Sample records for deposition velocity issues

  1. Recommended Tritium Oxide Deposition Velocity For Use In Savannah River Site Safety Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, P. L.; Murphy, C. E.; Viner, B. J.; Hunter, C. H.

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of examining the deposition velocity of water to forests, the residence time of HTO in forests, and the relation between deposition velocity and residence time with specific consideration given to the topography and experimental work performed at SRS. A simple mechanistic model is used to obtain plausible deposition velocity and residence time values where experimental data are not available and recommendations are made for practical application in a safety analysis model.

  2. Deposition Velocities of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Abrefah, John; Casella, Andrew M.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Nigl, Franz; Minette, Michael J.; Toth, James J.; Tingey, Joel M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The WTP pipe plugging issue, as stated by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Executive Summary, is as follows: “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” A strategy was employed to perform critical-velocity tests on several physical simulants. Critical velocity is defined as the point where a stationary bed of particles deposits on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry transport operations. Results from the critical velocity testing provide an indication of slurry stability as a function of fluid rheological properties and transport conditions. The experimental results are compared to the WTP design guide on slurry transport velocity in an effort to confirm minimum waste velocity and flushing velocity requirements as established by calculations and critical line velocity correlations in the design guide. The major findings of this testing is discussed below. Experimental results indicate that the use of the Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation in the design guide is conservative—Slurry viscosity has a greater affect on particles with a large surface area to mass ratio. The increased viscous forces on these particles result in a decrease in predicted critical velocities from this traditional industry derived equations that focus on particles large than 100 ?m in size. Since the Hanford slurry particles generally have large surface area to mass ratios, the reliance on such equations in the Hall (2006) design guide is conservative. Additionally, the use of the 95% percentile particle size as an input to this equation is conservative. However, test results indicate that the use of an average particle density as an input to the equation is not conservative. Particle density has a large influence on the overall result returned by the correlation. Lastly, the viscosity correlation used in the WTP design guide has been shown to be inaccurate for Hanford waste feed materials. The use of the Thomas (1979) correlation in the design guide is not conservative—In cases where 100% of the particles are smaller than 74 ?m or particles are considered to be homogeneous due to yield stress forces suspending the particles the homogeneous fraction of the slurry can be set to 100%. In such cases, the predicted critical velocity based on the conservative Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation is reduced to zero and the design guide returns a value from the Thomas (1979) correlation. The measured data in this report show that the Thomas (1979) correlation predictions often fall below that measured experimental values. A non-Newtonian deposition velocity design guide should be developed for the WTP— Since the WTP design guide is limited to Newtonian fluids and the WTP expects to process large quantities of such materials, the existing design guide should be modified address such systems. A central experimental finding of this testing is that the flow velocity required to reach turbulent flow increases with slurry rheological properties due to viscous forces dampening the formation of turbulent eddies. The flow becomes dominated by viscous forces rather than turbulent eddies. Since the turbulent eddies necessary for particle transport are not present, the particles will settle when crossing this boundary called the transitional deposition boundary. This deposition mechanism should be expected and designed for in the WTP.

  3. Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolations |Join the ChallengeWorkshopXcel EnergyY-12

  4. MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | DepartmentEnergy InvitationLegaltoLizLow- LEVEL WASTEMACCS2/Deposition

  5. Deposition Velocities of Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines: Complex Simulant Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Casella, Andrew M.; Johnson, Michael D.; Toth, James J.; Adkins, Harold E.; Chun, Jaehun; Denslow, Kayte M.; Luna, Maria; Tingey, Joel M.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the concerns expressed by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) is about the potential for pipe plugging at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Per the review’s executive summary, “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” To evaluate the potential for plugging, deposition-velocity tests were performed on several physical simulants to determine whether the design approach is conservative. Deposition velocity is defined as the velocity below which particles begin to deposit to form a moving bed of particles on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry-transport operations. The deposition velocity depends on the system geometry and the physical properties of the particles and fluid. An experimental program was implemented to test the stability-map concepts presented in WTP-RPT-175 Rev. 01. Two types of simulant were tested. The first type of simulant was similar to the glass-bead simulants discussed in WTP-RPT-175 Rev. 0 ; it consists of glass beads with a nominal particle size of 150 µm in a kaolin/water slurry. The initial simulant was prepared at a target yield stress of approximately 30 Pa. The yield stress was then reduced, stepwise, via dilution or rheological modifiers, ultimately to a level of <1 Pa. At each yield-stress step, deposition-velocity testing was performed. Testing over this range of yield-stress bounds the expected rheological operating window of the WTP and allows the results to be compared to stability-map predictions for this system. The second simulant was a precipitated hydroxide that simulates HLW pretreated sludge from Hanford waste tank AZ-101. Testing was performed in a manner similar to that for the first simulant over a wide range of yield stresses; however, an additional test of net-positive suction-head required (NPSHR) was performed at each yield stress condition. Unlike the previous simulant, the sizes and densities of the particles that can deposit in the piping are a result of the simulant precipitation process; there is expected to be a complex mixture of particles of various sizes and densities that make it difficult to predict a stability map. The objective of the testing is to observe whether behavior consistent with the stability-map concept occurs in complex simulants with mixtures of different sizes and densities.

  6. Dry Deposition Velocity Estimation for the Savannah River Site: Part 1 – Parametric Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Values for the dry deposition velocity of airborne particles were estimated with the GENII Version 2.10 computer code for the Savannah River site using assumptions about surface roughness parameters and particle size and density. Use of the GENII code is recommended by the U.S. Department of Energy for this purpose. Meteorological conditions evaluated include atmospheric stability classes D, E, and F and wind speeds of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 m/s. Local surface roughness values ranging from 0.03 to 2 meters were evaluated. Particles with mass mean diameters of 1, 5, and 10 microns and densities of 1, 3, and 5 g/cm3 were evaluated.

  7. Dry Deposition Velocity Estimation for the Savannah River Site: Part 2 -- Parametric and Site-Specific Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Cook, Kary M.

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Values for the dry deposition velocity of airborne particles were estimated with the GENII Version 2.10.1 computer code for the Savannah River site using assumptions about surface roughness parameters and particle size and density. Use of the GENII code is recommended by the U.S. Department of Energy for this purpose. Meteorological conditions evaluated include atmospheric stability classes D, E, and F and wind speeds of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m/s. Local surface roughness values ranging from 0.03 to 2 meters were evaluated. Particles with mass mean diameters of 1, 5, and 10 microns and densities of 1, 3, 4, and 5 g/cm3 were evaluated. Site specific meteorology was used to predict deposition velocity for Savannah River conditions for a range of distances from 670 to 11,500 meters.

  8. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and An Evaluation of Thermophoretic Deposition Rates C.1of estimated thermophoretic deposition velocities, v th+ ,of estimated thermophoretic deposition velocities, v th+ ,

  9. Perspectives on Deposition Velocity

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactorBatteries for Advanced26, 2005from the Board's

  10. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    releases during drilling, and well integrity issues duringand ? Ensuring well structural integrity with subsidence inat nearby wells, seal integrity loss and associated gas

  11. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

  12. Analysis of forest environmental measurements to estimate parameters of microclimate and air-pollution deposition-velocity models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jr, C E; Lorenz, R

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for estimating flux densities and deposition of gaseous pollutants for a period of a year or more, using data collected for a period of a few days. The estimates are based on models which characterize the transfer of gases from the atmosphere to the vegetation as a series of resistances and then use linear statistical submodels based on experimental data to relate the resistances to the surrounding environment. The models are shown to fit the experimental data reasonably well. Annual values calculated for a young loblolly pine plantation were: evaporation 63.2 cm, carbon dioxide exchange 31.5 t/ha, and sulfur dioxide exchange 120 gm/ha. 17 references.

  13. DOE Workshop - Deposition Velocity Status

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2ConsolidatedDepartment of1990,CFODOE Weighs in at 120,000 lbs!Wind

  14. Preliminary Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Several issues were presented at the meeting for discussion. This is a short summary that is organized in accordance with the primary issues discussed, which is not necessarily a chronological record. Issues include: SRS Meteorological Data and its Use in MACCS2; Deposition Velocities for Particles; Deposition Velocities for Tritium; MACCS2 Dispersion Coefficients; Use of Low Surface Roughness in Open Areas; Adequacy of Meteorological Tower and Instrumentation; Displacement Height; and Validity of MACCS2 Calculations at Close-in Distances. A longer report will be issued at a later date that expands upon these topics and recommendations.

  15. The role of size-dependent dry deposition of sulfate aerosol in a three-dimensional Eulerian air quality model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binkowski, F.S. [NOAA, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Shankar, U. [MCNC, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional Particulate Model, a three-dimensional Eulerian air quality model, was developed to investigate aerosol particle issues of important to the US EPA and to meet the demands of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990. In addition to aerosol dynamics such as growth and coagulation, the model includes photochemistry, transport, and deposition. A new formulation of dry deposition as a function of the aerosol size distribution has been incorporated into the model. This formulation allows for the representation of dry deposition of total particle number and total particle mass by deposition velocities specifically formulated for these two quantities as a function of particle size. Results for the dry deposition of sulfate mass from the new model will be compared with those from the Tagged Species Engineering Model for a variety of local conditions. The behavior of the aerosol size distribution responding to the new formulation will also be discussed.

  16. Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient...

  17. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  18. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  19. Modeling particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fouling of fin-and-tube heat exchangers by particle deposition leads to diminished effectiveness in supplying ventilation and air conditioning. This paper explores mechanisms that cause particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces. We present a model that accounts for impaction, diffusion, gravitational settling, and turbulence. Simulation results suggest that some submicron particles deposit in the heat exchanger core, but do not cause significant performance impacts. Particles between 1 and 10 {micro}m deposit with probabilities ranging from 1-20% with fin edge impaction representing the dominant mechanism. Particles larger than 10 {micro}m deposit by impaction on refrigerant tubes, gravitational settling on fin corrugations, and mechanisms associated with turbulent airflow. The model results agree reasonably well with experimental data, but the deposition of larger particles at high velocities is underpredicted. Geometric factors, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy.

  20. Velocity centroids as tracers of the turbulent velocity statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Esquivel; A. Lazarian

    2005-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the results of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to emulate spectroscopic observations and use maps of centroids to study their statistics. In order to assess under which circumstances the scaling properties of the velocity field can be retrieved from velocity centroids, we compare two point statistics (structure functions and power-spectra) of velocity centroids with those of the underlying velocity field and analytic predictions presented in a previous paper (Lazarian & Esquivel 2003). We tested a criterion for recovering velocity spectral index from velocity centroids derived in our previous work, and propose an approximation of the early criterion using only the variances of ``unnormalized'' velocity centroids and column density maps. It was found that both criteria are necessary, however not sufficient to determine if the centroids recover velocity statistics. Both criteria are well fulfilled for subsonic turbulence. We find that for supersonic turbulence with sonic Mach numbers > 2.5 centroids fail to trace the spectral index of velocity. Asymptotically, however, we claim that recovery of velocity statistics is always possible provided that the density spectrum is steep and the observed inertial range is sufficiently extended. In addition, we show that velocity centroids are useful for anisotropy studies and determining the direction of magnetic field, even if the turbulence is highly supersonic, but only if it is sub-Alfvenic. This provides a tool for mapping the magnetic field direction, and testing whether the turbulence is sub-Alfvenic or super-Alfvenic.

  1. Statistics of Velocity from Spectral Data: Modified Velocity Centroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lazarian; A. Esquivel

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the problem of studying interstellar turbulence using spectral line data. We find a criterion when the velocity centroids may provide trustworthy velocity statistics. To enhance the scope of centroids applications, we construct a measure that we term ``modified velocity centroids'' (MVCs) and derive an analytical solution that relates the 2D spectra of the modified centroids with the underlying 3D velocity spectrum. We test our results using synthetic maps constructed with data obtained through simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence. We show that the modified velocity centroids (MVCs) are complementary to the the Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) technique. Employed together, they make determining of the velocity spectral index more reliable and for wider variety of astrophysical situations.

  2. Laser induced thermophoresis and particulate deposition efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cipolla, J.; Morse, T.F.; Wang, C.Y.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of laser radiation and an absorbing aerosol in a tube flow has been considered. The aerosol is produced by external heating of reactants as in the MCVD (Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition) process to produce submicron size particles in the manufacture of optical fiber preforms. These are subsequently deposited by thermophoretic forces on the inner wall of the tube as they are convected by a Poiseuille velocity profile. Axial laser radiation in the tube interacts with the absorbing particles, and the laser heating of the gas induces additional thermophoretic forces that markedly increase the efficiency of particulate deposition. A particle concentration dependent absorption coefficient that appears in the energy equation couples the energy equation to the equation of particle conservation, so that a non-linear set of coupled partial integrodifferential equations must be solved. Numerical solutions for aerosol particle trajectories, and thus deposition efficiencies, have been obtained. It is shown that laser enhanced thermophoresis markedly improves the deposition efficiency.

  3. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  4. Theoretical Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  5. Suppression of Ge-O And Ge-N Bonding at Ge-HfO(2) And Ge-TiO(2) Interfaces By Deposition Onto Plasma-Nitrided Passivated Ge Substrates: Integration Issues Ge Gate Stacks Into Advanced Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Long, J.P.; Lucovsky, G.; Whitten, J.; Seo, H.; Luning, J.

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of changes in nano-scale morphology of thin films of nano-crystalline transition metal (TM) elemental oxides, HfO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}, on plasma-nitrided Ge(100) substrates, and Si(100) substrates with ultra-thin (-0.8 nm) plasma-nitrided Si suboxide, SiO{sub x}, x < 2, or SiON interfacial layers is presented. Near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAS) has been used to determine nano-scale morphology of these films by Jahn-Teller distortion removal of band edge d-state degeneracies. These results identify a new and novel application for NEXAS based on the resonant character of the respective O K{sub 1} and N K{sub 1} edge absorptions. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the integration issues for the introduction of this Ge breakthrough into advanced semiconductor circuits and systems. This includes a comparison of nano-crystalline and non-crystalline dielectrics, as well as issues relative to metal gates.

  6. President Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point07.06NucleonPreservationPresident Issues

  7. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access1 TechnicalOilOnline Application »OpenOpen Issues

  8. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  9. Development of analytical and numerical models predicting the deposition rate of electrically charged particles in turbulent channel flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Hanseo

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diameter for Re = 5, 000, 10, 000, and 20, 000. 15 Figure 3 Figure 4. Comparison of different roughness factors (e, = 0, 0. 1, 1. 0, and 10 mm) for dimensionless deposition velocity. Correlation of dimensionless deposition velocity and dimensionless... time for flow rate = 57 I/min, Re = 5, 000, and tube diameter = 15. 8 mm. 17 19 Figure 5. Correlation of dimensionless deposition velocity including electric migration velocity ( Vz = 0. 01, 0. 05, and 0. 1 mm/s) and dimensionless time for flow...

  10. PRVS-PLA-00005-0001 Executive Summary.doc PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    PRVS-PLA-00005-0001 Executive Summary.doc PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITY SPECTROMETER Document Title Executive Summary Document Number PRVS-PLA-00005-0001 Issue 1.0 Date 21st September 2006 Document Prepared and Date Ian Bryson 21st September 2006 #12;Document Number: PRVS-PLA-00005-0001 Issue: 1.0 Category

  11. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Modanese

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  12. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  13. Velocity Distributions from Nonextensive Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric I. Barnes; Liliya L. R. Williams; Arif Babul; Julianne J. Dalcanton

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    There is no accepted mechanism that explains the equilibrium structures that form in collisionless cosmological N-body simulations. Recent work has identified nonextensive thermodynamics as an innovative approach to the problem. The distribution function that results from adopting this framework has the same form as for polytropes, but the polytropic index is now related to the degree of nonextensiveness. In particular, the nonextensive approach can mimic the equilibrium structure of dark matter density profiles found in simulations. We extend the investigation of this approach to the velocity structures expected from nonextensive thermodynamics. We find that the nonextensive and simulated N-body rms-velocity distributions do not match one another. The nonextensive rms-velocity profile is either monotonically decreasing or displays little radial variation, each of which disagrees with the rms-velocity distributions seen in simulations. We conclude that the currently discussed nonextensive models require further modifications in order to corroborate dark matter halo simulations. (adapted from TeX)

  14. BENCAP, LLC: CAPSULE VELOCITY TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meidinger, Brian

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ben Cap, LLC, has a technology that utilizes bebtonite to plug wells. The bentonite is encapsulated in a cardboard capsule, droped down to the bottom of the well where it is allowed to hydrate, causing the bentonite to expand and plug the well. This method of plugging a well is accepted in some, but not all states. This technology can save a significant amount of money when compared to cementing methods currently used to plug and abandon wells. The test objective was to obtain the terminal velocity of the capsule delivery system as it drops through a column of water in a wellbore. Once the terminal velocity is known, the bentonite swelling action can be timed not to begin swelling until it reaches the bottom of the well bore. The results of the test showed that an average speed of 8.93 plus or minus 0.12 ft/sec was achieved by the capsule as it was falling through a column of water. Plotting the data revealed a very linear function with the capsules achieving terminal velocity shortly after being released. The interference of the capsule impacting the casing was not readily apparent in any of the runs, but a siginal sampling anomaly was present in one run. Because the anomaly was so brief and not present in any of the other runs, no solid conclusions could be drawn. Additional testing would be required to determine the effects of capsules impacting a fluid level that is not at surface.

  15. Partitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    flow of spring water from the high-temperature to low-temperature facies. These results suggest of depositional facies models that correlate (1) the depth, velocity, temperature, and chemistry of waterPartitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot Springs

  16. Panel 1 - comparative evaluation of deposition technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R.; Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Benson, D.K.; Pitts, R.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bhat, D.G. [GTE Valenite Corp., Troy, MI (United States); Yulin Chen [Allison Gas Turbine Division, GM, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Gat, R.; Sunkara, M.K. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Kelly, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Lawler, J.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Nagle, D.C. [Martin Marietta Labs., Baltimore, MD (United States); Outka, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Revankar, G.S. [Deere & Co., Moline, IL (United States); Subramaniam, V.V. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States); Wilbur, P.J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States); Mingshow Wong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Woolam, W.E. [Southwest Research Inst., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This working group attempted to evaluate/compare the different types of deposition techniques currently under investigation for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. A table lists the broad types of techniques that were considered for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. After some discussion, it was agreed that any evaluation of the various techniques would be dependent on the end application. Thus the next action was to list the different areas where diamond and DLC films could find applications in transportation. These application areas are listed in a table. The table intentionally does not go into great detail on applications because that subject is dealt with specifically by Panel No. 4 - Applications To Transportation. The next action concentrated on identifying critical issues or limitations that need to be considered in evaluating the different processes. An attempt was then made to rank different broad categories of deposition techniques currently available or under development based on the four application areas and the limitations. These rankings/evaluations are given for diamond and DLC techniques. Finally, the working group tried to identify critical development and research issues that need to be incorporated into developing a long-term program that focuses on diamond/DLC coatings for transportation needs. 5 tabs.

  17. Instrument Series: Deposition and Microfabrication Sputter Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensors ­ thin film growth of functional material systems for developing highly sensitive and portable chemical and biological sensors Energy sources ­ development of thin film materials systems for research and solid oxide fuel cells and solar cells for energy generation Microfabrication ­ deposition

  18. Radionuclide deposition control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA); McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  19. Solution deposition assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

  20. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  1. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Jaffe, Daniel T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, R.L. Moore Hall, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Beichman, Charles A., E-mail: crockett@lowell.edu, E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu, E-mail: naved@rice.edu, E-mail: cmj@rice.edu, E-mail: dtj@astro.as.utexas.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  2. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  3. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  4. Front Burner- Issue 15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 15 addresses the DOE eSCRM Program and Secure Online Shopping.

  5. Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R.L.

    1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release.

  6. Heavy ion fusion physics issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple systems model has been used to determine the sensitivity of the cost of electricity and the total cost of a power plant to the various uncertainties expressed in the following six issues. (1) can, at reasonable cost, an accelerator be built that puts more than 1 MJ of energy into a small 6-D phase space volume. (2) Can the beam be focused over a distance of several meters onto a small target in a reaction chamber. (3) Do present calculations adequately describe ion energy deposition. (4) Do current numerical simulations adequately describe the hydrodynamic and thermonuclear behavior of targets. (5) Can targets be cheaply mass produced. (6) Can an economical, tritium-breeding reactor be built.

  7. The Fix Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................. 5 LOST, Part III, by Lynna Bright. ......................................... 6 PHOTOGRAPH, by Ellen Morris .......................................... 14 For next issue ........................................................................ 19 V... this issue, " Gathering of the Clan," "Photograph," "Vacation," and "Hunger," but only explicit in the latter two. Two stories, "Vacation, 11 and "Priorities," deal with our episode of the issue, PLAGUE. Of our continued stories, "Hunger" ends...

  8. Ash deposit workshop: Class outline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatt, R. [Commercial Testing & Engineering Co., Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash deposits formed from the combustion of coal and other fuels have plagued the steam production industry from the start. The ash fusion test has been around for over eighty years. As steam plant size increased, so have the problems associated with ash deposits. This workshop is designed to cover: (1) The basic types of deposits. (2) Causes of deposits. (3) Analytical procedures for resolving, or at least providing information about deposits and fuels, and (4) Deposit removal and reduction techniques.

  9. Constraints on Neutrino Velocities Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunjie Huo; Tianjun Li; Yi Liao; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Yonghui Qi

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With a minimally modified dispersion relation for neutrinos, we reconsider the constraints on superluminal neutrino velocities from bremsstrahlung effects in the laboratory frame. Employing both the direct calculation approach and the virtual Z-boson approach, we obtain the generic decay width and energy loss rate of a superluminal neutrino with general energy. The Cohen-Glashow's analytical results for neutrinos with a relatively low energy are confirmed in both approaches. We employ the survival probability instead of the terminal energy to assess whether a neutrino with a given energy is observable or not in the OPERA experiment. Moreover, using our general results we perform systematical analyses on the constraints arising from the Super-Kamiokande and IceCube experiments.

