005-01-25

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell. Other polarization curves may be generated and used for fuel cell stack monitoring based on different operating pressures, temperatures, hydrogen quantities.

  9. Dose assessment from potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order required RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which points are subject to the continuous emission sampling requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61 (40 CFR 61), Subpart H, and (2) continuously sample radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Any stack identified in the assessment as having potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1} must have a compliant sampling system. In addition, a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was signed on. February 7, 1994. The FFCA required that all unregistered stacks on the Hanford Site be assessed. This requirement increased the number of stacks to be assessed to 123 stacks. Six methods for performing the assessments are described. An initial assessment using only the HEPA filtration factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions which would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}. When the other methods were applied the number was reduced to 20 stacks. The paper discusses reasons for these overestimates.

  10. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-02-17

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell.

  11. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  12. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulkowski, J.E.

    1986-10-21

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will. 3 figs.

  13. Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-02

    Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

  14. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulkowski, John E. (Newark, DE)

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will.

  15. Mobility and coalescence of stacking fault tetrahedra in Cu

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martínez, Enrique; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2015-03-13

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are ubiquitous defects in face-centered cubic metals. They are produced during cold work plastic deformation, quenching experiments or under irradiation. From a dislocation point of view, the SFTs are comprised of a set of stair-rod dislocations at the (110) edges of a tetrahedron bounding triangular stacking faults. These defects are extremely stable, increasing their energetic stability as they grow in size. At the sizes visible within transmission electron microscope they appear nearly immobile. Contrary to common belief, we show in this report, using a combination of molecular dynamics and temperature accelerated dynamics, how small SFTs canmore » diffuse by temporarily disrupting their structure through activated thermal events. More over, we demonstrate that the diffusivity of defective SFTs is several orders of magnitude higher than perfect SFTs, and can be even higher than isolated vacancies. Finally, we show how SFTs can coalesce, forming a larger defect in what is a new mechanism for the growth of these omnipresent defects.« less

  16. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants registered stack source assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency,, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site . The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified a total of 16 stacks as having potential emissions that,would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

  17. Fundamental stack and system issues in molten carbonate fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.; Mayfield, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    Stack research and system issues in molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) technology development and commercialization are discussed within context of status of MCFC development and commercialization in US. Status of MCFC development is addressed. Major known fundamental stack research issues remaining for the MCFC technology are identified and discussed. The cathode remains a focal point of performance improvement and cost reduction. The various aspects of MCFC power plant network and systems issues are also addressed and discussed. These include cost, heat loss management, startup and shutdown modes, dynamic response, footprint, packaging and integration, parasitic power losses, pressurization and reforming. Potential of MCFC networks is discussed. With the initial demonstration of full-area, fullheight 250-kW to 2-MW MCFC power plants, the spatial configuration of the MCFC stacks into networks in the fuel cell power plant takes on importance for the first time.

  18. Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MEAs | Department of Energy Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEAs Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEAs This presentation, which focuses on novel stack concepts, was given by Di-Jia Liu of Argonne National Laboratory at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects. PDF icon new_fc_liu_argonne.pdf More Documents & Publications Novel PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEA

  19. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malba, V.

    1998-11-10

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: (1) holding individual chips for batch processing, (2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, (3) opening vias in the dielectric, (4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and (5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume. 3 figs.

  20. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  1. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen (Pinole, CA)

    2011-08-16

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  2. SOFC cells and stacks for complex fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward M. Sabolsky; Matthew Seabaugh; Katarzyna Sabolsky; Sergio A. Ibanez; Zhimin Zhong

    2007-07-01

    Reformed hydrocarbon and coal (syngas) fuels present an opportunity to integrate solid oxide fuel cells into the existing fuel infrastructure. However, these fuels often contain impurities or additives that may lead to cell degradation through sulfur poisoning or coking. Achieving high performance and sulfur tolerance in SOFCs operating on these fuels would simplify system balance of plant and sequestration of anode tail gas. NexTech Materials, Ltd., has developed a suite of materials and components (cells, seals, interconnects) designed for operation in sulfur-containing syngas fuels. These materials and component technologies have been integrated into an SOFC stack for testing on simulated propane, logistic fuel reformates and coal syngas. Details of the technical approach, cell and stack performance is reported.

  3. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: 1) holding individual chips for batch processing, 2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, 3) opening vias in the dielectric, 4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and 5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume.

  4. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  5. Subsea BOP stack built for Caspian drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-16

    This paper reports that Shaffer Inc. completed construction of a multi-million dollar subsea drilling system for Caspmorneftegas, an operating company in the Republic of Azerbaijan. The subsea stack will be installed on the semisubmersible drilling rig Shelf 7 currently under construction in Astrakan in the Soviet Union. Shelf 7 will drill wells in the Caspian Sea, one of the most prolific production areas in the Soviet Union.

  6. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  7. Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K.; Beaman, Joseph J.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

  8. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Murray (Newington, CT); Schroll, Craig R. (West Hartford, CT)

    1985-10-22

    Electrical short protection is provided in an electrolytic cell stack by the combination of a thin, nonporous ceramic shield and a noble metal foil disposed on opposite sides of the sealing medium in a gas manifold gasket. The thin ceramic shield, such as alumina, is placed between the porous gasket and the cell stack face at the margins of the negative end plate to the most negative cells to impede ion current flow. The noble metal foil, for instance gold, is electrically coupled to the negative potential of the stack to collect positive ions at a harmless location away from the stack face. Consequently, corrosion products from the stack structure deposit on the foil rather than on the stack face to eliminate electrical shorting of cells at the negative end of the stack.

  9. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  10. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  11. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-04-01

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  12. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Neutzler, Jay K. (Peoria, AZ)

    1997-01-01

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. The fuel distribution manifold is formed from a hydrophilic-like material to redistribute water produced by fuel and oxygen reacting at the cathode. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  13. Co-flow planar SOFC fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-30

    A co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell stack with an integral, internal manifold and a casing/holder to separately seal the cell. This construction improves sealing and gas flow, and provides for easy manifolding of cell stacks. In addition, the stack construction has the potential for an improved durability and operation with an additional increase in cell efficiency. The co-flow arrangement can be effectively utilized in other electrochemical systems requiring gas-proof separation of gases.

  14. PEM Stack Manufacturing: Industry Status | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stack Manufacturing: Industry Status PEM Stack Manufacturing: Industry Status Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011. PDF icon PEM Stack Manufacturing: Industry Status More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Manufacturing: American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Summit Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Manufacturing Needs A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and

  15. Cassette less SOFC stack and method of assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meinhardt, Kerry D

    2014-11-18

    A cassette less SOFC assembly and a method for creating such an assembly. The SOFC stack is characterized by an electrically isolated stack current path which allows welded interconnection between frame portions of the stack. In one embodiment electrically isolating a current path comprises the step of sealing a interconnect plate to a interconnect plate frame with an insulating seal. This enables the current path portion to be isolated from the structural frame an enables the cell frame to be welded together.

  16. Stacked for Success: Celebrating National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Stacked for Success: Celebrating National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day Stacked for Success: Celebrating National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day October 8, 2015 - 11:15am Addthis Stacked for Success: Celebrating National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day David Friedman Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Do you know the atomic weight of hydrogen? It's 1.008, which makes today, October 8, a great day to celebrate National Hydrogen and Fuel

  17. Conceptual design report for Project W-420, stack monitoring upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, D.T., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-10

    This document provides the Conceptual Design for the upgrade of seven designated Tank Farm stacks to meet NESHAP Title 40, CFR, Part 61, Sub-part H requirements.

  18. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, M.; Schroll, C.R.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention relates to a device for preventing the electrical shorting of a stack of electrolytic cells during an extended period of operation. The device has application to fuel cell and other electrolytic cell stacks operating in low or high temperature corrosive environments. It is of particular importance for use in a stack of fuel cells operating with molten metal carbonate electrolyte for the production of electric power. Also, the device may have application in similar technology involving stacks of electrolytic cells for electrolysis to decompose chemical compounds.

  19. Manifold seal structure for fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, William P.

    1988-01-01

    The seal between the sides of a fuel cell stack and the gas manifolds is improved by adding a mechanical interlock between the adhesive sealing strip and the abutting surface of the manifolds. The adhesive is a material which can flow to some extent when under compression, and the mechanical interlock is formed providing small openings in the portion of the manifold which abuts the adhesive strip. When the manifolds are pressed against the adhesive strips, the latter will flow into and through the manifold openings to form buttons or ribs which mechanically interlock with the manifolds. These buttons or ribs increase the bond between the manifolds and adhesive, which previously relied solely on the adhesive nature of the adhesive.

  20. Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keolian, Robert M.; Swift, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid volume that is adjacent the surface within which viscous energy losses occur. Increasing the volume ratio results in an increase in the ratio of transferred thermal energy to viscous energy losses, with a concomitant increase in operating efficiency of the thermoacoustic converter. The convex surfaces may be easily provided by a pin array having elements arranged parallel to the direction of acoustic oscillations and with effective radial dimensions much smaller than the thicknesses of the viscous energy loss and thermoacoustic energy transfer volumes.

  1. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including

  2. ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all

  3. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, George T. (15 Cherry Hills Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1992-01-01

    An off-gas stack for a melter comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes pervents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  4. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, G.T.

    1991-04-08

    This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  5. FEDERAL FACILITY COMPLIANCE AGREEMENT (FFCA) STACK ISOLATION PROJECT FUNCTIONS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRANBARGER, R.K.

    2003-12-16

    This document delineates the functions and requirements for the FFCA Stack Isolation Project for the 244-A, 244-BX, 244-5, and 244-TX DCRTs. The isolation of each ventilation system and stack includes the electrical, instrumentation, and mechanical isolation of the ventilation system and the installation of primary and annulus breather filters to provide passive ventilation to meet the FFCA requirements.

  6. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 2_lanl.pdf More Documents & Publications Water Transport Exploratory Studies Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting Agenda

  7. Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiser, Carl A. (Glastonbury, CT); Maricle, Donald L. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1987-04-21

    A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack.

  8. Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiser, C.A.; Maricle, D.L.

    1987-04-21

    A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack. 6 figs.

  9. Talking Points

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Talking Points NATURAL GAS MARKET INTEGRITY: How EIA Helps Presentation by William F. Hederman Congressional Research Service at EIA 30 th Anniversary Conference April 8, 2008 Washington, DC INTRODUCTION 1. Price levels and volatility cause suspicions. 2. Actual integrity and perceived integrity are both important for markets. 3. EIA was created in response to a crisis of confidence in energy market information. CANDIDATE INTEGRITY CRITERIA 1. Transparency 2. Efficiency (gathering, reporting,

  10. Air-Breathing Fuel Cell Stack - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air-Breathing Fuel Cell Stack Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology Air-breathing passive fuel cell stack Air-breathing passive fuel cell stack Technology Marketing SummaryLANL has developed a fuel cell for portable power applications in laptop computers, toys, and other appliances with low-power demand.DescriptionThe increasing number of portable electronic devices on the market today-from laptop computers to remote-controlled toys-is creating a demand for improved,

  11. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  12. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunz, H. Russell (Vernon, CT); Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT); Katz, Murray (Newington, CT)

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  13. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunz, H.R.; Guthrie, R.J.; Katz, M.

    1987-03-17

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate. 5 figs.

  14. Fabrication of high gradient insulators by stack compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, John Richardson; Sanders, Dave; Hawkins, Steven Anthony; Norona, Marcelo

    2014-04-29

    Individual layers of a high gradient insulator (HGI) are first pre-cut to their final dimensions. The pre-cut layers are then stacked to form an assembly that is subsequently pressed into an HGI unit with the desired dimension. The individual layers are stacked, and alignment is maintained, using a sacrificial alignment tube that is removed after the stack is hot pressed. The HGI's are used as high voltage vacuum insulators in energy storage and transmission structures or devices, e.g. in particle accelerators and pulsed power systems.

  15. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

    2008-07-01

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  16. Progress Update: P&R Reactor Stacks Demolition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    October 2010 progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The demolition of nuclear reactor stacks and filling the reactors with grout to reduce the site footprint.

  17. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistentmore » tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  18. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, E.G.

    1985-07-03

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases. 1 fig.

  19. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beverly, Claude R. (Paducah, KY); Ernstberger, Harold G. (Paducah, KY)

    1988-01-01

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases.

  20. Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in MEAs This presentation, which focuses on novel stack concepts, was given by Di-Jia Liu of Argonne National Laboratory at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell...

  1. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gong, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.

  2. Assessment of the Revised 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2013-12-01

    In order to support the air emissions permit for the 3410 Building, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a series of tests in the exhaust air discharge from the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The objective was to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring meets the applicable regulatory criteria governing such effluent monitoring systems. In particular, the capability of the air sampling probe location to meet the acceptance criteria of ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 , Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities was determined. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks address 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity of tracer particle concentration. Testing was performed to conform to the quality requirements of NQA-1-2000. Fan configurations tested included all fan combinations of any two fans at a time. Most of the tests were conducted at the normal flow rate, while a small subset of tests was performed at a slightly higher flow rate achieved with the laboratory hood sashes fully open. The qualification criteria for an air monitoring probe location are taken from ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 and are paraphrased as follows with key results summarized: 1. Angular FlowThe average air velocity angle must not deviate from the axis of the stack or duct by more than 20. Our test results show that the mean angular flow angles at the center two-thirds of the ducts are smaller than 4.5? for all testing conditions. 2. Uniform Air VelocityThe acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ? 20% across the center two thirds of the area of the stack. Our results show that the COVs of the air velocity across the center two-thirds of the stack are smaller than 2.9% for all testing conditions. 3. Uniform Concentration of Tracer GasesThe uniformity of the concentration of potential contaminants is first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The tracer is injected downstream of the fan outlets and at the junction downstream fan discharges meet. The acceptance criteria are that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. Our test results show that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is < 2.9% for all test conditions and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >6.5%. 4. Uniform Concentration of Tracer ParticlesTracer particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter are used for the second demonstration of concentration uniformity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ? 20% across the center two thirds of the sampling plane. Our test results indicate that the COV of particle concentration is <9.9% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane among all testing conditions. Thus, the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack was determined to meet the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside the bounds described in this report (e.g., exhaust stack velocity changes, relocation of sampling probe, and addition of fans) may require re-testing or re-evaluation to determine compliance.

  3. Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Durability under Automotive Load Cycle | Department of Energy Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability, and Durability under Automotive Load Cycle Adaptive Stack with Subdivided Cells for Improved Stability, Reliability, and Durability under Automotive Load Cycle Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 5_plugpwr.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting Agenda Fuel Cell

  4. Fail-Safe, Inexpensive Electrochemical Device Stack Design - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Fail-Safe, Inexpensive Electrochemical Device Stack Design Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryCraig Jacobson, Steven Visco, and Lutgard DeJonghe have invented a robust and low cost electrochemical device stack system based on a modified segmented-cell-in-series design. In this invention a number of small cylindrical cell segments are in contact with a planar metallic interconnect sheet that electrically

  5. Migration by the Kirchhoff, slant stack, and Gaussian beam methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Migration by the Kirchhoff, slant stack, and Gaussian beam methods Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Migration by the Kirchhoff, slant stack, and Gaussian beam methods × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science

  6. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Malba, V.

    1999-08-03

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips is disclosed. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM. 12 figs.

  7. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA); Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM.

  8. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  9. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    2014-11-06

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salishan Conference High Speed Computing April 23-27, 2007 Jeff Sonsalla Engineering Director SGI Design and Qualification of High Performance Computer Systems Presentation Overview * The correctness stack - View from the top down - Middle ground - a data digression - View from the bottom up * Trends and challenges * That was then...This is now Slide 2 Correctness Stack: View From Above * A problem is defined * A solution is expressed as a numerical algorithm - Equations are constructed in a

  11. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-15

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  12. Control of electrolyte fill to fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollack, William (Scott Township, Allegheny County, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell stack which can be operated with cells in a horizontal position so that the fuel cell stack does not have to be taken out of operation when adding an electrolyte such as an acid. Acid is supplied to each matrix in a stack of fuel cells at a uniform, low pressure so that the matrix can either be filled initially or replenished with acid lost in operation of the cell, without exceeding the bubble pressure of the matrix or the flooding pressure of the electrodes on either side of the matrix. Acid control to each cell is achieved by restricting and offsetting the opening of electrolyte fill holes in the matrix relative to openings in the plates which sandwich the matrix and electrodes therebetween.

  13. Property:Depth(m) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Depth(m) Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Depth(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft...

  14. Recommended Practice: Defense-in-Depth

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    External Report # INL/EXT-06-11478 Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies May 2006 Prepared by Idaho National Laboratory Recommended Best Practice: Defense in Depth 2 Table of Contents Keywords............................................................................................................................. 3 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3 Background

  15. Uterine caliper and depth gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Loyd L.; Wheeler, Robert G.; Fish, Thomas M.

    1977-01-01

    A uterine caliper and sound consisting of an elongated body having outwardly biased resilient caliper wings and a spring-loaded slidable cervical stop. A slide on the body is operatively connected to the wings by a monofilament and operates with respect to a first scale on the body as a width indicator. A rod extending longitudinally on the body is connected to the cervical stop and cooperates with a second scale on the body as a depth indicator. The instrument can be positioned to measure the distance from the outer cervical ostium to the fundus, as read on said second scale. The wings may be allowed to open by moving the slide, and when the wings engage the utero-tubal junctions, the width may be read on said first scale. By adjustment of the caliper wings the instrument may be retracted until the resistance of the inner ostium of the cervix is felt, enabling the length of the cervical canal to be read directly by the position of the longitudinal indicator rod with respect to said second scale. The instrument may be employed to measure the width of the uterine cavity at any position between the inner ostium of the cervix and the fundus.

  16. Experimental and computational studies on stacking faults in zinc titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, W.; Ageh, V.; Mohseni, H.; Scharf, T. W. E-mail: Jincheng.Du@unt.edu; Du, J. E-mail: Jincheng.Du@unt.edu

    2014-06-16

    Zinc titanate (ZnTiO{sub 3}) thin films grown by atomic layer deposition with ilmenite structure have recently been identified as an excellent solid lubricant, where low interfacial shear and friction are achieved due to intrafilm shear velocity accommodation in sliding contacts. In this Letter, high resolution transmission electron microscopy with electron diffraction revealed that extensive stacking faults are present on ZnTiO{sub 3} textured (104) planes. These growth stacking faults serve as a pathway for dislocations to glide parallel to the sliding direction and hence achieve low interfacial shear/friction. Generalized stacking fault energy plots also known as ?-surfaces were computed for the (104) surface of ZnTiO{sub 3} using energy minimization method with classical effective partial charge potential and verified by using density functional theory first principles calculations for stacking fault energies along certain directions. These two are in qualitative agreement but classical simulations generally overestimate the energies. In addition, the lowest energy path was determined to be along the [451{sup }] direction and the most favorable glide system is (104) ?451{sup }? that is responsible for the experimentally observed sliding-induced ductility.

  17. Individually addressable cathodes with integrated focusing stack or detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Lowndes, Douglas; Whealton, John; Whitson, John C.; Wilgen, John B.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and method are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A plurality of individually addressable cathodes are integrated with an electrostatic focusing stack and/or a plurality of detectors on the addressable field emission array. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  18. Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohac, C.E.

    1990-04-01

    Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Photovoltaic device having light transmitting electrically conductive stacked films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Michael F. (St. Paul, MN); Tran, Nang T. (St. Paul, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (St. Paul, MN); Gilbert, James R. (St. Paul, MN); Aspen, Frank E. (St. Paul, MN)

    1990-07-10

    A light transmitting electrically conductive stacked film, useful as a light transmitting electrode, including a first light transmitting electrically conductive layer, having a first optical thickness, a second light transmitting layer, having a second optical thickness different from the optical thickness of the first layer, and an electrically conductive metallic layer interposed between and in initimate contact with the first and second layers.

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thickness: Within each of these layers, clouds are binned into ranges of optical depth: Tau 0 - 0.001 (clear) Tau 0.001 - 3 Tau 3 - 20 Tau 20 - 1000 Four optical depth...

  1. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for AP-40 exhauster stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Davis, W.E.; Bussell, J.H.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as applied to the AP-40 exhauster stack, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/AP-40 system meets all applicable performance criteria. The contaminant mixing tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the wind tunnel facility, 331-H Building, using a mockup of the actual stack. The particle sample transport tests were conducted by PNNL at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The AP-40 stack is typical of several 10-in. diameter stacks that discharge the filtered ventilation air from tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles. Unrelated to the performance criteria, it was found that the record sample filter holder exhibited symptoms of sample bypass around the particle collection filter. This filter holder should either be modified or replaced with a different type. 10 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. The modeling of RF stacking of protons in the Accumulator (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The modeling of RF stacking of protons in the Accumulator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The modeling of RF stacking of protons in the Accumulator When the Run2...

  3. Critical Point Finder

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-03-15

    The program robustly finds the critical points in the electric field generated by a specified collection of point charges.

  4. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record, Record # 11003, Fuel Cell Stack

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Durability | Department of Energy Program Record, Record # 11003, Fuel Cell Stack Durability DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record, Record # 11003, Fuel Cell Stack Durability Dated May 3, 2012, this program record from the U.S. Department of Energy focuses on fuel cell stack durability. PDF icon 11003_fuel_cell_stack_durability.pdf More Documents & Publications US DRIVE Fuel Cell Technical Team Roadmap Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Overview of DOE

  5. Fuel cell stack with internal manifolds for reactant gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schnacke, Arthur W. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of plate-like fuel cells arranged along an axis generally parallel to cell thickness with electrically conductive separator plates between each pair of cells. A plurality of axial manifolds are provided at opposite sides of the stack in outer marginal portions beyond the edges of electrodes and electrolyte tiles. Sealing rings prevent cross-leakage of oxidant fuel gases through use of pairs of outwardly extending lips from opposite tile surfaces bonded to first and second electrode frames respectively. The frames provide transition between electrode edges and manifold perimeters. The pairs of extension lips are sealingly bonded together through an electrically insulative sealing ring with wedge shaped fastening members.

  6. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  7. Fuel cell stack with internal manifolds for reactant gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schnacke, A.W.

    1983-10-12

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of plate-like fuel cells arranged along an axis generally parallel to cell thickness with electrically conductive separator plates between each pair of cells. A plurality of axial manifolds are provided at opposite sides of the stack in outer marginal portions beyond the edges of electrodes and electrolyte tiles. Sealing rings prevent cross-leakage of oxidant fuel gases through use of pairs of outwardly extending lips from opposite tile surfaces bonded to first and second electrode frames respectively. The frames provide transition between electrode edges and manifold perimeters. The pairs of extension lips are sealingly bonded together through an electrically insulative sealing ring with wedge shaped fastening members.

  8. Producing microchannels using graduated diffusion bonding of a stack of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    precision machined foils or sheets (laminates) to make a micro-channel reactor - Energy Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Producing microchannels using graduated diffusion bonding of a stack of precision machined foils or sheets (laminates) to make a micro-channel reactor A novel multi-step process for the diffusion bonding of laminates National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL About This Technology Publications: PDF

  9. Manufacturing Challenges for BOP and Graphite Stack Components

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENTEGRIS PROPRIETARY AND CONFIDENTIAL Feb 28, 2014 Manufacturing Challenges for BOP & Graphite Stack Components CONFIDENTIAL | 2 Areas of Development  C.T.E  Semi Dissipative Materials  Impregnation of Metal into Graphite - Titanium  Chemical Vapor Deposition/Physical Vapor Deposition  Silicon Carbide  Graphene CONFIDENTIAL | 3 Balance of Plant Manifold Assembly  Material selection process  High-density Polyethylene (HDPE)  Polyoxymethylene (POM)  Polyamide (PA)

  10. Scaled Tests and Modeling of Effluent Stack Sampling Location Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barnett, J. M.

    2009-02-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code to evaluate the mixing at a sampling system location of a research and development facility. The facility requires continuous sampling for radioactive air emissions. Researchers sought to determine whether the location would meet the criteria for uniform air velocity and contaminant concentration as prescribed in the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standard, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requires that the sampling location be well-mixed and stipulates specific tests (e.g., velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity and cyclonic flow angle) to verify the extent of mixing.. The exhaust system for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory was modeled with a CFD code to better understand the flow and contaminant mixing and to predict mixing test results. The CFD results were compared to actual measurements made at a scale-model stack and to the limited data set for the full-scale facility stack. Results indicated that the CFD code provides reasonably conservative predictions for velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity. Cyclonic flow predicted by the code is less than that measured by the required methods. In expanding from small to full scale, the CFD predictions for full-scale measurements show similar trends as in the scale model and no unusual effects. This work indicates that a CFD code can be a cost-effective aid in design or retrofit of a facilitys stack sampling location that will be required to meet Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999.