  10. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A. Sethian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethian, James A.

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. We derive a relation between the true seismic velocities and the routinely

  11. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  12. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N. [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  13. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

  14. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 032 ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev.Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 0

  15. Interconnect Issues in NE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers interconnect issues in the Northeast and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  16. Local Energy Velocity of Classical Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Drozdov; A. A. Stahlhofen

    2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to apply a recently developed concept of local wave velocities to the dynamical field characteristics, especially for the canonical field energy density. It is shown that local energy velocities can be derived from the lagrangian directly. The local velocities of zero- and first- order for energy propagation has been obtained for special cases of scalar and vector fields. Some important special cases of these results are discussed.

  17. in this issue Visualising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    in this issue Visualising Evolutionary Search Spaces James McDermott Unshackling Evolution Nick just published new Master or PhD theses, if you want to let our community know how your workshop) that you wish to advertise, just drop me an email. In this issue we have a new article by James Mc

  18. NEUROCOMPUTING JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojcik, Vladimir

    NEUROCOMPUTING JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE "ARTIFICIAL BRAINS" Call for Papers Guest Editors Prof. Dr for review to a special issue of the Neurocomputing journal, on the theme of "Artificial Brains". Background, and more powerful FPGA based accelerator boards, etc. thus allowing builders of "artificial brains" more

  19. Conservation Plan Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Plan Issues: Regional Surplus Northwest Power and Conservation Council What is the Issue? · Some have expressed concern about the surplus that is included lean on the market and be fine ­ Calls into question the aggressive pursuit of conservation

  20. Asphaltenes and Waxes Do Not Interact Synergistically and Coprecipitate in Solid Organic Deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    Asphaltenes and Waxes Do Not Interact Synergistically and Coprecipitate in Solid Organic Deposits Waxes and asphaltenes are the major components in organic deposits from petroleum fluids. A key unresolved issue is whether there are significant intermolecular interactions between wax and asphaltene

  1. A PHOTOSYNTHESIS-BASED DRY DEPOSITION MODELING DEV DUTTA S. NIYOGI1, KIRAN ALAPATY2 and SETHU RAMAN1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    A PHOTOSYNTHESIS-BASED DRY DEPOSITION MODELING APPROACH DEV DUTTA S. NIYOGI1, KIRAN ALAPATY2-atmosphere interactions through photosynthesis/carbon assimilation relationships. Gas deposition velocity (Vd (SVAT) model. For this, a photosynthesis-based surface evapotranspiration and gas exchange model

  2. Field comparison of the point velocity probe with other groundwater velocity measurement methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labaky, W.; Devlin, J. F.; Gillham, R. W.

    2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Field testing of a new tool for measuring groundwater velocities at the centimeter scale, the point velocity probe (PVP), was undertaken at Canadian Forces Base, Borden, Ontario, Canada. The measurements were performed in ...

  3. Measurements of aerosol thermophoretic deposition: Transition with temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varma, A.; Tompson, R.V.; Loyalka, S.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophoresis is the motion of aerosol particles due to a temperature gradient in the suspending gas. The thermophoretic velocity V{sub T} is expressed as: where a {alpha} = thermal diffusivity v = kinematic viscosity H= Pr K Pr = Prandtl number K = dimensionless coefficient that is a function of several parameters (particle radius, thermal conductivity, gas properties, gas surface interactions). This report describes measurements of the effects of temperature gradients on the deposition of polystyrene latex particles.

  4. Cogeneration Operational Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M.

    operations. Other operational issues also include utility transmission planning, generation planning and fuel mix decisions. All of these operational problems have an impact on the ratepayer in regard to quality of electric service and future rates. Both...

  5. Southern Enclave Issue 43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , hmm? This issue brings two innovations to the pages of SE. First is the bright new mastheads by Z. P. Florian. After looking back over the past issues, I realized that we'd been using Judith Low's mastheads for nine years! Much as I love them, I... ................................... 44 Lisa Cowan ................................. 55 Gerald Crotty .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 57 Z. P. Florian ................................. 26 Mary Jo Fox ................................. 41 John Fredericks...

  6. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In summary, stoker-fired boilers that cofire or switch to biomass fuel may potentially have to deal with ash behavior issues such as production of different concentrations and quantities of fine particulate or aerosols and ash-fouling deposition. Stoker boiler operators that are considering switching to biomass and adding potential infrastructure to accommodate the switch may also at the same time be looking into upgrades that will allow for generating additional power for sale on the grid. This is the case for the feasibility study being done currently for a small (<1-MW) stoker facility at the North Dakota State Penitentiary, which is considering not only the incorporation of a lower-cost biomass fuel but also a refurbishing of the stoker boiler to burn slightly hotter with the ability to generate more power and sell excess energy on the grid. These types of fuel and boiler changes can greatly affect ash behavior issues.

  7. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country`s nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country`s economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (100 thousand pounds). Brazil`s state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced it has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (600 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) in reserves.

  8. Modeling velocity dispersion In Gypsy site, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsaadan, Sami Ibrahim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrepancies in interval velocities estimated from vertical well measurements made with different source central frequencies at Gypsy site could be primarily explained in terms of intrinsic attenuation. Four intervals ...

  9. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  10. Kraith Collected Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichtenberg, Jacqueline; Clark, Beverly

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    who followed the saga of "denonstarting," we have, this issue, the tale of T'Uriamne's midget. If you can find that typo, you might be able to figure out what it was s~~pposed to be. Something about an air car , I think. This issue will probably....ften wo.ndered hew she to.lerated it. "This drink is delicio.usly refreshing." Sarek seemed to. accept her co.mment as the terminatio.n o.f the visit. With quiet co.urtesy, he sent fer a car and had her driven heme, repeatedly assuring her that T...

  11. Deposition and Microfabrication | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. The Desert Southwest RegionInsideDeposition and

  12. 3742SPACE ISSUES AND RESOLUTION PROCEDURE Space issue or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 3742SPACE ISSUES AND RESOLUTION PROCEDURE Space issue or conflict identified Do any of the strategies mitigate issue/conflict Complete Conflict Resolution Form Submit form to Space Management Office Space Management Office conduct issue/conflict analysis Space Management Office document possible

  13. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  14. Still Flying Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the UK Page 31 : Goofs! Page 32 : Blue Sun T-Shirt Advert Page 33 : Grand Prize Quiz! Page 43 : Drinking Game Page 35 : Fan Club Questionnaire Page 36 : Thanks and Contact Issue Three February 2005 2 Nathan Fillion has...

  15. Old Friends Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From Chained to the Typewriter Press Summer 1995 Welcome to the second issue of Old Friends. This is a circuit zine. You are welcome to make a copy or to pass one on to your friends. Table of Contents Familiarity by Dee 15 pages High Stakes by Gena...

  16. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance. Cancels DOE O 5400.2. Para. 5a(2) and 5a(7) canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  17. Accelerating News Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szeberenyi, A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this spring issue, we look at developments towards higher luminosity and higher energy colliders. We report on the technology developed for the remote powering of the LHC magnets and studies of diagnostics based on higher order mode port signals. We also inform you about the main outcome of the TIARA survey on market needs for accelerator scientists.

  18. Dragonchoice Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upton, Faye

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rider in the Weyr who has issues with L’dro’s leadership, Kamen,” said C’mine. “You’re just the one who’s best placed to do something about it.” “And if Valonna can be brought round too…” C’los slapped his hands suddenly together. “We get L...

  19. of Colorado's Special Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests Special Issue 2005 Aspen Forests #12;2005 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests February 2006 The 2005 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests highlights Colorado's central mountains. Both sections of the Report underscore the need to address forest management

  20. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts: Connectors, bends anddeveloping flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In ventilation duct flow the turbulent flow profile is commonly disturbed or not fully developed and these conditions are likely to influence particle deposition to duct surfaces. Particle deposition rates at eight S-connectors, in two 90{sup o} duct bends and in two ducts where the turbulent flow profile was not fully developed were measured in a laboratory duct system with both galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle diameters of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition of particles with nominal diameters of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m was measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces. Deposition at S-connectors, in bends and in straight ducts with developing turbulence was often greater than deposition in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence for equal particle sizes, air speeds and duct surface orientations. Deposition rates at all locations were found to increase with an increase in particle size or air speed. High deposition rates at S-connectors resulted from impaction and these rates were nearly independent of the orientation of the S-connector. Deposition rates in the two 90{sup o} bends differed by more than an order of magnitude in some cases, probably because of the difference in turbulence conditions at the bend inlets. In straight steel ducts where the turbulent flow profile was developing, the deposition enhancement relative to fully developed turbulence generally increased with air speed and decreased with downstream distance from the duct inlet. This enhancement was greater at the duct ceiling and wall than at the duct floor. In insulated ducts, deposition enhancement was less pronounced overall than in steel ducts. Trends that were observed in steel ducts were present, but weaker, in insulated ducts.

  1. High-velocity clouds: a diverse phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. P. Wakker

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution the current state of knowledge about the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) is summarized. Recent progress has shown that the HVCs are a diverse phenomenon. The intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are likely to be part of a Galactic Fountain. The Magellanic Stream is a tidal remnant. HVC complex C (possibly complexes A and GCN) are low-metallicity clouds near the Galaxy; they could be remnants of the formation of the Galaxy or old tidal streams extracted from nearby dwarf galaxies. Having a substantial number of HI HVCs dispersed throughout the Local Group seems incompatible with the observed HI mass function of galaxies. Finally, FUSE finds high-velocity OVI, some of which is clearly associated with HI HVCs, but some which is not.

  2. Lagrangian reconstruction of cosmic velocity fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lavaux

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a Lagrangian reconstruction method of the velocity field from galaxy redshift catalog that takes its root in the Euler equation. This results in a ``functional'' of the velocity field which must be minimized. This is helped by an algorithm solving the minimization of cost-flow problems. The results obtained by applying this method to cosmological problems are shown and boundary effects happening in real observational cases are then discussed. Finally, a statistical model of the errors made by the reconstruction method is proposed.

  3. Sound velocity bound and neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo F. Bedaque; Andrew W. Steiner

    2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by $\\sqrt{3}$. Simple arguments support this bound in non-relativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  4. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel research studies are underway on the following interrelated and fundamental subjects; Geometrical Approach to Determining the Sticking Probability of Particles Impacting on Convex Solid Surfaces; Correlations for High Schmidt Number Particle Deposition From Dilute Flowing Rational Engineering Suspensions; Average Capture Probability of Arriving Particles Which Are Distributed With ResPect to ImPact VelocitY and Incidence Angle (Relative to Deposit Substrate); Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Vapor Infiltration of Non-isothermal Granular Deposits; Effective Area/Volume of Populations of 'MicroPorous' Aerosol Particles (Compact and 'Fractal' Quasispherical Aggregates); Effects of Radiative Heat Transfer on the Coagulation Rates of Combustion-Generated Particles; Structure-Sensitivity of Total Mass Deposition Rates from Combustion Product Streams containing Coagulation-Aged Populations of Aggregated Primary Particles; and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] Chemical Vapor Deposition From Chlorine-containing Coal-Derived Gases.

  5. Interphase Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '? 0; ia M his issue cledicated to MKRY MKNCHESTER / 6& INTERPHASE 4, a Star Trek fanzine, is edited by Connie Faddis 5731 Kentucky Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15232 Because of some adult-interest materials, this fanzine will not knowingly be sold... Mularski Becca Oroukin Celeste Henkel Mary Ann Bentz Monica Miller PRINTING Copy Cat, Inc. Forbes Ave. Pittsburgh, PA Copyright (c) May 1977 by Connie Faddis, for the contributors. INTERPHASE is an amateur publication, produced solely...

  6. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa, Namibia; (2) China; (3) South Korea, Australia, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines; (4) Yugoslavia; (5) Brazil, Argentina, Cuba; (6) India, Libya, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) France, Germany, Netherlands.

  7. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Japan; (4) Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia; (5) Argentina, Brazil; (6) India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, Libya, Iraq, Egypt; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) Belgium, Germany, United Kingdom, Netherlands, France.

  8. Still Flying Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 8 : Grand Prize Quiz! Page 9 : Snakes and Ladders Page 10 : Fan Club Questionnaire Page 11 : Thanks Issue Four April 2005 2 UK Serenity release date moved forward again! Now 7th October! Special pre... Browncoat Man He's a Browncoat Man 7 Still Flying in is offering Grand Prizes for the first two people to send in the correct answers to this quiz! First prize is a sweatshirt from last year?s Atlanta Shindig! Second prize is a Serenity Valley sow...

  9. Kraith Collected Issue 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichtenberg, Jacqueline; Multiple Contributors

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fans, there will be no new Kraith stories. For more information on how we feel about fanzines in general, please turn to "Editors are Ghouls and Cannibals". Kraith Collected continues, with this issue, it's long established policy of publishing a... new volume at least two years later than we promised. Enjoy. (~ "- Carol Lynn December 18, 1980 EDITING: Carol Lynn, Deborah Goldstein TYPING: T'Pat, Deborah Goldstein, Carol Lynn, Michelle Barney LAYOUT: Carol Lynn, Deborah Goldstein, Fred...

  10. Sputter deposition of semiconductor superlattices for thermoelectric applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, A.V.; Foreman, R.J.; Farmer, J.C.; Barbee, T.W.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical dramatic improvement of the thermoelectric properties of materials by using quantum confinement in novel semiconductor nanostructures has lead to considerable interest in the thermoelectric community. Therefore, we are exploring the critical materials issues for fabrication of quantum confined structures by magnetron sputtering in the lead telluride and bismuth telluride families of materials. We have synthesized modulated structures from thermoelectric materials with bilayer periods of as little as 3.2 nm and shown that they are stable at deposition temperatures high enough to grow quality films. Issues critical to high quality film growth have been investigated such as nucleation and growth conditions and their effect on crystal orientation and growth morphology. These investigations show that nucleating the film at a temperature below the growth temperature of optimum electronic properties produces high quality films. Our work with sputter deposition, which is inherently a high rate deposition process, builds the technological base necessary to develop economical production of these advanced materials. High deposition rate is critical since, even if efficiencies comparable with CFC based refrigeration systems can be achieved, large quantities of quantum confined materials will be necessary for cost-competitive uses.

  11. PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP By NATHAN ANDREW WEBER PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP Thesis Approved: _______________________________________ Thesis Advisor the air speed transducer mount and the Plexiglas model of the heat pump. Ipseng Iu and myself worked side

  12. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, Philip L. (Bernalillo County, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Crump, Jr., O. B. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  13. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  14. Tritium deposition patterns in TFTR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Tritium deposition patterns in TFTR Presented by C. H. Skinner with key contributions from Charles, JAERI #12;· TFTR was a limiter machine - no divertor. · Operated with tritium Nov `93 - April `97. · NetV Limiter Temperature @ 28 MW NBI Low density, high temperature edge #12;Tritium deposition patterns in TFTR

  15. Analysis of gallium arsenide deposition in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition reactor using massively parallel computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salinger, A.G.; Shadid, J.N.; Hutchinson, S.A. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical analysis of the deposition of gallium from trimethylgallium (TMG) and arsine in a horizontal CVD reactor with tilted susceptor and a three inch diameter rotating substrate is performed. The three-dimensional model includes complete coupling between fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and species transport, and is solved using an unstructured finite element discretization on a massively parallel computer. The effects of three operating parameters (the disk rotation rate, inlet TMG fraction, and inlet velocity) and two design parameters (the tilt angle of the reactor base and the reactor width) on the growth rate and uniformity are presented. The nonlinear dependence of the growth rate uniformity on the key operating parameters is discussed in detail. Efficient and robust algorithms for massively parallel reacting flow simulations, as incorporated into our analysis code MPSalsa, make detailed analysis of this complicated system feasible.

  16. No Issue Left Behind: Reducing Information Overload in Issue Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    No Issue Left Behind: Reducing Information Overload in Issue Tracking Olga Baysal DIRO Université Science University of Waterloo Waterloo, ON, Canada migod@uwaterloo.ca ABSTRACT Modern software issue-tracking tasks. Categories and Subject Descriptors D.2.2 [Software Engineering]: Design Tools

  17. Velocity measurements in the near field of a diesel fuel injector by ultrafast imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedarsky, David; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Rozé, Claude

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the velocity profile of fuel issuing from a high-pressure single-orifice diesel injector. Velocities of liquid structures were determined from time-resolved ultrafast shadow images, formed by an amplified two-pulse laser source coupled to a double-frame camera. A statistical analysis of the data over many injection events was undertaken to map velocities related to spray formation near the nozzle outlet as a function of time after start of injection. These results reveal a strong asymmetry in the liquid profile of the test injector, with distinct fast and slow regions on opposite sides of the orifice. Differences of ~100 m/s can be observed between the 'fast' and 'slow' sides of the jet, resulting in different atomization conditions across the spray. On average, droplets are dispersed at a greater distance from the nozzle on the 'fast' side of the flow, and distinct macrostructure can be observed under the asymmetric velocity conditions. The changes in structural velocity and atomization b...

  18. Turbulence Spectra from Spectral Lines: Tests of the Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chepurnov; A. Lazarian

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence is a key element of the dynamics of astrophysical fluids, including those of interstellar medium, clusters of galaxies and circumstellar regions. Turbulent motions induce Doppler shifts of observable emission and absorption lines and this motivates studies of turbulence using precision spectroscopy. We provide high resolution numerical testing of the two promising techniques, namely, Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum. We obtain an expression for the shot noise that the discretization of the numerical data entails and successfully test it. We show that numerical resolution required for recovering the underlying turbulent spectrum from observations depend on the spectral index of velocity fluctuations. Thus the low resolution testing may be misleading.

  19. Collins Mausoleum Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escobar, Joe; Hamell, Geoffrey A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to infringe upon any of the copyrights held by Dan Curtis Productions. All creative works published here are copyrighted by the original artists and writers. Requests for possible future issues and email may be sent to quentincollinsii... Century. While she still had moments of what might be taken for humanity, she was as self-absorbed as ever. She claimed to love him, and on some level, Barnabas believed she did. Her love reminded him of his father?s adoration of his treasured...

  20. Southern Enclave Issue 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISSUE 42 SUMMER 1995 CHILDREN OF THE JEDI by Barbara Hambly A Book Review by Z. P. Florian I have been waiting for this one a long time, because I am an avid fan of Hambly, and knowing her abilities and her fondness for SW, I knew she... #8) "State Dinner" by Z. P. Florian (Bright Center of the Universe #4) "Dark Calling" by Cassandra Boyle (Imperium #4) "What're You Looking At" by Nora Mayers (Who's Scruffy Lookin '?) "Alliance Avant Garde" by Susan Zahn (A Tremor in the Force #8...

  1. Skywalker Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are holding it in your hand. You will notice first off that there are no ThousandWorlds stories in this issue. They will be back with a vengeance in skywalker 5: that will cnontain Maggie Nowakowska s novel "The Battle for Rynan." (If you wonder what Maggie.... Han gently lowered the FaJcon onto the large runway. "All right, I can see the spaceport faci lities from here. Chewie, you're coming with me on a little shopping spree once we deliver those two to their meeting. This baby's in need of parts...

  2. Interstat issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the ENTERPRISE, but not females? Just what IS wrong with Lt. Mary Sue — her sex? or her success? I've read some excellent stories tagged with this label and can't figure out why I'm not supposed to enjoy them. Anyone care to elucidate? Re ST vs SW: I thought SW... be received by the 15th of the month for consideration in the next issue CONTRIBUTING STAFF: Kay Johnson "Rumors". Michele Arvizu..."There's something I've been..." Melinda Shreve..."Insight". PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: Jackie Edwards ******** STAFF ARTISTS: M...

  3. Grip Issue 51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Just rest, Mrs. McCoy." The doctor turned to McCoy and hinted that they should to to the other room. "This is serious, isn't it?" McCoy asked. The other doctor stammered, "Ebola." McCoy smiled. "Is that all? I was afraid it was something incurable." "I... get access to the ship's comuters, I can't tell how come he can't talk." Kirk mouthed a curse. McCoy grinned. "I understood that." He sovered. "The planet issued a challege to us before we beamed down, remember? 'Defeat the undefeatable, and you...

  4. Sehlat's Roar Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there is no more, We shall still hear, the silent Sehlat's Roar. —Richard' Novotney This issue is dedicated to: Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William H, Ash. Editor's Note / 3 ARTICLES A Sociopolitical Survey of the Rim Worlds - Leslie Fish 6 The Federation Zoo - Theresa... Holmes 37 FICTION bo U6 52 Vigil - Theresa Holmes Of the Essence - Amy Falkowitz .. Home is the Sailor... - Ingrid Cross Scott's Passion - Leslie Fish 57 f Marooned - Randy Ash. . 68 Rcta - Jane Aumerle ...80 The Great Invention: A Fable - Beverley Clark...

  5. Contact Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their statement, or that it has gotten in a rut, then it may be time for a re-evaluation of prior ities and a re-establishment of goals. We're excited about this issue. It contains some powerful stories guaranteed to leave you wrung out, exhausted... patiently. "The power was cross circuited through both the engines and communications and set for overload. That didn't happen by accident - there is no way those lines could have become tangled. That ship was sabotaged!" Spock 's right eyebrow lifted...

  6. Issue: September 2012

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FORRemarksHEATINGI _ _++, +++_+InverterIssue:

  7. Pastaklan Vesla Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bo KclCendrick- .6, 1-0, 19 Allan Andress- 25t^L Ginnio Reynolds- 3^i 36, 4-3 No trades for other fanzines Kathy. Bushman.* 29 Peggy Barilla- 55, 56 Steve Barnes- 73, 84, 93 CAB - Bacovcr Horta Press Issue ;"*5 Rhubarb Publication.../\\ M A?TD TH5?T THERE'S. ? . 1 - ' > ?-^WW I II i,ijw" I Friends t We cano^up with this idea and we organized it and we bought the supplies and wo typed it and we glued it together and wo printed it and we collated7 w&at we printed and...

  8. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two-Phase Studies, with a focus on heat transfer and paraffin deposition at various pipe inclinations, which will be used to enhance the paraffin deposition code for gas-liquid flow in pipes. (3) Deposition Physics and Water Impact Studies, which will address the aging process, improve our ability to characterize paraffin deposits and enhance our understanding of the role water plays in paraffin deposition in deepwater pipelines. As in the previous two studies, knowledge gained in this suite of studies will be integrated into a state-of-the-art three-phase paraffin deposition computer program.

  9. ISSUE PAPER METHANE AVOIDANCE FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    ISSUE PAPER METHANE AVOIDANCE FROM COMPOSTING An Issue Paper for the: Climate Action Reserve...........................................................................................................39 6.2. Standard Methods for Quantifying Methane from Organic Waste in Landfills...40 6.3. GHG

  10. Special Issue on Human Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijholt, Anton

    The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

  11. Transmission Issues Policy Steering Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Business Practices CommitteesTeams Joint Operating Committee Transmission Issues Policy Steering Committee Customer Training Interconnection Notices Rates Standards of...

  12. 3D REGULARIZED VELOCITY FROM 3D DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    3D REGULARIZED VELOCITY FROM 3D DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer Dept, Ontario, M3H 5T4 Paul.Joe@ec.gc.ca ABSTRACT The recent availability of sequences of 3D Doppler radial velocity datasets provides sufficient information to estimate the 3D velocity of Doppler storms. We present

  13. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

    2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times. We obtained {approx}1500 absolute P and S arrival times and {approx}3200 P and S wave arrival time differences. Event locations do not change greatly when 3D velocity structure is included. Three-dimensional velocity structure, where resolvable, does not differ greatly from our optimized 1D model, indicating that the improved 1D model is adequate for routine event location. Finally, we calculated moment magnitudes, MW, for nearly 155 events using the coda magnitude technique of Mayeda et al., (2003). The fact that most of the relocated events occur below the known sedimentary structures extending to 7 km suggests that they are tectonic in origin. Shallow events within the sedimentary crust in the (southern) Minagish region may be related to oil field activities, although the current study cannot unambiguously determine the source of current seismicity in Kuwait. The improved velocity model reduces the scatter of travel time residuals relative to the locations reported in the KNSN bulletin and may be used for ground motion prediction and hazard estimate studies in Kuwait.

  14. Velocity coordinate spectrum: geometrical aspects of observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chepurnov; A. Lazarian

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a technique of obtaining turbulence power spectrum using spectral line data along the velocity coordinate, which we refer to as Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS). We formalize geometrical aspects of observation through a single factor, "geometric term". We find that all variety of particular observational configurations can be described using correspondent variants of this term, which we explicitly calculate. This allows us to obtain asymptotics for both parallel lines of sight and crossing lines of sight. The latter case is especially important for studies of turbulence within diffuse ISM in Milky Way. For verification of our results, we use direct calculation of VCS spectra, while the numerical simulations are presented in a companion paper.

  15. Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Ian

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many biologically active materials are transported as bioaerosols 1-10 {micro}m in diameter. These particles can deposit on cooling and heating coils and lead to serious indoor air quality problems. This paper investigates several of the mechanisms that lead to aerosol deposition on fin and tube heat exchangers. A model has been developed that incorporates the effects of several deposition mechanisms, including impaction, Brownian and turbulent diffusion, turbophoresis, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and gravitational settling. The model is applied to a typical range of air velocities that are found in commercial and residential HVAC systems 1 - 6 m/s (200 - 1200 ft/min), particle diameters from 1 - 8 {micro}m, and fin spacings from 3.2 - 7.9 fins/cm (8 - 16 fins/inch or FPI). The results from the model are compared to results from an experimental apparatus that directly measures deposition on a 4.7 fins/cm (12 FPI) coil. The model agrees reasonably well with this measured data and suggests that cooling coils are an important sink for biological aerosols and consequently a potential source of indoor air quality problems.

  16. Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozer, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R A T O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings NilgunUC-1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings NilgunPaper Sol-gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

  17. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

  18. Ash & pulverized coal deposition in combustors & gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, G.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the period of April 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995, a computational model for simulating particle motions turbulent flow condition is developed. The model was applied to the analysis of particle transport and deposition processes in a circular duct and in a plane recirculating region. The mean gas velocity and turbulence intensity fields were first estimated using the available experimental data, as well as those obtained from an earlier developed CFD code. A model for evaluating particle deposition rate in the presence of gravitational and electrical forces in turbulent flows was also formulated. Results concerning the deposition velocity of particles under various conditions were obtained. It was shown that the model predictions are in good agreement with the available experimental and digital simulation data. Experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition rate is also initiated.

  19. Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozer, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials, Elsevier, .O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

  20. Linked Deposit Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Linked Deposit Program provides loan financing for small businesses of up to $100,000 for up to 7 years. The State Investment Commission invests funds from the state's Abandoned Property Cash...

  1. Seasonalepisodic control of acid deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the climatological, technical and economic factors for episodic and seasonal control of emissions in existing power plants. Analyzing a large data set of acid deposition for the years 1982-85, we find ...

  2. Asphalt deposition in miscible floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan, Syed Mir Ahmed

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. . 22 23 8. REFERENCES. 24 9. APPENDIX. 26 LIST OF TABLES Table Page I II IV Properties of the Crude Oils Studied Average Core Properties for Different Tests Average Perrneabilities of Different Sections of Core Before and After... Displacement with Liquefied Petroleum Gas Percent Reduction in Permeability in Different Sections of Core Due to Asphalt Deposition Average Recoveries of Four Crude Oils and Increase in Swept Area due to Plugging by Asphalt Deposition 27 29 ABSTRACT...

  3. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  4. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  5. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocher, Jr., John M. (Columbus, OH); Veigel, Neil D. (Columbus, OH); Landrigan, Richard B. (Columbus, OH)

    1983-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  6. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. E. Guiseppe; S. R. Elliott; A. Hime; K. Rielage; S. Westerdale

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly Rn-222) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of Pb-210 on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  7. Impact of boundaries on velocity profiles in bubble rafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuhong Wang; Kapilanjan Krishan; Michael Dennin

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under conditions of sufficiently slow flow, foams, colloids, granular matter, and various pastes have been observed to exhibit shear localization, i.e. regions of flow coexisting with regions of solid-like behavior. The details of such shear localization can vary depending on the system being studied. A number of the systems of interest are confined so as to be quasi-two dimensional, and an important issue in these systems is the role of the confining boundaries. For foams, three basic systems have been studied with very different boundary conditions: Hele-Shaw cells (bubbles confined between two solid plates); bubble rafts (a single layer of bubbles freely floating on a surface of water); and confined bubble rafts (bubbles confined between the surface of water below and a glass plate on top). Often, it is assumed that the impact of the boundaries is not significant in the ``quasi-static limit'', i.e. when externally imposed rates of strain are sufficiently smaller than internal kinematic relaxation times. In this paper, we directly test this assumption for rates of strain ranging from $10^{-3}$ to $10^{-2} {\\rm s^{-1}}$. This corresponds to the quoted quasi-static limit in a number of previous experiments. It is found that the top plate dramatically alters both the velocity profile and the distribution of nonlinear rearrangements, even at these slow rates of strain.

  8. On the Velocity and Intensity Line Asymmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gabriel

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that, if solar 5 min. oscillations are excited by convection in the upper layers of the convective envelope, it is impossible to explain the opposite line asymmetries observed in the velocity and intensity spectra with assumptions on the dissipations which reduce the problem to a second order one. The interpretation of that observation requires to solve the full non-adiabatic problem which is of the fourth or sixth order. We also analyze the causes of line asymmetries in the frame of the general problem and we show that to locate the source, it is better to study line asymmetries not too far from line centers.

  9. Dark Matters Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . they went dn tolri I :!eek ol.tt ne{ xh?.e no m6fi exp lore new for*EtE, ttr ronts , to bdldly hrewh?< b.?wEd beFore iE gLrarrinteed to laEt no an hllur i:r y6ur riext mug .enEors b!rrred oirt From prior Cahage The Vedet!a betrame l13st, and wors$ tu.... New in?luCeq qIiStIys),mbio1, Pius we hE'/e e n--w -scruitrerl l,l e al so have a new calumn call ed lSoepbox". Wh,-re y.u can air y-ur vie*G anLi oFi iefls etrou! Klin!nn 3nd cl.ub relaEed issues, l"l y articlE nn he batlh Qu' or Honor Que$t fc a...

  10. Calculations of turbidite deposits and tsunamis from submarine landslides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gisler, Galen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gittings, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great underwater landslides like Storegga off the Norwegian coast leave massive deposits on the seafloor and must produce enormous tsunamis. Such events have occurred on continental slopes worldwide, and continue to do so. Triggers for such slides include earthquakes, gas hydrate releases, and underwater volcanos. We have petformed a numerical study of such landslides using the multi-material compressible hydrocode Sage in order to understand the relationship between the rheology of the slide material, the configuration of the resulting deposits on the seafloor, and the tsunami that is produced. Instabilities in the fluid-fluid mixing between slide material and seawater produce vortices and swirls with sizes that depend on the rheology of the slide material. These dynamical features of the flow may be preserved as ridges when the sliding material finally stops. Thus studying the configuration of the ridges in prehistoric slides may give us measures of the circumstances under which the slide was initiated. As part of this study, we have also done a convergence test showing that the slide velocity is sensitive to the resolution adopted in the simulation, but that extrapolation to infinite resolution is possible, and can yield good velocities. We will present two-dimensional simulations of schematic underwater slides for our study of rheology, and a three-dimensional simulation in bathymetric conditions that resemble the pre-Storegga Norwegian margin.

  11. Smart-Grid Security Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khurana, Himanshu; Hadley, Mark D.; Lu, Ning; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    TITLE: Smart-Grid Security Issues (Editorial Material, English) IEEE SECURITY & PRIVACY 8 (1). JAN-FEB 2010. p.81-85 IEEE COMPUTER SOC, LOS ALAMITOS

  12. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE DEDICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue is dedicated to the heroes and professionals who helped protect the world from nuclear disasters and to those who were displaced by these catastrophes.

  13. The Systemic Velocity of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectra of molecular hydrogen in the Homunculus nebula allow for the first direct measurement of the systemic velocity of Eta Carinae. Near-infrared long-slit data for H2 1-0 S(1) lambda 21218 obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer on the Gemini South telescope give Vsys=-8.1pm1 km/s (heliocentric), or VLSR=-19.7pm1 km/s, from the average of the near and far sides of the Homunculus. This measurement considerably improves the precision for the value of -7pm10 km/s inferred from neighboring O-type stars in the Carina nebula. New near-infrared spectra also provide a high-resolution line profile of [Fe II] lambda 16435 emission from gas condensations known as the Weigelt objects without contamination from the central star, revealing a line shape with complex kinematic structure. Previously, uncertainty in the Weigelt knots' kinematics was dominated by the adopted systemic velocity of Eta Car.

  14. Orthogonal-Phase-Velocity Propagation of Electromagnetic Plane Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom G. Mackay; Akhlesh Lakhtakia

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In an isotropic, homogeneous, nondissipative, dielectric-magnetic medium that is simply moving with respect to an inertial reference frame, planewave solutions of the Maxwell curl postulates can be such that the phase velocity and the time-averaged Poynting vector are mutually orthogonal. Orthogonal-phase-velocity propagation thus adds to the conventional positive-phase-velocity propagation and the recently discovered negative-phase-velocity propagation that is associated with the phenomenon of negative refraction.

  15. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, G.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the period of January 1, 1995 to March 31, 1995, further progress was made on the analysis of particle transport and deposition processes in a circular duct and in a plane recirculating region. The experimental data for the mean velocity and turbulence intensity fields, as well as those obtained from the STARPIC-RATE code were used in these simulations. A physical-based model for evaluating particle deposition rate in the presence of gravitational and electrical forces in turbulent flows was also formulated. Experimental study of particle transport and deposition rate is also initiated.

  16. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

  17. LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

  18. On Approximating the Translational Velocity of Vortex Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    from this configuration and the system scaling. Here, the accuracy of this approximation is presented orifice in a flat plate contain a converging radial component of velocity. For both configurations. By this definition, the piston velocity is the average jet velocity passing through the orifice independent

  19. RISO-M-2438 Dry deposition and resuspension of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deposition to city surfaces. INIS descriptors AEROSOLS; DEPOSITION; DUSTS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PARTICLE

  20. Experimental Determination of ETS Particle Deposition in a Low Ventilation Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, M.; Nematollahi, M.; Sextro, R.G.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deposition on indoor surfaces is an important removal mechanism for tobacco smoke particles. We report measurements of deposition rates of environmental tobacco smoke particles in a room-size chamber. The deposition rates were determined from the changes in measured concentrations by correcting for the effects of coagulation and ventilation. The air flow turbulent intensity parameter was determined independently by measuring the air velocities in the chamber. Particles with diameters smaller than 0.25 {micro}m coagulate to form larger particles of sizes between 0.25-0.5 {micro}m. The effect of coagulation on the particles larger than 0.5 {micro}m was found to be negligible. Comparison between our measurements and calculations using Crump and Seinfeld's theory showed smaller measured deposition rates for particles from 0.1 to 0.3 {micro}m in diameter and greater measured deposition rates for particles larger than 0.6 {micro}m at three mixing intensities. Comparison of Nazaroff and Cass model for natural convection flow showed good agreement with the measurements for particles larger than 0.1 {micro}m in diameter, however, measured deposition rates exceeded model prediction by a factor of approximately four for particles in size range 0.05-0.1 {micro}m diameter. These results were used to predict deposition of sidestream smoke particles on interior surfaces. Calculations predict that in 10 hours after smoking one cigarette, 22% of total sidestream particles by mass will deposit on interior surfaces at 0.03 air change per hour (ACH), 6% will deposit at 0.5 ACH, and 3% will deposit at 1 ACH.

  1. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) - State Issues &...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) - State Issues & Approaches Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) - State Issues & Approaches Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds...

  2. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Laia, Jr., Joseph R. (Los Alamos, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  3. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY ISSUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH THE KLAMATH HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT Kevin OF ENERGY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH THE KLAMATH HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT Summary As requested by the California Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 2082). Staff's assessment indicates that, from the perspective of potential

  4. Conservation Issues Raised for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Issues Raised for the Sixth Power Plan Power Committee Web Meeting June 30, 2009 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Conservation Targets · Problem ­ Are 5-Year conservation targets too high? · Issue for Bonneville and the Public Utilities ­ Are targets being driven

  5. Renewable Energy Issues Rangan Banerjee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    in Energy Options 2005 at Mumbai, March 23, 2005 #12;Issues #1 Sustainability #2 Access to Rural Poor Energy Services & Quality of Life 56% rural households (78 million) 112,400 villages unelectrifiedRenewable Energy Issues Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems Engineering IIT Bombay Talk delivered

  6. Inside this issue: Cultivating Cumberland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Authority, will sponsor Household Hazardous Waste and Electronics Recycling Days this year. Residents mayInside this issue: Cultivating Cumberland May - 2012 VOL. 17, ISSUE 5 Household Hazardous Waste Attachments: USDA-Ag Statistics Press Release NRCS Organic Initiative Applica- tions News Release

  7. Force-velocity relations for multiple molecular motor transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ziqing

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition rate model of cargo transportation by N effective molecular motors is proposed. Under the assumption of steady state, the force-velocity curve of multi-motor system can be derived from the force-velocity curve of single motor. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor number, which is dependent on the single motor force-velocity curve. And most commonly, the velocity decreases. This gives a possible explanation to some recent experimental observations.

  8. Force-velocity relations for multiple-molecular-motor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziqing Wang; Ming Li

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition rate model of cargo transport by $N$ molecular motors is proposed. Under the assumption of steady state, the force-velocity curve of multi-motor system can be derived from the force-velocity curve of single motor. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor number, which is dependent on the single motor force-velocity curve. And most commonly, the velocity decreases. This gives a possible explanation to some recent

  9. Myths and Value in the Deposit of ETDs: A Final Teachable Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, David

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation given on March 1, 2013 to Texas Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Association (TxETDA) meeting at Texas A&M University. The presentation addresses the issue surrounding the choices made by student in access upon deposit of their thesis...

  10. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  11. This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 6770

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 6770, the residual velocity and thus the loss of kinetic energy of the projec- tile. After impact, the residual and residual deformation and without perforation. Targets are mostly AA5086-H111 aluminum thin plates (from 2

  12. Continued Evaluation of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 12518

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will be governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. In 2010 Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to accurately identify critical velocities in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of >50 micrometers. In 2011 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated to identify critical velocities for slurries containing fast-settling, high-density particles with a mean particle diameter of <15 micrometers. This two-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  13. Method to inhibit deposit formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickakian, G.B.

    1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for inhibiting deposit formation on the contact surfaces of structures confining heated hydrocarbon fluid which exhibits substantial fouling. The process consists of introducing into the hydrocarbon fluid at least an inhibiting amount of thiophene-containing polycondensed aromatic/naphthenic compounds of number average molecular weight (M-bar n) from 200 to 1,000.

  14. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During this third quarter of Grant DE-FG22-86 PC 90756, we have obtained preliminary experimental results on the deposition behavior of submicron and supermicron solid particles (MgO, Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) on a two-dimensional surface exposed to a high temperature/velocity particle laden'' atmospheric pressure jet. The uniform velocity ( plug flow'') jet, with temperatures up to about 1520 K, derives from a pressurized gaseous fuel microcombustion chamber (110 cc) equipped with a platinum guiding (exit) channel. Particles were generated by several methods (Berglund-Liu type aerosol generator, ultrasonic nebulizer, or syringe feeder with aerodynamic particle off-take) and were introduced into the combustion chamber with a carrier stream of nitrogen or air. Laser light scattering and reflectivity techniques were used for the study of particle deposition, supplemented by post-mortem microscopy on the exposed surface. We observed a linear deposition rate of submicron particles due to the thermophoretic mechanism (until the first layer was developed) under both high and low velocity conditions. On the contrary, supermicron particle deposits reach a steady-state, evidently due to a dynamic equilibrium between particle deposition and dislodging caused by the impacting particles. At several temperatures particle-free subsonic gas jets (up to 120 m/sec) were unable to remove the submicron particle layer.

  15. An insitu borescopic quantitative imaging profiler for the measurement of high concentration sediment velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowen, Edwin A.; Dudley, Russell D.; Liao, Qian; Variano, Evan A.; Liu, Philip L.-F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of high concentration sediment velocity Edwin A. Cowen •instantaneous velocity in high sediment concentration ?ows,point reveals the sheet ?ow sediment velocities to be highly

  16. No Holds Barred Issue 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindar; The Captain

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    is all HolmesA/Vatson, with two novellas and several short stories. # 9 is Multimedia Slash, and includes stories featuring "Forever Knight", "Miami Vice", "Eroica", 'Wild Wild West", "UFO", "My Own Private Idaho" and "Riptide". Future issues: # 10...

  17. Future Fuels: Issues and Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    R Y S L E R G R O U P Fuel Quality Issues * Cetane * Lubricity * Aromatics * Sulfur * Biodiesel - adequate quality standards needed * GTL, CTL, and BTL -- The Future 9142005 2 C...

  18. Ethical issues in human experimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrmann, Marlene

    of biomedical research ­ Both experimental/basic ­ And clinical · Originally problems more in medical ethics ­ Abortion ­ Euthanasia ­ Reproductive technologies Neuroethics · Ethical issues in enhancement

  19. Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

  20. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  1. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Brodeur, Pierre H. (Smyrna, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  2. True Masses of Radial-Velocity Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the science power of space telescopes used to estimate the true masses of known radial-velocity exoplanets by means of astrometry on direct images. We translate a desired mass accuracy (+/10% in our example) into a minimum goal for the signal-to-noise ratio, which implies a minimum exposure time. When the planet is near a node, the mass measurement becomes difficult if not impossible, because the apparent separation becomes decoupled from the inclination angle of the orbit. The combination of this nodal effect with considerations of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, and image blurring due to orbital motion, severely limits the observing opportunities, often to only brief intervals in a five-year mission. We compare the science power of four missions, two with external star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, and two with internal coronagraphs, EXO-C and WFIRST-C. The star shades out-perform the coronagraph in this science program by about a factor of th...

  3. Essays on Banking Crises and Deposit Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wen-Yao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and elaborately illustrated the role of market discipline under deposit insurance. Barajas and Steiner (2000) show the ability of the Colombian deposit insurance system to limit moral hazard when considering market discipline. Demirguc-Kunt and Huizinga (2004...

  4. Formation mechanisms of combustion chamber deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Christopher J. (Christopher John)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion chamber deposits are found in virtually all internal combustion engines after a few hundred hours of operation. Deposits form on cylinder, piston, and head surfaces that are in contact with fuel-air mixture ...

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Ylva Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

  6. Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

  7. Structural characterization of carbonaceous engine deposits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto da Costa, José Mário Cerqueira

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous engine deposits tend to accumulate on most of the inner surfaces of the car engine. The presence of these deposits leads to a deteriorated efficiency of the engine and a number of adverse effects, such as ...