  11. Snow Depth and Density at End-of-Winter for NGEE Areas A, B, C and D, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    2016-02-02

    End-of-winter snow depth and average snow density from area A, B, C and D, which include 1000's of point depth measurement located between approximately 20 and 50 cm apart.

  12. Integrated fuel cell stack shunt current prevention arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roche, Robert P. (Cheshire, CT); Nowak, Michael P. (Bolton, CT)

    1992-01-01

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of fuel cells juxtaposed with one another in the stack and each including a pair of plate-shaped anode and cathode electrodes that face one another, and a quantity of liquid electrolyte present at least between the electrodes. A separator plate is interposed between each two successive electrodes of adjacent ones of the fuel cells and is unified therewith into an integral separator plate. Each integral separator plate is provided with a circumferentially complete barrier that prevents flow of shunt currents onto and on an outer peripheral surface of the separator plate. This barrier consists of electrolyte-nonwettable barrier members that are accommodated, prior to the formation of the integral separator plate, in corresponding edge recesses situated at the interfaces between the electrodes and the separator plate proper. Each barrier member extends over the entire length of the associated marginal portion and is flush with the outer periphery of the integral separator plate. This barrier also prevents cell-to-cell migration of any electrolyte that may be present at the outer periphery of the integral separator plate while the latter is incorporated in the fuel cell stack.

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud - - Aerosol Properties Aerosol Properties at the AMF Point Reyes Site at the AMF Point Reyes Site Maureen Dunn , Mike Jensen , Pavlos Kollias , Mark...

  14. Investigations of stacking fault density in perpendicular recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piramanayagam, S. N. Varghese, Binni; Yang, Yi; Kiat Lee, Wee; Khume Tan, Hang

    2014-06-28

    In magnetic recording media, the grains or clusters reverse their magnetization over a range of reversal field, resulting in a switching field distribution. In order to achieve high areal densities, it is desirable to understand and minimize such a distribution. Clusters of grains which contain stacking faults (SF) or fcc phase have lower anisotropy, an order lower than those without them. It is believed that such low anisotropy regions reverse their magnetization at a much lower reversal field than the rest of the material with a larger anisotropy. Such clusters/grains cause recording performance deterioration, such as adjacent track erasure and dc noise. Therefore, the observation of clusters that reverse at very low reversal fields (nucleation sites, NS) could give information on the noise and the adjacent track erasure. Potentially, the observed clusters could also provide information on the SF. In this paper, we study the reversal of nucleation sites in granular perpendicular media based on a magnetic force microscope (MFM) methodology and validate the observations with high resolution cross-section transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurements. Samples, wherein a high anisotropy CoPt layer was introduced to control the NS or SF in a systematic way, were evaluated by MFM, TEM, and magnetometry. The magnetic properties indicated that the thickness of the CoPt layer results in an increase of nucleation sites. TEM measurements indicated a correlation between the thickness of CoPt layer and the stacking fault density. A clear correlation was also observed between the MFM results, TEM observations, and the coercivity and nucleation field of the samples, validating the effectiveness of the proposed method in evaluating the nucleation sites which potentially arise from stacking faults.

  15. Thermoacoustic relaxation in a pin-array stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, M.E.; Swift, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The pressure response p{sub 1} of a fixed quantity of {sup 4}He gas subjected to sinusoidal volume perturbations is studied experimentally. Thermal diffusion near solid boundaries causes the gas response to be neither adiabatic nor isothermal. The data are interpreted in terms of the thermal relaxation function f{sub {kappa}} which relates p{sub 1} to the spatial average of the acoustic temperature profile. Comparison of a number of geometries allows us to accurately determine f{sub {kappa}} for a thermoacoustic pin-array stack. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  16. Floating Point Control Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  17. POHC selection and method validation using a bench-scale stack gas simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klamm, S.; Hinshaw, G.; Alburty, D.; Garrity, P.

    1996-12-31

    In December 1994, the Occidental Chemical Corporation and Midwest Research Institute (MRI) were preparing to conduct a combined RCRA and TSCA trial burn of the Niagara Plant incineration facility. Two of the Principal Organic Hazardous Constituents (POHCs) selected for the trial burn were parachlorobenzotrifluoride (PCBTF) and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB). PCBTF is a commonly available chemical. 1,2-DCB was selected for its low incinerability rating on the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) thermal stability ranking system. PCBTF and 1,2-DCB were approved for use by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), tentatively to be sampled and analyzed by semivolatile organic techniques (i.e., MM5) since their boiling points exceeded EPA`s recommended range for the Volatile Organic Sampling Train (VOST) sampling. A method evaluation study performed by MRI indicated that both PCBTF and 1,2-DCB had low recoveries by the semivolatile methods. With the trial burn deadline rapidly approaching, the VOST-based (i.e., volatile) methods were reconsidered. However, no historical data were available for either POHC related to their retention on Tenax{reg_sign}, so that their capture and recovery by a VOST train was not assured. In order to demonstrate capture and recovery of the target POHCs by Tenax, MRI also performed a VOST retention and recovery study using a bench-scale stack gas simulator. Both PCBTF and 1,2-DCB were spiked onto Tenax traps, simulated stack gas was drawn through the traps, and POHC retention was measured. Based on positive results from these tests, the trial burn was completed on schedule using VOST methods for these two POHCs. In addition, 1,2-DCB levels were also measured by the originally proposed semivolatile methods, allowing a direct comparison of the volatile and semivolatile sampling and analysis techniques using actual field data.

  18. Low hydrostatic head electrolyte addition to fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA)

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell and system for supply electrolyte, as well as fuel and an oxidant to a fuel cell stack having at least two fuel cells, each of the cells having a pair of spaced electrodes and a matrix sandwiched therebetween, fuel and oxidant paths associated with a bipolar plate separating each pair of adjacent fuel cells and an electrolyte fill path for adding electrolyte to the cells and wetting said matrices. Electrolyte is flowed through the fuel cell stack in a back and forth fashion in a path in each cell substantially parallel to one face of opposite faces of the bipolar plate exposed to one of the electrodes and the matrices to produce an overall head uniformly between cells due to frictional pressure drop in the path for each cell free of a large hydrostatic head to thereby avoid flooding of the electrodes. The bipolar plate is provided with channels forming paths for the flow of the fuel and oxidant on opposite faces thereof, and the fuel and the oxidant are flowed along a first side of the bipolar plate and a second side of the bipolar plate through channels formed into the opposite faces of the bipolar plate, the fuel flowing through channels formed into one of the opposite faces and the oxidant flowing through channels formed into the other of the opposite faces.

  19. Evaluation of a stack: A concrete chimney with brick liner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R.; Amin, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, West Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A 200 ft. tall stack, consisting of a concrete chimney with an independent acid proof brick liner built in the 1950`s, serving the Separations facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), was evaluated for the performance category 3 (PC3) level of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) effects. The inelastic energy absorption capacity of the concrete chimney was considered in the evaluation of the earthquake resistance, in particular, to compute the F{sub {mu}} factor. The calculated value of F{sub {mu}} exceeded 3.0, while the seismic demand for the PC3 level, using an F{sub {mu}} value of 1.5, was found to be less than the capacity of the concrete chimney. The capacity formulation of ACI 307 was modified to incorporate the effect of an after design opening on the tension side. There are considerable uncertainties in determining the earthquake resistance of the independent brick liner. The critical liner section, located at the bottom of the breeching opening, does not meet the current recommendations. A discussion is provided for the possible acceptable values for the ``Moment Reduction Factor``, R{sub w} or F{sub {mu}} for the liner. Comments are provided on the comparison of stack demands using response spectra (RS) versus time history (TH) analysis, with and without soil structure interaction (SSI) effects.

  20. Probabilistic Based Design Methodology for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xin; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-05-01

    A probabilistic-based component design methodology is developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack. This method takes into account the randomness in SOFC material properties as well as the stresses arising from different manufacturing and operating conditions. The purpose of this work is to provide the SOFC designers a design methodology such that desired level of component reliability can be achieved with deterministic design functions using an equivalent safety factor to account for the uncertainties in material properties and structural stresses. Multi-physics-based finite element analyses were used to predict the electrochemical and thermal mechanical responses of SOFC stacks with different geometric variations and under different operating conditions. Failures in the anode and the seal were used as design examples. The predicted maximum principal stresses in the anode and the seal were compared with the experimentally determined strength characteristics for the anode and the seal respectively. Component failure probabilities for the current design were then calculated under different operating conditions. It was found that anode failure probability is very low under all conditions examined. The seal failure probability is relatively high, particularly for high fuel utilization rate under low average cell temperature. Next, the procedures for calculating the equivalent safety factors for anode and seal were demonstrated such that uniform failure probability of the anode and seal can be achieved. Analysis procedures were also included for non-normal distributed random variables such that more realistic distributions of strength and stress can be analyzed using the proposed design methodology.

  1. LINKING Ly? AND LOW-IONIZATION TRANSITIONS AT LOW OPTICAL DEPTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-08-20

    We suggest that low optical depth in the Lyman continuum (LyC) may relate the Ly? emission, C II and Si II absorption, and C II* and Si II* emission seen in high-redshift galaxies. We base this analysis on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectra of four Green Pea (GP) galaxies, which may be analogs of z > 2 Ly? emitters (LAEs). In the two GPs with the strongest Ly? emission, the Ly? line profiles show reduced signs of resonant scattering. Instead, the Ly? profiles resemble the H? line profiles of evolved star ejecta, suggesting that the Ly? emission originates from a low column density and similar outflow geometry. The weak C II absorption and presence of non-resonant C II* emission in these GPs support this interpretation and imply a low LyC optical depth along the line of sight. In two additional GPs, weak Ly? emission and strong C II absorption suggest a higher optical depth. These two GPs differ in their Ly? profile shapes and C II* emission strengths, however, indicating different inclinations of the outflows to our line of sight. With these four GPs as examples, we explain the observed trends linking Ly?, C II, and C II* in stacked LAE spectra, in the context of optical depth and geometric effects. Specifically, in some galaxies with strong Ly? emission, a low LyC optical depth may allow Ly? to escape with reduced scattering. Furthermore, C II absorption, C II* emission, and Ly? profile shape can reveal the optical depth, constrain the orientation of neutral outflows in LAEs, and identify candidate LyC emitters.

  2. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  3. Hole in one: Technicians smoothly install the center stack in the NSTX-U

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vacuum vessel | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Hole in one: Technicians smoothly install the center stack in the NSTX-U vacuum vessel By John Greenwald November 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Closeup of the center stack being lowered into position by an overhead crane. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Closeup of the center stack being lowered into position by an overhead crane. Gallery: Technicians guide the unit into place. (Photo by Elle

  4. Novel PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MEA | Department of Energy PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEA Novel PEMFC Stack Using Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEA This project received DOE funding as part of a larger effort to advance the development of fuel cell technology. PDF icon 5_anl.pdf More Documents & Publications Novel Stack Concepts: Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Electrodes in MEAs Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting Agenda

  5. Dr Robert J Stack | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Robert J Stack Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Staff What's New Research Areas Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Staff Dr. Robert J Stack Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Dr. Robert J. Stack Program Manager Physical Biosciences Office of Basic Energy Sciences SC-22.1/Germantown Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585-1290

  6. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Balance of Plant and Stack Component Integration |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Balance of Plant and Stack Component Integration Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Balance of Plant and Stack Component Integration Presentation by Acumentrics Corporation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Balance of Plant and Stack Component Integration March 16, 2010 PDF icon fuelcell_pre-solicitation_wkshop_mar10_bessette.pdf More Documents & Publications The Micro-CHP Technologies Roadmap, December 2003 High Temperature BOP and Fuel Processing Ceramic Fuel Cells (SOFC)

  7. Fuel Cell Animation - Fuel Cell Stack (Text Version) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stack (Text Version) Fuel Cell Animation - Fuel Cell Stack (Text Version) This text version of the fuel cell animation demonstrates how a fuel cell uses hydrogen to produce electricity, with only water and heat as byproducts. Fuel cell stack with electrical circuit. Fuel cell: The amount of power produced by a fuel cell depends on several factors, including fuel cell type, cell size, temperature at which it operates, and pressure at which the gases are supplied to the cell. A single fuel cell

  8. Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power and CHP Applications | Department of Energy Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP Applications Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP Applications Presentation on Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP Applications for Fuel Cell Pre-solicitation Workshop March 10, 2010 PDF icon fuelcell_pre-solicitation_wkshop_mar10_ainscough.pdf More Documents &

  9. U-207: Pidgin 'mxit_show_message()' Function Stack-Based Buffer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROBLEM: Pidgin 'mxitshowmessage()' Function Stack-Based Buffer Overflow Vulnerability. PLATFORM: Versions prior to Pidgin 2.10.5 vulnerable. ABSTRACT: Pidgin is prone to a...

  10. Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an Advanced Metallic Open-Flowfield Fuel Cell Stack

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, which focuses on fuel cell stacks, was given by C. Cross of Nuvera Fuel Cells at a DOE fuel cell meeting in February 2007.

  11. ARM - PI Product - Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Optical Depths ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths MFRSR irradiance data collected during the ACRF AMF deployment in Niamey, Niger have been used to derive AOD for five wavelength channels of the MFRSR. These data have been corrected to adjust for filter drift over the course of the campaign and contamination due to forward scattering as a result of

  12. Using the depth-velocity-size diagram to interpret equilibrium bed configurations in river flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, J.B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Data from flume studies that report equilibrium bed configuration as well as water temperature, flow depth, flow velocity, and sediment size were used to develop the best approximation to the relationships among the various bed phases (ripples, dunes, lower regime plane bed, upper regime plane bed, and antidunes) in a three-axis graph (depth-velocity-size diagram) with dimensionless measures of mean flow depth, mean flow velocity, and sediment size along the axis. Relationships are shown in a series of depth-velocity and velocity-size sections through the diagram. Boundaries between bed-phase stability fields are drawn as surfaces that minimize, misplacement of data points. A large subset of the data, for which reliable values of bed shear stress are reported, was also used to represent the stability relationships in a graph of dimensionless boundary shear stress against dimensionless sediment size, but with results less useful for fluvial flow interpretation. The diagram covers about one order of magnitude in flow depth. To be useful for river flows, the diagram must be extrapolated in flow depth by about one more order of magnitude, but this is not a serious problem for approximate work. The depth-velocity-size diagram permits prediction of equilibrium bed configuration in river flows when the approximate flow depth and mean flow velocity are known. Because the diagram is essentially dimensionless, the effect of water temperature (via the fluid viscosity) on the bed configuration is easily accounted for by use of the diagram.

  13. The change of microstructure and thermal properties in ion irradiated carbon nanotube mats as a function of ion penetration depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitkaliyeva, A. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Shao, L. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2013-02-11

    A stack of three carbon nanotube (CNT) mats was irradiated with 3 MeV He ions. The change in structural and thermal properties of individual mats as a function of ion penetration depth was characterized using electron microscopy and laser flash techniques. Ion irradiation can enhance thermal conductivity of the mats by introducing inter-tube displacements, which improve phonon transport across adjacent nanotubes. The enhancement, however, is reduced at higher damage levels due to the increasing phonon-defect scattering within the tubes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using ion irradiation to manipulate thermal transport in carbon nanotubes.

  14. A novel micro-Raman technique to detect and characterize 4H-SiC stacking faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piluso, N. Camarda, M.; La Via, F.

    2014-10-28

    A novel Micro-Raman technique was designed and used to detect extended defects in 4H-SiC homoepitaxy. The technique uses above band-gap high-power laser densities to induce a local increase of free carriers in undoped epitaxies (n?stacking faults; the obtained morphologies were found to be in excellent agreement with those provided by standard photoluminescence techniques. The results show that the detection of defects via i-LOPC spectroscopy is totally independent from the stacking fault photoluminescence signals that cover a large energy range up to 0.7?eV, thus allowing for a single-scan simultaneous determination of any kind of stacking fault. Combining the i-LOPC method with the analysis of the transverse optical mode, the micro-Raman characterization can determine the most important properties of unintentionally doped film, including the stress status of the wafer, lattice impurities (point defects, polytype inclusions) and a detailed analysis of crystallographic defects, with a high spectral and spatial resolution.

  15. Measurements with reticulated vitreous carbon stacks in thermoacoustic prime movers and refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeff, J.A.; Hofler, T.J.; Atchley, A.A.; Moss, W.C.

    1998-07-01

    Reticulated vitreous carbon has been successfully used as a stack material in thermoacoustic prime movers and refrigerators. It is a rigid glassy carbon material, with a porous spongelike structure. Test results indicate peak pressure amplitudes of up to 32{percent} in a prime mover, and refrigeration performance comparable to that of a traditional plastic roll stack. {copyright} {ital 1998 Acoustical Society of America.}

  16. Systems and methods that generate height map models for efficient three dimensional reconstruction from depth information

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc Andre Leon; Gallup, David Robert

    2015-12-08

    Methods of generating a three dimensional representation of an object in a reference plane from a depth map including distances from a reference point to pixels in an image of the object taken from a reference point. Weights are assigned to respective voxels in a three dimensional grid along rays extending from the reference point through the pixels in the image based on the distances in the depth map from the reference point to the respective pixels, and a height map including an array of height values in the reference plane is formed based on the assigned weights. An n-layer height map may be constructed by generating a probabilistic occupancy grid for the voxels and forming an n-dimensional height map comprising an array of layer height values in the reference plane based on the probabilistic occupancy grid.

  17. Germanium-induced stabilization of a very high-k zirconia phase in ZrO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2} gate stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsipas, P.; Volkos, S. N.; Sotiropoulos, A.; Galata, S. F.; Mavrou, G.; Tsoutsou, D.; Panayiotatos, Y.; Dimoulas, A.; Marchiori, C.; Fompeyrine, J.

    2008-08-25

    Electrical data on ZrO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2} stacks prepared by atomic oxygen beam deposition on Ge at 225 deg. C reveal a relatively weak dependence of the stack equivalent oxide thickness upon the ZrO{sub 2} thickness. This trend points to a very high zirconia dielectric permittivity (k) value which is estimated to be around 44. This is indicative of zirconia crystallization into a tetragonal phase which is also supported by x-ray diffraction data. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is in line with the assumption that due to a finite GeO{sub 2} decomposition, Ge is incorporated into the growing ZrO{sub 2}, thus, stabilizing the high-k tetragonal phase.

  18. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... performance improvement over 3 years Gold 10% energy performance improvement over 3 ... over 10 years + 30 Scorecard points Gold 15% improvement over 10 years + 61 ...

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optic links will replace many hardwire connections - Remotely programmable set-points and monitoring for each klystron cart - Klystron collector over-temperature protection will...

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disease biomarkers in human biological samples * Point-of-Care diagnostics amenable to health clinics and field sensing applications * Integrated miniaturized electronics, optical...

  1. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in ...

  2. Analysis of NSTX Upgrade OH Magnet and Center Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Zolfaghari, P. Titus, J. Chrzanowski, A. Salehzadeh, F. Dahlgren

    2010-11-30

    The new ohmic heating (OH) coil and center stack for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) upgrade are required to meet cooling and structural requirements for operation at the enhanced 1 Tesla toroidal field and 2 MA plasma current. The OH coil is designed to be cooled in the time between discharges by water flowing in the center of the coil conductor. We performed resistive heating and thermal hydraulic analyses to optimize coolant channel size to keep the coil temperature below 100 C and meet the required 20 minute cooling time. Coupled electromagnetic, thermal and structural FEA analyses were performed to determine if the OH coil meets the requirements of the structural design criteria. Structural response of the OH coil to its self-field and the field from other coils was analyzed. A model was developed to analyze the thermal and electromagnetic interaction of centerstack components such as the OH coil, TF inner legs and the Bellville washer preload mechanism. Torsional loads from the TF interaction with the OH and poloidal fields are transferred through the TF flag extensions via a torque transfer coupling to the rest of the tokamak structure. A 3D FEA analysis was performed to qualify this design. The results of these analyses, which will be presented in this paper, have led to the design of OH coil and centerstack components that meet the requirements of the NSTX-upgrade structural design criteria.

  3. Optically enhanced photon recycling in mechanically stacked multijunction solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Ward, J. Scott; Garcia, Ivan; Friedman, Daniel J.; King, Richard R.; Chiu, Philip T.; France, Ryan M.; Duda, Anna; Olavarria, Waldo J.; et al

    2015-11-09

    Multijunction solar cells can be fabricated by mechanically bonding together component cells that are grown separately. Here, we present four-junction four-terminal mechanical stacks composed of GaInP/GaAs tandems grown on GaAs substrates and GaInAsP/GaInAs tandems grown on InP substrates. The component cells were bonded together with a low-index transparent epoxy that acts as an angularly selective reflector to the GaAs bandedge luminescence, while simultaneously transmitting nearly all of the subbandgap light. As determined by electroluminescence measurements and optical modeling, the GaAs subcell demonstrates a higher internal radiative limit and, thus, higher subcell voltage, compared with GaAs subcells without the epoxy reflector.more » The best cells demonstrate 38.8 ± 1.0% efficiency under the global spectrum at 1000 W/m2 and ~ 42% under the direct spectrum at ~100 suns. As a result, eliminating the series resistance is the key challenge for further improving the concentrator cells.« less

  4. Intra-Fuel Cell Stack Measurements of Transient Concentration Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partridge Jr, William P; Toops, Todd J; Green Jr, Johney Boyd; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2006-01-01

    Intra-fuel-cell measurements are required to understand detailed fuel-cell chemistry and physics, validate models, optimize system design and control, and realize enhanced efficiency regimes; in comparison, conventional integrated fuel-cell supply and effluent measurements are fundamentally limited in value. Intra-reactor measurements are needed for all fuel cell types. This paper demonstrates the ability of a capillary-inlet mass spectrometer to resolve transient species distributions within operating polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) fuel cells and at temperatures typical of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). This is the first such demonstration of a diagnostic that is sufficiently minimally invasive as to allow measurements throughout an operating fuel cell stack. Measurements of transient water, hydrogen, oxygen and diluent concentration dynamics associated with fuel-cell load switching suggest oxygen-limited chemistry. Intra-PEM fuel cell measurements of oxygen distribution at various fuel-cell loads are used to demonstrate concentration gradients, non-uniformities, and anomalous fuel cell operation.

  5. Assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks and diffuse and fugitive sources on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

    1995-06-01

    By using the six EPA-approved methods, instead of only the original back calculation method for assessing the 84 WHC registered stacks, the number of stacks requiring continuous monitoring was reduced from 32 to 19 stacks. The intercomparison between results showed that no correlation existed between back calculations and release fractions. Also the NDA, upstream air samples, and powder release fraction method results were at least three orders of magnitude lower then the back calculations results. The most surprising results of the assessment came from NDA. NDA was found to be an easy method for assessing potential emissions. For the nine stacks assessed by NDA, all nine of the stacks would have required continuous monitoring when assessed by back calculations. However, when NDA was applied all stacks had potential emissions that would cause an EDE below the > 0.1 mrem/y standard. Apparent DFs for the HEPA filter systems were calculated for eight nondesignated stacks with emissions above the detection limit. These apparent DFs ranged from 0.5 to 250. The EDE dose to the MEI was calculated to be 0.028 mrem/y for diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Sited. This is well below the > 0.1 mrem/y standard.

  6. EFFECT OF GEOMETRY AND OPERATING PARAMETERS ON SIMULATED SOFC STACK TEMPERATURE UNIFORMITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Lai, Canhai; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-08-10

    A uniform temperature field is desirable in the solid oxide fuel cell stack to avoid local hot regions that contribute to material degradation, thermal stresses, and differences in electrochemical performance. Various geometric and operational design changes were simulated by numerical modeling of co-flow and counter-flow multi-cell stacks, and the effects on stack maximum temperature, stack temperature difference, and maximum cell temperature difference were characterized. The results showed that 40-60% on-cell steam reforming of methane and a reduced reforming rate of 25-50% of the nominal rate was beneficial for a more uniform temperature field. Fuel exhaust recycling up to 30% was shown to be advantageous for reforming fuels and co-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel, but counter-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel showed higher temperature differences. Cells with large aspect ratios showed a more uniform temperature response due to either the strong influence of the inlet gas temperatures or the greater thermal exchange with the furnace boundary condition. Improved lateral heat spreading with thicker interconnects was demonstrated, but greater improvements towards a uniform thermal field for the same amount of interconnect mass could be achieved using thicker heat spreader plates appropriately distributed along the stack height.

  7. RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: STACK TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X, Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; J. J. Hartvigsen; G. Tao; N. Petigny

    2012-07-01

    High temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology for efficient sustainable large-scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) are able to utilize high temperature heat and electric power from advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors or renewable sources to generate carbon-free hydrogen at large scale. However, long term durability of SOECs needs to be improved significantly before commercialization of this technology. A degradation rate of 1%/khr or lower is proposed as a threshold value for commercialization of this technology. Solid oxide electrolysis stack tests have been conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate recent improvements in long-term durability of SOECs. Electrolytesupported and electrode-supported SOEC stacks were provided by Ceramatec Inc., Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI), and Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain), respectively for these tests. Long-term durability tests were generally operated for a duration of 1000 hours or more. Stack tests based on technology developed at Ceramatec and MSRI have shown significant improvement in durability in the electrolysis mode. Long-term degradation rates of 3.2%/khr and 4.6%/khr were observed for MSRI and Ceramatec stacks, respectively. One recent Ceramatec stack even showed negative degradation (performance improvement) over 1900 hours of operation. A three-cell short stack provided by St. Gobain, however, showed rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Improvements on electrode materials, interconnect coatings, and electrolyteelectrode interface microstructures contribute to better durability of SOEC stacks.

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sun Photometer and Sky Radiometer Measurements From Moving Platforms John N. Porter Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology Sun Photometer Measurements On Aircraft (250 m resolution) Aerosol Optical Depths Near Hawaii (Porter Algorithm) Use Commercial Aircraft And Insert Instrumented Doors Handheld Sun Photometer Measurements From Ships and Planes Basic Approach: Collect many measurements and reject more than 90% (Porter et al., 2001). This approach now used by NASA for ship based sun

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Risk_Portfolio_Manager(RPM)_overview_Under_Sec_DOE__2011_V4 Final 3-22-2011.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibili | Department of Energy PowerPoint - Risk_Portfolio_Manager(RPM)_overview_Under_Sec_DOE__2011_V4 Final 3-22-2011.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibili Microsoft PowerPoint - Risk_Portfolio_Manager(RPM)_overview_Under_Sec_DOE__2011_V4 Final 3-22-2011.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibili PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - Risk_Portfolio_Manager(RPM)_overview_Under_Sec_DOE__2011_V4 Final 3-22-2011.ppt

  10. Deloitte MarketPoint.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Deloitte MarketPoint. Analysis of Economic Impact of LNG Exports from the United States i Contents Executive summary 1 Overview of Deloitte MarketPoint Reference Case 5 Potential impact of LNG exports 10 Comparison of results to other studies 18 Appendix A: Price Impact Charts for other Export Cases 20 Appendix B: DMP's World Gas Model and data 24 Executive summary 1 Executive summary Deloitte MarketPoint LLC ("DMP") has been engaged by Excelerate Energy L.P. ("Excelerate")

  11. Temperature dependent photoluminescence and micromapping of multiple stacks InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Ming Jaffr, Alexandre Alvarez, Jos Kleider, Jean-Paul Boutchich, Mohamed; Jittrong, Apichat; Chokamnuai, Thitipong; Panyakeow, Somsak; Kanjanachuchai, Songphol

    2015-02-27

    We utilized temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) techniques to investigate 1, 3 and 5 stack InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on cross-hatch patterns. PL mapping can well reproduce the QDs distribution as AFM and position dependency of QD growth. It is possible to observe crystallographic dependent PL. The temperature dependent spectra exhibit the QDs energy distribution which reflects the size and shape. The inter-dot carrier coupling effect is observed and translated as a red shift of 120mV on the [110] direction peak is observed at 30K on 1 stack with regards to 3 stacks samples, which is assigned to lateral coupling.

  12. Modeling of On-Cell Reforming Reaction for Planar SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Choongmo; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Hwang, Soon Cheol; Kim, Dohyung; Lai, Canhai; Koeppel, Brian J.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-30

    Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack is known to suffer thermal problem from high stack temperature during operation to generate high current. On-Cell Reforming (OCR) phenomenon is often used to reduce stack temperature by an endothermic reaction of steam-methane reforming process. RIST conducted single-cell experiment to validate modeling tool to simulate OCR performance including temperature measurement. 2D modeling is used to check reforming rate during OCR using temperature measurement data, and 3D modeling is used to check overall thermal performance including furnace boundary conditions.

  13. System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J; Weissman, Jeffrey G

    2013-08-13

    A system for adding sulfur to a reformate stream feeding a fuel cell stack, having a sulfur source for providing sulfur to the reformate stream and a metering device in fluid connection with the sulfur source and the reformate stream. The metering device injects sulfur from the sulfur source to the reformate stream at a predetermined rate, thereby providing a conditioned reformate stream to the fuel cell stack. The system provides a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microneedles for medical point of care diagnostics and drug delivery Ronen Polsky Department of Biosensors and Nanomaterials February 25, 2015 Sandia MedTech Showcase Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-1388C Brief Technology Overview Wearable Point of

  15. EAMidnightPointMahogany

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Assessment Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon April 2013 Prepared By Bureau of Land Management - Prineville and Burns Districts DOI-BLM-OR-P040-2011-0021-EA DOE/EA-1925 Environmental Assessment Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon April 2013 Lead Agency United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Prineville District 3050 N.E. 3rd Street, Prineville, OR 97754 Tel: 541

  16. Material Point Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Point Methods and Multiphysics for Fracture and Multiphase Problems Joseph Teran, UCLA and Alice Koniges, LBL Contact: jteran@math.ucla.edu Material point methods (MPM) provide an intriguing new path for the design of algorithms that are poised to scale to billions of cores [4]. These methods are particularly important for simulating various phases in the presence of extreme deformation and topological change. This brings about the possibility of new simulations enabled at the exascale

  17. Points of Contact - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Points of Contact About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Tools Points of Contact Points of Contact Email Email Page...

  18. Stacked silicide/silicon mid- to long-wavelength infrared detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maserjian, Joseph (Goleta, CA)

    1990-03-13

    The use of stacked Schottky barriers (16) with epitaxially grown thin silicides (10) combined with selective doping (22) of the barriers provides high quantum efficiency infrared detectors (30) at longer wavelengths that is compatible with existing silicon VLSI technology.

  19. Device for equalizing molten electrolyte content in a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.L.

    1985-12-23

    A device for equalizing the molten electrolyte content throughout the height of a fuel cell stack is disclosed. The device includes a passageway for electrolyte return with electrolyte wettable wicking material in the opposite end portions of the passageway. One end portion is disposed near the upper, negative end of the stack where electrolyte flooding occurs. The second end portion is placed near the lower, positive end of the stack where electrolyte is depleted. Heating means are provided at the upper portion of the passageway to increase electrolyte vapor pressure in the upper wicking material. The vapor is condensed in the lower passageway portion and conducted as molten electrolyte in the lower wick to the positive end face of the stack. An inlet is provided to inject a modifying gas into the passageway and thereby control the rate of electrolyte return.

  20. Device for equalizing molten electrolyte content in a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A device for equalizing the molten electrolyte content throughout the height of a fuel cell stack is disclosed. The device includes a passageway for electrolyte return with electrolyte wettable wicking material in the opposite end portions of the passageway. One end portion is disposed near the upper, negative end of the stack where electrolyte flooding occurs. The second end portion is placed near the lower, positive end of the stack where electrolyte is depleted. Heating means are provided at the upper portion of the passageway to increase electrolyte vapor pressure in the upper wicking material. The vapor is condensed in the lower passageway portion and conducted as molten electrolyte in the lower wick to the positive end face of the stack. An inlet is provided to inject a modifying gas into the passageway and thereby control the rate of electrolyte return.

  1. Effect of stacking fault energy on mechanism of plastic deformation in nanotwinned FCC metals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borovikov, Valery; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; King, Alexander H.; LeSar, Richard

    2015-05-15

    Starting from a semi-empirical potential designed for Cu, we have developed a series of potentials that provide essentially constant values of all significant (calculated) materials properties except for the intrinsic stacking fault energy, which varies over a range that encompasses the lowest and highest values observed in nature. In addition, these potentials were employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate how stacking fault energy affects the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. The results indicate that properties such as yield strength and microstructural stability do not vary systematically with stacking fault energy, but rather fall into twomore » distinct regimes corresponding to 'low' and 'high' stacking fault energies.« less

  2. Photonic band gap of a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yuancheng; Wei, Zeyong; Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Hong; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2013-12-10

    Here, we present a mechanism for tailoring the photonic band structure of a quarter-wave stack without changing its physical periods by embedding conductive sheets. Graphene is utilized and studied as a realistic, two-dimensional conductive sheet. In a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack, the synergic actions of Bragg scattering and graphene conductance contributions open photonic gaps at the center of the reduced Brillouin zone that are nonexistent in conventional quarter-wave stacks. Such photonic gaps show giant, loss-independent density of optical states at the fixed lower-gap edges, of even-multiple characteristic frequency of the quarter-wave stack. The conductive sheet-induced photonic gaps provide a platform for the enhancement of light-matter interactions.

  3. Method and apparatus for obtaining stack traceback data for multiple computing nodes of a massively parallel computer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gooding, Thomas Michael (Rochester, MN); McCarthy, Patrick Joseph (Rochester, MN)

    2010-03-02

    A data collector for a massively parallel computer system obtains call-return stack traceback data for multiple nodes by retrieving partial call-return stack traceback data from each node, grouping the nodes in subsets according to the partial traceback data, and obtaining further call-return stack traceback data from a representative node or nodes of each subset. Preferably, the partial data is a respective instruction address from each node, nodes having identical instruction address being grouped together in the same subset. Preferably, a single node of each subset is chosen and full stack traceback data is retrieved from the call-return stack within the chosen node.

  4. Numerical study of oscillatory flow and heat transfer in a loaded thermoacoustic stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worlikar, A.S.; Knio, O.M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoacoustic refrigerator may be idealized as consisting of a straight resonance tube housing a stack of parallel plates and heat exchangers, and an acoustic source. Among the advantages of thermoacoustic refrigerators are the simplicity of their design and the fact that they naturally avoid the need for harmful refrigerants such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The operation of these devices is based on exploiting the well-known thermoacoustic effect to induce a temperature difference across the stack and to transport heat from one end of the plate to the other. Heat exchangers are then used to transfer energy from the thermoacoustic refrigerator to hot and cold reservoirs. A two-dimensional, low-Mach-number computational model is used to analyze the unsteady flow and temperature fields in the neighborhood of an idealized stack/heat exchanger configuration. The model relies on a vorticity-based formulation of the mass, momentum, and energy equations in the low-Mach-number, short-stack limit. The stack and heat exchangers are assumed to consist of flat plates of equal thickness. The heat exchanger plates are assumed isothermal and in perfect thermal contact with the stack plates. The simulations are used to study the effect of heat exchanger size and operating conditions on the heat transfer and stack performance. Computed results show that optimum stack performance is achieved when the length of the heat exchanger is nearly equal to the peak-to-peak particle displacement. Numerical estimates of the mean enthalpy flux within the channel are in good agreement with the predictions of linear theory. However, the results reveal that a portion of the heat exchangers is ineffective due to reverse heat transfer. Details of the energy flux density around the heat exchangers are visualized, and implications regarding heat exchanger design and model extension are discussed.

  5. Optimized End-Stacking Provides Specificity of N-Methyl Mesoporphyrin IX

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Human Telomeric G-Quadruplex DNA (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Optimized End-Stacking Provides Specificity of N-Methyl Mesoporphyrin IX for Human Telomeric G-Quadruplex DNA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimized End-Stacking Provides Specificity of N-Methyl Mesoporphyrin IX for Human Telomeric G-Quadruplex DNA Authors: Nicoludis, John M. ; Miller, Stephen T. ; Jeffrey, Philip D. ; Barrett, Steven P. ; Rablen, Paul R. ; Lawton, Thomas J. ; Yatsunyk, Liliya A. [1] ;

  6. Effects of stacking faults on the electronic structures of quantum rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-03-30

    Atomistic semiempirical pseudopotential method is used to study the effects of stacking faults in a wurtzite structure quantum rod. It is found that a single stacking fault can cause a 10-50 meV change in the conduction state eigen energy, and a localization in the electron wave function. However, the effects on the hole eigen energies and wave functions are very small.

  7. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record, Record # 11003, Fuel Cell Stack Durability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Record #: 11003 Date: March 8, 2011 Title: Fuel Cell Stack Durability Originator: Jacob Spendelow, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, and John Garbak Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: May 3, 2012 Item DOE-funded R&D work has enabled substantial improvements in durability, with automotive fuel cell stack and system durability in laboratory testing increasing from approximately 2,000 hours in 2006 to 4,000 hours in 2011. Durability in real-world testing of

  8. Startup of PEFC Stacks From Sub-Freezing Temperatures | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Startup of PEFC Stacks From Sub-Freezing Temperatures Startup of PEFC Stacks From Sub-Freezing Temperatures Presentation by R. K. Ahluwalia and X. Wang ) to DOE's Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Workshop held February 1-5, 2005 in Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon 09_ahluwalia_startup.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Program/Targets and Workshop Objectives Open Discussion of Freeze Related Issues Fuel Cell Freeze Startup and Landscape of FC Freeze Patents

  9. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  10. Inherent Driving Force for Charge Separation in Curved Stacks of Oligothiophenes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Qin

    2015-01-30

    Coexistence of high local charge mobility and an energy gradient can lead to efficient free charge carrier generation from geminate charge transfer states at the donor–acceptor interface in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics. It is, however, not clear what polymer microstructures can support such coexistence. Using recent methods from density functional theory, we propose that a stack of similarly curved oligothiophene chains can deliver the requirements for efficient charge separation. Curved stacks are stable because of the polymer’s strong π-stacking ability and because backbone torsions are flexible in neutral chains. However, energy of a charge in a polymer chain has remarkablymore » stronger dependence on torsions. The trend of increasing planarity in curved stacks effectively creates an energy gradient that drives charge in one direction. The curvature of these partially ordered stacks is found to beneficially interact with fullerenes for charge separation. The curved stacks, therefore, are identified as possible building blocks for interfacial structures that lead to efficient free carrier generation in high-performing organic photovoltaic systems.« less

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Collie, Jeffrey C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

  13. Appendix B - Control Points

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Control Points B.1 Injector Control Points Qty Type Device 2 Magnet Bend magnet - DL1 bend 9 Magnet Quad magnet 10 Magnet X-Y Corrector Pair 2 Magnet Solenoid 2 Magnet Spectrometer 1 RF Gun 2 RF Accelerating Structure 1 RF Transverse RF Structure 1 TIMING Timing/Trigger System 1 Laser Gun Laser 1 Laser Alignment Laser 13 DIAG BPM 4 DIAG Wire Scanner 11 DIAG Profile Monitor 3 DIAG Toroid 1 DIAG Transverse RF BL Monitor 3 DIAG Faraday Cup 1 DIAG Energy Collimator 1 DIAG Tune-up Dump 1 VAC Vacuum

  14. EndPoints 2000

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-13

    The application leads the user through a logical framework to determine the minimum effort and cost necessary to reach the desired end state for each space, system, and facility. Endpoints are used to plan the project work, track and manage the determination, management, verification, and closure of D&D endpoints, consistent with DOE End Point guidance documents.

  15. Modeling the Air Flow in the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Barnett, J. M.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2013-01-23

    Additional ventilation capacity has been designed for the 3410 Building filtered exhaust stack system. The updated system will increase the number of fans from two to three and will include ductwork to incorporate the new fan into the existing stack. Stack operations will involve running various two-fan combinations at any given time. The air monitoring system of the existing two-fan stack was previously found to be in compliance with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, however it is not known if the modified (three-fan) system will comply. Subsequently, a full-scale three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the modified stack system has been created to examine the sampling location for compliance with the standard. The CFD modeling results show good agreement with testing data collected from the existing 3410 Building stack and suggest that velocity uniformity and flow angles will remain well within acceptance criteria when the third fan and associated ductwork is installed. This includes two-fan flow rates up to 31,840 cfm for any of the two-fan combinations. For simulation cases in which tracer gas and particles are introduced in the main duct, the model predicts that both particle and tracer gas coefficients of variance (COVs) may be larger than the acceptable 20 percent criterion of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard for each of the two-fan, 31,840 cfm combinations. Simulations in which the tracers are introduced near the fans result in improved, though marginally acceptable, COV values for the tracers. Due to the remaining uncertainty that the stack will qualify with the addition of the third fan and high flow rates, a stationary air blender from Blender Products, Inc. is considered for inclusion in the stack system. A model of the air blender has been developed and incorporated into the CFD model. Simulation results from the CFD model that includes the air blender show striking improvements in tracer gas mixing and tracer particle dispersion. The results of these simulations suggest the air blender should be included in the stack system to ensure qualification of the stack.

  16. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM ...

  17. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  18. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the worlds first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STARs spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLOUD RADARS A Year in Review and a Look to the Future Kevin Widener (a), Karen Johnson (b) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (a), Brookhaven National Laboratory (b) Summary A total of 7 zenith pointing Doppler cloud radars are in operation 24/7 at the ARM sites. We successfully addressed many hardware problems on all of the radars. Antenna refurbishment and procurement of a new digital transceiver are currently underway. We are also working on the next version of the signal processor to

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager WTP Start-Up and Commissioning Integration Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework Hanford Advisory Board December 11, 2013 2 Secretary Moniz Visits Hanford Tank Farm Project Assistant Manager Tom Fletcher points out C-Farm activity from observation platform ORP Manager Kevin Smith (Far Left) discusses WTP construction with Secretary Moniz  June 19, 2013 * Secretary Moniz toured Tank Farms and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP)  Two Briefings

  1. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    E R G Y R E S I L I E N C E - O I L QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW TECHNICAL WORKSHOP 4/29/2014 Bernie Vaughan - vaughabf@gmail.com 1 ENERGY RESILIENCE - OIL * Production * Crude Oil Distribution System * Pipeline (Production to terminals) * Rail * Terminals (Load) * Storage * Transportation * Vessels * Ships * Barges * Transit choke points * Ports (Delivery) * Pipelines (Delivery port to refinery) 4/29/2014 Bernie Vaughan - vaughabf@gmail.com 2 ENERGY RESILIENCE - OIL * Refineries * Docks/tankage *

  2. Strategic Focus Points

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Focus Points June 2011 1. Establish the human capital and organizational foundation to create a high-performing organization. 2. Implement a cyber risk-management and incident response program that ensures effective security of Federal and M&O networks, provides appropriate flexibility, and meets legal requirements and OMB expectations. 3. Improve IT Services (EITS) into a best-in-class provider from both a technical and business perspective. 4. Implement and institutionalize a reformed,

  3. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    John Nangle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Tribal Leader Forum, Phoenix, AZ - May 30 - 31, 2013 State Incentives and Project Impacts Main Points - Market Context * State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) - What are they? - How can they help your project? - Potential gap means more market demand for RE projects Starting a Renewable Energy Project * What renewable resources exist? * What sites with resources do you own? * To whom will you sell the electricity? * How will federal

  4. Assessment of the Group 5-6 (LB C2, LB S2, LV S1) Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2011-03-11

    This document reports on a series of tests to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 5-6 exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LB-C2, LV-S1, and LB S2 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 5-6) because the common factor in their design is that the last significant flow disturbance upstream of the air sampling probe is a reduction in duct diameter. Federal regulations( ) require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The testing on scale models of the stacks conducted for this project was part of the River Protection ProjectWaste Treatment Plant Support Program under Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 according to the statement of work issued by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI, 24590-QL-SRA-W000-00101, N13.1-1999 Stack Monitor Scale Model Testing and Qualification, Revision 1, 9/12/2007) and Work Authorization 09 of Memorandum of Agreement 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task is 53024, Work for Hanford Contractors Stack Monitoring. The testing described in this document was further guided by the Test Plan Scale Model Testing the Waste Treatment Plant LB-C2, LB-S2, and LV-S1 (Test Group 5-6) Stack Air Sampling Positions (TP-RPP-WTP-594). The tests conducted by PNNL during 2009 and 2010 on the Group 5-6 scale model systems are described in this report. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross-section at the designed sampling probe locations and at five duct diameters up and downstream from the design location to accommodate potential construction variability. The tests were done only at the design sampling probe location on the scale model of LB-S2 because that ductwork was already constructed. The ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 criteria and the corresponding results of the test series on the scale models are summarized in this report.

  5. Numerical simulation of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. I. Unsteady adiabatic flow around the stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worlikar, A.S.; Knio, O.M.

    1996-09-01

    A low Mach-number compressible flow model for the simulation of acoustically driven flow in a thermoacoustic stack is constructed. The model is based on the assumption that the acoustic wavelength is much larger than the characteristic hydrodynamic lengthscale. Thus, a simplified description of the flow is obtained which still retains the essential features of acoustically induced velocity oscillations near solid boundaries. A vorticity-based formulation of the governing equation is derived which relies on the Helmholtz decomposition of the velocity vector into irrotational and divergence-free components. Irrotational motion is used to represent the action of acoustic waves. Meanwhile the divergence-free velocity component is used to capture the nonlinear vortical perturbations due to no-slip boundaries. A simplified version of the model is applied to analyze unsteady flow in the neighborhood of an idealized thermo-acoustic stack which consists of a periodic array of thin plates placed in an acoustic standing wave. Computed results are used to analyze, for different stack configurations, the nonlinear response of the flow to different acoustic driving amplitudes and frequencies. In particular, it is shown that the flow is dominated by the motion of vortices which result from the shedding of boundary layers from the edges of the stack. The dependence of energy losses on stack configuration and operating conditions is also examined. 28 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Revealing the Preferred Interlayer Orientations and Stackings of Two-Dimensional Bilayer Gallium Selenide Crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xufan; Yoon, Mina; Puretzky, Alexander A; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0 or 60 interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale andmore » the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. The combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.« less

  7. Interplay between intrinsic and stacking-fault magnetic domains in bi-layered manganites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, M.A; Burkhardt, Mark H.; Sarkar, S.; Ohldag, H.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Scholl, A.; Young, A.T.; Doran, A.; Dessau, D.S.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J.F.; Durr, H.A.; Stohr, J.

    2012-09-11

    We present a low temperature X-ray photoemission electron microscopy study of the bi-layered manganite compound La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} (BL-LSMO) to investigate the influence of stacking faults, which are structurally and magnetically different from the bi-layered host. In BL-LSMO small magnetic moment persists to T* = 300K, well above the Curie temperature of 120K (T{sub C}). Our magnetic images show that 3D stacking faults are responsible for the T* transition. Furthermore, close to the T{sub C}, stacking faults are well coupled to the bi-layered host with latter magnetic domains controlling the spin direction of the stacking faults. Contrary to recent reports, we find that stacking faults do not seed magnetic domains in the host via an exchange spring mechanism and the intrinsic T{sub C} of the BL-LSMO is not lower than 120K.

  8. Degree of polarization and source counts of faint radio sources from Stacking Polarized intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stil, J. M.; George, S. J.; Keller, B. W.; Taylor, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    We present stacking polarized intensity as a means to study the polarization of sources that are too faint to be detected individually in surveys of polarized radio sources. Stacking offers not only high sensitivity to the median signal of a class of radio sources, but also avoids a detection threshold in polarized intensity, and therefore an arbitrary exclusion of sources with a low percentage of polarization. Correction for polarization bias is done through a Monte Carlo analysis and tested on a simulated survey. We show that the nonlinear relation between the real polarized signal and the detected signal requires knowledge of the shape of the distribution of fractional polarization, which we constrain using the ratio of the upper quartile to the lower quartile of the distribution of stacked polarized intensities. Stacking polarized intensity for NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources down to the detection limit in Stokes I, we find a gradual increase in median fractional polarization that is consistent with a trend that was noticed before for bright NVSS sources, but is much more gradual than found by previous deep surveys of radio polarization. Consequently, the polarized radio source counts derived from our stacking experiment predict fewer polarized radio sources for future surveys with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders.