  8. Bibliography on transmission access issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lankford, C.B. [Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co., Oklahoma City, OK (United States); McCalley, J.D. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Saini, N.K. [Entergy Services Corp., Metairie, LA (United States)] [Entergy Services Corp., Metairie, LA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a bibliography on issues related to transmission access in electric power systems. There are 233 citations referenced in this bibliography. This bibliography presents a collection of selected literature on issues related to transmission access. It does not contain all of the material available on this subject or the categories contained herein. Some readers may feel that citations within this bibliography should be strictly limited to transmission system issues and not include energy pricing or reliability issues. However, it was the decision of the Subcommittee of the IEEE Task Force on Transmission Access and Nonutility Generation that selected entries relating to reliability and energy pricing, most relevant to transmission access, should be included. This decision was made because certain issues relating to reliability, transmission and energy pricing are perceived by the industry to be critical in the discussion of transmission access. The bibliography has been divided into the following sections or sub-sections: 2.0 Operational (Engineering) Issues, 3.0 Planning, 4.0 Reliability, 5.1 Economics: Costing, 5.2(a) Economics: Location-Differentiated Pricing, 5.2(b) Economics: Time-Differentiated Pricing, 5.3 Economics: Brokering, Bidding, and Auctioning, 6.0 Regulatory, and 7.0 General. Although the content of many publications spanned two or more of these sections, the desire to limit document length required that all publications be placed in the single most appropriate section. Publications are sorted according to author or publication resource.

  9. Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

  10. The Polar Deposits of Mars Shane Byrne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellinek, Mark

    - tian polar layered deposits and understanding the role of the residual ice caps that cover them of the stratigraphy of the polar layered deposits in unprecedented detail. Additionally, change within the residualThe Polar Deposits of Mars Shane Byrne Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona

  11. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  12. P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from local earthquake...

  13. A novel photonic Doppler velocimetry for transverse velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Guanghua; Wang Detian; Liu Jun; Meng Jianhua; Liu Shouxian; Yang Qingguo [Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-109, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber interferometry for transverse velocity measurement has been developed. This diagnostic is similar to photonic Doppler velocimetry in the way in which laser propagates and couples. The interferometer mainly consists of a fiber coupler, an emitting probe, and two receiving probes. A pair of scattered laser beams mix in the coupler and generates fringes with frequency proportional to transverse velocity. Measurement of transverse velocity is independent of longitudinal velocity. The feasibility of the technique has been verified by rotating wheel experiment and shock loading experiment.

  14. Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption. Abstract: We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on...

  15. Modified definition of group velocity and electromagnetic energy conservation equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical definition of group velocity has two flaws: (a) the group velocity can be greater than the phase velocity in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; (b) the definition is not consistent with the principle of relativity for a plane wave in a moving isotropic uniform medium. To remove the flaws, a modified definition is proposed. A criterion is set up to identify the justification of group velocity definition. A "superluminal power flow" is constructed to show that the electromagnetic energy conservation equation cannot uniquely define the power flow if the principle of Fermat is not taken into account.

  16. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  17. USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  18. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface Geologic and Hydrologic Structure Within the Coso...

  19. Effective velocities in fractured media: a numerical study using the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    and precise numerical study of effective velocities in fractured structures. ... In this paper, we ..... A final result is that our numerical simulations of P-, SV- and.

  20. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay R. Gunderson; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early with biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the boiler, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value, which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior.

  1. Deposition

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    it as simple as possible. So that when 123 13 comes into effect, then the Secretary of Energy, with 14 the concurrence of the State Department and consulting 15 with the other...

  2. Deposition

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational NuclearhasAdministration77 SandiaGuidance to8/08/2012Reporting Company

  3. Nonlinear peculiar-velocity analysis and PCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekel, A. [and others

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We allow for nonlinear effects in the likelihood analysis of peculiar velocities, and obtain {approximately}35%-lower values for the cosmological density parameter and for the amplitude of mass-density fluctuations. The power spectrum in the linear regime is assumed to be of the flat {Lambda}CDM model (h = 0:65, n = 1) with only {Omega}{sub m} free. Since the likelihood is driven by the nonlinear regime, we break the power spectrum at k{sub b} {approximately} 0.2 (h{sup {minus}1} Mpc){sup {minus}1} and fit a two-parameter power-law at k > k{sub b} . This allows for an unbiased fit in the linear regime. Tests using improved mock catalogs demonstrate a reduced bias and a better fit. We find for the Mark III and SFI data {Omega}{sub m} = 0.35 {+-} 0.09 with {sigma}{sub 8}{Omega}P{sub m}{sup 0.6} = 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (90% errors). When allowing deviations from {Lambda}CDM, we find an indication for a wiggle in the power spectrum in the form of an excess near k {approximately} 0.05 and a deficiency at k {approximately} 0.1 (h{sup {minus}1} Mpc){sup {minus}1}--a cold flow which may be related to a feature indicated from redshift surveys and the second peak in the CMB anisotropy. A {chi}{sup 2} test applied to principal modes demonstrates that the nonlinear procedure improves the goodness of fit. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) helps identifying spatial features of the data and fine-tuning the theoretical and error models. We address the potential for optimal data compression using PCA.

  4. Political connections, bank deposits, and formal deposit insurance: Evidence from an emerging economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Political connections, bank deposits, and formal deposit insurance: Evidence from an emerging the impact of banks' political connections on their ability to collect deposits under two different deposit, regardless of their type (state-owned or private entities), politically connected banks are able to attract

  5. Front Burner - Issue 18 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Front Burner - Issue 18 Front Burner - Issue 18 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 18 addresses keeping kids safe on the Internet, cyber crime, and DOE Cyber awareness and...

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berkman, Samuel (Florham Park, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  7. Development of Lithium Deposition Techniques for TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, J.; Johnson, D.; Kugel, H.W.; Labik, G.; Lemunyan, G.; et al

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to increase the quantity of lithium deposition into TFTR beyond that of the Pellet Injector while minimizing perturbations to the plasma provides interesting experimental and operational options. Two additional lithium deposition tools were developed for possible application during the 1996 Experimental Schedule: a solid lithium target probe for real-time deposition, and a lithium effusion oven for deposition between discharges. The lithium effusion oven was operated in TFTR to deposit lithium on the Inner Limiter in the absence of plasma. This resulted in the third highest power TFTR discharge.

  8. Development of lithium deposition techniques for TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugel, H.W.; Gorman, J.; Johnson, D.; Labik, G.; Lemunyan, G.; Mansfield, D.; Timberlake, J.; Vocaturo, M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to increase the quantity of lithium deposition into TFTR beyond that of the Pellet Injector while minimizing perturbations to the plasma provides interesting experimental and operational options. Two additional lithium deposition tools were developed for possible application during the 1996 Experimental Schedule: a solid lithium target probe for real-time deposition, and a lithium effusion oven for deposition between discharges. The lithium effusion oven was operated in TFTR to deposit lithium on the Inner Limiter in the absence of plasma. This resulted in the third highest power TFTR discharge.

  9. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    combining the material balance equation with the diffusivitya material (and energy balance) balance equation that allows

  10. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum System (TPS), including hydrocarbon source rocks (source-rock type and maturation and hydrocarbon generation

  11. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    require some form of artificial lift (typically gas lift forGH development will require artificial lift such as electriclow pressure at surface. Artificial lift will be required to

  12. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. , Yokoi, K. 2008. Resource assessment of methane hydrategoal because other resource assessment studies in northerntargets. Since 2008, resource assessment of GH in this mode

  13. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Mexico, http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/of Mexico, http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil- gas/

  14. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gas Price ($/Mscf) for Offshore Gas Hydrate StudyEvaluation of deepwater gas-hydrate systems. The Leadingfor Gas Production from Gas Hydrates Reservoirs. J. Canadian

  15. Department of Energy Issues Funding Opportunity Announcements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Issues Funding Opportunity Announcements to Enhance Nuclear Energy Education Department of Energy Issues Funding Opportunity Announcements to Enhance Nuclear Energy Education March...

  16. Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Issues Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification...

  17. Front Burner - Issue 13 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Front Burner - Issue 13 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 13 contained a message from the Associate Chief Information Officer (ACIO) for Cybersecurity informing readers...

  18. Front Burner - Issue 14 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4 Front Burner - Issue 14 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 14 addresses the 2013 National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) Campaign and Phishing Scams. Cybersecurity...

  19. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  20. Comparing Glider Observed Velocities and Geostrophic Currents Regina Yopak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    offshore and brings cold, deep water to fill it's place. The upwelling regime creates a unique coastal. This project endeavors to compare calculated geostrophic velocities to the water velocities measured which the net vertical volume of water is transferred 90° to the right which forces warm, surface waters

  1. Determination of hydrogen cluster velocities and comparison with numerical calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Täschner, A.; Köhler, E.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Khoukaz, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of powerful hydrogen cluster jet targets in storage ring experiments led to the need of precise data on the mean cluster velocity as function of the stagnation temperature and pressure for the determination of the volume density of the target beams. For this purpose a large data set of hydrogen cluster velocity distributions and mean velocities was measured at a high density hydrogen cluster jet target using a trumpet shaped nozzle. The measurements have been performed at pressures above and below the critical pressure and for a broad range of temperatures relevant for target operation, e.g., at storage ring experiments. The used experimental method is described which allows for the velocity measurement of single clusters using a time-of-flight technique. Since this method is rather time-consuming and these measurements are typically interfering negatively with storage ring experiments, a method for a precise calculation of these mean velocities was needed. For this, the determined mean cluster velocities are compared with model calculations based on an isentropic one-dimensional van der Waals gas. Based on the obtained data and the presented numerical calculations, a new method has been developed which allows to predict the mean cluster velocities with an accuracy of about 5%. For this two cut-off parameters defining positions inside the nozzle are introduced, which can be determined for a given nozzle by only two velocity measurements.

  2. A laser Doppler method for noninvasive measurement of flow velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, G.L.

    1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Doppler velocimetry is a powerful optical technique for noninvasively obtaining experimental flow-velocity data. This paper describes the principle of operation and various optical configurations of the laser Doppler velocimeter. As a sample application, we describe an experimental apparatus for measuring the velocity flow field around a cylinder, and give our experimental results.

  3. Tsallis Entropy Based Velocity Distribution in Open Channel Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Hao

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................. 94 32 Dimensionless velocity distribution and parameter M ............................... 96 33 um/ umax versus various M ........................................................................... 99 34 Upper Tiber River basin with location... velocity distribution with different m ... 68 9 Computation of M, ?1 and ?V based on um and umax measured on the Po river (Italy) for different verticals at Pontelagoscuro gauged section during flood event that occurred on February 2, 1985...

  4. October 2011 SDI FEP Issues Heat Conduction Issues (HC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a thermal dam and EPA is looking for information to address the issue. Heat Effects on Host Rock Properties (HRP) Clay Seams SDI-(HRP) -1 What are the expected effects of a 300o C temperature source on the clay source on the anhydrite layer properties? Background: There has been significant effort to incorporate

  5. Scanning the Issue Special Issue on Energy Infrastructure Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    natural disasters and physical attacks have long been recognized. In 1990, the Office of Tech- nology to absolutely defend. The report on the northeastern blackout of August 2003 by the U.S.­Canada Power System Assessment (OTA) of the U.S. Congress issued a detailed report, Physical Vulnerability of the Electric System

  6. Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and. 4) development of dry deposition formulations applicable to urban areas. Also to improve dry deposition modeling capabilities, atmospheric dispersion models in which the dry deposition formulations are imbedded need better source-term plume initialization and improved in-plume treatment of particle growth processes. Dry deposition formulations used in current models are largely inapplicable to the complex urban environment. An improved capability is urgently needed to provide surface-specific information to assess local exposure hazard levels in both urban and non-urban areas on roads, buildings, crops, rivers, etc. A model improvement plan is developed with a near-term and far-term component. Despite some conceptual limitations, the current formulations for particle deposition based on a resistance approach have proven to provide reasonable dry deposition simulations. For many models with inadequate dry deposition formulations, adding or improving a resistance approach will be the desirable near-term update. Resistance models however are inapplicable aerodynamically very rough surfaces such as urban areas. In the longer term an improved parameterization of dry deposition needs to be developed that will be applicable to all surfaces, and in particular urban surfaces.

  7. Cosmic Particle Acceleration: Basic Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Jones

    2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmic-rays are ubiquitous, but their origins are surprisingly difficult to understand. A review is presented of some of the basic issues common to cosmic particle accelerators and arguments leading to the likely importance of diffusive shock acceleration as a general explanation. The basic theory of diffusive shock acceleration is outlined, followed by a discussion of some of the key issues that still prevent us from a full understanding of its outcomes. Some recent insights are mentioned at the end that may help direct ultimate resolution of our uncertainties.

  8. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,lderney Street, London SWW 4EZ (Mail order only) STl~R TREK GIANT POST BOOK 3 - 16 50p each (post'"ge 10p for 1st mage + 5p for each subseQuent issue. Subscription (12 issues) - ?7.50 THEK UNIFOH:lfJ SHIHTS. W;ade to measure. Nylon velvet complete... SlJD for details and list your favouri tee. Oldfield BroVl, 1.1 trincham, Cheshire, WLI4 4JG Dl.VID Ci.RRi.:DINE & others" Huth Inglis, 33 West Ave., Would anyone be willing to record Danny La Rue off the TV for me and also take photographs. He...

  9. Key Issues | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DC 20585on253.16582104)Key Issues Key Issues

  10. APS User News, Issue 85

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPSAPS50 -Issue 60 (2.19) -Issue5,

  11. APS User News, Issue 86

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPSAPS50 -Issue 60 (2.19) -Issue5,6,

  12. APS User News, Issue 87

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPSAPS50 -Issue 60 (2.19) -Issue5,6,7,

  13. TREKiSM Issue 45

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for notification of price and avai labi I ltv; if you've purchased a Tal before, you'l I 102 automatically receive a postcard announcement. TREKisM at Length VI I wi I I be a retrospective of stories by Karen Hunter, due sometime in 1986, probably the summer... Vol. 8, No.6 My thanks to al I of you who sent hoi iday greetings -- we were a bit distracted getting our latest zine ready for mal I lng, hence the lateness of this issue of TREKlsM. We can warn you ahead of time that issue 46/47 wi I I be a...

  14. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, G.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During this quarter, further progress has been made in accomplishing the objectives of the project. The computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows has been further developed. The model was applied to the analysis of particle transport and deposition processes in a circular duct and in a plane recirculating region. A model for evaluating particle deposition rate in the presence of gravitational and electrical forces in turbulent flows formulated. Results concerning the deposition velocity of particles under various conditions were obtained. It is shown that the model predictions are in good agreement with the available experimental and digital simulation data. Experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition rate is also being planned.

  15. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  16. A comparison of light and velocity variations in Semiregular variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lebzelter; L. L. Kiss; K. H. Hinkle

    2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    NIR velocity variations are compared with simultaneous visual light curves for a sample of late-type semiregular variables (SRV). Precise radial velocity measurements are also presented for the SRV V450 Aql. Our aim is to investigate the nature of the irregular light changes found in these variables. Light and velocity variations are correlated in all stars of our sample. Based on these results we discuss several possibilities to explain the observed behavior. We find that pulsation is responsible for large amplitude variations. In a recent paper Lebzelter (1999) invoked large convective cells to understand observed velocity variations. This possibility is discussed with respect to the observed correlation between light and velocity changes. In the light of these results we investigate the origin of the semiregular variations.

  17. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  18. Silica Deposition | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,Pvt LtdShrub Oak, New York:Siemens°SilescentDeposition

  19. Issue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/SurfacePump-Testing SignIon MobilityImpact

  20. Scholarly Communications In this issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    Library recently removed the search box from the library website. Faculty and students discover library, suggestions for topics to address in the SC Digest, and information to include in the Digest. Contact Denise Did You Know? This issue of the SC Digest shares news of CMU's endorsement of two important

  1. Current Issue June 10, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Current Issue June 10, 2009 Vol. 109, No. 15 LETTERS CLASS NOTES MEMORIALS ALUMNI PROFILES SEARCH > Alum's startup company bets on Princeton research Alum's startup company bets on Princeton research materials-science innovation into a promising startup company. John Lettow '95, president and co

  2. Contact Issue 5&6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fandom and the creators of TREK, united as one to make it live again. We decided to make this a double i~sue because in the past two years we accumulated enough material for one issue and then we wrote a novella which was large enough to publish as a...

  3. Energy Management Issued: June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Management Policy Issued: June 2010 Revised: Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance.0 BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The Engineering and Energy Management division of the Department of Facilities Management at the Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the school") has developed an Energy Management

  4. No Holds Barred Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    ILLYA by Emmi Hear Re 86 _ GOING SOLObyMim 89 THE ILLYA KURYAKIN PATENTED METHOD..." by Mim 91 ' THE SECOND CHANCEAFFAIR by MaryL Millard 94 Cover by TACS pusi FUTURE ISSUES - Yes, they'replanned! Seekingall"/"fandoms, particularly MUNCLE...

  5. TrekISM Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    warp drive 21=Kloog 22=colonizers from the Andromeda galaxy ("By Any Other Name") 23=Elas, in the Tellan star system 24=Kara 25=tetrahedral. TRIVIA QUIZ #3i' answers next issue 1. In what episode do we see Kirk's tombstone? 2. What caused...

  6. Inside this issue: Virtual Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    of sustainability. Our next installment will feature Dr. Richard Perez speaking on alternative energy. The talk sustainability of cruise ship mass tourism in Cozumel, Mexico. #12;Page 3Volume 6, Issue 3 Come to the Harvest Sustainability Sustainability Bulletin The semester is in full swing and we've got some great events coming up

  7. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  8. Size-velocity correlations in high order moment methods for polydisperse evaporating sprays: modelling and numerical issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , such as internal combustion engine ([1, 2] and references therein), gas turbine [3] or rocket booster [4]. Those, Laboratoire d'Energ´etique mol´eculaire et macroscopique, combustion, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay emissions...). The description of a disperse phase may rely on a population balance equation (PBE

  9. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time laser light-reflectivity technique is being used to study simultaneous thermophoretic and inertial influences on the deposition behavior of MgO particles produced via ultrasonic nebulization (submicrometer range). The deposition surface (a concave platinum ribbon) is exposed to a high velocity/temperature jet of alkali sulfate-free combustion products exiting from a seeded (C3[sub 3]H[sub 8]/air) microcombustor (110 cm[sup 3]). The reflectivity data were calibrated against deposition rates obtained from SEM pictures of the target, and were normalized with the nominal particle feed rate, in order to obtain the mass transfer Stanton number, St[sub m], trends depicted in Figure 1. For the submicron (ca. 0.7[mu]m) particles inertial effects appear to set in at Stokes (Stk) numbers of O(10[sup [minus]2]) (an order of magnitude lower than the ones needed for pure'' inertial impaction), affecting significantly the dominant thermophoretic deposition mechanism. A first order (in Stk) theoretical analysis of the problem in which particle inertia is treated as equivalent to pressure diffusion,'' cannot explain the observed dependence of the deposition rate on Stk. We are presently formulating a Lagrangian approach, valid for all values of Stk, in order to interpret these data. In addition, a Single Particle Counter (SPC) and Transit Time Velocimeter (TTV), are being developed, to allow more precise measurements of particle feed rates and velocities.

  10. Measuring Oscillatory Velocity Fields Due to Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this fluid dynamics video, we present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga C. reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The measured velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, and scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields and peaks at 15 fW. The dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require.

  11. On the Representation of Intermediate States in the Velocity Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Tay; S. Wickramasekara

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Unstable state furnishes a semigroup irreducible representation of the Poincar\\'e group. The state vector is represented by a superposition of energy eigenkets. As a consequence of this superposition, the state vector can be transformed into the rest frame through {\\it a} Lorentz transformation only when the eigenkets are labeled by velocity variable, but not momentum variable. We also clarify the meaning of the velocity variable in the state vector with respect to the velocity derived from kinematical consideration of the scattering process.

  12. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qin, Hong [PPPL; Davidson, Ronald C. [PPPL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  13. Stellar Velocity Dispersion of the Leo A Dwarf Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren R. Brown; Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Michael J. Kurtz

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the first stellar velocity dispersion of the Leo A dwarf galaxy, \\sigma = 9.3 +- 1.3 km/s. We derive the velocity dispersion from the radial velocities of ten young B supergiants and two HII regions in the central region of Leo A. We estimate a projected mass of 8 +- 2.7 x10^7 solar masses within a radius of 2 arcmin, and a mass to light ratio of at least 20 +- 6 M_sun/L_sun. These results imply Leo A is at least ~80% dark matter by mass.

  14. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  15. Fundamental enabling issues in nanotechnology :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floro, Jerrold Anthony; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hearne, Sean Joseph; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Seel, Steven Craig; Webb, Edmund Blackburn,; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To effectively integrate nanotechnology into functional devices, fundamental aspects of material behavior at the nanometer scale must be understood. Stresses generated during thin film growth strongly influence component lifetime and performance; stress has also been proposed as a mechanism for stabilizing supported nanoscale structures. Yet the intrinsic connections between the evolving morphology of supported nanostructures and stress generation are still a matter of debate. This report presents results from a combined experiment and modeling approach to study stress evolution during thin film growth. Fully atomistic simulations are presented predicting stress generation mechanisms and magnitudes during all growth stages, from island nucleation to coalescence and film thickening. Simulations are validated by electrodeposition growth experiments, which establish the dependence of microstructure and growth stresses on process conditions and deposition geometry. Sandia is one of the few facilities with the resources to combine experiments and modeling/theory in this close a fashion. Experiments predicted an ongoing coalescence process that generates signficant tensile stress. Data from deposition experiments also supports the existence of a kinetically limited compressive stress generation mechanism. Atomistic simulations explored island coalescence and deposition onto surfaces intersected by grain boundary structures to permit investigation of stress evolution during later growth stages, e.g. continual island coalescence and adatom incorporation into grain boundaries. The predictive capabilities of simulation permit direct determination of fundamental processes active in stress generation at the nanometer scale while connecting those processes, via new theory, to continuum models for much larger island and film structures. Our combined experiment and simulation results reveal the necessary materials science to tailor stress, and therefore performance, in nanostructures and, eventually, integrated nanocomponents.