  9. Revealing the Preferred Interlayer Orientations and Stackings of Two-Dimensional Bilayer Gallium Selenide Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xufan; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0 or 60 interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale and the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. The combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.

  10. Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for silicon diodes using a plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the perturbation factor in megavoltage electron beams for three models of silicon diodes (IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded) using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6-, 12-, and 18-MeV clinical electron beams. They also measured depth-dose curves using the IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded diodes. The authors used the depth-dose curves measured with the PSD as a perturbation-free reference to extract the perturbation factors of the diodes. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the diodes increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results show the same trend as published Monte Carlo simulation results for the EFD diode; however, the perturbations measured experimentally were greater. They found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed slightly away from the source reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: The manufacturer recommended EPOM appears to be incorrect at low electron energy (6 MeV). In addition, the perturbation factors for diodes may be greater than predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. MODIFYING A 60 YEAR OLD STACK SAMPLING SYSTEM TO MEET ANSI N13.1-1999 EQUIVALENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2006-06-14

    The 291-T-1 stack was constructed in 1944 to support ongoing missions associated with the Hanford Project. Recent changes in the plant mission required a revision to the existing license of the stack that was operating as a minor emission unit. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Health (WDOH) deemed this revision to be a significant modification, thereby requiring the stack to operate to the ANSI N13.1-1999 sampling and monitoring requirements. Because the stack is similar to other stacks on the Hanford site, allowance was made by EPA to demonstrate equivalency to the ANSI standard via calculations in lieu of actual testing. Calculations were allowed for determining the deposition, nozzle transmission and aspiration ratios, but measurements were required for the stack flow coefficient of variation (COV). The equivalency determination was to be based on the requirements of Table 6 of the ANSI N13.1-1999 Standard.

  12. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RapiDx Victoria VanderNoot, Ph.D. February 25, 2015 Sandia MedTech Showcase Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-1392C Brief Technology Overview - RapiDx Rapid, Automated Point-of-Care System (RapiDx) * Portable microfluidic in vitro diagnostic instrument

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automated Prep of Nucleic Acids from Blood for Point-of-Care Applications Steven S. Branda Principal Member of Technical Staff February 25, 2015 Sandia MedTech Showcase Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-1389C Technology Overview * Platform for automated

  14. Capital Point | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Point Jump to: navigation, search Name: Capital Point Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Joint Venture Consortium ) References: Capital...

  15. Rapid and Nondestructive Identification of Polytypism and Stacking Sequences in Few-Layer Molybdenum Diselenide by Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Xin; Utama, M. Iqbal Bakti; Lin, Junhao; Luo, Xin; Zhao, Yanyuan; Zhang, Jun; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Quek, Su Ying; Xiong, Qihua

    2015-07-02

    Various combinations of interlayer shear modes emerge in few-layer molybdenum diselenide grown by chemical vapor deposition depending on the stacking configuration of the sample. Raman measurements may also reveal polytypism and stacking faults, as supported by first principles calculations and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Thus, Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in probing stacking-dependent properties in few-layer 2D materials.

  16. Embedded atom calculations of unstable stacking fault energies and surface energies in intermetallics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farkas, D.; Zhou, S.J.; Vailhe, C.; Mutasa, B.; Panova, J.

    1997-01-01

    We performed embedded atom method calculations on surface energies and unstable stacking fault energies for a series of intermetallics for which interatomic potentials of the embedded atom type have recently been developed. These results were analyzed and applied to the prediction of relative ductility of these materials using the various current theories. Series of alloys with the B2 ordered structure were studied, and the results were compared to those in pure body-centered cubic (bcc) Fe. Ordered compounds with L1{sub 2} and L1{sub 0} structures based on the face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice were also studied. It was found that there is a correlation between the values of the antiphase boundary (APB) energies in B2 alloys and their unstackable stacking fault energies. Materials with higher APB energies tend to have higher unstable stacking fault energies, leading to an increased tendency to brittle fracture. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  17. Determination of Fire Enviroment in Stacked Cargo Containers with Radioactive Materials Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arviso, M.; Bobbe, J.G.; Dukart, R.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1999-05-01

    Results from a Fire Test with a three-by-three stack of standard 6 m long International Standards Organization shipping containers containing combustible fuels and empty radioactive materials packages are reported and discussed. The stack is intended to simulate fire conditions that could occur during on-deck stowage on container cargo ships. The fire is initated by locating the container stack adjacent to a 9.8 x 6 m pool fire. Temperatures of both cargoes (empty and simulated radioactive materials packages) and containers are recorded and reported. Observations on the duration, intensity and spread of the fire are discussed. Based on the results, models for simulation of fire exposure of radioactive materials packages in such fires are suggested.

  18. A study of the stack relaxation in thermal batteries on activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; THOMAS,EDWARD V.

    2000-04-17

    The stack-relaxation processes occurring in a thermal-battery upon activation and discharge were studied dynamically with a special test fixture that incorporated an internal load cell. The factors which were screened initially included stack diameter and height (number of cells), thickness and binder content of the separator, temperature, and closing pressure. A second series of more-detailed experiments included only those factors that were identified by the screening study as being important (as closing force, number of cells, and separator thickness). The resulting experimental data from this second series of experiments were used to generate a surface-response model based on these three factors. This model accounted for 94% of the variation in the response (final stack-relaxation pressure) over the range of conditions studied.

  19. Breakthrough Flow Battery Cell Stack: Transformative Electrochemical Flow Storage System (TEFSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-09

    GRIDS Project: UTRC is developing a flow battery with a unique design that provides significantly more power than today's flow battery systems. A flow battery is a cross between a traditional battery and a fuel cell. Flow batteries store their energy in external tanks instead of inside the cell itself. Flow batteries have traditionally been expensive because the battery cell stack, where the chemical reaction takes place, is costly. In this project, UTRC is developing a new stack design that achieves 10 times higher power than todays flow batteries. This high power output means the size of the cell stack can be smaller, reducing the amount of expensive materials that are needed. UTRCs flow battery will reduce the cost of storing electricity for the electric grid, making widespread use feasible.

  20. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

    2011-01-01

    Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

  1. 4 kW Test of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new test stand has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for multi-kW testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. This test stand will initially be operated at the 4 KW scale. The 4 kW tests will include two 60-cell stacks operating in parallel in a single hot zone. The stacks are internally manifolded with an inverted-U flow pattern and an active area of 100 cm2 per cell. Process gases to and from the two stacks are distributed from common inlet/outlet tubing using a custom base manifold unit that also serves as the bottom current collector plate. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells and electrode gases. Sealing is accomplished with compliant mica-glass seals. A spring-loaded test fixture is used for mechanical stack compression. Due to the power level and the large number of cells in the hot zone, process gas flow rates are high and heat recuperation is required to preheat the cold inlet gases upstream of the furnace. Heat recuperation is achieved by means of two inconel tube-in-tube counter-flow heat exchangers. A current density of 0.3 A/cm2 will be used for these tests, resulting in a hydrogen production rate of 25 NL/min. Inlet steam flow rates will be set to achieve a steam utilization value of 50%. The 4 kW test will be performed for a minimum duration of 1000 hours in order to document the long-term durability of the stacks. Details of the test apparatus and initial results will be provided.

  2. Fiber optic coupling of a microlens conditioned, stacked semiconductor laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Mills, Steven T. (Antioch, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The output radiation from the two-dimensional aperture of a semiconductor laser diode array is efficiently coupled into an optical fiber. The two-dimensional aperture is formed by stacking individual laser diode bars on top of another in a "rack and stack" configuration. Coupling into the fiber is then accomplished using individual microlenses to condition the output radiation of the laser diode bars. A lens that matches the divergence properties and wavefront characteristics of the laser light to the fiber optic is used to focus this conditioned radiation into the fiber.

  3. Fiber optic coupling of a microlens conditioned, stacked semiconductor laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.; Mills, S.T.

    1997-04-01

    The output radiation from the two-dimensional aperture of a semiconductor laser diode array is efficiently coupled into an optical fiber. The two-dimensional aperture is formed by stacking individual laser diode bars on top of another in a ``rack and stack`` configuration. Coupling into the fiber is then accomplished using individual microlenses to condition the output radiation of the laser diode bars. A lens that matches the divergence properties and wavefront characteristics of the laser light to the fiber optic is used to focus this conditioned radiation into the fiber. 3 figs.

  4. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Kachmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1995-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  5. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  6. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1994-08-09

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  7. Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan; Ohmacht, Martin; Salapura, Valentina; Sugavanam, Krishnan; Hoenicke, Dirk

    2012-01-24

    Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth dynamically changes the depth of prefetching so that the number of multiple streams as well as the hit rate of a single stream are optimized. The method and apparatus in one aspect monitor a plurality of load requests from a processing unit for data in a prefetch buffer, determine an access pattern associated with the plurality of load requests and adjust a prefetch depth according to the access pattern.

  8. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Advanced Technology ...

  9. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  10. A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

  11. Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  12. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in ... strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a ...

  13. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

  14. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  15. Experimental study of stack plume rise and dispersion at the power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-10

    This paper describes the primary results of stack plume rise and dispersion experiment at Xu Zhou power station during November-December, 1978. (1) Under neutral and near-neutral stratification conditions, the 2/3 power law is the optimizing formula up to date, because of its calculated values in coincidence with observed. (2) Vertical of the buoyant plume from the tall stack is obviously stronger than that of non buoyant plume from the low stack. It is shown that the concept sof Pasquill(1976) model are acceptable, but formula should be modified. (3) From reliable monitoring data of SO/sub 2/ ground concentration, it is found that the effects of topography and stack height should be comprehensively taken into account in estimating dispersion by gaussian model. (4) It is suggested that in analyzing the stereophoto grammetric data of fluctuating plume, the square deviation of plume distribution should be considered as the sum of two parts--the distribution square deviation of the plume particulates relative to the instantaneous center line of the plume, and the distriubtion square deviaton of the instantaneous center line relative to the average center line of the plume. (5) Lidar is shown to be as effective as steroegraphic method in studying behavior of chimney plumes.

  16. Light Weight, Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Stacks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 5_cwru.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting Agenda Light Weight, Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Stacks Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting

  17. Light Weight, Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Stacks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation, which focuses on fuel cell stacks, was given at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects. PDF icon new_fc_wainwright_casewestern.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Advanced Cathode Catalysts Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes

  18. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gard, Eric (San Francisco, CA); Riot, Vincent (Oakland, CA); Coffee, Keith (Diablo Grande, CA); Woods, Bruce (Livermore, CA); Tobias, Herbert (Kensington, CA); Birch, Jim (Albany, CA); Weisgraber, Todd (Brentwood, CA)

    2011-11-22

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  19. X-Stack Software Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    X-Stack Software Research Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC)

  20. ASCR X-Stack Portfolio | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ASCR X-Stack Portfolio Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Exascale Tools Workshop Programming Challenges Workshop Architectures I Workshop External link Architectures II Workshop External link Next Generation Networking Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community

  1. Low-frequency Raman 'fingerprints' of two-dimensional metal dichalcogenide layer stacking configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Liang, Liangbo; Li, Xufan; Xiao, Kai; Wang, Kai; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Geohegan, David B

    2015-01-01

    Stacked monolayers of two-dimensional (2D) materials present a new class of hybrid materials with tunable optoelectronic properties determined by their stacking orientation, order, and atomic registry. Atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (AR-Z-STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used to determine the exact atomic registration between different layers, in few-layer 2D stacks, however fast optical characterization techniques are essential for rapid development of the field. Here, using two- and three-layer MoSe2 and WSe2 crystals synthesized by chemical vapor deposition we show that the generally unexplored low frequency (LF) Raman modes (< 50 cm-1) that originate from interlayer vibrations can serve as fingerprints to characterize not only the number of layers, but also their stacking configurations. Ab initio calculations and group theory analysis corroborate the experimental assignments determined by AR-Z-STEM and show that the calculated LF mode fingerprints are related to the 2D crystal symmetries.

  2. Type A verification report for the high flux beam reactor stack and grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpenau, Evan M.

    2012-01-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The HFBR Stack and Grounds surveys began in June 2011 and were completed in September 2011. Survey activities by BSA included gamma walkover scans and sampling of the as-left soils in accordance with the BSA Work Procedure (BNL 2010a). The Field Sampling Plan - Stack and Remaining HFBR Outside Areas (FSP) stated that gamma walk-over surveys would be conducted with a bare sodium iodide (NaI) detector, and a collimated detector would be used to check areas with elevated count rates to locate the source of the high readings (BNL 2010b). BSA used the Mult- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) principles for determining the classifications of each survey unit. Therefore, SUs 6 and 7 were identified as Class 1 and SU 8 was deemed Class 2 (BNL 2010b). Gamma walkover surveys of SUs 6, 7, and 8 were completed using a 2?2 NaI detector coupled to a data-logger with a global positioning system (GPS). The 100% scan surveys conducted prior to the final status survey (FSS) sampling identified two general soil areas and two isolated soil locations with elevated radioactivity. The general areas of elevated activity identified were investigated further with a collimated NaI detector. The uncollimated average gamma count rate was less than 15,000 counts per minute (cpm) for the SU 6, 7, and 8 composite area (BNL 2011a). Elevated count rates were observed in portions of each survey unit. The general areas of elevated counts near the Building 801 ventilation and operations and the entry to the Stack were determined to be directly related to the radioactive processes in those structures. To compensate for this radioactive shine, a collimated or shielded detector was used to lower the background count rate (BNL 2011b and c). This allowed the surveyor(s) to distinguish between background and actual radioactive contamination. Collimated gamma survey count rates in these shine affected areas were below 9,000 cpm (BNL 2011a). The average background count rate of 7,500 cpm was reported by BSA for uncollimated NaI detectors (BNL 2011d). The average collimated background ranged from 4,500-6,500 cpm in the westernmost part of SU 8 and from 2,000-3,500 cpm in all other areas (BNL 2011e). Based on these data, no further investigations were necessary for these general areas. SU 8 was the only survey unit that exhibited verified elevated radioactivity levels. The first of two isolated locations of elevated radioactivity had an uncollimated direct measurement of 50,000 cpm with an area background of 7,500 cpm (BNL 2011f). The second small area exhibiting elevated radiation levels was identified at a depth of 6 inches from the surface. The maximum reported count rate of 28,000 cpm was observed during scanning (BNL 2011g). The affected areas were remediated, and the contaminated soils were placed in an intermodal container for disposal. BSA's post-remediation walkover surveys were expanded to include a 10-foot radius around the excavated locations, and it was determined that further investigation was not required for these areas (BNL 2011 f and g). The post-remediation soil samples were collected and analyzed with onsite gamma spectroscopy equipment. These samples were also included with the FSS s

  3. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report | Department of Energy Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal

  4. Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-08-27

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

  5. Point Bio Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Point Bio Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Point Bio Energy LLC Place: La Pointe, Wisconsin Product: Wisconsin-based wood fuel pellet producer. References: Point Bio...

  6. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-04-08

    BattellePacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energys Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

  7. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley; Dana A. (New Milford, CT), Farooque; Mohammad (Danbury, CT), Davis; Keith (Southbury, CT)

    2007-10-02

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  8. Progress in Multi-Batch Slip Stacking in the Fermilab Main Injector and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiya, K.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    The multi-batch slip stacking has been used for operations since January, 2008 and effectively increased proton intensity to the NuMI target by 50% in a Main Injector (MI) cycle. The MI accepts 11 batches at injection energy from the Booster, and sends two batches to antiproton production and nine to the NuMI beam line. The total beam power in a cycle was increased to 340 kW on average. We have been doing beam studies in order to increase the beam power to 400 kW and to control the beam loss. We will also discuss 12 batch slip stacking scheme which is going to be used for future neutrino experiments.

  9. Cassettes for solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and methods of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2012-10-23

    Solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack assembly designs are consistently investigated to develop an assembly that provides optimal performance, and durability, within desired cost parameters. A new design includes a repeat unit having a SOFC cassette and being characterized by a three-component construct. The three components include an oxidation-resistant, metal window frame hermetically joined to an electrolyte layer of a multi-layer, anode-supported ceramic cell and a pre-cassette including a separator plate having a plurality of vias that provide electrical contact between an anode-side collector within the pre-cassette and a cathode-side current collector of an adjacent cell. The third component is a cathode-side seal, which includes a standoff that supports a cathode channel spacing between each of the cassettes in a stack. Cassettes are formed by joining the pre-cassette and the window frame.

  10. Numerical simulation of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. 2: Stratified flow around the stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worlikar, A.S.; Knio, O.M.; Klein, R.

    1998-08-10

    The unsteady, two-dimensional, thermally stratified flow in the neighborhood of an idealized thermoacoustic stack is analyzed using a low-Mach-number model that extends the adiabatic flow scheme developed in part 1 (Journal of Computational Physics 127, 424 (1996)). The extension consists of incorporation of numerical solvers for the energy equations in the fluid and the stack plates, and construction and implementation of fast Poisson solver for the velocity potential based on a domain decomposition/boundary Green`s function technique. The unsteady computations are used to predict the steady-state, acoustically generated temperature gradient across a two-dimensional couple and to analyze its dependence on the amplitude of the prevailing resonant wave. Computed results are compared to theoretical predictions and experimental data.

  11. A simplified model for heat transfer in heat exchangers and stack plates for thermoacoustic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.; Herman, C.

    1999-07-01

    A simplified model of heat transfer in heat exchangers and stack plates of thermoacoustic devices was developed. The model took advantage of previous results regarding the thermal behavior of the thermoacoustic core for investigations of the performance of heat exchangers attached to the core. Geometrical and operational parameters as well as thermophysical properties of the heat exchangers, the plate, and the working medium were organized into dimensionless groups that allowed to account for their impact on the performance of the heat exchangers. Numerical simulations with the model were carried out. Nonlinear temperature distributions and heat fluxes near the edge of the stack plate were observed. Effects of different parameters on the thermal performance of the heat exchangers were investigated.

  12. Three-dimensional stacked structured ASIC devices and methods of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shinde, Subhash L.; Teifel, John; Flores, Richard S.; Jarecki Jr., Robert L.; Bauer, Todd

    2015-11-19

    A 3D stacked sASIC is provided that includes a plurality of 2D reconfigurable structured structured ASIC (sASIC) levels interconnected through hard-wired arrays of 3D vias. The 2D sASIC levels may contain logic, memory, analog functions, and device input/output pad circuitry. During fabrication, these 2D sASIC levels are stacked on top of each other and fused together with 3D metal vias. Such 3D vias may be fabricated as through-silicon vias (TSVs). They may connect to the back-side of the 2D sASIC level, or they may be connected to top metal pads on the front-side of the 2D sASIC level.

  13. Shunt-capacitor-assisted synchronization of oscillations in intrinsic Josephson junctions stack.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, I.; Halasz, G. B.; Bulaevskii, L. N.; Koshelev, A. E.; Materials Science Division; LANL

    2010-08-06

    We show that a shunt capacitor, by coupling each Josephson junction to all the other junctions, stabilizes synchronized oscillations in an intrinsic Josephson junction stack biased by a dc current. This synchronization mechanism is similar to the previously discussed radiative coupling between junctions, however, it is not defined by the geometry of the stack. It is particularly important in crystals with smaller numbers of junctions (where the radiation coupling is weak), and is comparable with the effect of strong super-radiation in crystals with many junctions. The shunt also helps to enter the phase-locked regime in the beginning of the oscillations, after switching on the bias current. Furthermore, it may be used to tune radiation power, which drops as the shunt capacitance increases.

  14. Stacked white OLED having separate red, green and blue sub-elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, Stephen; Qi, Xiangfei; Slootsky, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The present invention relates to efficient organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The devices employ three emissive sub-elements, typically emitting red, green and blue, to sufficiently cover the visible spectrum. Thus, the devices may be white-emitting OLEDs, or WOLEDs. Each sub-element comprises at least one organic layer which is an emissive layer--i.e., the layer is capable of emitting light when a voltage is applied across the stacked device. The sub-elements are vertically stacked and are separated by charge generating layers. The charge-generating layers are layers that inject charge carriers into the adjacent layer(s) but do not have a direct external connection.

  15. Two-band lasing in epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinokurov, D. A.; Ladugin, M. A.; Lyutetskii, A. V.; Marmalyuk, A. A.; Petrunov, A. N.; Pikhtin, N. A.; Slipchenko, S. O. Sokolova, Z. N.; Stankevich, A. L.; Fetisova, N. V.; Shashkin, I. S.; Averkiev, N. S.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2010-06-15

    Epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction laser hetero structures were grown by hydride metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy in the system of AlGaAs/GaAs/In GaAs alloys. Based on such structures, mesa stripe lasers with an aperture of 150 s- 7 m were fabricated. The possibility of controlling the lasing wavelength by varying the active region thickness in each tunnel-junction laser structure was demonstrated. Independent two-band lasing at wavelengths of 914 and 925 nm (the difference frequency is 2.3 THz) was achieved at a maximum optical radiation power of 20 W in each band of the epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction semiconductor laser.

  16. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kachmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1995-02-28

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device is described, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  17. Development of MnCoO Coating with New Aluminizing Process for Planar SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, K. Scott; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-03-22

    Low-cost, chromia-forming steels find widespread use in SOFCs at operating temperatures below 800C, because of their low thermal expansion mismatch and low cost. However, volatile Cr-containing species originating from this scale poison the cathode material in the cells and subsequently cause power degradation in the devices. To prevent this, a conductive manganese cobaltite coating has been developed. However, this coating is not compatible with forming hermetic seals between the interconnect or window frame component and ceramic cell. This coating reacts with sealing materials. Thus, a new aluminizing process has been developed for the sealing regions in these parts, as well as for other metallic stack and balance-of-plant components. From this development, the sealing performance and SOFC stack performance became very stable.

  18. Prediction of crack propagation paths in the unit cell of SOFC stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joulaee, N.; Makradi, A.; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2009-08-01

    Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) stacks are multi-material layered systems with different thermo-mechanical properties. Due to their severe thermal loading, these layers have to meet high demands to preserve their mechanical integrity without initiation and propagation of fracture. Here, we focus on a typical unit cell of the stack which consists of positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN). Based on the mechanical properties of each layer and their interfaces, an energy criterion as a function of crack length is used for the prediction of possible crack extensions in the PEN. This criterion is a pure local criterion, independent of applied loads and geometry of the specimen. An analysis of the competition between crack deflections in the interfaces and crack penetration in layers is presented.

  19. System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J; Weissman, Jeffrey G.

    2012-03-06

    A system for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack, having a reformer adapted to reform a hydrocarbon fuel stream containing sulfur contaminants, thereby providing a reformate stream having sulfur; a sulfur trap fluidly coupled downstream of the reformer for removing sulfur from the reformate stream, thereby providing a desulfurized reformate stream; and a metering device in fluid communication with the reformate stream upstream of the sulfur trap and with the desulfurized reformate stream downstream of the sulfur trap. The metering device is adapted to bypass a portion of the reformate stream to mix with the desulfurized reformate stream, thereby producing a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

  20. Stacked switchable element and diode combination with a low breakdown switchable element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Ward, James Scott (Englewood, CO); Hu, Jian (Englewood, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2012-06-19

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship. The semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a low-density forming current and/or a low voltage.

  1. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL); Mawdsley, Jennifer R. (Woodridge, IL); Niyogi, Suhas (Woodridge, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Santos, Lilia (Lombard, IL)

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  2. Review of the Physical Science Facility Stack Air Sampling Probe Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2007-09-30

    This letter report reviews compliance of the current design of the Physical Science Facility (PSF) stack air sampling locations with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard. The review was based on performance criteria used for locating air sampling probes, the design documents provided and available information on systems previously tested for compliance with the criteria. Recommendations are presented for ways to bring the design into compliance with the requirements for the sampling probe placement.

  3. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  4. Heat Flow At Standard Depth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Heat Flow At Standard Depth Abstract Secular and long-term periodic changes in surface...

  5. Confocal volume in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-11-15

    To clarify the degradation of confocality in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling (optical sectioning) and the influence of pinhole filtering on it, we investigate the confocal volume in detail based on Gaussian beam optics and scalar wave optics. Theoretical depth profiles of a homogeneous transparent sample for four different pinhole sizes, which are computed using the measured incident beam waist radius w{sub 0} and only a few optical system specific parameters such as a numerical aperture (NA) and a focal length, show a good agreement with the corresponding measured depth profiles. The computed confocal volume demonstrates that the pinhole size affects the actual probe depth as well as the axial resolution and the total intensity loss.

  6. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

  7. Possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose measurements in clinical electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose (PDD) measurements in high-energy clinical electron beams. Methods: The cavity correction factor, P{sub cav}, for cylindrical chambers with various diameters was calculated as a function of depth from the surface to R{sub 50}, in the energy range of 6-18 MeV electrons with the EGSnrc C ++ -based user-code CAVITY. The results were compared with those for IBA NACP-02 and PTW Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers. The effective point of measurement (EPOM) for the cylindrical chamber and the parallel-plate chamber was positioned according to the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. The overall correction factor, P{sub Q}, and the percent depth-ionization (PDI) curve for a PTW30013 Farmer-type chamber were also compared with those of NACP-02 and Roos chambers. Results: The P{sub cav} values at depths between the surface and R{sub 50} for cylindrical chambers were all lower than those with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth for cylindrical chambers equal to or less than 4 mm in diameter was equivalent to or smaller than that for parallel-plate chambers. The P{sub Q} values for the PTW30013 chamber mainly depended on P{sub cav}, and for parallel-plate chambers depended on the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, rather than P{sub cav}. P{sub Q} at depths from the surface to R{sub 50} for the PTW30013 chamber was consequently a lower value than that with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth was equivalent to that of parallel-plate chambers at electron energies equal to or greater than 9 MeV. The shift to match calculated PDI curves for the PTW30013 chamber and water (perturbation free) varied from 0.65 to 0 mm between 6 and 18 MeV beams. Similarly, the shifts for NACP-02 and Roos chambers were 0.5-0.6 mm and 0.2-0.3 mm, respectively, and were nearly independent of electron energy. Conclusions: Calculated PDI curves for PTW30013, NACP-02, and Roos chambers agreed well with that of water by using the optimal EPOM. Therefore, the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers can be expected for PDD measurements in clinical electron beams.

  8. Internal electrolyte supply system for reliable transport throughout fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA); Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); King, Robert B. (Westlake, OH)

    1988-01-01

    An improved internal electrolyte supply system in a fuel cell stack employs a variety of arrangements of grooves and passages in bipolar plates of the multiplicity of repeating fuel cells to route gravity-assisted flowing electrolyte throughout the stack. The grooves route electrolyte flow along series of first paths which extend horizontally through the cells between the plates thereof. The passages route electrolyte flow along series of second paths which extend vertically through the stack so as to supply electrolyte to the first paths in order to expose the electrolyte to the matrices of the cells. Five different embodiments of the supply system are disclosed. Some embodiments employ wicks in the grooves for facilitating transfer of the electrolyte to the matrices as well as providing support for the matrices. Additionally, the passages of some embodiments by-pass certain of the grooves and supply electrolyte directly to other of the grooves. Some embodiments employ single grooves and others have dual grooves. Finally, in some embodiments the passages are connected to the grooves by a step which produces a cascading electrolyte flow.

  9. Effect of interconnect creep on long-term performance of SOFC of one cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-02-01

    Creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 1073oK. High temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and CTE compatibility with other SOFC components. Since the melting temperature of most stainless steel is around 1800oK, possible creep deformation of IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of interconnect creep behavior on stack geometry change and stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the fuel and air channel geometry changes due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel interconnect, therefore indicating possible SOFC performance change under long term operations. IC creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long term steady state operating temperature. It is found that creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel and the air flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  10. 2014 PowerPoint template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Addition of lime to the residuals will precipitate the leaching uranium * How can this information be used in modeling Retrievals System Plan 7 Points of Interest * Current...

  11. Fresnel zone plate stacking in the intermediate field for high efficiency focusing in the hard X-ray regime

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Wojcik, Michael; Liu, Jie; Roehrig, Chris; Cummings, Marvin; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Li, Kenan; Lai, Barry; Shu, Deming; Vogt, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    Focusing efficiency of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) for X-rays depends on zone height, while the achievable spatial resolution depends on the width of the finest zones. FZPs with optimal efficiency and sub-100-nm spatial resolution require high aspect ratio structures which are difficult to fabricate with current technology especially for the hard X-ray regime. A possible solution is to stack several zone plates. To increase the number of FZPs within one stack, we first demonstrate intermediate-field stacking and apply this method by stacks of up to five FZPs with adjusted diameters. Approaching the respective optimum zone height, we maximized efficiencies formorehigh resolution focusing at three different energies, 10, 11.8, and 25 keV.less

  12. 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgeon, Richard W.

    2012-06-27

    This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

  13. END POINTS MANAGEMENT End Points Management The Need for End...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    End Points End-state has been used to refer to the overall status and disposition of a ... They are equally applicable and usable for planning of stabilization and decommissioning ...

  14. Twisted MoSe2 bilayers with variable local stacking and interlayer coupling revealed by low-frequency Raman spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Puretzky, Alexander A.; Liang, Liangbo; Li, Xufan; Xiao, Kai; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Meunier, Vincent; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-01-14

    Unique twisted bilayers of MoSe2 with multiple stacking orientations and interlayer couplings in the narrow range of twist angles, 60 ± 3°, are revealed by low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and theoretical analysis. The slight deviation from 60 allows the concomitant presence of patches featuring all three high-symmetry stacking configurations (2H or AA', AB', A'B) in one unique bilayer system. In this case, the periodic arrangement of the patches and their size strongly depend on the twist angle. Ab initio modeling predicts significant changes in frequencies and intensities of low-frequency modes versus stacking and twist angle. Experimentally, the variable stacking and couplingmore » across the interface is revealed by the appearance of two breathing modes corresponding to the mixture of the high-symmetry stacking configurations and unaligned regions of monolayers. Only one breathing mode is observed outside the narrow range of twist angles. This indicates a stacking transition to unaligned monolayers with mismatched atom registry without the in-plane restoring force required to generate a shear mode. As a result, the variable interlayer coupling and spacing in transition metal dichalcogenide bilayers revealed in this study may provide a new platform for optoelectronic applications of these materials.« less

  15. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE STACKS WITH ELECTRODE-SUPPORTED CELLS OPERATING IN THE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. Tao; B. J. Butler

    2011-11-01

    Performance characterization and durability testing have been completed on two five-cell high-temperature electrolysis stacks constructed with advanced cell and stack technologies. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. The per-cell active area is 100 cm2. The stack is internally manifolded with compliant mica-glass seals. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells. Stack compression is accomplished by means of a custom spring-loaded test fixture. Initial stack performance characterization was determined through a series of DC potential sweeps in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes of operation. Results of these sweeps indicated very good initial performance, with area-specific resistance values less than 0.5 ?.cm2. Long-term durability testing was performed with A test duration of 1000 hours. Overall performance degradation was less than 10% over the 1000-hour period. Final stack performance characterization was again determined by a series of DC potential sweeps at the same flow conditions as the initial sweeps in both electrolysis and fuel cell modes of operation. A final sweep in the fuel cell mode indicated a power density of 0.356 W/cm2, with average per-cell voltage of 0.71 V at a current of 50 A.

  16. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - NatureNanotech_748_2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Epitaxial growth of SrTiO 3 on Si by molecular beam epitaxy has opened up the route to the integration of functional complex oxides on a Si platform. Chief among them is ferroelectric functionality using perovskite oxides such as BaTiO 3 . However, it has remained a challenge to achieve ferroelectricity in epitaxial BaTiO 3 films with a polarization pointing perpendicular to the Si substrate without a conducting bottom electrode. Here, we demonstrate ferroelectricity in such stacks. Synchrotron

  18. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM Fed) has long been one of the Nation's principal sources of proved reserves. At the end of 2009, the GOM Fed accounted for close to one-fifth of oil proved reserves (second only to Texas) and just over four percent of natural gas proved reserves (the country's seventh largest reporting region). 1 Natural gas proved reserves

  19. Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Ronghai; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Carl, Jr., Ralph James; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Lopez, Fulton Jose

    2010-04-06

    An electrical machine includes a rotor with an inner rotor portion and an outer rotor portion, and a double-sided yokeless stator. The yokeless stator includes modular lamination stacks and is configured for radial magnetic flux flow. The double-sided yokeless stator is concentrically disposed between the inner rotor portion and the outer rotor portion of the electrical machine. Examples of particularly useful embodiments for the electrical machine include wind turbine generators, ship propulsion motors, switch reluctance machines and double-sided synchronous machines.

  20. T-556: BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon stack-based buffer overflow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stack-based buffer overflow in BMC PATROL Agent Service Daemon for in Performance Analysis for Servers, Performance Assurance for Servers, and Performance Assurance for Virtual Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; Performance Analyzer and Performance Predictor for Servers 7.4.00 through 7.5.10; and Capacity Management Essentials 1.2.00 (7.4.15) allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted length value in a BGS_MULTIPLE_READS command to TCP port 6768.

  1. MEASUREMENT OF THE HALO BIAS FROM STACKED SHEAR PROFILES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covone, Giovanni; Sereno, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    We present observational evidence of the two-halo term in the stacked shear profile of a sample of ?1200 optically selected galaxy clusters based on imaging data and the public shear catalog from the CFHTLenS. We find that the halo bias, a measure of the correlated distribution of matter around galaxy clusters, has amplitude and correlation with galaxy cluster mass in very good agreement with the predictions based on the LCDM standard cosmological model. The mass-concentration relation is flat but higher than theoretical predictions. We also confirm the close scaling relation between the optical richness of galaxy clusters and their mass.

  2. Cedar Point Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cedar Point Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cedar Point Wind Farm Facility Cedar Point Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  3. Star Point Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Point Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Star Point Wind Farm Facility Star Point Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  4. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss031_rask_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Advanced Technology Vehicle Benchmark and Assessment

  5. Nonlinear modelling of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack using nonlinear cancellation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barus, R. P. P.; Tjokronegoro, H. A.; Leksono, E.; Ismunandar

    2014-09-25

    Fuel cells are promising new energy conversion devices that are friendly to the environment. A set of control systems are required in order to operate a fuel cell based power plant system optimally. For the purpose of control system design, an accurate fuel cell stack model in describing the dynamics of the real system is needed. Currently, linear model are widely used for fuel cell stack control purposes, but it has limitations in narrow operation range. While nonlinear models lead to nonlinear control implemnetation whos more complex and hard computing. In this research, nonlinear cancellation technique will be used to transform a nonlinear model into a linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics. The transformation is done by replacing the input of the original model by a certain virtual input that has nonlinear relationship with the original input. Then the equality of the two models is tested by running a series of simulation. Input variation of H2, O2 and H2O as well as disturbance input I (current load) are studied by simulation. The error of comparison between the proposed model and the original nonlinear model are less than 1 %. Thus we can conclude that nonlinear cancellation technique can be used to represent fuel cell nonlinear model in a simple linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics and therefore retain the wide operation range.

  6. Airborne Effluent Monitoring System Certification for New Canister Storage Building Ventilation Exhaust Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1999-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted three of the six tests needed to verify that the effluent monitoring system for the new Canister Storage Building ventilation exhaust stack meets applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the location for the air-sampling probe and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering the location for the air-sampling probe ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample-transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in this report. The tests reported here cover the contaminant tracer uniformity and particle delivery performance criteria. These criteria were successfully met. The other three tests were conducted by the start-up staff of Duke Engineering and Services Hanford Inc. (DESH) and reported elsewhere. The Canister Storage Building is located in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The new air-exhaust system was built under the W379 Project. The air sampling system features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and a filter holder to collect the sample.

  7. Application of Derrick Corporation's stack sizer technology for slimes reduction in 6 inch clean coal hydrocyclone circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzik, P.

    2009-04-15

    The article discusses the successful introduction of Derrick Corporation's Stack Sizer technology for removing minus 200 mesh slimes from 6-inch coal hydrocyclone underflow prior to froth flotation or dewatering by screen bowl centrifuges. In 2006, the James River Coal Company selected the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 150 micron and 100 micron urethane screen panels for removal of the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits. After this application proved successful, Derrick Corporation introduced new 75 micron urethane screen panels for use on the Stack Sizer. Evaluation of feed slurry to flotation cells and screen bowl centrifuges showed significant amounts of minus 75 micron that could potentially be removed by efficient screening technology. Removal of the minus 75 micron fraction was sought to reduce ash and moisture content of the final clean coal product. Full-scale lab tests confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 75 micron urethane screen panels consistently reduced the minus 75 micron percentage in coal slurry from 6-inch clean coal hydrocyclone underflow that is approximately 15 to 20% solid by-weight and 30 to 60% minus 75 micron to a clean coal fraction that is approximately 13 to 16% minus 75 micron. As a result total ash is reduced from approximately 36 to 38% in the hydrocyclone underflow to 14 to 16% in the oversize product fraction form the Stack Sizers. 1 fig., 2 tabs., 5 photos.

  8. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  9. Extremely scaled high-k/In?.??Ga?.??As gate stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chobpattana, Varistha; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhang, Jack Y.; Mates, Thomas E.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2014-09-28

    Highly scaled gate dielectric stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities are required for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology with III-V semiconductor channels. Here, we show that a novel pre-deposition technique, consisting of alternating cycles of nitrogen plasma and tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium, allows for HfO? and ZrO? gate stacks with extremely high accumulation capacitance densities of more than 5 ?F/cm? at 1 MHz, low leakage current, low frequency dispersion, and low midgap interface trap densities (10cm?eV?range). Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the interface contains TiO? and small quantities of In?O?, but no detectable Ga- or As-oxides, or As-As bonding. The results allow for insights into the microscopic mechanisms that control leakage and frequency dispersion in high-k/III-V gate stacks.

  10. Highly uniform, multi-stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatebayashi, J. Ota, Y.; Ishida, S.; Nishioka, M.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate a highly uniform, dense stack of In{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures in a single GaAs nanowire (NW). The size (and hence emission energy) of individual QD is tuned by careful control of the growth conditions based on a diffusion model of morphological evolution of NWs and optical characterization. By carefully tailoring the emission energies of individual QD, dot-to-dot inhomogeneous broadening of QD stacks in a single NW can be as narrow as 9.3?meV. This method provides huge advantages over traditional QD stack using a strain-induced Stranski-Krastanow growth scheme. We show that it is possible to fabricate up to 200 uniform QDs in single GaAs NWs using this growth technique without degradation of the photoluminescence intensity.

  11. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

    2008-12-22

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  12. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

    2008-12-23

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  13. Designing π-stacked molecular structures to control heat transport through molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiršanskas, Gediminas; Li, Qian; Solomon, Gemma C.; Flensberg, Karsten; Leijnse, Martin

    2014-12-08

    We propose and analyze a way of using π stacking to design molecular junctions that either enhance or suppress a phononic heat current, but at the same time remain conductors for an electric current. Such functionality is highly desirable in thermoelectric energy converters, as well as in other electronic components where heat dissipation should be minimized or maximized. We suggest a molecular design consisting of two masses coupled to each other with one mass coupled to each lead. By having a small coupling (spring constant) between the masses, it is possible to either reduce or perhaps more surprisingly enhance the phonon conductance. We investigate a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use first principle calculations to extract model parameters for a number of specific molecular realizations, confirming that our proposal can indeed be realized using standard molecular building blocks.

  14. Scalable stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror for astronomy and laser processing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L. Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Bryce, Emma; Hutson, David; Kirk, Katherine; Schwartz, Noah; Atkinson, David; Beard, Steven; Baillie, Tom; Parr-Burman, Phil; Strachan, Mel; UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ

    2014-02-15

    A prototype of a scalable and potentially low-cost stacked array piezoelectric deformable mirror (SA-PDM) with 35 active elements is presented in this paper. This prototype is characterized by a 2 ?m maximum actuator stroke, a 1.4 ?m mirror sag (measured for a 14 mm 14 mm area of the unpowered SA-PDM), and a 200 nm hysteresis error. The initial proof of concept experiments described here show that this mirror can be successfully used for shaping a high power laser beam in order to improve laser machining performance. Various beam shapes have been obtained with the SA-PDM and examples of laser machining with the shaped beams are presented.

  15. Basic criteria for formation of growth twins in high stacking fault energy metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K. Y.; Zhang, X. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bufford, D.; Chen, Y.; Liu, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Wang, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2013-10-28

    Nanotwinned metals received significant interest lately as twin boundaries may enable simultaneous enhancement of strength, ductility, thermal stability, and radiation tolerance. However, nanotwins have been the privilege of metals with low-to-intermediate stacking fault energy (SFE). Recent scattered studies show that nanotwins could be introduced into high SFE metals, such as Al. In this paper, we examine several sputter-deposited, (111) textured Ag/Al, Cu/Ni, and Cu/Fe multilayers, wherein growth twins were observed in Al, Ni, and face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe. The comparisons lead to two important design criteria that dictate the introduction of growth twins in high SFE metals. The validity of these criteria was then examined in Ag/Ni multilayers. Furthermore, another twin formation mechanism in high SFE metals was discovered in Ag/Ni system.

  16. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  17. Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

    2011-07-19

    This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic is minimized while still offering the desired low temperature coefficient of resistance compared to sodium thiosulfate. The characterization experiments and comparison with the sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors will be fully discussed and the final design described.

  18. PowerPoint Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PowerPoint Presentation PowerPoint Presentation PDF icon PowerPoint Presentation More Documents & Publications 2012 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan EM QA Working Group September 2011 Meeting Materials QA Corporate Board Meeting - May 2012

  19. End Point Implementation Examples | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Point Implementation Examples End Point Implementation Examples PDF icon End Point Implementation Examples More Documents & Publications Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 Deactivation Management

  20. Florida Nuclear Profile - Turkey Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turkey Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 3,693,"5,356",88.2,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" 4,693,"5,950",98.0,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  1. Continuous Learning Points Credit Assignment Table | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continuous Learning Points Credit Assignment Table Continuous Learning Points Credit Assignment Table PDF icon Microsoft Word - CLPCreditAssignmentTable More Documents &...

  2. TEPP Points of Contact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program TEPP Points of Contact TEPP Points of Contact TEPP is a national program managed at a headquarters level and implemented through...

  3. AMF Deployment, Point Reyes National Seashore, California

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California Point Reyes Deployment AMF Home Point Reyes Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments Experiment Planning MASRAD Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Outreach Posters...

  4. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  5. Starting Points | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sandia National Laboratories Contract Competition / Starting Points Starting Points Sandia Field Office Home Page SNL Contract DOE Directives NNSA Policy System

  6. Starting Points | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Security Campus Management and Operating (M&O) Contract Competition Starting Points Starting Points Kansas City Plant Related Web Pages Summary Kansas City Plant Home ...

  7. Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer; Mohamad, Edy Tonizam

    2010-12-23

    Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

  8. Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prommapan, Plegchart

    2011-08-15

    A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

  9. Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resourses Management Division | Department of Energy SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information Resourses Management Division Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information Resourses Management Division Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information Resourses Management Division PDF icon Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA, Information Resourses Management Division More Documents & Publications

  10. VPP POINTS OF CONTACT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POINTS OF CONTACT VPP POINTS OF CONTACT July 9, 2015 The VPP Points of Contact document provides a current listing of all current DOE VPP participants Points of Contact for both Federal and Contractor positions. PDF icon VPP Points of Contact - July 9, 2015 More Documents & Publications 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentaton:

  11. Optical control of electron phase space in plasma accelerators with incoherently stacked laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalmykov, S. Y. Shadwick, B. A.; Davoine, X.; Lehe, R.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2015-05-15

    It is demonstrated that synthesizing an ultrahigh-bandwidth, negatively chirped laser pulse by incoherently stacking pulses of different wavelengths makes it possible to optimize the process of electron self-injection in a dense, highly dispersive plasma (n{sub 0}∼10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}). Avoiding transformation of the driving pulse into a relativistic optical shock maintains a quasi-monoenergetic electron spectrum through electron dephasing and boosts electron energy far beyond the limits suggested by existing scaling laws. In addition, evolution of the accelerating bucket in a plasma channel is shown to produce a background-free, tunable train of femtosecond-duration, 35–100 kA, time-synchronized quasi-monoenergetic electron bunches. The combination of the negative chirp and the channel permits acceleration of electrons beyond 1 GeV in a 3 mm plasma with 1.4 J of laser pulse energy, thus offering the opportunity of high-repetition-rate operation at manageable average laser power.

  12. STUDYING INTERCLUSTER GALAXY FILAMENTS THROUGH STACKING gmBCG GALAXY CLUSTER PAIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yuanyuan; Dietrich, Joerg P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Nguyen, Alex T. Q.; Sheldon, Erin S.

    2013-08-20

    We present a method to study the photometric properties of galaxies in filaments by stacking the galaxy populations between pairs of galaxy clusters. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, this method can detect the intercluster filament galaxy overdensity with a significance of {approx}5{sigma} out to z = 0.40. Using this approach, we study the g - r color and luminosity distribution of filament galaxies as a function of redshift. Consistent with expectation, filament galaxies are bimodal in their color distribution and contain a larger blue galaxy population than clusters. Filament galaxies are also generally fainter than cluster galaxies. More interestingly, the observed filament population seems to show redshift evolution at 0.12 < z < 0.40: the blue galaxy fraction has a trend to increase at higher redshift; such evolution is parallel to the ''Butcher-Oemler effect'' of galaxy clusters. We test the dependence of the observed filament density on the richness of the cluster pair: richer clusters are connected by higher density filaments. We also test the spatial dependence of filament galaxy overdensity: this quantity decreases when moving away from the intercluster axis between a cluster pair. This method provides an economical way to probe the photometric properties of filament galaxies and should prove useful for upcoming projects like the Dark Energy Survey.

  13. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink, K.; Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von; Looe, H. K.; Harder, D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known inscattering effect, whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the inout balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the inout balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the collecting electrode radius and the width of the guard ring are reflecting the deep radial penetration of the electron transport processes into the gas-filled cavities and the need for appropriate corrections of the chamber reading. New values for these corrections have been established in two forms, one converting the indicated value into the absorbed dose to water in the front plane of the chamber, the other converting it into the absorbed dose to water at the depth of the effective point of measurement of the chamber. In the Appendix, the inout imbalance of electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary is demonstrated in the approximation of classical small-angle multiple scattering theory. Conclusions: The inout electron transport imbalance at the lateral boundaries of parallel-plate chambers in electron beams has been studied with Monte Carlo simulation over a range of depth in water, and new correction factors, covering all depths and implementing the effective point of measurement concept, have been developed.

  14. A New Algorithm for Processing Interferometric Data-Stacks: SqueeSAR...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    over the entire observation time period. These targets often correspond to point-wise, man-made objects widely available over a city, but less present in non-urban areas. To...

  15. Post-test evaluation of the oxygen electrode from a solid oxide electrolysis stack and electrode materials development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mawdsley, J. R.; Carter, J. D.; Yildiz, B.; Call, A. V.; Kropf, A. J.; Ferrandon, M. S.; Myers, D. J.; Maroni, V. A.

    2009-05-01

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) stack degradation analysis - significant sources of degradation have been identified, (a) oxygen electrode delamination off the electrolyte and (b) chromium contamination of the oxygen electrode and bond layer; (2) electrode materials development - improved electrode materials have been demonstrated, Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} oxygen electrodes show state-of-the-art performance without optimization of fabrication parameters.

  16. A method to determine fault vectors in 4H-SiC from stacking sequences observed on high resolution transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Fangzhen; Wang, Huanhuan; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Mueller, Stephan G.; Chung, Gil; Sanchez, Edward K.; Hansen, Darren; Loboda, Mark J.; Zhang, Lihua; Su, Dong; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric

    2014-09-14

    A new method has been developed to determine the fault vectors associated with stacking faults in 4H-SiC from their stacking sequences observed on high resolution TEM images. This method, analogous to the Burgers circuit technique for determination of dislocation Burgers vector, involves determination of the vectors required in the projection of the perfect lattice to correct the deviated path constructed in the faulted material. Results for several different stacking faults were compared with fault vectors determined from X-ray topographic contrast analysis and were found to be consistent. This technique is expected to applicable to all structures comprising corner shared tetrahedra.

  17. Fast concurrent array-based stacks, queues and deques using fetch-and-increment-bounded, fetch-and-decrement-bounded and store-on-twin synchronization primitives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alana; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert

    2014-09-16

    Implementation primitives for concurrent array-based stacks, queues, double-ended queues (deques) and wrapped deques are provided. In one aspect, each element of the stack, queue, deque or wrapped deque data structure has its own ticket lock, allowing multiple threads to concurrently use multiple elements of the data structure and thus achieving high performance. In another aspect, new synchronization primitives FetchAndIncrementBounded (Counter, Bound) and FetchAndDecrementBounded (Counter, Bound) are implemented. These primitives can be implemented in hardware and thus promise a very fast throughput for queues, stacks and double-ended queues.