  16. Laser Induced Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition (LCLD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanai, Laszlo; Balint, Agneta M. [University of Szeged, JGYPK, Department of General and Environmental Physics H-6725 Szeged, Boldogasszony sgt. 6 (Hungary); West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Physics, Department of Physics, Bulv. V. Parvan 4, Timisoara 300223 (Romania)

    2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser induced chemical deposition (LCLD) of metals onto different substrates attracts growing attention during the last decade. Deposition of metals onto the surface of dielectrics and semiconductors with help of laser beam allows the creation of conducting metal of very complex architecture even in 3D. In the processes examined the deposition occurs from solutions containing metal ions and reducing agents. The deposition happens in the region of surface irradiated by laser beam (micro reactors). Physics -chemical reactions driven by laser beam will be discussed for different metal-substrate systems. The electrical, optical, mechanical properties of created interfaces will be demonstrated also including some practical-industrial applications.

  17. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems. Seventh quarterly technical report, March 6, 1992--June 5, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel research studies are underway on the following interrelated and fundamental subjects; Geometrical Approach to Determining the Sticking Probability of Particles Impacting on Convex Solid Surfaces; Correlations for High Schmidt Number Particle Deposition From Dilute Flowing Rational Engineering Suspensions; Average Capture Probability of Arriving Particles Which Are Distributed With ResPect to ImPact VelocitY and Incidence Angle (Relative to Deposit Substrate); Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Vapor Infiltration of Non-isothermal Granular Deposits; Effective Area/Volume of Populations of `MicroPorous` Aerosol Particles (Compact and `Fractal` Quasispherical Aggregates); Effects of Radiative Heat Transfer on the Coagulation Rates of Combustion-Generated Particles; Structure-Sensitivity of Total Mass Deposition Rates from Combustion Product Streams containing Coagulation-Aged Populations of Aggregated Primary Particles; and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} Chemical Vapor Deposition From Chlorine-containing Coal-Derived Gases.

  18. Issues in recycling galvanized scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koros, P.J. [LTV Steel Co., Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Hellickson, D.A. [General Motors Corp., Detroit, MI (United States); Dudek, F.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of the steel used for most galvanizing (and tinplate) applications makes scrap derived from their production and use a premier solid charge material for steelmaking. In 1989 the AISI created a Task Force to define the issues and to recommend technologically and economically sound approaches to assure continued, unhindered recyclability of the growing volume of galvanized scrap. The AISI program addressed the treatment of full-sized industrial bales of scrap. The current, on-going MRI (US)--Argonne National Laboratory program is focused on ``loose`` scrap from industrial and post-consumer sources. Results from these programs, issues of scrap management from source to steel melting, the choices for handling zinc in iron and steelmaking and the benefits/costs for removal of zinc (and lead) from scrap prior to melting in BOF and foundry operations are reviewed in this paper.

  19. TrekISM Issue 16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .d ..r7::'::~'X. ~xll", 105 pages, offset. T~~s is the latest issue of one of fandom's first X-rated ST fanzines, and like most T'Kuhtian Press publications... catalog?) ***** [for the techs in the crowd: Tim Farley (Georgia Tech Box 3158'7, Atlanta GA 30332) is soliciting material of a technical nature, specifically data not cove~in Trimble's CONDORDANCE. Tim eventually intends to ,pUblish a "Technizine...

  20. artery peak velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The time series analysis of Doppler velocity maps show enhanced power in the sunspot umbra at higher frequencies and in the penumbra at lower frequencies. We find that the peak...

  1. CO and IRAS detection of an intermediate-velocity cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desert, F.X.; Bazell, D.; Blitz, L. (Paris Observatoire, Meudon (France) Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA) Maryland Univ., College Park (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of a radio survey of high-Galactic-latitude clouds, CO emission was detected at the position l = 210.8 deg and b = 63.1 deg with an LSR velocity of -39 km/sec. This molecular cloud constitutes the third one with an unusually large absolute velocity at these latitudes, as compared with the 5.4-km/sec cloud-to-cloud velocity dispersion of the high-latitude molecular clouds. The position is coincident with an H I intermediate-velocity cloud (GHL 11, Verschuur H, OLM 268) and the IR-excess cloud 306 in the list by Desert et al. (1988). This cloud is clearly detected at all four IRAS wavelengths and has warmer colors than the local ISM. 27 refs.

  2. Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Christopher

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid jetting is a well stimulation technique that is used in carbonate reservoirs. It typically involves injecting acid down hole at high flow rates through small orifices which cause high velocities of acid to strike the borehole wall...

  3. Superluminal Velocity of Photons in a Gravitational Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    1994-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of radiative corrections on the photon propagation in a gravitational background is investigated without the low-frequency approximation $\\omega \\ll m$. The conclusion is made in this way that the velocity of light can exceed unity.

  4. GPS velocity field for the Tien Shan and surrounding regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubovich, Alexander V.

    Measurements at ?400 campaign-style GPS points and another 14 continuously recording stations in central Asia define variations in their velocities both along and across the Kyrgyz and neighboring parts of Tien Shan. They ...

  5. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  6. Turbulence Spectra from Doppler-broadened Spectral Lines: Tests of the Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chrupnov; A. Lazarian

    2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent motions induce Doppler shifts of observable emission and absorption lines motivating studies of turbulence using precision spectroscopy. We provide the numerical testing of the two most promising techniques, Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS). We obtain an expression for the shot noise that the discretization of the numerical data entails and successfully test it. We show that the numerical resolution required for recovering the underlying turbulent spectrum from observations depend on the spectral index of velocity fluctuations, which makes low resolution testing misleading. We demonstrate numerically that, dealing with absorption lines, sampling of turbulence along just a dozen directions provides a high quality spectrum with the VCS technique.

  7. Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

  8. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  9. Vertical velocity in oceanic convection off tropical Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Christopher

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . v Vl Vl I I 1 3 6 10 Description of the Data Data Processing . . Event Criteria 10 15 21 III RESULTS . . . 26 Cores. Environment 26 34 IV COMPARISON WITH OTHER STUDIES . . . . . 40 Cores... Variations with altitude of median and strongest 10'/o-level statistics of (a) average vertical velocity, (b) maximum vertical velocity, (c) mass flux per unit length normal to the flight track and (d) diameter 32 Figure Page Reconstructed temperature...

  10. Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John Martin

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VELOCITY OF SOUND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1968 Ma)or Sub)ect: Physics VELOCITY OF SOVND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Approved as to style and content by& (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departsmnt) (Mem er (Member) May 1968...

  11. Temperature and velocity effects in naphthenic acid corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, H.L. Jr. [Corrosion Prevention and Control, Richmond, VA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of temperature and velocity were studied with respect to alloy selection for corrosion resistant service. The amount of molybdenum in the austenitic stainless steel alloys is critical in conferring corrosion resistance on the alloy as the temperature of the environment increases. Velocity effects have been studied in a closed loop hot oil circuit where the stream impinges on the target specimen. Film breakdown is prevented by increasing the molybdenum content.

  12. Interrelationships between air velocity and globe thermometer response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, James Robert

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERRELATIONSHIPS BE~ AIR VELOCITY ANIl GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis JANES ROBERT THORNTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARAN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE... August 197$ Najor Subject: Industrial Hygiene INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEZ AIR VELOCITY AND GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis JAMES ROBERT THORNTON Approved as to style and content by: h z. an o ommmt ee ad o partmen Me er August 1$7$ ABSTRACT...

  13. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution is disclosed. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna. 46 figs.

  14. Uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.; Chen, W.; Molnar, P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran were estimated by applying the conventional travel time-distance relation method to arrival times of well located earthquakes recorded at a few stations. The average uppermost mantle P wave velocity under Turkey is estimated from two stations of the World Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN), Istanbul and Tabriz. The data are consistent with a crust of uniform, but poorly determined, thickness and an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 7.73 +- 0.08 km/s. This velocity is very similar to that for the Aegean Sea and suggests that its structure could be closely related to that beneath Turkey. For Iran, the results calculated from travel times to three WWSSN stations, Meshed, Shiraz, and Tabriz, can be explained by a crust dipping toward the south-southeast at about 1/sup 0/ with an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 8.0 +- 0.1 km/s. If the crustal thickness were 34 km in the north it would reach about 49 km in the south. Based on these uppermost mantle velocities, the temperature at Moho beneath Turkey is probably close to the melting temperature of peridotite but that beneath Iran is probably lower.

  15. Supersonic relative velocity effect on the baryonic acoustic oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uroš [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zürich, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Dalal, Neal, E-mail: jyoo@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: neal@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: seljak@physik.uzh.ch [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of supersonic relative velocities between baryons and dark matter, recently shown to arise generically at high redshift, on baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at low redshift. The amplitude of the relative velocity effect at low redshift is model-dependent, but can be parameterized by using an unknown bias. We find that if unaccounted, the relative velocity effect can shift the BAO peak position and bias estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state due to its non-smooth, out-of-phase oscillation structure around the BAO scale. Fortunately, the relative velocity effect can be easily modeled in constraining cosmological parameters without substantially inflating the error budget. We also demonstrate that the presence of the relative velocity effect gives rise to a unique signature in the galaxy bispectrum, which can be utilized to isolate this effect. Future dark energy surveys can accurately measure the relative velocity effect and subtract it from the power spectrum analysis to constrain dark energy models with high precision.

  16. A Wiener-Laguerre model of VIV forces given recent cylinder velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maincon, Philippe

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slender structures immersed in a cross flow can experience vibrations induced by vortex shedding (VIV), which cause fatigue damage and other problems. VIV models in engineering use today tend to operate in the frequency domain. A time domain model would allow to capture the chaotic nature of VIV and to model interactions with other loads and non-linearities. Such a model was developed in the present work: for each cross section, recent velocity history is compressed using Laguerre polynomials. The compressed information is used to enter an interpolation function to predict the instantaneous force, allowing to step the dynamic analysis. An offshore riser was modeled in this way: Some analyses provided an unusually fine level of realism, while in other analyses, the riser fell into an unphysical pattern of vibration. It is concluded that the concept is promissing, yet that more work is needed to understand orbit stability and related issues, in order to further progress towards an engineering tool.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  18. MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49339 MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS J.A. Siegel1,3 * and W.W. Nazaroff2 Department of Energy under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy. INDEX TERMS HVAC, Fouling

  19. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences by Greta J. Orris1 and Richard I. Grauch2 Open. For many years, the deposit at Mountain Pass was the world's dominant source of rare earth elements of rare earth element concentration. Many of the occurrences have not been well studied and the economic

  20. Colloidal particle deposition in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, D.S.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the initial deposition of monodispersed spherical colloidal particles from a steady fully developed turbulent flow onto conduit walls. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential is attractive, particle deposition is shown to be often governed by turbulent hydrodynamics. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential possess a repulsive maximum, particle deposition to first order is uniform and depends solely on electrical interaction effects. The developed theoretical model specialized to orifice deposition with the use of Harwell Flow3D turbulence modelling software qualitatively described the deposition of 0.5 {mu}m silica particles onto glass orifices from an aqueous suspension. The effect of the electrical double layer on the rate of colloidal particle deposition in laminar flow has been described by Spielman and Friedlander (1), Dahneke (2), Bowen et al. (3) and Bowen and Epstein (4). This article describes the extension of their work to colloidal particle deposition under steady fully developed turbulent flow conditions. This article also reports the results of orifice particle deposition experiments which were conducted to qualitatively investigate the developed theoretical model.

  1. Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selin, Noelle Eckley

    Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition Noelle E. Selin and Christopher D. Holmes mercury oxidation [Selin & Jacob, Atmos. Env. 2008] 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 Influences on Mercury Wet Deposition · Hg wet dep = f(precipitation, [Hg(II)+Hg(P)]) Correlation (r2) between

  2. The use of particle tracking to obtain planar velocity measurements in an unsteady laminar diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, G.S.; Cantwell, B.J.; Lecuona, A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the flame-flow interaction in an unsteady laminar co-flowing jet diffusion flame is underway. The flame is made periodic by acoustic excitation of the fuel stream. The objective of the research is to develop a better understanding of the relationship between the flowfield and combustion process by superimposing measurements of the vector velocity field on planar measurements of reactive and passive scalars. In this connection a technique is being developed to obtain instantaneous two-dimensional velocity measurements from multiply-exposed photographic images of scattered light from speed particles in the flow. The technique involves simple photographic images taken at a right angle to a thin laser sheet on the diametric center of the jet. The illumination source is pulsed Cu vapor laser. The important issues considered have included the particle type and size as they relate to the particle's ability to follow the flow and to withstand combustion temperatures. Also of concern is the effect of thermophoretic forces on the measurement accuracy. Both Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and TiO/sub 2/ have been used successfully and detailed information about the size and geometry of TiO/sub 2/ particles has been obtained through scanning electron microscope photographs. The TiO/sub 2/ particles have been produced from the reaction of TiCl/sub 4/ and water. The technique has been successfully demonstrated by measuring a cold laminar jet exit velocity profile. Also, good particle images have been obtained in a pulsed diffusion flame.

  3. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chenju; Yan, Xiaozhen [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Xiang, Shikai, E-mail: skxiang@caep.ac.cn; Chen, Haiyan [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Gu, Jianbing; Yu, Yin [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Kuang, Xiaoyu [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); International Centre for Materials Physics, Academia Sinica, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  4. TrekISM Issue 67

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Write to Vulkon, PO Box 786, Hollywood FL 33022-0786. STAR-FEST - March 22-24, Holiday Inn, Denver CO. Guests: Leonard Nimoy, Colm Meany. Write to: Starland, 8200 East Pacific Place, #307, Denver CO 80231 DREAMWERKS - April 6-7, Cleveland Guest....00 or send a SASE with two stams for an updated flyer and sample issue. Regina Moore, 7755 E. Quincy Ave #D3-302, Denver, CO 80237 [Ed note: Though Regina didnlt mention an age statement for her publi- cation, by its very nature K/S is a genre usually...

  5. FED pumped limiter configuration issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, J.R.; Fuller, G.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurity control in the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is provided by a toroidal belt pumped limiter. Limiter design issues addressed in this paper are (1) poloidal location of the limiter belt, (2) shape of the limiter surface facing the plasma, and (3) whether the belt is pumped from one or both sides. The criteria used for evaluation of limiter configuration features were sensitivity to plasma-edge conditions and ease of maintenance and fabrication. The evaluation resulted in the selection of a baseline FED limiter that is located at the bottom of the device and has a flat surface with a single leading edge.

  6. TrekISM Issue 66

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a proposed concordance can re1ax -- a group called IIEnterpri se America II has already pub1ished a ST:TNG encyclopedia/lexicon. Look ahead in the fanzine section for ordering information. Renewals: Subscriptions expire with the issue number... as of July 1 of this year. Ralph Winter is the best bet to take over as producer for ST VI. A~I Deb J. Kingsley: RR 3 PO Box 747, Monticello IN 47960 I'm 36, female, single and a salesman for Herff Jones, selling rings, cap and gowns, announcements...

  7. TrekISM Issue 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a SIG coordinator. I thought I just did this routine a little while ago7 but it \\\\l'asactually way back in issue. #6. The basic statis- tics haven't changed much.,though. I'm still marrled to the same-~~~net with three kids (Charles~9, Gordon-7... on a belt. WILLIA-M SHA'lNER Weekend - just try to keep me aI'l'ay from this one! But the dates have been changed: it IS nm\\l'scheduled for July 10-12, at the new LA Airport hotel. Write to me directly for more information on this. I...

  8. T-Negative Issue 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ilm not making any predictions of schedule. I can't because (this is a repeat for those of you who read m~ general sfzine No -- 3 issues/~l) 11m in the last year (probably) of working on my-Fh.D. I've spent the summer re~earching fantasy in 19th... three unre- viewed zines under that heap of dust in my study? No, there it was. I'm a sucker for large manila envelopes, so I opened it. Blue cover, dammit. Would you believe just one more little | review...? I didn't think so. Well, then, four l...

  9. 'Long-Cell Action' Corrosion: A Basic Mechanism Hidden Behind Components Degradation Issues in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genn Saji [Ex-Secretariate of Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (Japan)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of industries' effort over the last 40 years, corrosion-related issues continue to be one of the largest unresolved problems for nuclear power plants worldwide. There are several types of strange corrosion phenomena from the point of view of our current understanding of corrosion science established in other fields. Some of these are IGSCC, PWSCC, AOA, and FAC (Erosion-Corrosion). Through studying and coping with diverse corrosion phenomena, the author believes that they share a common basis with respect to the assumed corrosion mechanism (e.g., 'local cell action' hypothesis). In general, local cell action is rarely severe since it produces a fairly uniform corrosion. The 'long cell action' that transports electrons through structures far beyond the region of local cell corrosion activities has been identified as a basic mechanism in soil corrosion. If this mechanism is assumed in nuclear power plants, the structure becomes anodic in the area where the potential is less positive and cathodic where this potential is more positive. Metallic ions generated at anodic corrosion sites are transported to remote cathodic sites through the circulation of water and deposits as corrosion products. The SCC, FAC (E-C) and PWSCC occur in the anodic sites as the structure itself acts as a short-circuiting conductor between the two sites, the action is similar to a galvanic cell but in a very large scale. This situation is the same as a battery that has been short-circuited at the terminals. No apparent external potential difference exists between the two electrodes, but an electrochemical reaction is still taking place inside the battery cell with a large internal short current. In this example what is important is the potential difference between the local coolant and the surface of the structural material. Long cell action corrosion is likely enhancing the local cell action's anodic corrosion activities, such as SCC, FAC/E-C, and PWSCC. It tends to be more hazardous because of its localized nature compared with the local cell action corrosion. There exist various mechanisms (electrochemical cell configurations) that induce such potential differences, including: ionic concentration, aeration, temperature, flow velocity, radiation and corrosion potentials. In this paper, the author will discuss these potential differences and their relevance to the un-resolved corrosion issues in nuclear power plants. Due to the importance of this potential mechanism the author is calling for further verification experiments as a joint international project. (author)

  10. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, Forrest; Bons, Jeffrey

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness levels found on in service vanes (Bons, et al., 2001, up to 300 microns) flow blockage in first stage turbine nozzles can easily reach 1 to 2 percent in conventional turbines. Deposition levels in syngas fueled gas turbines are expected to be even more problematic. The likelihood of significant deposition to the leading edge of vanes in a syngas environment indicates the need to examine this effect on the leading edge cooling problem. It is critical to understand the influence of leading edge geometry and turbulence on deposition rates for both internally and showerhead cooled leading edge regions. The expected level of deposition in a vane stagnation region not only significantly changes the heat transfer problem but also suggests that cooling arrays may clog. Addressing the cooling issue suggests a need to better understand stagnation region heat transfer with realistic roughness as well as the other variables affecting transport near the leading edge. Also, the question of whether leading edge regions can be cooled internally with modern cooling approaches should also be raised, thus avoiding the clogging issue. Addressing deposition in the pressure side throat region of the nozzle is another critical issue for this environment. Issues such as examining the protective effect of slot and full coverage discrete-hole film cooling on limiting deposition as well as the influence of roughness and turbulence on effectiveness should be raised. The objective of this present study is to address these technical challenges to help enable the development of high efficiency syngas tolerant gas turbine engines.

  11. Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, J.L. Jr. [Amoco Worldwide Exploration Business Group, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shanmugam and Moiola (1994a, b, 1995) have generated substantial controversy and reexamination of what was originally thought to be a well-understood stratigraphic interval of deep-water origin in the Carboniferous Jackfork Group of Arkansas and Oklahoma. This reexamination of interpretation is good in that it forces sedimentologists, sequence stratigraphers, and reservoir geologists to reconsider their understanding of deep-water processes and products, usage of scientific terms to communicate interpretations, and the economic consequences of being nearly right or certainly wrong. Examination of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) prompts brief comments on three issues: (1) the classification of a sedimentary deposit based on the sedimentary process during the final moments of deposition, (2) the use of apparently irrelevant analogs to interpret depositional and postdepositional processes and products, and (3) the regional interpretation of overall depositional environment from very specific and very local observations of sedimentary products.

  12. Guest editorial: Special issue on human computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantic, Maja

    The seven articles in this special issue focus on human computing. Most focus on two challenging issues in human computing, namely, machine analysis of human behavior in group interactions and context-sensitive modeling.

  13. Front Burner - Issue 16 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6 Front Burner - Issue 16 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 16 addresses Malware, the Worst Passwords of 2013, and the Flat Stanley and Stop.Think.Connect. Campaign....

  14. Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues with Methane and Propane Michael A. Green LawrenceSAFETY ISSUES WITH METHANE AND PROPANE M. A. Green Lawrencehydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary

  15. FOUNDATIONAL ISSUES IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickhard, Mark H.

    WITH THE ISSUES 36 Searle 36 Gibson 40 Piaget 40 Maturana and Varela 42 Dreyfus 42 Hermeneutics 44 6 General

  16. Bridges and wildlife: issues and solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carey, Marion

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    applicable regulations (Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and stateto identify any Migratory Bird Treaty Act issues that may

  17. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  18. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS’ System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  19. Exceptional Ground Accelerations and Velocities Caused by Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, John

    2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to understand the characteristics of the free-field strong-motion records that have yielded the 100 largest peak accelerations and the 100 largest peak velocities recorded to date. The peak is defined as the maximum magnitude of the acceleration or velocity vector during the strong shaking. This compilation includes 35 records with peak acceleration greater than gravity, and 41 records with peak velocities greater than 100 cm/s. The results represent an estimated 150,000 instrument-years of strong-motion recordings. The mean horizontal acceleration or velocity, as used for the NGA ground motion models, is typically 0.76 times the magnitude of this vector peak. Accelerations in the top 100 come from earthquakes as small as magnitude 5, while velocities in the top 100 all come from earthquakes with magnitude 6 or larger. Records are dominated by crustal earthquakes with thrust, oblique-thrust, or strike-slip mechanisms. Normal faulting mechanisms in crustal earthquakes constitute under 5% of the records in the databases searched, and an even smaller percentage of the exceptional records. All NEHRP site categories have contributed exceptional records, in proportions similar to the extent that they are represented in the larger database.

  20. MAGNETIZED GAS IN THE SMITH HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Alex S.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, NSW (Australia); Mao, S. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Benjamin, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI (United States); Lockman, Felix J., E-mail: alex.hill@csiro.au, E-mail: naomi.mcclure-griffiths@csiro.au, E-mail: mao@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: benjamir@uww.edu, E-mail: jlockman@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, WV (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures toward extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new H I observations from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of H? from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure (RM) of ?100 rad m{sup –2} which are generally well correlated with decelerated H? emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of ?8 ?G along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by H I or H? at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth H? morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (?1 Rayleigh) H? intensity of the lower-velocity magnetized ionized gas suggests an ionization process associated with shocks due to interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The presence of the magnetic field may contribute to the survival of high velocity clouds like the Smith Cloud as they move from the Galactic halo to the disk. We expect these data to provide a test for magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas.

  1. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  2. VELOCITY ANISOTROPY AND SHAPE BIAS IN THE CAUSTIC TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, Daniel; Miller, Christopher J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the Millennium Simulation to quantify the statistical accuracy and precision of the escape-velocity technique for measuring cluster-sized halo masses at z {approx} 0.1. We show that in three dimensions one can measure nearly unbiased (<4%) halo masses (>1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} h {sup -1}) with 10%-15% scatter. Line-of-sight projection effects increase the scatter to {approx}25%, where we include the known velocity anisotropies. The classical ''caustic'' technique incorporates a calibration factor that is determined from N-body simulations. We derive and test a new implementation that eliminates the need for calibration and utilizes only the observables: the galaxy velocities with respect to the cluster mean v, the projected positions r{sub p} , an estimate of the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density concentration, and an estimate of the velocity anisotropies {beta}. We find that differences between the potential and density NFW concentrations induce a 10% bias in the caustic masses. We also find that large (100%) systematic errors in the observed ensemble average velocity anisotropies and concentrations translate to small (5%-10%) biases in the inferred masses.

  3. Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions Robin Reid1 and Maria Fernandez Ecology Lab 2Associate Professor Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Global Issues and Questions in Rangeland Ecology · Despite the focus here on global issues, we need to recognize that Mongolia

  4. SUBSTRUCTURE IN BULK VELOCITIES OF MILKY WAY DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; DeLaunay, James; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Gole, Daniel; Grabowski, Kathleen [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Deng, Licai; Liu, Chao; Luo, A-Li; Zhang, Haotong; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Yongheng [Key Lab for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)] [Key Lab for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Jin, Ge [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)] [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Liu, Xiaowei; Yuan, Haibo, E-mail: carlij@rpi.edu [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We find that Galactic disk stars near the anticenter exhibit velocity asymmetries in both the Galactocentric radial and vertical components across the midplane as well as azimuthally. These findings are based on Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectroscopic velocities for a sample of ?400, 000 F-type stars, combined with proper motions from the PPMXL catalog for which we have derived corrections to the zero points based in part on spectroscopically discovered galaxies and QSOs from LAMOST. In the region within 2 kpc outside the Sun's radius and ±2 kpc from the Galactic midplane, we show that stars above the plane exhibit net outward radial motions with downward vertical velocities, while stars below the plane have roughly the opposite behavior. We discuss this in the context of other recent findings, and conclude that we are likely seeing the signature of vertical disturbances to the disk due to an external perturbation.

  5. Planar velocity analysis of diesel spray shadow images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedarsky, David; Blaisot, J-B; Rozé, C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this work is to demonstrate how spatially resolved image information from diesel fuel injection events can be obtained using a forward-scatter imaging geometry, and used to calculate the velocities of liquid structures on the periphery of the spray. In order to obtain accurate velocities directly from individual diesel spray structures, those features need to be spatially resolved in the measurement. The distributed structures measured in a direct shadowgraphy arrangement cannot be reliably analyzed for this kind of velocity information. However, by utilizing an intense collimated light source and adding imaging optics which modify the signal collection, spatially resolved optical information can be retrieved from spray edge regions within a chosen object plane. This work discusses a set of measurements where a diesel spray is illuminated in rapid succession by two ultrafast laser pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti-Sapphire oscillator seeding a matched pair of regenerative amplifiers. Light fro...

  6. Photobiomolecular deposition of metallic particles and films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  7. Depositional environments of the Kodiak Shelf, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burbach, Stuart Peter

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'te ?eel i 9/I !, . jor S h!est; O? anoo! aphJ DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS OF THE KODIAK SHELF, ALASKA A Thesis by STUART PETER BURBACH Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of Committee ( ead of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1977... -'DSTRRCT Depositional Environments of the Kodiak ', elf, Alaska. (December 1977) Stuart Peter Burbach, B. P, . , University of Ifisconsin at Iililv!aukee Chairman of Cidvfsory Committee: Dr. I!illiam B. Bryant Four depositional environments are defined...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - average settling velocity Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is on the enhancement of the mean particle settling velocity... in a turbulent carrier fluid, as compared to the settling velocity ... Source: Meiburg, Eckart H. - Department of...

  9. Parameters influencing the deposition of methylammonium lead halide iodide in hole conductor free perovskite-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Bat-El; Gamliel, Shany; Etgar, Lioz, E-mail: lioz.etgar@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Chemistry, Casali Center for Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 90400 (Israel)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased, making them a competitive source of renewable energy. An important parameter when designing high efficiency perovskite-based solar cells is the perovskite deposition, which must be performed to create complete coverage and optimal film thickness. This paper describes an in-depth study on two-step deposition, separating the perovskite deposition into two precursors. The effects of spin velocity, annealing temperature, dipping time, and methylammonium iodide concentration on the photovoltaic performance are studied. Observations include that current density is affected by changing the spin velocity, while the fill factor changes mainly due to the dipping time and methylammonium iodide concentration. Interestingly, the open circuit voltage is almost unaffected by these parameters. Hole conductor free perovskite solar cells are used in this work, in order to minimize other possible effects. This study provides better understanding and control over the perovskite deposition through highly efficient, low-cost perovskite-based solar cells.

  10. St. Stephen powerhouse tailrace velocity measurement. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagerburg, T.L.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were conducted to provide a prototype evaluation of the operating conditions of the project and to evaluate the adequacy of the repairs and remedial work performed in the channel downstream of the tailrace. Prototype measurements were made to define the relative magnitudes of velocities and the surface flow patterns in the channel downstream of the tailrace and the displacement, if any, of the stone protection material resulting from various turbine operations and tailwater conditions. Results of the data collection included determination of (a) velocity distribution at various ranges across the channel; (b) velocity profiles at the toe of the slope and at the observed location of highest velocity; and (c) unusual surface flow patterns that are produced by different combinations of turbine operations. Recommendations for start-up and shut-down procedures for the turbine operations that would produce the most acceptable. The depth soundings revealed that the stone protection material was quite stable (District surveys reveal that no appreciable displacement has occurred during the subsequent months of operation of the powerhouse.) The flow velocities were found to concentrate along the right side of the channel as a result of uneven flow distribution from the draft tube bays and the asymmetrical geometry along the left side of the tailrace. Return flows were observed and found to concentrate along the left side of the channel except when all three turbines were operating. Operating recommendations for the turbines are made based on tailwater conditions, length of time of nonoperation of the powerhouse, and the velocity data obtained from the tests.

  11. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  12. ELECTROSTATIC MODE ASSOCIATED WITH PINCH VELOCITY IN RFPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DELZANNO, GIAN LUCA [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FINN, JOHN M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; CHACON, LUIS [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of a new electrostatic instability is shown for RFP (reversed field pinch) equilibria. This mode arises due to the non-zero equilibrium radial flow (pinch flow). In RFP simulations with no-stress boundary conditions on the tangential velocity at the radial wall, this electrostatic mode is unstable and dominates the nonlinear dynamics, even in the presence of the MHD modes typically responsible for the reversal of the axial magnetic field at edge. Nonlinearly, this mode leads to two beams moving azimuthally towards each other, which eventually collide. The electrostatic mode can be controlled by using Dirichlet (no-slip) boundary conditions on the azimuthal velocity at the radial wall.

  13. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  14. Clutter in the GMTI range-velocity map.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.

  15. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  16. Source shape determination with directional fragment-fragment velocity correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, A; Auger, G; Begemann-Blaich, M L; Bellaize, N; Bittiger, R; Bocage, F; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Bouriquet, B; Charvet, J L; Chbihi, A; Dayras, R; Durand, D; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Gourio, D; Guinet, D; Hudan, S; Lautesse, P; Lavaud, F; Legrain, R; López, O; Lukasik, J; Lynen, U; Müller, W F J; Nalpas, L; Orth, H; Plagnol, E; Rosato, E; Saija, A; Sfienti, C; Tamain, B; Trautmann, W; Trzcinski, A; Turzó, K; Vient, E; Vigilante, M; Volant, C; Zwieglinski, B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation functions, constructed from directional projections of the relative velocities of fragments, are used to determine the shape of the breakup volume in coordinate space. For central collisions of 129Xe + natSn at 50 MeV per nucleon incident energy, measured with the 4pi multi-detector INDRA at GSI, a prolate shape aligned along the beam direction with an axis ratio of 1:0.7 is deduced. The sensitivity of the method is discussed in comparison with conventional fragment-fragment velocity correlations.

  17. Impact of Phase Transitions on P Wave Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Weidner; L Li

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In regions where a high pressure phase is in equilibrium with a low pressure phase, the bulk modulus defined by the P-V relationship is greatly reduced. Here we evaluate the effect of such transitions on the P wave velocity. A model, where cation diffusion is the rate limiting factor, is used to project laboratory data to the conditions of a seismic wave propagating in the two-phase region. We demonstrate that for the minimum expected effect there is a significant reduction of the seismic velocity, as large as 10% over a narrow depth range.

  18. Dynamic optical properties in graphene: Length versus velocity gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H. M.; Han, K., E-mail: han6409@263.net [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Xu, W. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic optical properties of graphene are theoretically investigated in both length gauge and velocity gauge in the presence of ultrafast optical radiation field. The two gauges present different results of dynamic photo-induced carriers and optical conductance due to distinct dependencies on electric field and non-resonant optical absorption, while the two gauges give identical results in the steady state time. It shows that the choice of gauge affects evidently the dynamic optical properties of graphene. The velocity gauge represents an outcome of a real physical experiment.

  19. Backpulse and filter feed velocity effects on Norton filter performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siler, J.L.

    1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests have been conducted using the 2.2 ft{sup 2} Norton filter to solve the fouling problems observed with the ETF Norton system. The objective of these tests was to determine filter efficiency as a function of backpulse strength and feed velocity. Based on experimental results, it is recommend that the filters should be operated at the following conditions: (1) Backpulse Transmembrane Pressure/FeedTransmembrane Pressure (BP/FP) > 1.5, preferably 2 or 3. (2) Feed crossflow velocity = 6--8 f/s. It is expected that operation at these conditions should improve performance by 30--60%.

  20. Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

  1. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a project to examine the fundamental issues limiting the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC is attempting to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience damaging fouling when switched to higher volatile and more reactive lower-rank fuels, such as when cofiring biomass. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause more clinkering or slagging at the grate because of higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start too early for biomass fuels compared to the design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates and various chlorides, in combination with different flue gas temperatures because of changes in fuel heating value which can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project is to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project are: Modification of an existing EERC pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system; Verification testing of the simulator; Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system; and Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data will be collected, analyzed, and reported to elucidate ash-related problems during biomass-coal cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

  2. BARRIER ISSUES TO THE UTILIZATION OF BIOMASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Jay R. Gunderson; Darren D. Schmidt; Greg F. Weber; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has completed a project to examine fundamental issues that could limit the use of biomass in small industrial steam/power systems in order to increase the future use of this valuable domestic resource. Specifically, the EERC attempted to elucidate the ash-related problems--grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling--associated with cofiring coal and biomass in grate-fired systems. Utilization of biomass in stoker boilers designed for coal can be a cause of concern for boiler operators. Boilers that were designed for low-volatile fuels with lower reactivities can experience problematic fouling when switched to higher-volatile and more reactive coal-biomass blends. Higher heat release rates at the grate can cause increased clinkering or slagging at the grate due to higher temperatures. Combustion and loss of volatile matter can start much earlier for biomass fuels compared to design fuel, vaporizing alkali and chlorides which then condense on rear walls and heat exchange tube banks in the convective pass of the stoker, causing noticeable increases in fouling. In addition, stoker-fired boilers that switch to biomass blends may encounter new chemical species such as potassium sulfates, various chlorides, and phosphates. These species in combination with different flue gas temperatures, because of changes in fuel heating value, can adversely affect ash deposition behavior. The goal of this project was to identify the primary ash mechanisms related to grate clinkering and heat exchange surface fouling associated with cofiring coal and biomass--specifically wood and agricultural residuals--in grate-fired systems, leading to future mitigation of these problems. The specific technical objectives of the project were: (1) Modification of an existing pilot-scale combustion system to simulate a grate-fired system. (2) Verification testing of the simulator. (3) Laboratory-scale testing and fuel characterization to determine ash formation and potential fouling mechanisms and to optimize activities in the modified pilot-scale system. (4) Pilot-scale testing in the grate-fired system. The resulting data were used to elucidate ash-related problems during coal-biomass cofiring and offer a range of potential solutions.

  3. Theoretical issues in Spheromak research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, R. H.; Hooper, E. B.; LoDestro, L. L.; Mattor, N.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Ryutov, D. D.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the state of theoretical knowledge of several physics issues important to the spheromak. It was prepared as part of the preparation for the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX), which addresses these goals: energy confinement and the physics which determines it; the physics of transition from a short-pulsed experiment, in which the equilibrium and stability are determined by a conducting wall (``flux conserver``) to one in which the equilibrium is supported by external coils. Physics is examined in this report in four important areas. The status of present theoretical understanding is reviewed, physics which needs to be addressed more fully is identified, and tools which are available or require more development are described. Specifically, the topics include: MHD equilibrium and design, review of MHD stability, spheromak dynamo, and edge plasma in spheromaks.

  4. Petroleum 1996 - issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasingly, users of the Energy Information Administration`s petroleum data and analytical reports have expressed an interest in a recurring report that takes a broad view of the petroleum sector. What is sought is some perspective on the complex interrelationships that comprise an industry and markets accounting for 40 percent of the energy consumed in the United States and ranging from the drilling rig in the oil field to the pump at the local gasoline station. This report comprehensively examines historical trends, and selectively focuses on major issues and the events they represent. It analyzes different dimensions of the industry and related markets in terms of how they relate to a common theme, in this case, the volatility in petroleum markets.

  5. Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis, and VNIR spectroscopy. Samples of hot spring deposits, geyser deposits, and soil were also collected. Analysis of ASTER data provided broad scale characteristics of the...

  6. Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional landform positions. Persistence of soil organic matter in eroding versus depositional landform positions....

  7. Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Abstract A close spatial relationship exists between Quaternary borate deposits and moderate to high...

  8. Supercritical Fluid Immersion Deposition: A New Process for Selective...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    property of immersion deposition, enables the SFID technique to selectively deposit metal films in small features. SFID may also provide a new method to fabricate palladium...

  9. Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercriti...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method. Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method....

  10. aln film deposited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deposited by the reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique at room, amorphous and polycrystalline GaN thin films have been deposited using the magnetron sputtering...

  11. aln films deposited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deposited by the reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique at room, amorphous and polycrystalline GaN thin films have been deposited using the magnetron sputtering...

  12. Eulerian CFD Models to Predict Thermophoretic Deposition of Soot...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eulerian CFD Models to Predict Thermophoretic Deposition of Soot Particles in EGR Coolers Eulerian CFD Models to Predict Thermophoretic Deposition of Soot Particles in EGR Coolers...

  13. High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray of Fe-Based Amorphous Alloy: a Numerical and Experimental Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajdelsztajn, L.; Dannenberg, J.; Lopez, J.; Yang, N.; Farmer, J.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray of Fe-Basedusing a high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray processstructure. [12] High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal

  14. Small Business Linked Deposit Program (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Business Linked Deposit Program provides below-market interest rates for qualified small businesses and certified industrial parks through local financing sources. Loans are for a two...

  15. CALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION IN GEOTHERMAL WELLBORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    geothermal energy exploration and development are most important. Geothermal resources in Costa Rica have of energy development in Costa Rica. The Miravalles geothermCALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION IN GEOTHERMAL WELLBORES MIRAVALLES GEOTHERMAL FIELD COSTA RICA

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Tyler Philip, 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is large and growing interest in making a wide variety of materials and surfaces antimicrobial. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers ...

  17. Source replenishment device for vacuum deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, R.A.

    1986-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A material source replenishment device for use with a vacuum deposition apparatus is described. The source replenishment device comprises an intermittent motion producing gear arrangement disposed within the vacuum deposition chamber. An elongated rod having one end operably connected to the gearing arrangement is provided with a multiarmed head at the opposite end disposed adjacent the heating element of the vacuum deposition apparatus. An inverted U-shaped source material element is releasably attached to the outer end of each arm member whereby said multiarmed head is moved to locate a first of said material elements above said heating element, whereupon said multiarmed head is lowered to engage said material element with the heating element and further lowered to release said material element on the heating element. After vaporization of said material element, second and subsequent material elements may be provided to the heating element without the need for opening the vacuum deposition apparatus to the atmosphere.

  18. Linked Deposit Loan Program (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Linked Deposit Loan Program is targeted at small, private firms with 50 or fewer employees and gross annual revenues of $5 million or less comes. This loan offered through the West Virginia...

  19. The Light Velocity Casimir Effect Does the Velocity of Light Increase when Propagating Between the Casimir Plates?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose experiments that might be set up to detect the increase in the velocity of light in a vacuum in the laboratory frame for photons travelling between (and perpendicular to) the Casimir plates in a vacuum. The Casimir plates are two closely spaced, conductive plates, where an attractive force is observed to exist between the plates called the 'Casimir Force'. We propose that the velocity of light in a vacuum increases when propagating between two transparent Casimir Plates. We call this effect the 'Light Velocity Casimir Effect' or LVC effect. The LVC effect happens because the vacuum energy density in between the plates is lower than that outside the Casimir plates. The conductive plates disallow certain frequencies of electrically charged virtual particles to exist inside the plates, thus lowering the inside vacuum particle density, compared to the density outside the plates. The reduced (electrically charged) virtual particle density results in fewer photon scattering events inside the plates, whic...

  20. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  1. THE VELOCITY DEPENDENCE OF AERODYNAMIC DRAG: A PRIMER FOR MATHEMATICIANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE VELOCITY DEPENDENCE OF AERODYNAMIC DRAG: A PRIMER FOR MATHEMATICIANS LYLE N. LONG and HOWARD­entry of the space shuttle into the earth's atmosphere. Dimensional analysis is an important tool in aerodynamics­T E X 1 #12; For detailed information on the aerodynamics and fluid mechanics pertinent to this paper

  2. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  3. Velocity Autocorrelation Functions and Diffusion of Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Daniyarov, T. T.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N. [IETP, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a, Tole bi St., Almaty, 050012 (Kazakhstan)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The velocity autocorrelation functions and square displacements were calculated on the basis of experimental data obtained on experimental setup with dc discharge. Computer simulation of the system of dust particles by the method of the Langevin dynamics was performed. The comparisons of experimental and theoretical results are given.

  4. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  5. Measurements of Laminar Flame Velocity for Components of Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , BP 20451, 1 Rue Grandville, 54001 Nancy, France 2 Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University flame velocity of components of natural gas, methane, ethane, propane, and nbutane as well as of binary performed by the heat flux method using a newly built flat flame adiabatic burner at atmospheric pressure

  6. Harmonic analysis of the Ha velocity field of NGC 4254

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Chemin; Olivier Hernandez; Chantal Balkowski; Claude Carignan; Philippe Amram

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionized gas kinematics of the Virgo Cluster galaxy NGC 4254 (Messier 99) is analyzed by an harmonic decomposition of the velocity field into Fourier coefficients. The aims of this study are to measure the kinematical asymmetries of Virgo cluster galaxies and to connect them to the environment. The analysis reveals significant $m=1,2,4$ terms which origins are discussed.

  7. Feedback on vertical velocity. Rotation, convection, self-sustaining process.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebovitz, Norman

    Feedback on vertical velocity. Rotation, convection, self-sustaining process. Fabian Waleffe the mechanisms involved in the nonlinear feedback from u to v, yielding a self-sustaining process for shear flows feedback from the streak instability into the rolls sufficient to lead to a self-sustaining process

  8. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feldmann, Herman F. (Worthington, OH); Paisley, Mark A. (Upper Arlington, OH)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a novel method of operating a gasifier for production of fuel gas from carbonaceous fuels. The process disclosed enables operating in an entrained mode using inlet gas velocities of less than 7 feet per second, feedstock throughputs exceeding 4000 lbs/ft.sup.2 -hr, and pressures below 100 psia.