  18. Cycling Endurance of SONOS Non-Volatile Memory Stacks Prepared with Nitrided SiO(2)/Si(100) Intefaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habermehl, S.; Nasby, R.D.; Rightley, M.J.

    1999-01-11

    The effects of nitrided SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) interfaces upon cycling endurance in silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) non-volatile memory transistors are investigated. Analysis of MOSFET sub-threshold characteristics indicate cycling degradation to be a manifestation of interface state (D{sub it}) generation at the tunnel oxide/silicon interface. After 10{sup 6} write/erase cycles, SONOS film stacks prepared with nitrided tunnel oxides exhibit enhanced cycling endurance with {Delta}D{sub it}=3x10{sup 12} V{sup -1}cm{sup -2}, compared to {Delta}D{sub it}=2x10{sup 13} V{sup -l}cm{sup -2} for non-nitrided tunnel oxides. Additionally, if the capping oxide is formed by steam oxidation, rather than by deposition, SONOS stacks prepared with non-nitrided tunnel oxides exhibit endurance characteristics similar to stacks with nitrided tunnel oxides. From this observation it is concluded that latent nitridation of the tunnel oxidehilicon interface occurs during steam oxide cap formation.

  19. Comprehensive study and design of scaled metal/high-k/Ge gate stacks with ultrathin aluminum oxide interlayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asahara, Ryohei; Hideshima, Iori; Oka, Hiroshi; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji; Ogawa, Shingo; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Teraoka, Yuden

    2015-06-08

    Advanced metal/high-k/Ge gate stacks with a sub-nm equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) and improved interface properties were demonstrated by controlling interface reactions using ultrathin aluminum oxide (AlO{sub x}) interlayers. A step-by-step in situ procedure by deposition of AlO{sub x} and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) layers on Ge and subsequent plasma oxidation was conducted to fabricate Pt/HfO{sub 2}/AlO{sub x}/GeO{sub x}/Ge stacked structures. Comprehensive study by means of physical and electrical characterizations revealed distinct impacts of AlO{sub x} interlayers, plasma oxidation, and metal electrodes serving as capping layers on EOT scaling, improved interface quality, and thermal stability of the stacks. Aggressive EOT scaling down to 0.56 nm and very low interface state density of 2.4 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}eV{sup −1} with a sub-nm EOT and sufficient thermal stability were achieved by systematic process optimization.

  20. Detection of an unidentified emission line in the stacked X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulbul, Esra; Foster, Adam; Smith, Randall K.; Randall, Scott W.; Markevitch, Maxim; Loewenstein, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We detect a weak unidentified emission line at E = (3.55-3.57) 0.03 keV in a stacked XMM-Newton spectrum of 73 galaxy clusters spanning a redshift range 0.01-0.35. When the full sample is divided into three subsamples (Perseus, Centaurus+Ophiuchus+Coma, and all others), the line is seen at >3? statistical significance in all three independent MOS spectra and the PN 'all others' spectrum. It is also detected in the Chandra spectra of the Perseus Cluster. However, it is very weak and located within 50-110 eV of several known lines. The detection is at the limit of the current instrument capabilities. We argue that there should be no atomic transitions in thermal plasma at this energy. An intriguing possibility is the decay of sterile neutrino, a long-sought dark matter particle candidate. Assuming that all dark matter is in sterile neutrinos with m{sub s} = 2E = 7.1 keV, our detection corresponds to a neutrino decay rate consistent with previous upper limits. However, based on the cluster masses and distances, the line in Perseus is much brighter than expected in this model, significantly deviating from other subsamples. This appears to be because of an anomalously bright line at E = 3.62 keV in Perseus, which could be an Ar XVII dielectronic recombination line, although its emissivity would have to be 30 times the expected value and physically difficult to understand. Another alternative is the above anomaly in the Ar line combined with the nearby 3.51 keV K line also exceeding expectation by a factor of 10-20. Confirmation with Astro-H will be critical to determine the nature of this new line.

  1. Points of Contact and Privacy Act Advisory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Points of Contact Points of Contact and Privacy Act Advisory If you are trying to contact an agency other than the Department of Energy, use the web address: http:...

  2. CenterPoint Comments | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CenterPoint Comments CenterPoint Comments CenterPoint Comments on the Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges PDF icon CenterPoint Comments More Documents & Publications City Utilities of Springfield Missouri Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Comments of North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) to DOE Smart Grid RFI:

  3. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Risk and Decision Analysis Dept.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Geologic Integration Group; Di Sanza, F. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA`s 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE`s actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA`s requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health.

  4. T-559: Stack-based buffer overflow in oninit in IBM Informix Dynamic Server (IDS) 11.50 allows remote execution

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stack-based buffer overflow in oninit in IBM Informix Dynamic Server (IDS) 11.50 allows remote execution attackers to execute arbitrary code via crafted arguments in the USELASTCOMMITTED session environment option in a SQL SET ENVIRONMENT statement

  5. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R.; Kusdiantara, Rudy Puspita, Dila Sidarto, Kuntjoro A. Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y.

    2014-03-24

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  6. Noise and zero point drift in 1.7 mu m cutoff detectors forSNAP

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Noise and zero point drift in 1.7 mu m cutoff detectors forSNAP Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Noise and zero point drift in 1.7 mu m cutoff detectors forSNAP We present the results of a detailed study of the noiseperformance of candidate NIR detectors for the proposed Super-NovaAcceleration Probe. Effects of Fowler sampling depth and frequency,temperature, exposure time, detector material, detector reverse-bias andmultiplexer type are

  7. A gene stacking approach leads to engineered plants with highly increased galactan levels in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gondolf, Vibe M.; Stoppel, Rhea; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten; Liwanag, April J.M.; Loqu, Dominique; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2014-12-10

    Background: Engineering of plants with a composition of lignocellulosic biomass that is more suitable for downstream processing is of high interest for next-generation biofuel production. Lignocellulosic biomass contains a high proportion of pentose residues, which are more difficult to convert into fuels than hexoses. Therefore, increasing the hexose/pentose ratio in biomass is one approach for biomass improvement. A genetic engineering approach was used to investigate whether the amount of pectic galactan can be specifically increased in cell walls of Arabidopsis fiber cells, which in turn could provide a potential source of readily fermentable galactose. Results: First it was tested if overexpression of various plant UDP-glucose 4-epimerases (UGEs) could increase the availability of UDP-galactose and thereby increase the biosynthesis of galactan. Constitutive and tissue-specific expression of a poplar UGE and three Arabidopsis UGEs in Arabidopsis plants could not significantly increase the amount of cell wall bound galactose. We then investigated co-overexpression of AtUGE2 together with the ?-1,4-galactan synthase GalS1. Co-overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 led to over 80% increase in cell wall galactose levels in Arabidopsis stems, providing evidence that these proteins work synergistically. Furthermore, AtUGE2 and GalS1 overexpression in combination with overexpression of the NST1 master regulator for secondary cell wall biosynthesis resulted in increased thickness of fiber cell walls in addition to the high cell wall galactose levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that the increased galactose was present as ?-1,4-galactan in secondary cell walls. Conclusions: This approach clearly indicates that simultaneous overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 increases the cell wall galactose to much higher levels than can be achieved by overexpressing either one of these proteins alone. Moreover, the increased galactan content in fiber cells while improving the biomass composition had no impact on plant growth and development and hence on the overall biomass amount. Thus, we could show that the gene stacking approach described here is a promising method to engineer advanced feedstocks for biofuel production.

  8. A gene stacking approach leads to engineered plants with highly increased galactan levels in Arabidopsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gondolf, Vibe M.; Stoppel, Rhea; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten; Liwanag, April J.M.; Loqué, Dominique; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2014-12-10

    Background: Engineering of plants with a composition of lignocellulosic biomass that is more suitable for downstream processing is of high interest for next-generation biofuel production. Lignocellulosic biomass contains a high proportion of pentose residues, which are more difficult to convert into fuels than hexoses. Therefore, increasing the hexose/pentose ratio in biomass is one approach for biomass improvement. A genetic engineering approach was used to investigate whether the amount of pectic galactan can be specifically increased in cell walls of Arabidopsis fiber cells, which in turn could provide a potential source of readily fermentable galactose. Results: First it was tested ifmore » overexpression of various plant UDP-glucose 4-epimerases (UGEs) could increase the availability of UDP-galactose and thereby increase the biosynthesis of galactan. Constitutive and tissue-specific expression of a poplar UGE and three Arabidopsis UGEs in Arabidopsis plants could not significantly increase the amount of cell wall bound galactose. We then investigated co-overexpression of AtUGE2 together with the β-1,4-galactan synthase GalS1. Co-overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 led to over 80% increase in cell wall galactose levels in Arabidopsis stems, providing evidence that these proteins work synergistically. Furthermore, AtUGE2 and GalS1 overexpression in combination with overexpression of the NST1 master regulator for secondary cell wall biosynthesis resulted in increased thickness of fiber cell walls in addition to the high cell wall galactose levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that the increased galactose was present as β-1,4-galactan in secondary cell walls. Conclusions: This approach clearly indicates that simultaneous overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 increases the cell wall galactose to much higher levels than can be achieved by overexpressing either one of these proteins alone. Moreover, the increased galactan content in fiber cells while improving the biomass composition had no impact on plant growth and development and hence on the overall biomass amount. Thus, we could show that the gene stacking approach described here is a promising method to engineer advanced feedstocks for biofuel production.« less

  9. ChargePoint America | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ChargePoint America ChargePoint America 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt073_vss_gogineni_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications ChargePoint America Electric Drive Vehicle Infrastructure Deployment Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing R&D Annual Progress Report

  10. End Points Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management End Points Management The policy of the EM is that a formal project management approach be used for the planning, managing, and conducting of its projects. Specifying and achieving end points is a systematic, engineering way of proceeding from an existing condition to a stated desired final set of conditions in which the facility is safe and can be economically monitored and maintained. An end point method is a way to translate broad mission statements to explicit goals that are

  11. Effect of Creep of Ferritic Interconnect on Long-Term Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-08-01

    High-temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) compatibility with other components for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . However, creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature exceeds or even is less than half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the SOFCs under development are around 1,073 K. With around 1,800 K of the melting temperature for most stainless steel, possible creep deformation of ferritic IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of IC creep behavior on stack geometry change and the stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the changes in fuel- and air-channel geometry due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel IC, therefore indicating possible changes in SOFC performance under long-term operations. The ferritic IC creep model was incorporated into software SOFC-MP and Mentat-FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long-term steady-state operating temperature. It was found that the creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel- and the air-flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  12. GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: GreatPoint Energy Address: 222 Third Street Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 02142 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Biomass Product:...

  13. Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Prairie Pointe Townhomes in Greensburg, Kansas.

  14. CenterPoint Energy New Homes Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program is only available to electric customers in CenterPoint Energy's service territory (greater Houston area, Texas). 

  15. West Point Utility System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility System Jump to: navigation, search Name: West Point Utility System Place: Iowa Phone Number: (319) 837-6313 Website: www.westpointiowa.comwp-utili Facebook: https:...

  16. Point of Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Point of Compliance More Documents & Publications Long-Term Grout Performance Concentration Averaging Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis...

  17. Point380 LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 80302 Sector: Carbon Product: Point380 provides carbon consulting and resource management solutions to a broad range of clients seeking energy related risk analysis and...

  18. Building a Parallel Cloud Storage System using OpenStacks Swift Object Store and Transformative Parallel I/O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Andrew J.; Lora, Kaleb D.; Martinez, Esteban; Shorter, Martel L.

    2012-07-30

    Our project consists of bleeding-edge research into replacing the traditional storage archives with a parallel, cloud-based storage solution. It used OpenStack's Swift Object Store cloud software. It's Benchmarked Swift for write speed and scalability. Our project is unique because Swift is typically used for reads and we are mostly concerned with write speeds. Cloud Storage is a viable archive solution because: (1) Container management for larger parallel archives might ease the migration workload; (2) Many tools that are written for cloud storage could be utilized for local archive; and (3) Current large cloud storage practices in industry could be utilized to manage a scalable archive solution.

  19. End plate assembly having a two-phase fluid-filled bladder and method for compressing a fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlstrom, Jr., Charles M. (Clifton Park, NY)

    2001-01-01

    An end plate assembly is disclosed for use in a fuel cell assembly in which the end plate assembly includes a housing having a cavity, and a bladder receivable in the cavity and engageable with the fuel cell stack. The bladder includes a two-phase fluid having a liquid portion and a vapor portion. Desirably, the two-phase fluid has a vapor pressure between about 100 psi and about 600 psi at a temperature between about 70 degrees C. to about 110 degrees C.

  20. Segregation At Stacking Faults Within The ?' Phase Of Two Ni-base Superalloys Following Intermediate Temperature Creep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, G. B.; Shi, R.; Genc, Arda; Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Rae, C.M. F.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art energy dispersive spectroscopy, it has been established for the first time that there exists significant compositional variation (enrichment of Co and Cr and deficiency of Ni and Al) associated with superlattice intrinsic stacking faults created in the ordered ?' precipitates following intermediate temperature deformation of two commercial superalloys. The results indicate that long range diffusion of these elements is intimately involved in the precipitate shearing process and is therefore closely linked to the time-dependent deformation of the alloys.

  1. Experimental characterization of glass-ceramic seal properties and their constitutive implementation in solid oxide fuel cell stack models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Vetrano, John S.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Chou, Y. S.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-09-05

    This paper discusses experimental determination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) glass-ceramic seal material properties and seal/interconnect interfacial properties to support development and optimization of SOFC designs through modeling. Material property experiments such as dynamic resonance, dilatometry, flexure, creep, tensile, and shear tests were performed on PNNLs glass-ceramic sealant material, designated as G18, to obtain property data essential to constitutive and numerical model development. Characterization methods for the physical, mechanical, and interfacial properties of the sealing material, results, and their application to the constitutive implementation in SOFC stack modeling are described.

  2. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  3. Los Alamos Drills to Record-breaking Depths | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drills to Record-breaking Depths Los Alamos Drills to Record-breaking Depths November 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers reached a record-breaking depth of 1,100 feet with a sonic drill rig. Workers reached a record-breaking depth of 1,100 feet with a sonic drill rig. LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - The EM-supported Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory is pushing the limits of drilling technology with the use of a sonic drill rig to drill coreholes more than 1,100 feet deep in support of

  4. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1984-01-23

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  5. Starting Points | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Security Campus Management and Operating (M&O) Contract Competition / Starting Points Starting Points Kansas City Plant Related Web Pages Summary Kansas City Plant Home Page Kansas City Plant Contracts DOE Directives NNSA Policy System Kansas City Field Office (KCFO) Home Page List of Applicable Directives in the Current Contract

  6. Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    angles of incidence (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence The paper describes a new scheme for wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence by a matched pair of spherically bent crystals to eliminate the astigmatism, which is a

  7. Project W420 Air Sampler Probe Placement Qualification Tests for Four 6-Inch Diameter Stacks: 296-A-25, 296-B-28, 296-S-22, and 296-T-18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maughan, A.D.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1998-09-30

    The W420 project covers the upgrading of effluent monitoring systems at six ventilation exhaust stacks in tank-farm facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The discharge stacks of five of the six systems will be completely replaced. Four of these (296-A-25, 296-B-28, 296-S-22, and 296-T-18) will be of the same size, 6-inches in diameter and about 12-ft high. This report documents tests that were conducted to verify that these four stacks meet the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of the air sampling probe. These criteria ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the location of the probe such that the extracted sample represents the whole. There are also criteria addressing the transport of the sample to the collection device. These are not covered in this report, but will need to be addressed later. These tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on a full-scale model of the 6-inch stick. The sequence of tests addresses the acceptability of the flow angle relative to the probe and the uniformity of air velocity and gaseous and particle tracers in the cross section of the stack. All tests were successful, and all acceptance criteria were met.

  8. DEPTH-CHARGE static and time-dependent perturbation/sensitivity system for nuclear reactor core analysis. Revision I. [DEPTH-CHARGE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides the background theory, user input, and sample problems required for the efficient application of the DEPTH-CHARGE system - a code black for both static and time-dependent perturbation theory and data sensitivity analyses. The DEPTH-CHARGE system is of modular construction and has been implemented within the VENTURE-BURNER computational system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DEPTH module (coupled with VENTURE) solves for the three adjoint functions of Depletion Perturbation Theory and calculates the desired time-dependent derivatives of the response with respect to the nuclide concentrations and nuclear data utilized in the reference model. The CHARGE code is a collection of utility routines for general data manipulation and input preparation and considerably extends the usefulness of the system through the automatic generation of adjoint sources, estimated perturbed responses, and relative data sensitivity coefficients. Combined, the DEPTH-CHARGE system provides, for the first time, a complete generalized first-order perturbation/sensitivity theory capability for both static and time-dependent analyses of realistic multidimensional reactor models. This current documentation incorporates minor revisions to the original DEPTH-CHARGE documentation (ORNL/CSD-78) to reflect some new capabilities within the individual codes.

  9. Two weight system for measuring depth and sediment in slurry-supported excavations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deming, P.; Good, D.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a two weight system using bar and flat shaped weights for measuring depth and detecting sediment at the bottom of slurry-supported excavations. Currently there are no standard depth measurement weights or methods for reliably identifying bottom sediment. Two weights and a procedural system for using the weights is described. Details suitable for manufacture are provided.

  10. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Example BCP Template Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points in notes Read-Only CD-2, Approve Performance Baseline External Independent Review (EIR) Standard ...

  12. Solid-State Fault Current Limiter Development : Design and Testing Update of a 15kV SSCL Power Stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ram Adapa; Mr. Dante Piccone

    2012-04-30

    ABSTRACT The Solid-State Fault Current Limiter (SSCL) is a promising technology that can be applied to utility power delivery systems to address the problem of increasing fault currents associated with load growth. As demand continues to grow, more power is added to utility system either by increasing generator capacity or by adding distributed generators, resulting in higher available fault currents, often beyond the capabilities of the present infrastructure. The SSCL is power-electronics based equipment designed to work with the present utility system to address this problem. The SSCL monitors the line current and dynamically inserts additional impedance into the line in the event of a fault being detected. The SSCL is based on a modular design and can be configured for 5kV through 69kV systems at nominal current ratings of 1000A to 4000A. Results and Findings This report provides the final test results on the development of 15kV class SSCL single phase power stack. The scope of work included the design of the modular standard building block sub-assemblies, the design and manufacture of the power stack and the testing of the power stack for the key functional tests of continuous current capability and fault current limiting action. Challenges and Objectives Solid-State Current Limiter technology impacts a wide spectrum of utility engineering and operating personnel. It addresses the problems associated with load growth both at Transmission and Distribution class networks. The design concept is pioneering in terms of developing the most efficient and compact power electronics equipment for utility use. The initial test results of the standard building blocks are promising. The independent laboratory tests of the power stack are promising. However the complete 3 phase system needs rigorous testing for performance and reliability. Applications, Values, and Use The SSCL is an intelligent power-electronics device which is modular in design and can provide current limiting or current interrupting capabilities. It can be applied to variety of applications from distribution class to transmission class power delivery grids and networks. It can also be applied to single major commercial and industrial loads and distributed generator supplies. The active switching of devices can be further utilized for protection of substation transformers. The stress on the system can be reduced substantially improving the life of the power system. It minimizes the voltage sag by speedy elimination of heavy fault currents and promises to be an important element of the utility power system. DOE Perspective This development effort is now focused on a 15kV system. This project will help mitigate the challenges of increasing available fault current. DOE has made a major contribution in providing a cost effective SSCL designed to integrate seamlessly into the Transmission and Distribution networks of today and the future. Approach SSCL development program for a 69kV SSCL was initiated which included the use of the Super GTO advanced semiconductor device which won the 2007 R&D100 Award. In the beginning, steps were identified to accomplish the economically viable design of a 69kV class Solid State Current Limiter that is extremely reliable, cost effective, and compact enough to be applied in urban transmission. The prime thrust in design and development was to encompass the 1000A and the 3000A ratings and provide a modular design to cover the wide range of applications. The focus of the project was then shifted to a 15kV class SSCL. The specifications for the 15kV power stack are reviewed. The design changes integrated into the 15kV power stack are discussed. In this Technical Update the complete project is summarized followed by a detailed test report. The power stack independent high voltage laboratory test requirements and results are presented. Keywords Solid State Current Limiter, SSCL, Fault Current Limiter, Fault Current Controller, Power electronics controller, Intelligent power-electronics Device, IED

  13. CenterPoint Energy Sustainable Schools Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sustainable Schools Program focuses on energy savings through behavioral and operational improvements, and may be used along with CenterPoint Energy’s SCORE and Load Management programs. It...

  14. City of Boulder- Green Points Building Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Boulder Green Points Building Program is a mandatory residential green building program that requires a builder or homeowner to include a minimum amount of sustainable building components bas...

  15. LMJ Points Plus v2.6

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-01-15

    Short summary of the software's functionality: • built-in scan feature to acquire optical image of the surface to be analyzed • click-and-point selection of points of interest on the surface • supporting standalone autosampler/HPLC/MS operation: creating independent batch files after points of interests are selected for LEAPShell (autosampler control software from Leap Technologies) and Analyst® (mass spectrometry (MS) software from AB Sciex) • supporting integrated autosampler/HPLC/MS operation: creating one batch file for all instruments controlledmore »by Analyst® (mass spectrometry software from AB Sciex) after points of interests are selected •creating heatmaps of analytes of interests from collected MS files in a hand-off fashion« less

  16. CenterPoint Energy's Energy Wise Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy's Energy Wise program provides take-home kits containing efficiency devices with classroom and in-home education techniques with the aim to inspire families to adopt new resource...

  17. FortyPoint Seven | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: FortyPoint Seven Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: BH14 8LQ Sector: Biofuels Product: A Biofuels company founded by John Nicholas, one of Biofuels Corporation...

  18. Point Power Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems, ranging from 1-6kW. It has received support from Environmental Business Cluster, a California-based incubator. References: Point Power Systems1 This article is a...

  19. power point | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    power point Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(88) Contributor 12 March, 2012 - 14:40 Mockups of the Geothermal Checklist on OpenEI checklist geothermal mockups OpenEI...

  20. Analysis of Crossover Points for MVLT Superclass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel and Amorphous Ribbon for the MVLT Superclass Cross-over points for the Medium Voltage Liquid Filled distribution transformer super-class have been analyzed based on the...

  1. TEPP Points of Contact | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TEPP Points of Contact TEPP Points of Contact TEPP is a national program managed at a headquarters level and implemented through the TEPP Central Operations Center managed by Technical Resources Group, Inc. For additional information on the TEPP, or to find out how you can obtain TEPP materials or schedule a class, contact either the HQ Program Manager or TEPP Central Operations. EM Contact EM Headquarters Program Manager Ellen Edge, Office of Transportation Ellen.Edge@em.doe.gov U.S. Department

  2. Apparatus and methods for aligning holes through wheels and spacers and stacking the wheels and spacers to form a turbine rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, Robert Randolph (Greenville, SC); Palmer, Gene David (Clifton Park, NY); Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor stacking fixture includes upstanding bolts for reception in aligned bolt holes in superposed aft disk, wheels and spacers and upstanding alignment rods received in openings of the disk, wheels and spacers during the rotor stacking assembly. The axially registering openings enable insertion of thin-walled tubes circumferentially about the rim of the rotor, with tight tolerances to the openings to provide supply and return steam for cooling buckets. The alignment rods have radial dimensions substantially less than their dimensions in a circumferential direction to allow for radial opening misalignment due to thermal expansion, tolerance stack-up and wheel-to-spacer mismatch due to rabbet mechanical growth. The circumferential dimension of the alignment rods affords tightly toleranced alignment of the openings through which the cooling tubes are installed.

  3. Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

    2013-02-01

    This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  4. POINT OF CONTACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR RECORDS MANAGEMENT | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POINT OF CONTACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR RECORDS MANAGEMENT POINT OF CONTACT RESPONSIBILITIES FOR RECORDS MANAGEMENT A list of point of contact responsibilites for Records Management...