  9. A three-dimensional analysis of the flow and heat transfer for the modified chemical vapor deposition process including buoyancy, variable properties, and tube rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Y.T.; Choi, M.; Greif, R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been made of the heat transfer, flow, and particle deposition relative to the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process. The effects of variable properties, buoyancy, and tube rotation have been included in the study. The resulting three-dimensional temperature and velocity fields have been obtained for a range of conditions. The effects of buoyancy result in asymmetric temperature and axial velocity profiles with respect to the tube axis. Variable properties cause significant variations in the axial velocity along the tube and in the secondary flow in the region near the torch. Particle trajectories are shown to be strongly dependent on the tube rotation and are helices for large rotational speeds. The component of secondary flow in the radial direction is compared to the thermophoretic velocity, which is the primary cause of particle deposition in the MCVD process. Over the central portion of the tube the radial component of the secondary flow is most important in determining the motion of the particles.

  10. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  11. Continued Evaluation of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Burns, Carolyn A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an extensive evaluation of the ability of three ultrasonic instruments to detect critical velocity for a broad range of simulated Hanford nuclear waste streams containing particles with mean particle sizes of >50 microns. Evaluations were perform using the pipe loop at the Process Development Laboratory – East (PDL-E) at PNNL that was designed and built to evaluate the pipeline plugging issue during slurry transfer operations at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. In 2011 the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho system to detect critical velocity continued to be evaluated using the PDL-E flow loop and new simulants containing high-density particles with a mean particle size of < 15 microns. The PDL-E flow loop was modified for the 2011 testing to include a new test section that contained 5-MHz and 10-MHz ultrasonic transducers non-invasively mounted to schedule 40 pipe. The test section also contained reference instrumentation to facilitate direct comparison of the real-time PulseEcho transducer responses with experimentally observed critical velocities. This paper presents the results from the 2011 PulseEcho evaluation using a variety of simulated Hanford nuclear waste streams that were selected to encompass the expected high-level waste feed properties.

  12. Avian issues in wind development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyea, J. [National Audubon Society, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a lot of concern among wind supporters, I know, about Audubon`s position on wind power. There is concern that this is the wrong time to be critical, and the wrong time to be putting any doubts in investors` minds, and the wrong time to provide an excuse for utilities to stop buying windpower. The long-term future of biodiversity, including bird diversity, depends on development of renewable energy, and that will mean some wind development in the right places and with the right types of systems. For both the long-time survival of the wind industry and for protection of bird populations, Audubon cannot be quiet on this issue. To avoid mistakes that can kill the industry in the long run, expenditures for wind/avian research have to be increased way beyond their present scope. We are going to need about $5 million dollars per year, if we are to (1) understand the biology and physics of bird-wind plant interactions, (2) if we are to understand relevant bird flightpaths, and (3) if we are to design a strategy to protect bird populations.

  13. Hydrotreating the native bitumen from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah was hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variables. The process variables investigated included reactor pressure (11.2--16.7 MPa); reactor temperature (641--712 K) and liquid hourly space velocity (0.19--0.77 h{sup {minus}1}). The hydrogen/oil ratio, 890 m{sup 3} m{sup {minus}3} was fixed in all experiments. A sulphided Ni-Mo on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in these studies. The deactivation of the catalyst, 0.2 {degree}C/day, was monitored by thedecline in the API gravity of the total liquid product with time on-stream at a standard set of conditions. The effect of temperature, WHSV, and pressure on denitrogenation, desulphurization, and metals removalwere studied and apparent kinetic parameters determined. The effect of process variables on residue conversion and Conradson carbon residue reduction were also investigated.

  14. Hydrotreating the native bitumen from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah was hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variables. The process variables investigated included reactor pressure (11.2--16.7 MPa); reactor temperature (641--712 K) and liquid hourly space velocity (0.19--0.77 h[sup [minus]1]). The hydrogen/oil ratio, 890 m[sup 3] m[sup [minus]3] was fixed in all experiments. A sulphided Ni-Mo on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in these studies. The deactivation of the catalyst, 0.2 [degree]C/day, was monitored by thedecline in the API gravity of the total liquid product with time on-stream at a standard set of conditions. The effect of temperature, WHSV, and pressure on denitrogenation, desulphurization, and metals removalwere studied and apparent kinetic parameters determined. The effect of process variables on residue conversion and Conradson carbon residue reduction were also investigated.

  15. Sustainable Development: Physical and Moral Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermanowicz, S W

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Development: Physical and Moral Issues Slav W.e-mail: hermanowicz@ce.berkeley.edu Sustainable developmentaims and objectives of sustainable development are right and

  16. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) ? State Issues ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) - State Issues & Approaches February 12 th , 2013 DOE's Technical Assistance Program 2 Agenda * TAP Introduction & QECB Resources * QECB...

  17. DFAS Wide-Area Workflow Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the DFAS wide-area workflow issues and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  18. Open Discussion of Freeze Related Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Freezing in PEMFCs", John Van Zee, University of South Carolina 2. "Freeze Issues & Landscape of Fuel Cell Freeze Patents", Ahmad Pesaran, National Renewable Energy Laboratory 3....

  19. Introduction to Structure and Dynamics: Inaugural Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.; Manlove, Robert; Colby, B. N.; Garfias, Robert; Bell, Duran

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the premier issue of Structure and Dynamics, an electronicFor this great boon, Structure and Dynamics in particular iselectronic journals, Structure and Dynamics will be widely

  20. IN THIS ISSUE Excessive Cotton Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    AGRONOMY NOTES July, 2004 IN THIS ISSUE COTTON Excessive Cotton Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Management Influence on Hardlock Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Wet Conditions and Nitrogen Applications on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

  1. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition of iodine-131 released from the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.; Stage, S.A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2.6x10{sup 4} TBq (700,000 curies) of iodine-131 were released to the air from reactor fuel processing plants on the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington State from December 1944 through December 1949. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project developed a suite of codes to estimate the doses that might have resulted from these releases. The Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET) computer code is part of this suite. The RATCHET code implements a Lagrangian-trajectory, Gaussian-puff dispersion model that uses hourly meteorological and release rate data to estimate daily time-integrated air concentrations and surface contamination for use in dose estimates. In this model, iodine is treated as a mixture of three species (nominally, inorganic gases, organic gases, and particles). Model deposition parameters are functions of the mixture and meteorological conditions. A resistance model is used to calculate dry deposition velocities. Equilibrium between concentrations in the precipitation and the air near the ground is assumed in calculating wet deposition of gases, and irreversible washout of the particles is assumed. RATCHET explicitly treats the uncertainties in model parameters and meteorological conditions. Uncertainties in iodine-131 release rates and partitioning among the nominal species are treated by varying model input. The results of 100 model runs for December 1944 through December 1949 indicate that monthly average air concentrations and deposition have uncertainties ranging from a factor of two near the center of the time-integrated plume to more than an order of magnitude near the edge. These results indicate that -10% of the iodine-131 released to the atmosphere decayed during transit in the study area, -56% was deposited within the study area, and the remaining 34% was transported out of the study area while still in the air.

  2. Velocity distribution of high-energy particles and the solar neutrino problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2001-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy infers high velocity and high velocity is a concept of special relativity. The Maxwellian velocity distribution is corrected to be consistent with special relativity. The corrected distribution reduces to the Maxwellian distribution for small velocities, contains a relatively depleted high-energy tail and vanishes at the velocity of light. This corrected distribution will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but keep solar sound speeds.

  3. Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J.R.; Dominguez, F.; Johnson, A.W.; Omstead, T.R.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten. 2 figs.

  4. Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Frank (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, A. Wayne (Albuquerque, NM); Omstead, Thomas R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten.

  5. Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; McLean, W. II

    1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus. 9 figs.

  6. Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Pleasanton, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus.

  7. Source-attribution for atmospheric mercury deposition: Where does the mercury in mercury deposition come from?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Source-attribution for atmospheric mercury deposition: Where does the mercury in mercury of the Mercury Working Group, Office of Air Quality, Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) April 21, 2005 #12;2 For mercury, how important is atmospheric deposition relative to other loading

  8. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): FOURTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Carrillo, I. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Boeche, C.; Roeser, S. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Siebert, A. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Zwitter, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Binney, J. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bijaoui, A. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR 7293, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, BP4229, F-06304 Nice (France); Wyse, R. F. G. [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Freeman, K. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Munari, U. [INAF National Institute of Astrophysics, Astronomical Institute of Padova, I-36012 Asiago (VI) (Italy); Anguiano, B., E-mail: gkordo@ast.cam.ac.uk [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); and others

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  9. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Angus, G. W., E-mail: hkatz@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: teuben@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  10. Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horine, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); James, Jr., Forrest B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

  11. Velocity renormalization in graphene from lattice Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joaquín E. Drut; Timo A. Lähde

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the Fermi velocity of the Dirac quasiparticles in clean graphene at the charge neutrality point for strong Coulomb coupling alpha_g. We perform a Lattice Monte Carlo calculation within the low-energy Dirac theory, which includes an instantaneous, long-range Coulomb interaction. We find a renormalized Fermi velocity v_FR > v_F, where v_F = c/300. Our results are consistent with a momentum-independent v_FR which increases approximately linearly with alpha_g, although a logarithmic running with momentum cannot be excluded at present. At the predicted critical coupling alpha_gc for the semimetal-insulator transition due to excitonic pair formation, we find v_FR/v_F = 3.3, which we discuss in light of experimental findings for v_FR/v_F at the charge neutrality point in ultra-clean suspended graphene.

  12. The critical velocity in the BEC-BCS crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf Weimer; Kai Morgener; Vijay Pal Singh; Jonas Siegl; Klaus Hueck; Niclas Luick; Ludwig Mathey; Henning Moritz

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We map out the critical velocity in the crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluidity with ultracold $^{6}$Li gases. A small attractive potential is dragged along lines of constant column density. The rate of the induced heating increases steeply above a critical velocity $v_c$. In the same samples, we measure the speed of sound $v_s$ by exciting density waves and compare the results to the measured values of $v_c$. We perform numerical simulations in the BEC regime and find very good agreement, validating the approach. In the strongly correlated regime, where theoretical predictions only exist for the speed of sound, our measurements of $v_c$ provide a testing ground for theoretical approaches.

  13. Velocity and charge reconstruction with the AMS/RICH detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arruda, Luísa; Borges, João; Carmo, Fernando; Gonçalves, Patrícia; Pimenta, Mário

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008, will be equipped with a proximity focusing Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH). This detector will be equipped with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers and light-guides, enabling measurements of particle electric charge and velocity. A likelihood method for the Cherenkov angle reconstruction was applied leading to a velocity determination for protons with a resolution around 0.1%. The electric charge reconstruction is based on the counting of the number of photoelectrons and on an overall efficiency estimation on an event-by-event basis. Results from the application of both methods are presented.

  14. The AMS-RICH velocity and charge reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barão, F; Arruda, L; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barreira, G; Belmont, E; Berdugo, J; Borges, J; Buénerd, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cortina, E; Costado, M; Crespo, D; Delgado, C; Díaz, C; Derome, L; Gonçalves, P; Garcia-Lopez, R; de la Guia, C; Herrero, A; Lanciotti, E; Laurenti, G; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Marin, J; Mangin-Brinet, M; Martínez, G; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Palomares, C; Pereira, R; Pimenta, M; Putze, A; Sallaz-Damaz, Y; Seo, E S; Sevilla, I; Torrento, A; Vargas-Trevino, M; Veziant, O

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMS detector, to be installed on the International Space Station, includes a Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector with two different radiators, silica aerogel (n=1.05) and sodium fluoride (n=1.334). This detector is designed to provide very precise measurements of velocity and electric charge in a wide range of cosmic nuclei energies and atomic numbers. The detector geometry, in particular the presence of a reflector for acceptance purposes, leads to complex Cerenkov patterns detected in a pixelized photomultiplier matrix. The results of different reconstruction methods applied to test beam data as well as to simulated samples are presented. To ensure nominal performances throughout the flight, several detector parameters have to be carefully monitored. The algorithms developed to fulfill these requirements are presented. The velocity and charge measurements provided by the RICH detector endow the AMS spectrometer with precise particle identification capabilities in a wide energy range. The expected performance...

  15. Low velocity ion stopping in binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tashev, Bekbolat; Baimbetov, Fazylkhan [Department of Physics, Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96, Almaty 480012 (Kazakhstan); Deutsch, Claude [LPGP (UMR-CNRS 8578), Universite Paris XI, 91405 Orsay (France); Fromy, Patrice [Direction de l'Informatique, Universite Paris XI, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Attention is focused on the low ion velocity stopping mechanisms in multicomponent and dense target plasmas built of quasiclassical electron fluids neutralizing binary ionic mixtures, such as, deuterium-tritium of current fusion interest, proton-heliumlike iron in the solar interior or proton-helium ions considered in planetology, as well as other mixtures of fiducial concern in the heavy ion beam production of warm dense matter at Bragg peak conditions. The target plasma is taken in a multicomponent dielectric formulation a la Fried-Conte. The occurrence of projectile ion velocities (so-called critical) for which target electron slowing down equals that of given target ion components is also considered. The corresponding multiquadrature computations, albeit rather heavy, can be monitored analytical through a very compact code operating a PC cluster. Slowing down results are systematically scanned with respect to target temperature and electron density, as well as ion composition.

  16. The AMS-RICH velocity and charge reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Barao; M. Aguilar-Benitez; L. Arruda; B. Baret; A. Barrau; G. Barreira; E. Belmont; J. Berdugo; J. Borges; M. Buenerd; D. Casadei; J. Casaus; E. Cortina; M. Costado; D. Crespo; C. Delgado; C. Diaz; L. Derome; P. Goncalves; R. Garcia-Lopez; C. de la Guia; A. Herrero; E. Lanciotti; G. Laurenti; A. Malinin; C. Mana; J. Marin; M. Mangin-Brinet; G. Martinez; A. Menchaca-Rocha; C. Palomares; R. Pereira; M. Pimenta; A. Putze; Y. Sallaz-Damaz; E. S. Seo; I. Sevilla; A. Torrento; M. Vargas-Trevino; O. Veziant

    2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMS detector, to be installed on the International Space Station, includes a Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector with two different radiators, silica aerogel (n=1.05) and sodium fluoride (n=1.334). This detector is designed to provide very precise measurements of velocity and electric charge in a wide range of cosmic nuclei energies and atomic numbers. The detector geometry, in particular the presence of a reflector for acceptance purposes, leads to complex Cerenkov patterns detected in a pixelized photomultiplier matrix. The results of different reconstruction methods applied to test beam data as well as to simulated samples are presented. To ensure nominal performances throughout the flight, several detector parameters have to be carefully monitored. The algorithms developed to fulfill these requirements are presented. The velocity and charge measurements provided by the RICH detector endow the AMS spectrometer with precise particle identification capabilities in a wide energy range. The expected performances on light isotope separation are discussed.

  17. Role of gas phase reactions in subatmospheric chemical-vapor deposition ozone/TEOS processes for oxide deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    -vapor deposition. Our results for oxide deposition show optimum process window around 200 Torr for producing films a po- tentially optimum process window in which film properties, deposition rates, film uniformity requires high quality dielectric films that can be deposited rapidly and conformally on high aspect ratio

  18. Authorization Form for Direct Deposit for Boston College Vendor Payments Boston College has implemented Direct Deposit for Vendor Payments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Authorization Form for Direct Deposit for Boston College Vendor Payments Boston College has implemented Direct Deposit for Vendor Payments. Once you are set up, all payments will be processed via direct, a brief payment description, and the estimated deposit date. Direct Deposit Form Vendor Information Vendor

  19. Boltzmann Solver with Adaptive Mesh in Velocity Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolobov, Vladimir I.; Arslanbekov, Robert R. [CFD Research Corporation, 215 Wynn Dr, Huntsville, AL, 35803 (United States); Frolova, Anna A. [Dorodnicyn Computing Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova Str., 40, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the implementation of direct Boltzmann solver with Adaptive Mesh in Velocity Space (AMVS) using quad/octree data structure. The benefits of the AMVS technique are demonstrated for the charged particle transport in weakly ionized plasmas where the collision integral is linear. We also describe the implementation of AMVS for the nonlinear Boltzmann collision integral. Test computations demonstrate both advantages and deficiencies of the current method for calculations of narrow-kernel distributions.

  20. Pneumatic cleaning of sugarcane utilizing a high velocity air jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, John Ray

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    - oped to cope with the increased amount of trash present in unburned sugarcane. This research involved the testing and computer simulation of a chopper air jet nozzle assembly. The experimental test setup included a two-stage conveyor. This conveyor... of the system was evaluated. The results of the chopper air jet nozzle assembly tests verified that the air velocity, nozzle size, chopper blade configuration and feed-in rate contributed signifi- cantly to the cleanliness of the billets. The air velo- city...

  1. Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data �º Ð 1 ¸ � � �¹ � Ý�¹� � 2 1 to measure fish swimming speeds. This is possible when fish form schools that are large enough so that the multiple Doppler sonar beams are sampling the fish speeds at the same time. In situations where fish

  2. Studies of the velocity fields near a submerged rectangular object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-Ki

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of the time periodic waves past a submerged rectangular object. For sotne wave conditions, large energy dissipation occurred at the submerged object due to vortex generation. The amount of energy dissipation was examined by comparing incident wave energy... object. A two component laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) was used to obtain detailed measurements of the instantaneous velocity field and flow visualization was conducted to study the vortex structure around the submerged object. The measured wave...

  3. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, Moscow, 117036 (Russian Federation); Baker Hughes, Inc, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX, 77073 (United States)

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  4. Time, Distance, Velocity, Redshift: a personal guided tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kiang

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt to answer the question 'Can we observe galaxies that recede faster than light ?' led to a re-examination of the notions of time, distance, velocity and redshift as they occur in newtonian physics, special relativity, general relativity and cosmology. A number of misconceptions were uncovered. It was found that, once freed of special relativity preconceptions, the above question is easily and unequivocally answered

  5. Design of regulated velocity flow assurance device for petroleum industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yardi, Chaitanya Narendra

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    flowmeter, which monitors the bypass flow. A motorized butterfly valve is used for actually controlling the bypass flow. In addition to cleaning, the proposed pig utilizes on-board electronics like accelerom- eter and pressure transducers to store the data... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 B. Concept 1 : Governor Pig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 vii CHAPTER Page C. Concept 2 : Pig Velocity Control Using Mechanical Braking . 39 D. Concept 3 : Bypass Control Using Motorized Butterfly Valve . 40 E. Conclusion...

  6. Experimental investigation of velocity biasing in laser Doppler anemometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiedner, Brian Gregory

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tech University; Chair of Advisory Commettee: Dr. Gerald L. Morrison The effects of several velocity bias reduction schemes were invest- igated using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer and counter type (burst) signal processors. Amongst these schemes... was the McLaughlin Tiederman 3-D weighting factor, time between data weighting factor, equal time interval sampling and analogue instrumentation measurements. The ana- logue instrumentation measurements were obtained from the analogue frequency outputs...

  7. Glow discharge plasma deposition of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weakliem, Herbert A. (Pennington, NJ); Vossen, Jr., John L. (Bridgewater, NJ)

    1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A glow discharge plasma reactor for deposition of thin films from a reactive RF glow discharge is provided with a screen positioned between the walls of the chamber and the cathode to confine the glow discharge region to within the region defined by the screen and the cathode. A substrate for receiving deposition material from a reactive gas is positioned outside the screened region. The screen is electrically connected to the system ground to thereby serve as the anode of the system. The energy of the reactive gas species is reduced as they diffuse through the screen to the substrate. Reactive gas is conducted directly into the glow discharge region through a centrally positioned distribution head to reduce contamination effects otherwise caused by secondary reaction products and impurities deposited on the reactor walls.

  8. Supplemental heating of deposition tooling shields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlhausen, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peebles, Diane E. (Albuquerque, NM); Hunter, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Eckelmeyer, Kenneth H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of reducing particle generation from the thin coating deposited on the internal surfaces of a deposition chamber which undergoes temperature variation greater than 100.degree. C. comprising maintaining the temperature variation of the internal surfaces low enough during the process cycle to keep thermal expansion stresses between the coating and the surfaces under 500 MPa. For titanium nitride deposited on stainless steel, this means keeping temperature variations under approximately 70.degree. C. in a chamber that may be heated to over 350.degree. C. during a typical processing operation. Preferably, a supplemental heater is mounted behind the upper shield and controlled by a temperature sensitive element which provides feedback control based on the temperature of the upper shield.

  9. Forming aspheric optics by controlled deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aspheric optical element formed by depositing material onto a spherical surface of an optical element by controlled deposition to form an aspheric surface of desired shape. A reflecting surface, single or multi-layer, can then be formed on the aspheric surface by evaporative or sputtering techniques. Aspheric optical elements are suitable for deep ultra-violet (UV) and x-ray wavelengths. The reflecting surface may, for example, be a thin (.about.100 nm) layer of aluminum, or in some cases the deposited modifying layer may function as the reflecting surface. For certain applications, multi-layer reflective surfaces may be utilized, such as chromium-carbon or tungsten-carbon multi-layer, with the number of layers and thickness being determined by the intended application.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  11. Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of October 1 to December 31, 1996. In particular, the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. The computational model for simulating particle transport in turbulent flows was used to analyze the dispersion and deposition of particles in a recirculating flow region. The predictions of the particle resuspension model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as we as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data. Considerable progress was also made in the direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of glass fiber in the aerosol wind tunnel was also obtained.