  5. Modeling of Pressurized Electrochemistry and Steam-Methane Reforming in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and the Effects on Thermal and Electrical Stack Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-03-01

    Summarizes work done to extend the electrochemical performance and methane reforming submodels to include the effects of pressurization and to demonstrate this new modeling capability by simulating large stacks operating on methane-rich fuel under pressurized and non-pressurized conditions. Pressurized operation boosts electrochemical performance, alters the kinetics of methane reforming, and effects the equilibrium composition of methane fuels. This work developed constitutive submodels that couple the electrochemistry, reforming, and pressurization to yield an increased capability of the modeling tool for prediction of SOFC stack performance.

  6. Note: A short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-11-15

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  7. High blue-near ultraviolet photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene-MoS{sub 2}-metal heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wi, Sungjin; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Liu, Amy C.; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan

    2014-06-09

    We present a study on the photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures in which MoS{sub 2} layers are doped with various plasma species. In comparison with undoped heterostructures, such doped ones exhibit significantly improved quantum efficiencies in both photovoltaic and photoconductive modes. This indicates that plasma-doping-induced built-in potentials play an important role in photocurrent generation. As compared to indium-tin-oxide/ MoS{sub 2}/metal structures, the presented graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures exhibit greatly enhanced quantum efficiencies in the blue-near ultraviolet region, which is attributed to the low density of recombination centers at graphene/MoS{sub 2} heterojunctions. This work advances the knowledge for making photo-response devices based on layered materials.

  8. Magnetoelectric switching of perpendicular exchange bias in Pt/Co/?-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Pt stacked films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoki, Kentaro; Shiratsuchi, Yu Kobane, Atsushi; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Kotani, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Tetsuya

    2015-04-20

    We report the realization of magnetoelectric switching of the perpendicular exchange bias in Pt/Co/?-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Pt stacked films. The perpendicular exchange bias was switched isothermally by the simultaneous application of magnetic and electric fields. The threshold electric field required to switch the perpendicular exchange bias was found to be inversely proportional to the magnetic field, which confirmed the magnetoelectric mechanism of the process. The observed temperature dependence of the threshold electric field suggested that the energy barrier of the antiferromagnetic spin reversal was significantly lower than that assuming the coherent rotation. Pulse voltage measurements indicated that the antiferromagnetic domain propagation dominates the switching process. These results suggest an analogy of the electric-field-induced magnetization with a simple ferromagnet.

  9. Potential-induced degradation in solar cells: Electronic structure and diffusion mechanism of sodium in stacking faults of silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebarth, Benedikt Gumbsch, Peter; Mrovec, Matous; Elssser, Christian

    2014-09-07

    Sodium decorated stacking faults (SFs) were recently identified as the primary cause of potential-induced degradation in silicon (Si) solar-cells due to local electrical short-circuiting of the p-n junctions. In the present study, we investigate these defects by first principles calculations based on density functional theory in order to elucidate their structural, thermodynamic, and electronic properties. Our calculations show that the presence of sodium (Na) atoms leads to a substantial elongation of the Si-Si bonds across the SF, and the coverage and continuity of the Na layer strongly affect the diffusion behavior of Na within the SF. An analysis of the electronic structure reveals that the presence of Na in the SF gives rise to partially occupied defect levels within the Si band gap that participate in electrical conduction along the SF.

  10. L-connect routing of die surface pads to the die edge for stacking in a 3D array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petersen, Robert W. (Dublin, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Integrated circuit chips and method of routing the interface pads from the face of the chip or die to one or more sidewall surfaces of the die. The interconnection is routed from the face of the die to one or more edges of the die, then routed over the edge of the die and onto the side surface. A new pad is then formed on the sidewall surface, which allows multiple die or chips to be stacked in a three-dimensional array, while enabling follow-on signal routing from the sidewall pads. The routing of the interconnects and formation of the sidewall pads can be carried out in an L-connect or L-shaped routing configuration, using a metalization process such as laser pantography.

  11. Risk assessment based on point source deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, G.F.

    1997-12-31

    The International Joint Commission (IJC) in a recently published report states that various clean-up techniques have resulted in significantly cleaner lakes than 20 years ago. Both the US EPA and Environment Canada have passed laws that require emissions controls on significant sources of contaminants. Improved emission controls have played a large part in the reduced pollution levels to the Great Lakes. Improved controls have significantly reduced the pollutants deposited to both land and water. This paper will discuss a Risk Analysis for the emissions from a Hospital in Rochester, New York. Current New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) regulations require emission controls on such incinerators. This hospital has added both a scrubber and a bag house to control emissions. Twenty years ago, such incinerators, like many other emission sources would not have had control devices. New York`s Department of Environmental Conservation requires, as part of the Permitting process, that an Impact Analysis and if required, a multipathway Health Risk Assessment (HRA) be performed for all Medical Waste Incinerators before a Permit can be issued. This insures that the emissions will not create a health hazard to humans. Such an analysis was performed for a new 1,000 lb/hr Medical Waste Incinerator (MWI) installed in the North-East part of Rochester, New York. An Air Quality Impact Assessment (AQIA) based on an actual stack test indicated that this facility`s dioxin emissions would exceed the NY DEC Guideline levels. The Carcinogenic Risk (of death) for our most exposed individual (MEI) was calculated to be 8.75 E{sup {minus}06} (<1:100,000). The Hazard Index calculated for this MEI was 0.43. Hazard Index`s less then 1 are considered a reasonable risk. Health risk assessments are by design, very conservative. EPA sources have concluded that calculated death risks between one (1) and one hundred (100) per million are not excessive.

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Emergency_Rutherford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety for First Responders 1 Radiation Branch Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Program Mike Rutherford WIPP WIPP 699A:a7426 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant The WIPP began operations on March 26, 1999 when it received waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility uses underground storage "rooms" that have been mined at a depth of 2,150 feet in an ancient salt formation. The salt formation has been stable for over 200 million

  13. Environmental geophysics at Beach Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Miller, S.F.; Mandell, W.A.; Wrobel, J.

    1994-07-01

    Geophysical studies at Beach Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling, outcrop mapping, and groundwater sampling and analyses. Suspected sources of near-surface contaminants were defined by magnetic and conductivity measurements. Negative conductivity anomalies may be associated with unlined trenches. Positive magnetic and conductivity anomalies outline suspected tanks and pipes. The anomalies of greatest concern are those spatially associated with a concrete slab that formerly supported a mobile clothing impregnating plant. Resistivity and conductivity profiling and depth soundings were used to identify an electrical anomaly extending through the surficial aquifer to the basal pleistocene unconformity, which was mapped by using seismic reflection methods. The anomaly may be representative of a contaminant plume connected to surficial sources. Major activities in the area included liquid rocket fuel tests, rocket fuel fire suppression tests, pyrotechnic material and smoke generator tests, and the use of solvents at a mobile clothing impregnating plant.

  14. Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Depth profiling for the amount of lattice damage using a Confocal Micro-Raman (CMR) spectrometer is demonstrated in this paper. Samples of n-type silicon carbide were implanted with 2 MeV He and O ions at both room temperature and 500 C, and fluences between 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 17}

  15. ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) The MPLCOD VAP retrieves the column cloud visible optical depth using LIDAR derived backscatter from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and

  16. Hot Springs Point Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Point Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Hot Springs Point Geothermal Project Project Location Information...

  17. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medecki, H.

    1998-11-10

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

  18. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medecki, Hector

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams.

  19. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David; Mireles, Jose; Marquez, Noel; Quinones, Stella

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  20. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burke, William F. (Crest Hill, IL); Winiecki, Alan L. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1986-01-01

    An instrument for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of an electrical system for varying the temperature with strain, the instrument including opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  1. Non-lead hollow point bullet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughn, Norman L. (Knoxville, TN); Lowden, Richard A. (Clinton, TN)

    2003-04-15

    The non-lead hollow point bullet of the instant invention comprises a mixed construction slug further comprising, a monolithic metal insert having a tapered (preferred conical) hollow point tip and a tapered (preferred conical) tail protrusion, and an unsintered powdered metal composite core in tandem alignment with the insert. The core has a hollow tapered (preferred conical) cavity tip portion coupled with the tapered (preferred conical) tail protrusion on the insert. An open tip jacket envelops at least a portion of the insert and the core. The jacket is swaged at the open tip.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

  3. Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover behavior ...

  4. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Mishra, X. Zhang, K. Chesnel, J.B. Kortright, S.K. Sinha, and I.K. Schuller,, "Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange Bias System," Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 047201...

  5. Method of varying a physical property of a material through its depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, Claus

    2015-04-21

    A method is disclosed for varying a mechanical property of a material at two depths. The method involves the application of at least two laser pulses of different durations. The method involves a determination of the density of the material from the surface to each depth, a determination of the heat capacity of the material from the surface to each depth, and a determination of the thermal conductivity of the material from the surface to each depth. Each laser pulse may affect the density, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity of the material, so it may be necessary to re-evaluate those parameters after each laser pulse and prior to the next pulse. The method may be applied to implantation materials to improve osteoblast and osteoclast activity.

  6. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  7. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  8. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  9. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  10. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  11. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  12. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  13. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  14. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  15. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0...

  16. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  17. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  18. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  19. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  20. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  1. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  2. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  3. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Wednesday, 25 January 2006 00:00 The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used

  4. Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MISR, and MODIS Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms

  5. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in Low Level Waste Disposal | Department of Energy Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Linda Suttora*, U.S. Department of Energy ; Andrew Wallo, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted an integrated protection system for the safety of radioactive waste disposal similar to

  6. Assessment of the LV-S2 & LV-S3 Stack Sampling Probe Locations for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2014-09-30

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling locations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Group 1-2A exhaust stacks with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. The LV-C2, LV-S2, and LV-S3 exhaust stacks were tested together as a group (Test Group 1-2A). This report only covers the results of LV-S2 and LV-S3; LV-C2 will be reported on separately. Federal regulations1 require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. 2 These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  7. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  8. Compositional modulated atomic layer stacking and uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy of CoPt alloy sputtered films with close-packed plane orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Shin Nozawa, Naoki; Hinata, Shintaro; Takahashi, Migaku; Shibuya, Kazunari; Hoshino, Kazuya; Awaya, Satoru

    2015-05-07

    An atomic layer stacking structure in hexagonal close packed (hcp) Co{sub 100?x}Pt{sub x} alloy films with c-plane sheet texture was directly observed by a high-angle annular dark-field imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of sequential and/or compositional atomic layer stacking structure and uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy (K{sub u}?=?K{sub u1}?+?K{sub u2}) revealed that (1) integrated intensity of the superlattice diffraction takes the maximum at x?=?20 at. % and shows broadening feature against x for the film fabricated under the substrate temperature (T{sub sub}) of 400?C. (2) Compositional separation structure in atomic layers is formed for the films fabricated under T{sub sub}?=?400?C. A sequential alternative stacking of atomic layers with different compositions is hardly formed in the film with x?=?50 at. %, whereas easily formed in the film with x?=?20 at. %. This peculiar atomic layer stacking structure consists of in-plane-disordered Pt-rich and Pt-poor layers, which is completely different from the so-called atomic site ordered structure. (3) A face centered cubic atomic layer stacking as faults appeared in the host hcp atomic layer stacking exists in accompanies with irregularities for the periodicity of the compositional modulation atomic layers. (4) K{sub u1} takes the maximum of 1.4??10{sup 7?}erg/cm{sup 3} at around x?=?20 at. %, whereas K{sub u2} takes the maximum of 0.7??10{sup 7?}erg/cm{sup 3} at around x?=?40 at. %, which results in the maximum of 1.8??10{sup 7?}erg/cm{sup 3} of K{sub u} at x?=?30 at. % and a shoulder in compositional dependence of K{sub u} in the range of x?=?3060 at. %. Not only compositional separation of atomic layers but also sequential alternative stacking of different compositional layers is quite important to improve essential uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM200903_Poster_KHLee [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol optical depth measurements during the EAST-AIRE and the AMF deployment in China Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), Univ. of Maryland (UMD),...

  10. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burke, W.F.; Winiecki, A.L.

    1984-10-17

    An instrument is described for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of means for varying the temperature with strain. The instrument includes opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  11. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  12. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  13. EIS-0153: Niagara Import Point Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of the proposed Niagara Import Point project that would construct an interstate natural gas pipeline to transport gas from Canada and domestic sources to the Northeastern United States market. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy was a cooperating agency during statement development and adopted this statement on 6/15/1990.

  14. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel (Oakland, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-11-09

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of five inorganic salts including about 29.1-33.5 mol % LiNO.sub.3, 0-3.9 mol % NaNO.sub.3, 2.4-8.2 mol % KNO.sub.3, 18.6-19.9 mol % NaNO.sub.2, and 40-45.6 mol % KNO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures below 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  15. Points of Pride | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Points of Pride Of national note: Construction is underway for Ames Laboratory's new $10 million, state-of-the-art Sensitive Instrument Facility. The SIF will house next generation electron microscopy equipment vital for the characterization of new materials. Ames Laboratory is home to one of the U.S. Department of Energy's five Energy Innovation Hubs. The Critical Materials Institute focuses on technologies that make better use of materials and eliminate the need for materials that are subject

  16. New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indian Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,"1,022","7,326",81.8,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  17. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhl, J.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Whetten, E.B.

    1998-06-30

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves. 9 figs.

  18. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhl, James Eugene (Albuquerque, NM); Warpinski, Norman Raymond (Albuquerque, NM); Whetten, Ernest Blayne (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves.

  19. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  20. Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, L.J.; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H.

    1997-02-01

    This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

  1. Depth profiling analysis of solar wind helium collected in diamond-like carbon film from Genesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bajo, Ken-ichi; Olinger, Chad T.; Jurewicz, Amy J.G.; Burnett, Donald S.; Sakaguchi, Isao; Suzuki, Taku; Itose, Satoru; Ishihara, Morio; Uchino, Kiichiro; Wieler, Rainer; et al

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of solar-wind ions in Genesis mission collectors, as determined by depth profiling analysis, constrains the physics of ion solid interactions involving the solar wind. Thus, they provide an experimental basis for revealing ancient solar activities represented by solar-wind implants in natural samples. We measured the first depth profile of ⁴He in a collector; the shallow implantation (peaking at <20 nm) required us to use sputtered neutral mass spectrometry with post-photoionization by a strong field. The solar wind He fluence calculated using depth profiling is ~8.5 x 10¹⁴ cm⁻². The shape of the solar wind ⁴He depth profile ismore » consistent with TRIM simulations using the observed ⁴He velocity distribution during the Genesis mission. It is therefore likely that all solar-wind elements heavier than H are completely intact in this Genesis collector and, consequently, the solar particle energy distributions for each element can be calculated from their depth profiles. Ancient solar activities and space weathering of solar system objects could be quantitatively reproduced by solar particle implantation profiles.« less

  2. Multi-stacked InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown with different growth modes for quantum dot solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yeongho; Ban, Keun-Yong Honsberg, Christiana B.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the material properties and device performance of InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) made using three different QD growth modes: Stranski-Krastanov (S-K), quasi-monolayer (QML), and sub-monolayer (SML) growth modes. All QDSCs show an extended external quantum efficiency (EQE) at near infrared wavelengths of 9501070?nm from the QD absorption. Compared to the S-K and SML QDSCs, the QML QDSC with a higher strain exhibits a poor EQE response in the wavelength region of 300880?nm due to increased non-radiative recombination. The conversion efficiency of the S-K and SML QDSCs exceeds that of the reference cell (13.4%) without QDs due to an enhanced photocurrent (>16% increase) produced by the silicon doped QD stacks. However, as expected from the EQE of the QML QDSC, the increase of strain-induced crystalline defects greatly degrades the photocurrent and open-circuit voltage, leading to the lowest conversion efficiency (8.9%)

  3. Multi-scale simulation of lithium diffusion in the presence of a 30 partial dislocation and stacking fault in Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chao-Ying; Li, Chen-liang; Wu, Guo-Xun; Wang, Bao-Lai; Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wei; Meng, Qing-Yuan

    2014-01-28

    The multi-scale simulation method is employed to investigate how defects affect the performances of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). The stable positions, binding energies and dynamics properties of Li impurity in Si with a 30 partial dislocation and stacking fault (SF) have been studied in comparison with the ideal crystal. It is found that the most table position is the tetrahedral (T{sub d}) site and the diffusion barrier is 0.63?eV in bulk Si. In the 30 partial dislocation core and SF region, the most stable positions are at the centers of the octagons (Oct-A and Oct-B) and pentahedron (site S), respectively. In addition, Li dopant may tend to congregate in these defects. The motion of Li along the dislocation core are carried out by the transport among the Oct-A (Oct-B) sites with the barrier of 1.93?eV (1.12?eV). In the SF region, the diffusion barrier of Li is 0.91?eV. These two types of defects may retard the fast migration of Li dopant that is finally trapped by them. Thus, the presence of the 30 partial dislocation and SF may deactivate the Li impurity and lead to low rate capability of LIB.

  4. SU-E-I-11: Cascaded Linear System Model for Columnar CsI Flat Panel Imagers with Depth Dependent Gain and Blur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, B; Lubinsky, A; Zheng, H; Zhao, W; Teymurazyan, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a depth dependent gain and blur cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for optimizing columnar structured CsI indirect conversion flat panel imager (FPI) for advanced imaging applications. Methods: For experimental validation, depth dependent escape efficiency, e(z), was extracted from PHS measurement of different CsI scintillators (thickness, substrate and light output). The inherent MTF and DQE of CsI was measured using high resolution CMOS sensor. For CLSM, e(z) and the depth dependent MTF(f,z), were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation (Geant4) of optical photon transport through columnar CsI. Previous work showed that Monte Carlo simulation for CsI was hindered by the non-ideality of its columnar structure. In the present work we allowed variation in columnar width with depth, and assumed diffusive reflective backing and columns. Monte Carlo simulation was performed using an optical point source placed at different depth of the CsI layer, from which MTF(z,f) and e(z) were computed. The resulting e(z) with excellent matching with experimental measurements were then applied to the CLSM, Monte Carlo simulation was repeated until the modeled MTF, DQE(f) also match experimental measurement. Results: For a 150 micron FOS HL type CsI, e(z) varies between 0.56 to 0.45, and the MTF at 14 cycles/mm varies between 62.1% to 3.9%, from the front to the back of the scintillator. The overall MTF and DQE(f) at all frequencies are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements at all frequencies. Conclusion: We have developed a CLSM for columnar CsI scintillators with depth dependent gain and MTF, which were estimated from Monte Carlo simulation with novel optical simulation settings. Preliminary results showed excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental measurements. Future work is aimed at extending this approach to optimize CsI screen optic design and sensor structure for achieving higher DQE(f) in cone-beam CT, which uses high kVp.

  5. ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2014-11-01

    Dual beam depth profiling strategy has been widely adopted in ToF-SIMS depth profiling, in which two basic operation modes, interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode, are commonly used. Generally, interlaced mode is recommended for conductive or semi-conductive samples, whereas non-interlaced mode is recommended for insulating samples, where charge compensation can be an issue. Recent publications, however, show that the interlaced mode can be used effectively for glass depth profiling, despite the fact that glass is an insulator. In this study, we provide a simple guide for choosing between interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode for insulator depth profiling. Two representative cases are presented: (1) depth profiling of a leached glass sample, and (2) depth profiling of a single crystal MgO sample. In brief, the interlaced mode should be attempted first, because (1) it may provide reasonable-quality data, and (2) it is time-saving for most cases, and (3) it introduces low H/C/O background. If data quality is the top priority and measurement time is flexible, non-interlaced mode is recommended because interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity and poor mass resolution. A big challenge is tracking trace H/C/O in a highly insulating sample (e.g., MgO), because non-interlaced mode may introduce strong H/C/O background but interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity. Meanwhile, a C or Au coating is found to be very effective to improve the signal intensity. Surprisingly, the best analyzing location is not on the C or Au coating, but at the edge (outside) of the coating.

  6. TurningPoint Evaluation Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TurningPoint Evaluation Results TurningPoint Evaluation Results NTSF 2012 Meeting Evaluation Results. PDF icon TurningPoint Evaluation Results More Documents & Publications NTSF 2014 Meeting Agenda NTSF Activities and Accomplishments NTSF Spring 2014 Preliminary Agenda

  7. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  8. In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs January 7, 2014 - 5:30pm Addthis These solar power collection dishes at Sandia National Labs' National Solar Thermal Test Facility are capable of some of the highest solar to electricity conversion. In January 2008, this technology set a new solar-to-grid system conversion efficiency record of 31.25 percent net efficiency rate; the technology is still available to benefit the U.S. by delivering power at all hours

  9. Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects Structural defects in a crystal are responsible for the ''two-length-scale'' behavior in which a sharp

  10. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  11. Agency Points of Contact for Tribal Consultation Agency Point of Contact Email and Phone

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Agency Points of Contact for Tribal Consultation Agency Point of Contact Email and Phone Department of the Interior Sarah Harris Chief of Staff to the Assist Secretary - Indian Affairs Tribalconsultation@bia.gov (202) 208-7163 Department of Justice Tracy Toulou Director, Office of Tribal Justice OTJ@usdoj.gov (202) 514-8812 Department of State Reta Lewis Special Representative for Global Intergovernmental Affairs tribalconsultation@state.gov (202) 647-7710 Department of the Treasury Alexander

  12. Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, D.T.; Jubin, R.T.; Schmidt, T.W.

    2001-06-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed. The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc. (Participant) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor) was the measurement of the formation of solids in crude oils and petroleum products that are commonly transported through pipelines. This information is essential in the proper design, operation and maintenance of the petroleum pipeline system in the United States. Recently, new petroleum discoveries in the Gulf of Mexico have shown that there is a potential for plugging of undersea pipeline because of the precipitation of wax. It is important that the wax points of the expected crude oils be well characterized so that the production facilities for these new wells are capable of properly transporting the expected production. The goal of this work is to perform measurements of solids formation in crude oils and petroleum products supplied by the Participant. It is anticipated that these data will be used in the design of new production facilities and in the development of thermodynamic models that describe the behavior of wax-saturated petroleum.

  13. Undercompensated Kondo Impurity with Quantum Critical Point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlottmann, P.

    2000-02-14

    The low-temperature properties of a magnetic impurity of spin S interacting with an electron gas via anisotropic spin exchange are studied via Bethe's ansatz. For S>1/2 the impurity is only partially compensated at T=0 , leaving an effective spin that is neither integer nor half integer. The entropy has an essential singularity at H=T=0 , and the susceptibility and the specific heat follow power laws of H and T with nonuniversal exponents, which are the consequence of a quantum critical point. The results for the generalization to an arbitrary number of channels are also reported. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,506,"3,954",89.2,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" 2,512,"4,336",96.7,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Salishan_dpc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archival Storage At LANL Past, Present and Future Danny Cook Los Alamos National Laboratory dpc@lanl.gov Salishan Conference on High Performance Computing April 24-27 2006 LA-UR-06-0977 Main points of presentation * Brief history of archival storage at LANL. * More detailed history of HPSS with focus on how HPSS has been used at LANL * Discuss LANL future in archival storage. HSM: Hierarchical storage management * Purposes of HSM: - Extend file system space - Back up disk files to tape - Manage

  16. Vantage Point Venture Partners (Canada) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Canada) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Vantage Point Venture Partners (Canada) Name: Vantage Point Venture Partners (Canada) Address: 1200 McGill College, Suite 1240 Place:...

  17. Windy Point (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (08) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Point (08) Wind Farm Facility Windy Point (08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  18. Windy Point - Siemens Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Siemens Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Point - Siemens Wind Farm Facility Windy Point - Siemens Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility...

  19. Windy Point - REpower (09) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    REpower (09) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Point - REpower (09) Wind Farm Facility Windy Point - REpower (09) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale...

  20. Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point Authors: Kolodrubetz, Michael ; Katz, ...

  1. City of Strawberry Point, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strawberry Point, Iowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Strawberry Point Place: Iowa Phone Number: 563-933-4482 Website: www.strawberrypt.com Facebook:...

  2. Recommendation 217: Stewardship Point of Contact for the Oak...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7: Stewardship Point of Contact for the Oak Ridge Reservation Recommendation 217: Stewardship Point of Contact for the Oak Ridge Reservation The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory...

  3. MissionPoint Capital Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MissionPoint Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name: MissionPoint Capital Partners Place: Norwalk, Connecticut Zip: CT 06854 Product: Private Investment company...

  4. Zero point energy of renormalized Wilson loops (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Zero point energy of renormalized Wilson loops Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Zero point energy of renormalized Wilson loops The quark-antiquark potential, and its ...

  5. OpenEI:Neutral point of view | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    point of view Jump to: navigation, search Neutral point of view (NPOV) means that articles and content contributed or edited on the platform must be unbiased. All significant...

  6. TYPE A VERIFICATION REPORT FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR STACK AND GROUNDS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-08-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-11-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

  7. Assessment of the Proposed INTEC CPP 666 Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-02-16

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the proposed new location for air sampling probes in the CPP-666 heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct would meet the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations( ) require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the American National Standards Institute/Health Physical Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream.

  8. 2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Material Handling Equipment Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Material Handling Equipment Markets Doug Wheeler DJW Technology Michael Ulsh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-53046 August 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013

  9. Compositional analysis and depth profiling of thin film CrO{sub 2} by heavy ion ERDA and standard RBS: a comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamlich, S.; Msimanga, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C.A.; Nuru, Z.Y.; McCrindle, R.; Maaza, M.

    2012-08-15

    Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin film has generated considerable interest in applied research due to the wide variety of its technological applications. It has been extensively investigated in recent years, attracting the attention of researchers working on spintronic heterostructures and in the magnetic recording industry. However, its synthesis is usually a difficult task due to its metastable nature and various synthesis techniques are being investigated. In this work a polycrystalline thin film of CrO{sub 2} was prepared by electron beam vaporization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} onto a Si substrate. The polycrystalline structure was confirmed through XRD analysis. The stoichiometry and elemental depth distribution of the deposited film were measured by ion beam nuclear analytical techniques heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), which both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Moreover, the analysis carried out highlights the importance of complementary usage of the two techniques to obtain a more complete description of elemental content and depth distribution in thin films. - Graphical abstract: Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films of CrO{sub 2} have been grown by e-beam evaporation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} target in vacuum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composition was determined by heavy ion-ERDA and RBS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HI-ERDA and RBS provided information on the light and heavy elements, respectively.

  10. Ordering mechanism of stacked CdSe/ZnS{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} quantum dots: A combined reciprocal-space and real-space approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Th.; Roventa, E.; Clausen, T.; Flege, J. I.; Alexe, G.; Rosenauer, A.; Hommel, D.; Falta, J.; Bernstorff, S.; Kuebel, C.

    2005-11-15

    The vertical and lateral ordering of stacked CdSe quantum dot layers embedded in ZnS{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} has been investigated by means of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Different growth parameters have been varied in order to elucidate the mechanisms leading to quantum dot correlation. From the results obtained for different numbers of quantum dot layers, we conclude on a self-organized process which leads to increasing ordering for progressive stacking. The dependence on the spacer layer thickness indicates that strain induced by lattice mismatch drives the ordering process, which starts to break down for too thick spacer layers in a thickness range from 45 to 80 A. Typical quantum dot distances in a range from about 110 to 160 A have been found. A pronounced anisotropy of the quantum dot correlation has been observed, with the strongest ordering along the [110] direction. Since an increased ordering is found with increasing growth temperature, the formation of stacking faults as an additional mechanism for quantum dot alignment can be ruled out.

  11. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  12. Stacked organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Xue, Jiangeng; Uchida, Soichi; Rand, Barry P.

    2007-03-27

    A device is provided having a first electrode, a second electrode, a first photoactive region having a characteristic absorption wavelength .lamda..sub.1 and a second photoactive region having a characteristic absorption wavelength .lamda..sub.2. The photoactive regions are disposed between the first and second electrodes, and further positioned on the same side of a reflective layer, such that the first photoactive region is closer to the reflective layer than the second photoactive region. The materials comprising the photoactive regions may be selected such that .lamda..sub.1 is at least about 10% different from .lamda..sub.2. The device may further comprise an exciton blocking layer disposed adjacent to and in direct contact with the organic acceptor material of each photoactive region, wherein the LUMO of each exciton blocking layer other than that closest to the cathode is not more than about 0.3 eV greater than the LUMO of the acceptor material.

  13. Center Stack Vacuum Vessel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hotter than the 15 million degree Celsius core of the sun. Magnetic field strength: 1 tesla, or 20,000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field Neutral Beam Poloidal...

  14. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph G. (Oakland, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-04-12

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid comprising a mixture of LiNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.3, KNO.sub.3, NaNO.sub.2 and KNO.sub.2 salts where the Li, Na and K cations are present in amounts of about 20-33.5 mol % Li, about 18.6-40 mol % Na, and about 40-50.3 mol % K and where the nitrate and nitrite anions are present in amounts of about 36-50 mol % NO.sub.3, and about 50-62.5 mol % NO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures between 70.degree. C. and 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  15. Laser beam centering and pointing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael Charles

    2015-01-13

    An optical instrument aligns an optical beam without the need for physical intervention of the instrument within the apparatus or platforms from which the trajectory of the beam to be ascertained. The alignment apparatus and method enable the desired function to be realized without the placement of physical apertures or sensors directly in the path of the beam through the system whose spatial position and slope is to be sought. An image plane provides the observer with a pair of well-defined images that are indicative of the beam centering and pointing alignment parameters. The optical alignment can be realized without the need for referencing to an external or fixed set of coordinates or fiducials. The instrument can therefore service situations where adverse environments would otherwise prohibit the use of such instruments, including regions of high radiation, high temperature, vacuum and/or cryogenic atmospheres.

  16. Seismic Analysis of Morrow Point Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, C R

    2002-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to perform nonlinear dynamic earthquake time history analyses on Morrow Point Dam, which is located 263 km southwest of Denver, Colorado. This project poses many significant technical challenges, one of which is to model the entire Morrow Point Dam/Foundation Rock/Reservoir system which includes accurate geology topography. In addition, the computational model must be initialized to represent the existing dead loads on the structure and the stress field caused by the dead loads. To achieve the correct dead load stress field due to gravity and hydrostatic load, the computer model must account for the manner in which the dams were constructed. Construction of a dam finite element model with the correct as-built geometry of the dam structure and simply ''turning on'' gravity in the computer model will generally lead to an incorrect initial stress field in the structure. The sequence of segmented lifts typical of dam construction has a significant impact on the static stress fields induced in the dam. In addition, the dam model must also account for the interaction between the adjacent dam segments across the dam contraction joints. As a result of these challenges, it was determined that a significant amount of code development was required in order to accurately simulate the motion of the dam structure. Modifications to the existing slide surfaces are needed to allow for appropriate modeling of the shear keys across the contraction joints. Furthermore, a model for hydrodynamic interaction was also implemented into NIKE3D and DYNA3D for fluid representation in the 3D dam system finite element model. Finally, the modeling of the 3D dam system results in a very large computational model, which makes it difficult to perform a static initialization using an implicit code. Traditionally, for these large models, the model has been initialized over a long time scale using an explicit code. However, recent advancements have made it possible to run NIKE3D in ''parallel'' on relatively small parallel machines as well as on the ASCI platforms.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points in notes

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    [Read-Only] | Department of Energy DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points in notes [Read-Only] Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points in notes [Read-Only] PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points in notes [Read-Only] More Documents & Publications Example BCP Template Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE O 413 3B Brief v9 with key points in notes [Read-Only] CD-2, Approve Performance Baseline External Independent Review (EIR) Standard Operating

  18. Practical Point-to-Point Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution over 1/2 KM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01

    We have demonstrated point-to-point single-photon quantum key distribution (QKD) over a free-space optical path of {approximately}475 m under daylight conditions. This represents an increase of >1,000 times farther than any reported point-to-point demonstration, and >6 times farther than the previous folded path daylight demonstration. We expect to extend the daylight range to 2 km or more within the next few months. A brief description of the system is given here. The QKD transmitter, a.k.a. ''Alice'' (Fig. 1), consists of three thermoelectrically cooled diode lasers, a single interference filter (IF), two optical attenuators, two linear polarizers, two non-polarization beam-splitters (BSs), and a 27x beam expander. The two data-lasers' (dim-lasers') wavelengths are temperature controlled and constrained by the IF to {approximately}773 {+-} 0.5 nm, while the transmitted wavelength of the bright-laser (timing-laser) is {approximately}768 nm; the data-lasers are configured to emit a weak pulse of approximately 1 ns duration. The transmitter incorporates no active polarization switching--a first in QKD.

  19. Effect of Ion Skin Depth on Relaxation of Merging Spheromaks to a Field-Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Ono, Yasushi

    2005-08-19

    The effect of ion skin depth on the relaxation of merging spheromaks to a field-reversed configuration (FRC) is studied experimentally for a wide range of size parameter S* (ratio of minor radius to ion skin depth) from 1 to 7. The two merging spheromaks are observed to relax to an FRC or a new spheromak depending on whether the initial poloidal eigenvalue is smaller or larger than a threshold value. The bifurcation value is found to increase with decreasing size parameter S{sup *}, indicating that the low-S* condition provides a wide bifurcated range of relaxation to an FRC. The FRC-style relaxation under the low-S* conditions was accompanied by the suppression of the low-n modes (n is the toroidal mode number) activity. The fast rotations of the modes were followed by suppression of the low-n modes.

  20. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  1. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  2. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  3. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product A Koontz C Flynn G Hodges J Michalsky J Barnard March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use

  4. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings J. Woods, J. Winkler, and D. Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-57441 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401

  5. NREL Takes First In-Depth Look at Solar Project Completion Timelines - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Takes First In-Depth Look at Solar Project Completion Timelines Report examines new data to show how long the PV interconnection process takes in the U.S. February 11, 2015 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has gathered and analyzed data for more than 30,000 solar photovoltaic (PV) installations across the United States to better understand how interconnection regulations align with actual project completion timelines. The findings indicate

  6. STARSPOTS-TRANSIT DEPTH RELATION OF THE EVAPORATING PLANET CANDIDATE KIC 12557548b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawahara, Hajime; Kurosaki, Kenji; Ito, Yuichi; Ikoma, Masahiro; Hirano, Teruyuki

    2013-10-10

    Violent variation of transit depths and an ingress-egress asymmetry of the transit light curve discovered in KIC 12557548 have been interpreted as evidence of a catastrophic evaporation of atmosphere with dust ( M-dot {sub p}?>1 M{sub ?} Gyr{sup 1}) from a close-in small planet. To explore what drives the anomalous atmospheric escape, we perform time-series analysis of the transit depth variation of Kepler archival data for ?3.5 yr. We find a ?30% periodic variation of the transit depth with P {sub 1} = 22.83 0.21 days, which is within the error of the rotation period of the host star estimated using the light curve modulation, P {sub rot} = 22.91 0.24 days. We interpret the results as evidence that the atmospheric escape of KIC 12557548b correlates with stellar activity. We consider possible scenarios that account for both the mass loss rate and the correlation with stellar activity. X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV)-driven evaporation is possible if one accepts a relatively high XUV flux and a high efficiency for converting the input energy to the kinetic energy of the atmosphere. Star-planet magnetic interaction is another possible scenario, though huge uncertainty remains for the mass loss rate.

  7. Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2009-05-12

    A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

  8. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  9. Compound nucleus decay: Comparison between saddle point and scission point barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, T. J.; Carlson, B. V.

    2014-11-11

    One of the principal characteristics of nuclear multifragmentation is the emission of complex fragments of intermediate mass. An extension of the statistical multifragmentation model has been developed, in which the process can be interpreted as the near simultaneous limit of a series of sequential binary decays. In this extension, intermediate mass fragment emissions are described by expressions almost identical to those of light particle emission. At lower temperatures, similar expressions have been shown to furnish a good description of very light intermediate mass fragment emission but not of the emission of heavier fragments, which seems to be determined by the transition density at the saddle-point rather than at the scission point. Here, we wish to compare these different formulations of intermediate fragmment emission and analyze the extent to which they remain distinguishable at high excitation energy.

  10. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  11. City of West Point, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: West Point Municipal Power Place: Nebraska Phone Number: 402.372.2466 Website: www.ci.west-point.ne.usutilit Outage Hotline: After Hours (402) 372-6009 References: EIA Form...

  12. Microsoft Word - AU Funtional Area Points of Contact by Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Functional Area Points of Contact Listing by AU Office Director Page 1 of 11 Integrated ... Area Points of Contact Listing by AU Office Director Page 2 of 11 COMSEC ...

  13. ZeroPoint Clean Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ZeroPoint Clean Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: ZeroPoint Clean Technology Inc Place: New York, New York Zip: 13676 Sector: Biomass Product: Developing of biomass...

  14. CenterPoint Energy Advanced Residential Lighting Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy’s Advanced Lighting program provides a point-of-sale discount on the purchase of selected Energy Star® rated LED products, such as screw-in LEDs and LED fixtures, which are...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - 05 Okonski final Project Management Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Okonski final Project Management Workshop Slides O'Konski Microsoft PowerPoint - 05 Okonski final Project Management Workshop Slides O'Konski PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - 05...

  16. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  17. Three-junction solar cells comprised of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs tandem cell mechanically stacked on a Si cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazawa, Y.; Tamura, K.; Watahiki, S.; Kitatani, T.; Ohtsuka, H.; Warabisako, T.

    1997-12-31

    Three-junction tandem solar cells were fabricated by mechanical stacking of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell and a Si cell. The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique was used for the thinning of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells. Both spectral responses of the GaInP top cell and the GaAs middle cell in the thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell were conserved. The Si cell performance has been improved by reducing the absorption loss in the GaAs substrate.

  18. Nano-scale luminescence characterization of individual InGaN/GaN quantum wells stacked in a microcavity using scanning transmission electron microscope cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Gordon Mller, Marcus; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jrgen; Glauser, Marlene; Carlin, Jean-Franois; Cosendey, Gatien; Butt, Raphal; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    Using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy directly performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope at liquid helium temperatures, the optical and structural properties of a 62 InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well embedded in an AlInN/GaN based microcavity are investigated at the nanometer scale. We are able to spatially resolve a spectral redshift between the individual quantum wells towards the surface. Cathodoluminescence spectral linescans allow directly visualizing the critical layer thickness in the quantum well stack resulting in the onset of plastic relaxation of the strained InGaN/GaN system.

  19. CenterPoint Energy- Residential and Small Commercial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Rebate Incentives are only available to CenterPoint Energy electric customers in the greater Houston area, Texas.

  20. Development of a Multi-Point Microwave Interferometry (MPMI) Method

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Development of a Multi-Point Microwave Interferometry (MPMI) Method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a Multi-Point Microwave Interferometry (MPMI) Method A multi-point microwave interferometer (MPMI) concept was developed for non-invasively tracking a shock, reaction, or detonation front in energetic media. Initially, a single-point, heterodyne microwave interferometry capability was established. The design,

  1. CenterPoint Energy Healthcare Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Program is only available to electric customers in CenterPoint Energy's service territory (greater Houston, Texas area)

  2. PowerPoint Presentation Templates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Templates » PowerPoint Presentation Templates PowerPoint Presentation Templates The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) PowerPoint templates can be used for all EERE presentations. They provide a consistent look and feel for all presentations given by the EERE's offices. The templates below do not include any content or material. All templates are available in Microsoft PowerPoint 2010. Calibri is the default font for all templates. Larger Image Template This template has

  3. CenterPoint Energy- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program only applies to electric customers of CenterPoint Energy in the greater Houston area, Texas.

  4. CenterPoint Energy Low-Rise Multi Family Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This Incentive is only available to customers in the CenterPoint Energy Houston electric territory.

  5. Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour PDF icon Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour More Documents & Publications Clean, Efficient, and Reliable Power for the 21st Century: Fact Sheet State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2010 State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2012

  6. FPD's Perspective Talking Points - Los Alamos National Labratory - NISA |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Talking Points - Los Alamos National Labratory - NISA FPD's Perspective Talking Points - Los Alamos National Labratory - NISA 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop PDF icon 30_FPD Perspective_Talking Points.pdf More Documents & Publications FPD's Perspective Photos - Los Alamos National Labratory - NISA Aligning Contract Incentives 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Los Alamos Field Office

  7. Tribal Agency Points of Contact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Agency Points of Contact Tribal Agency Points of Contact This document contains names and contact information at all federal agencies for Tribal Affairs. PDF icon Tribal Agency points of contact More Documents & Publications 2011 Tribal Summit Agenda DOETribalSummitAgenda.pdf 2011 Tribal Summit Book

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2) |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2) Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2) PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2) More Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - Final translated version of Tsinghua Speech Idaho Operations AMWTP Fact Sheet Methane Hydrate R&D

  9. EA-379 FreePoint Commodities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 FreePoint Commodities EA-379 FreePoint Commodities Order authorizing FreePoint Commodities to export electric energy to Mexico. File EA-379 Freepoint MX_Revised.docx More Documents & Publications EA-380 Freeport Commodities EA-314-A BP Energy Co EA-176 Sempra Energy Trading Corporation

  10. Response to high-energy photons of PTW31014 PinPoint ion chamber with a central aluminum electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agostinelli, S.; Garelli, S.; Piergentili, M.; Foppiano, F.

    2008-07-15

    Since its introduction the PinPoint (PTW-Freiburg) micro-ionization chamber has been proposed for relative dosimetry (output factors, depth dose curves, and beam profiles) as well as for determination of absolute dose of small high-energy photon beams. This paper investigates the dosimetric performance of a new design (type 31014) of the PinPoint ion chamber with a central aluminum electrode. The study included characterization of inherent and radiation-induced leakage, ion collection efficiency and polarity effect, relative response of the chamber, measurement of beam profiles, and depth dose curves. The 6 and 15 MV photon beams of a Varian 2100 C/D were considered. At the nominal operating voltage of 400 V the PinPoint type 31014 chamber was found to present a strong field size dependence of the polarity correction factor and an excess of the collected charge, which can lead to an underestimation of the collection efficiency if determined with the conventional ''two-voltage'' method. In comparison to the original PinPoint design (type 31006) the authors found for type 31014 chamber no overresponse to large-area fields if polarity correction is applied. If no correction is taken into consideration, the authors found the chamber's output to be inaccurate for large-area fields (0.5% accuracy limited up to the 12x12 and 20x20 cm{sup 2} field for the 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively), which is a direct consequence of the stem and polarity effects due to the chamber's very small sensitive volume (0.015 cc) and cable irradiation. Beam profiles and depth dose curves measured with type 31014 PinPoint chamber for small and medium size fields were compared to data measured with a 0.125 cc ion chamber and with high-resolution Kodak EDR2 films. Analysis of the penumbra (80%-20% distance) showed that the spatial resolution of type 31014 PinPoint ion chamber approaches (penumbra broadening {<=}0.6 mm) EDR2 film results.

  11. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  12. Observed damage during Argon gas cluster depth profiles of compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, Anders J. Portoles, Jose F.; Cumpson, Peter J.

    2014-08-07

    Argon Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) sources have become very popular in XPS and SIMS in recent years, due to the minimal chemical damage they introduce in the depth-profiling of polymer and other organic materials. These GCIB sources are therefore particularly useful for depth-profiling polymer and organic materials, but also (though more slowly) the surfaces of inorganic materials such as semiconductors, due to the lower roughness expected in cluster ion sputtering compared to that introduced by monatomic ions. We have examined experimentally a set of five compound semiconductors, cadmium telluride (CdTe), gallium arsenide (GaAs), gallium phosphide (GaP), indium arsenide (InAs), and zinc selenide (ZnSe) and a high-? dielectric material, hafnium oxide (HfO), in their response to argon cluster profiling. An experimentally determined HfO etch rate of 0.025?nm/min (3.95??10{sup ?2}?amu/atom in ion) for 6?keV Ar gas clusters is used in the depth scale conversion for the profiles of the semiconductor materials. The assumption has been that, since the damage introduced into polymer materials is low, even though sputter yields are high, then there is little likelihood of damaging inorganic materials at all with cluster ions. This seems true in most cases; however, in this work, we report for the first time that this damage can in fact be very significant in the case of InAs, causing the formation of metallic indium that is readily visible even to the naked eye.

  13. Results of Hg speciation testing on tanks 30, 32, and 37 depth samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-11-30

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team. The twelfth shipment of samples was designated to include 3H evaporator system Tank 30, 32, and 37 depth samples. The Tank 30 depth sample (HTF-30-15-70) was taken at 190 inches from the tank bottom and the Tank 32 depth sample (HTF-32-15-68) was taken at 89 inches from the tank bottom and both were shipped to SRNL on June 29, 2015 in an 80 mL stainless steel dip bottles. The Tank 37 surface sample (HTF-37-15-94) was taken around 253.4 inches from the tank bottom and shipped to SRNL on July 21, 2015 in an 80 mL stainless steel dip bottle. All samples were placed in the SRNL Shielded Cells and left unopened until intermediate dilutions were made on July 24, 2015 using 1.00 mL of sample diluted to 100.00 mL with deionized H2O. A 30 mL Teflon bottle was rinsed twice with the diluted tank sample and then filled leaving as little headspace as possible. It was immediately removed from the Shielded Cells and transferred to refrigerated storage where it remained at 4 C until final dilutions were made on October 20. A second portion of the cells diluted tank sample was poured into a shielded polyethylene bottle and transferred to Analytical Development for radiochemical analysis data needed for Hazardous Material Transportation calculations.

  14. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

  15. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, M.D.

    1994-01-11

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position. 8 figures.

  16. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Melvin D. (Richland, WA)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position.

  17. Methods For Calculating Thyroid Doses to The Residents Of Ozersk Due to 131I Releases From The Stacks of The Mayak Production Association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovny, Sergey I.; Mokrov, Y.; Stukalov, Pavel M.; Beregich, D. A.; Teplyakov, I. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was established in the late 1940s in accordance with a special Decree of the USSR Government for the production of nuclear weapons. In early years of MPA operation, due to the lack of experience and absence of effective methods of RW management, the enterprise had extensive routine (designed) and non-routine (accidental) releases of gaseous radioactive wastes to the atmosphere. These practices resulted in additional technogenic radiation exposure of residents inhabiting populated areas near the MPA. The primary objective of ongoing studies under JCCRER Project 1.4 is to estimate doses to the residents of Ozersk due to releases of radioactive substances from the stacks of MPA. Preliminary scoping studies have demonstrated that releases of radioactive iodine (131I) from the stacks of the Mayak Radiochemical Plant represented the major contribution to the dose to residents of Ozersk and of other nearby populated areas. The behavior of 131I in the environment and of 131I migration through biological food chains (vegetation-cows-milk-humans) indicated a need for use of special mathematical models to perform the estimation of radiation doses to the population. The goal of this work is to select an appropriate model of the iodine migration in biological food chains and to justify numerical values of the model parameters.

  18. Optical properties of multi-stacked InGaAs/GaNAs quantum dot solar cell fabricated on GaAs (311)B substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoji, Yasushi; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2012-09-15

    Quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) comprised of 10 stacked pairs of strain-compensated InGaAs/GaNAs QD structure have been fabricated by atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A homogeneous and high-density QD array structure with improved in-plane ordering and total density of {approx}10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} has been achieved on GaAs (311)B grown at 460 Degree-Sign C after stacking. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of InGaAs/GaNAs QDSC increases in the longer wavelength range due to additive contribution from QD layers inserted in the intrinsic region. The short-circuit current density measured for QDSC is 17.2 mA/cm{sup 2} compared to 14.8 mA/cm{sup 2} of GaAs reference cell. Further, an increase in EQE due to photocurrent production by 2-step photon absorption has been observed at room temperature though it is still small at around 0.1%.

  19. Single-point representative sampling with shrouded probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1993-08-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed methodologies for sampling radionuclides in air effluents from stacks and ducts at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Requirements include use of EPA Method 1 for the location of sampling sites and use of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N13.1 for guidance in design of sampling probes and the number of probes at a given site. Application of ANSI N13.1 results in sampling being performed with multiprobe rakes that have as many as 20 probes. There can be substantial losses of aerosol particles in such sampling that will degrade the quality of emission estimates from a nuclear facility. Three alternate methods, technically justified herein, are proposed for effluent sampling. First, a shrouded aerosol sampling probe should replace the sharp-edged elbowed-nozzle recommended by ANSI. This would reduce the losses of aerosol particles in probes and result in the acquisition of more representative aerosol samples. Second, the rakes of multiple probes that are intended to acquire representative samples through spatial coverage should be replaced by a single probe located where contaminant mass and fluid momentum are both well mixed. A representative sample can be obtained from a well-mixed flow. Some effluent flows will need to be engineered to achieve acceptable mixing. Third, sample extraction should be performed at a constant flow rate through a suitable designed shrouded probe rather than at a variable flow rate through isokinetic probes. A shrouded probe is shown to have constant sampling characteristics over a broad range of stack velocities when operated at a fixed flow rate.

  20. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.