  12. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

  13. RVSAO 2.0: Digital Redshifts and Radial Velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael J. Kurtz; Douglas J. Mink

    1998-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    RVSAO is a set of programs to obtain redshifts and radial velocities from digital spectra. RVSAO operates in the IRAF(Tody 1986, 1993) environment. The heart of the system is xcsao, which implements the cross-correlation method, and is a direct descendant of the system built by Tonry and Davis (1979). emsao uses intelligent heuristics to search for emission lines in spectra, then fits them to obtain a redshift. sumspec shifts and sums spectra to build templates for cross-correlation. linespec builds synthetic spectra given a list of spectral lines. bcvcorr corrects velocities for the motion of the earth. We discuss in detail the parameters necessary to run xcsao and emsao properly. We discuss the reliability and error associated with xcsao derived redshifts. We develop an internal error estimator, and we show how large, stable surveys can be used to develop more accurate error estimators. We develop a new methodology for building spectral templates for galaxy redshifts. We show how to obtain correlation velocities using emission line templates. Emission line correlations are substantially more efficient than the previous standard technique, automated emission line fitting. We compare the use of RVSAO with new methods, which use Singular Value Decomposition and $\\chi^2$ fitting techniques.

  14. ECONOMICS UPDATE Issue 1 Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    ECONOMICS UPDATE Issue 1 Economics Update Autumn 2014 UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN ­ DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS IN THIS ISSUE Welcome to the first Economics update! In this twice-yearly publication, we. In the Research Assessment Exercise results of 2008, 100% of Economics research, was judged to be of international

  15. Inside this Issue Clean Sweep 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    (coal, aggregate, ore, etc.) are involved in commercial transactions where current weighing technologyInside this Issue Page Clean Sweep 1 This Month in History 1 Calendar 2 This Month in History on page 4) 1 Volume 2 Issue 5 August 29, 2011 Clean Sweep By John Barton Vast amounts of bulk materials

  16. Product and Service Directory 2004 Issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, N.K. (ed.)

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual November-December issue of the Nuclear Plant Journal serves as directory of information resources on products and services related to the nuclear power industry. The directory consists of over 3,000 products and services submitted by over 300 suppliers worldwide during October and November 2003. The issue is divided into 4 main areas: Products and Services, Corporate Capabilities, and Suppliers.

  17. Bristol Heart Institute issue broken heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    Bristol Heart Institute issue Mending a broken heart The energy powerhouse Plaques, cracks and heart attacks re:search University of Bristol · June 2006 #12;BRISTOL HEART INSTITUTE ISSUE · JUNE 2006 THE BRISTOL HEART INSTITUTE 1 C ardiovascular disease is the UK's single biggest killer of both men and women

  18. Volume 7, Issue 1 January 27, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tiefeng

    this issue at http://readsh101.com/umn.html Join us on facebook at https://www.facebook't cross the line. Stay in control. Facebook.com/LineOfRegret" #12;Page 2 Volume 7, Issue 1 January 27.com and click Create Account OR imleagues.com and click "Log in with Facebook" (if you have a Facebook account

  19. Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations and Their Impacts on The Private College of Forest Resources continued its Denman Forestry Issues Series on May 30, 2001. Alumni landowners. Policy analysts and speakers representing the Washington Farm Forestry Assn., Washington Forest

  20. California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Law 273.71 California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008) Units: 2 CCN (2Ls/3Ls): 49696 for Environmental Law & Policy and a Lecturer in Residence at Boalt Hall School of Law. He received his law degree of key California environmental law and policy issues. Guest speakers include a distinguished group

  1. EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION AND DATA COLLECTION ISSUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION AND DATA COLLECTION ISSUES Data Management Group Joint Program .................................................................................... 16 #12;Employment Information and Data Collection Issues ii Table of Figures Table 1 ­ Person use of the municipal property assessment file as a starting source of employer information. The key

  2. Method for using salt deposits for storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, M. W.; Voorhees, E. J.

    1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for developing, evacuating, using, sealing, and re-entering multiple stacked cavities which are created from a single well in salt deposits. The cavities are created in a salt deposit by circulating raw water through concentric casing strings in the well. Each of the cavities is evacuated of liquids prior to use. After storage material is injected into a cavity, the cavity is sealed by setting a plug in the well bore above the top of the cavity. The cavities may be re-entered by drilling out the plug or by drilling a directional well directly into the cavity.

  3. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  4. Polymer-assisted deposition of films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey,Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell,Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia,Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Lin,Yuan (Chandler, AZ)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer assisted deposition process for deposition of metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be conformal on a variety of substrates including non-planar substrates. In some instances, the films can be epitaxial in structure and can be of optical quality. The process can be organic solvent-free.

  5. Management issues in automated audit analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, K.A.; Hochberg, J.G.; Wilhelmy, S.K.; McClary, J.F.; Christoph, G.G.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses management issues associated with the design and implementation of an automated audit analysis system that we use to detect security events. It gives the viewpoint of a team directly responsible for developing and managing such a system. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) as a case in point. We examine issues encountered at Los Alamos, detail our solutions to them, and where appropriate suggest general solutions. After providing an introduction to NADIR, we explore four general management issues: cost-benefit questions, privacy considerations, legal issues, and system integrity. Our experiences are of general interest both to security professionals and to anyone who may wish to implement a similar system. While NADIR investigates security events, the methods used and the management issues are potentially applicable to a broad range of complex systems. These include those used to audit credit card transactions, medical care payments, and procurement systems.

  6. Issues paper on radiation site cleanup regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA prepared the document to present issues, approaches, and preliminary analyses related to its development of radiation site cleanup regulations. It focuses exclusively on issues and approaches related to developing cleanup regulations; it does not address issues specific to waste management regulations, which will be addressed in a separate document. The first three chapters discuss Significant Issues, Regulatory Approaches, and Summary and Next Steps. Appendix A presents background information on radioactive waste and provides additional details of EPA coordination of its rulemaking effort. Appendix B discusses statutory authorities upon which EPA may base its cleanup regulations. Appendix C is a copy of the EPA/NRC MOU. Appendix D discusses the issues raised in NRC's Enhanced Participatory Rulemaking on Radiological Criteria for Decommissioning, in which EPA participated. Appendix E is a list of acronyms, and Appendix F is a glossary of terms used throughout the document.

  7. Experimental study on thermophoretic deposition of soot particles in laminar diffusion flames along a solid wall in microgravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jae-Hyuk; Chung, Suk Ho [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea); Fujita, Osamu; Tsuiki, Takafumi [Division of Mechanical and Space Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kim, Junhong [Laboratoire E.M2.C., UPR 288 C.N.R.S Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes 92295 (France)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Soot deposition process in diffusion flames along a solid wall has been investigated experimentally under a microgravity environment. An ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) diffusion flame was formed around a cylindrical rod-burner with the surrounding air velocities of V{sub a} = 2.5, 5, and 10 cm/s, the oxygen concentration of 35%, and the burner wall temperature of 300 K. A laser extinction method was adopted to measure the distribution of soot volume fraction. The experiments determined the trace of maximum soot concentration together with the relative distance of the trace of flame. Results showed that the distance was about 2-5 mm. As the surrounding air velocity increased, the region of the soot particle distribution moved closer to the burner wall. The soot particles near the flame zone tended to move away from the flame zone because of the thermophoretic force and to concentrate at a certain narrow region inside the flame. Because of the simultaneous effects of convection and the thermophoresis, soot particles finally adhered to the burner wall. It has been found that there existed an optimal air velocity for the early deposition of soot on the furnace wall. (author)

  8. Measurements of Spatially Resolved Velocity Variations in Shock Compressed Heterogeneous Materials Using a Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ASAY,JAMES R.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; TROTT,WAYNE M.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relatively straightforward changes in the optical design of a conventional optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) can be used to produce a line-imaging velocity interferometer wherein both temporal and spatial resolution can be adjusted over a wide range. As a result line-imaging ORVIS can be tailored to a variety of specific applications involving dynamic deformation of heterogeneous materials as required by the characteristic length scale of these materials (ranging from a few {micro}m for ferroelectric ceramics to a few mm for concrete). A line-imaging ORVIS has been successfully interfaced to the target chamber of a compressed gas gun driver and fielded on numerous tests in combination with simultaneous measurements using a dual delay-leg, ''push-pull'' VISAR system. These tests include shock loading of glass-reinforced polyester composites, foam reverberation experiments (measurements at the free surface of a thin aluminum plate impacted by foam), and measurements of dispersive velocity in a shock-loaded explosive simulant (sugar). Comparison of detailed spatially-resolved material response to the spatially averaged VISAR measurements will be discussed.

  9. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioecology is the study of the fate and transport and potential effects of radionuclides and associated contaminants in the environment. In short, it is the science that describes the fundamental connection between environmental health and human health risks. As such, radioecology can and has provided the credible, consistent and defensible basis for the successful and cost-effective environmental cleanup and closure of nuclear production and waste sites. In addition, radioecology also provides the technical basis for making timely and reliable decisions on cleanup in the aftermath of nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. The 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident resulted in catastrophic health, social, and economic consequences in many countries, predominantly, Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. The extent of radioactive contamination, levels and forms of contamination, and diversity of the ecosystems affected by the accident did not have any precedent and provided unique opportunities for environmental scientists around the world. Following the natural course of their development, populations of species and their communities found themselves in conditions of chronic radiation exposure that exceeded the natural background by factors of hundreds and thousands. Anything similar would have been extremely difficult if not impossible to recreate in a scientific laboratory. Consequently, since the first few years after the accident, many teams of scientists have visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The knowledge gained by studying the consequences of this accident has tremendous importance. The concept of an international research and technical center to address the problems involving nuclear and radiological accidents became a reality with the establishment of the International Chernobyl Center (ICC). In May 1995, the US and Ukraine signed a Protocol of Intent on establishment of the ICC, and the government of Ukraine appealed to the international scientific community to support ICC and join its activities (Chernobyl Center 2006). In December 1995, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on the ChNPP closure was signed by the government of Ukraine, all of the G7 governments, and the European Commission. The ICC foundation was considered critical to ensure the safe decommissioning of the ChNPP reactor units and improvement of the safety of the Chernobyl Containment Shelter. On the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident (26 April 1996), Mr. Viktor Yushchenko, the President of Ukraine, issued a decree to establish the Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology (Chernobyl Center). On the same day, a MOU involving the US participation in Chernobyl Center activities was signed by the US and Ukraine (Chernobyl Center 2006). In July 1998, the US and Ukraine signed an agreement to establish the International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) as part of the Chernobyl Center. The creation of IRL was a logical continuation of previous programs to conduct scientific research in radioecology and provide Ukraine and the rest of the world with the necessary infrastructure and scientific basis to conduct research in radioecology, radiobiology, dosimetry, and environmental protection in the ChEZ (Chernobyl Center 2006). A recent collaborative effort with IRL has been implemented through a project titled 'Long-term impacts from radiation/contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone' (Farfan et al. 2008; Gerdes et al. 2009; Marra et al. 2010). This collaboration had the following objectives: (1) Assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure within the ChEZ; (2) Provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories based on the results of long-term field monitoring, analytical measurements, and numerical modeling of soils and groundwater radioactive contamination; and (3) Recommend the development and testing of effective cleanup technologies to reduce environmental and health risks. Based o

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Roy (Cambridge, MA); Kramer, Keith (Cleveland, OH); Liu, Xinye (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aluminum oxide film is deposited on a heated substrate by CVD from one or more alkylaluminum alkoxide compounds having composition R.sub.n Al.sub.2 (OR').sub.6-n, wherein R and R' are alkyl groups and n is in the range of 1 to 5.

  11. Issues in microwave power systems engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, R.M. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The key issues in microwave power system engineering are beam safety, frequency allocation, and affordability. These major issues are presented, discussed, and suggestions for resolving them are offered. The issue of beam safety can be captured in the phrase ``Fear of Frying.`` Can a properly engineered beamed power safety system allay the public perception of microwave radiation dangers? Openness, visibility, and education may be keys to resolving this issue satisfactorily. ``Not in my Spectrum`` is a phrase that is frequently encountered in connection with the issue of where can the microwave power beam frequency be located. International cooperation may provide a part of the solution to this issue. ``Wow, that much?`` is a phrase encountered when dealing with the issue of economic affordability of large beamed power systems. A phased engineering approach for multiple uses even during construction is presented to aid in garnering revenue during the system build phase. Also, dual mode dc-RF converters are encouraged for bi-directional power flow utility and economies of scale in production.

  12. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly technical report No. 3, March 1, 1987--May 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During this third quarter of Grant DE-FG22-86 PC 90756, we have obtained preliminary experimental results on the deposition behavior of submicron and supermicron solid particles (MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on a two-dimensional surface exposed to a high temperature/velocity particle ``laden`` atmospheric pressure jet. The uniform velocity (``plug flow``) jet, with temperatures up to about 1520 K, derives from a pressurized gaseous fuel microcombustion chamber (110 cc) equipped with a platinum guiding (exit) channel. Particles were generated by several methods (Berglund-Liu type aerosol generator, ultrasonic nebulizer, or syringe feeder with aerodynamic particle off-take) and were introduced into the combustion chamber with a carrier stream of nitrogen or air. Laser light scattering and reflectivity techniques were used for the study of particle deposition, supplemented by post-mortem microscopy on the exposed surface. We observed a linear deposition rate of submicron particles due to the thermophoretic mechanism (until the first layer was developed) under both high and low velocity conditions. On the contrary, supermicron particle deposits reach a steady-state, evidently due to a dynamic equilibrium between particle deposition and dislodging caused by the impacting particles. At several temperatures particle-free subsonic gas jets (up to 120 m/sec) were unable to remove the submicron particle layer.

  13. Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends provides a summary of the latest data and information relating to the US natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and the financial and environmental aspects of the industry. The report consists of seven chapters and five appendices. Chapter 1 presents a summary of various data trends and key issues in today`s natural gas industry and examines some of the emerging trends. Chapters 2 through 7 focus on specific areas or segments of the industry, highlighting some of the issues associated with the impact of natural gas operations on the environment. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That difference decreases with increasing elastic modulus mismatch between the sphere material and borosilicate This trend was opposite in soda-lime silicate glass; (5) Fracture in borosilicate glass occurs at lower velocities (i.e., easier) at 24{sup o} than at 0{sup o} (orthogonal) and 46{sup o} of impact for the same probability of failure. Though not analyzed yet, this suggests that a convolution of kinetic energy and friction is contributing to that trend; (6) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation RCIF. This likely is not a material property nor exclusive to borosilicate glass, rather, it is a statistical response of a combination of local, surface-located flaw and imposed tensile stress. Understanding of the surface flaw population and flaw positioning can likely enable prediction of spherical indentation RCIF; and (7) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Borofloat BS for impact kinetic energies up to {approx} 20 mJ. For kinetic energies between {approx} 20-150 mJ, fracture sometimes initiated. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 150 mJ. The energy values, and their boundaries, were much lower for BS glass than they were for soda-lime silicate glass.

  15. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  16. Velocity bunching in travelling wave accelerator with low acceleration gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui-Xuan; Li, Wei-Wei; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analytical and simulated results concerning the influences of the acceleration gradient in the velocity bunching process, which is a bunch compression scheme that uses a traveling wave accelerating structure as a compressor. Our study shows that the bunch compression application with low acceleration gradient is more tolerant to phase jitter and more successful to obtain compressed electron beam with symmetrical longitudinal distribution and low energy spread. We also present a transverse emittance compensation scheme to compensate the emittance growth caused by the increasing of the space charge force in the compressing process that is easy to be adjusted for different compressing factors.

  17. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  18. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  19. Property:Maximum Velocity(m/s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to:ManagingFieldOffice Jump to: navigation,Velocity(m/s)

  20. Supercritical Fluid Immersion Deposition: A New Process for Selective Deposition of Metal Films on Silicon Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Xiangrong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe; Young, James S.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical CO2 is used as a new solvent for immersion deposition, a galvanic displacement process traditionally carried out in aqueous HF solutions containing metal ions, to selectively develop metal films on featured or non-featured silicon substrates. Components of supercritical fluid immersion deposition (SFID) solutions for fabricating Cu and Pd films on silicon substrates are described along with the corresponding experimental setup and procedure. Only silicon substrates exposed and reactive to SFID solutions can be coated. The highly pressurized and gas-like supercritical CO2, combined with the galvanic displacement property of immersion deposition, enables the SFID technique to selectively deposit metal films in small features. SFID may also provide a new method to fabricate palladium silicide in small features or to metallize porous silicon.

  1. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  2. QualityofService Issues in Networking Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Quality­of­Service Issues in Networking Environments Burkhard Stiller \\Lambda University: +44 +1223 334476, FAX: +44 +1223 334678 E­Mail: Burkhard.Stiller@cl.cam.ac.uk Abstract Quality

  3. Inside this issue: Area Events 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    your own reusable bag to the exchange and get entered to win a passport to NYS parks. Thanks to UAS : Quad Offices Husted Hall, Downtown Campus East Campus UAB and MSC Buildings #12;Volume 6, Issue 8

  4. Regulatory issues controlling carbon capture and storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adam (Adam M.), 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is increasingly being recognized by governments, industry, the scientific community, and the public as an issue that must be dealt with. Parties are pursuing various strategies to reduce CO? emissions. ...

  5. IN THIS ISSUE Nitrogen on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    AGRONOMY NOTES July 2005 IN THIS ISSUE COTTON Nitrogen on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Protecting Cotton Squares and Blooms / University of Florida / Larry Arrington, Interim Dean. #12;2 Nitrogen on Cotton Now is the time to apply N

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - a-type hyper-velocity star Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hyper-velocity star Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: a-type hyper-velocity star Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Jahresbericht 2008...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - additional radial velocity Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: additional radial velocity Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 3D Least Squares Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer Summary:...

  8. Evidence for a critical velocity in a Bose-Einstein condensed gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Raman; M. Kohl; R. Onofrio; D. S. Durfee; C. E. Kuklewicz; Z. Hadzibabic; W. Ketterle

    1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied dissipation in a Bose--Einstein condensed gas by moving a blue detuned laser beam through the condensate at different velocities. Strong heating was observed only above a critical velocity.

  9. Radiation issues for the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harward, E.D. (ed.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are organized under the following categories: Radiation Control: New Issues; Exploring the Use of a De Minimus Concept in Radiation Protection; Evolving Radiation Protection Standards; Occupational Radiation Protection: Are We Doing Enough; and Emergency Planning: the Potassium Iodide Issue. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 22 papers for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 6 of the papers are included in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). Three papers were processed earlier.

  10. Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    NATURAL GAS REGULATORY roLICY: CURRENT ISSUES G. GAIL WATKINS Railroad Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased... the options of industrial energy consumers for purchasing and moving natural gas. This panel viII discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed viII be: 1...

  11. Cosmic density and velocity fields in Lagrangian perturbation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikel Susperregi; Thomas Buchert

    1997-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A first- and second-order relation between cosmic density and peculiar-velocity fields is presented. The calculation is purely Lagrangian and it is derived using the second-order solutions of the Lagrange-Newton system obtained by Buchert & Ehlers. The procedure is applied to two particular solutions given generic initial conditions. In this approach, the continuity equation yields a relation between the over-density and peculiar-velocity fields that automatically satisfies Euler's equation because the orbits are derived from the Lagrange-Newton system. This scheme generalizes some results obtained by Nusser et al. (1991) in the context of the Zel'dovich approximation. As opposed to several other reconstruction schemes, in this approach it is not necessary to truncate the expansion of the Jacobian given by the continuity equation in order to calculate a first- or second-order expression for the density field. In these previous schemes, the density contrast given by (a) the continuity equation and (b) Euler's equation are mutually incompatible. This inconsistency arises as a consequence of an improper handling of Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates in the analysis. Here, we take into account the fact that an exact calculation of the density is feasible in the Lagrangian picture and therefore an accurate and consistent description is obtained.

  12. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (3) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in Resistan{trademark}-G1 from quasi-static spherical indentation. This indicates that friction is affecting ring crack initiation in Resistan{trademark}-G1. Friction also affected ring crack initiation in Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glasses. Among these three materials, friction was the most pronounced (largest slope in the RCIF-elastic modulus graph) in the Starphire{reg_sign} and least pronounced in the BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. The reason for this is not understood, but differences in deformation behavior under high contact stresses could be a cause or contributor to this. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than it is under quasi-static conditions in Resistan{trademark}-L and Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramics. This is a trend observed too in Starphire{reg_sign} and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. (5) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation-induced ring crack initiation forces. This is not a material property nor is it exclusive to glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, rather, it is a statistical mechanical response to an accumulated history of processing and handling of that specific tile.

  13. All graphene electromechanical switch fabricated by chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milaninia, Kaveh M.

    We demonstrate an electromechanical switch comprising two polycrystalline graphene films; each deposited using ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition. The top film is pulled into electrical contact with the bottom film ...

  14. Aeolian depositional landforms of the south eastern Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, William Thomas

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing and photo interpretation techniques are used to describe and map aeolian deposits found along two sediment transport corridors in the south eastern Mojave Desert. The first pathway and associated sand deposits extend eastward from...

  15. Geochemical and sedimentological investigations of Youngest Toba Tuff ashfall deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatti, Emma

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    sedimentological structures and geometry ...................................................... 90 5.5 Discussion .......................................................................................................................... 91 5.5.1 The local... ..................................................... 97 5.6 Conclusion ......................................................................................................................... 97 CHAPTER 6. DEPOSITIONAL PROCESSES AND SEDIMENTOLOGY OF YTT DEPOSITS IN THE LENGGONG VALLEY, MALAYSIA...

  16. amyloid deposition limits: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: 1 Title page. Title: Subjective cognition and amyloid deposition imaging. A PiB PET study in normal-beta (A) deposition, imaged with 11 C-Pittsburg compound B (PiB) -...

  17. Crater ice deposits near the south pole of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westbrook, Owen William

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Layered deposits atop both Martian poles are thought to preserve a record of past climatic conditions in up to three km of water ice and dust. Just beyond the extent of these south polar layered deposits (SPLD), dozens of ...

  18. Investigation of the Moessbauer Spectrum Quality as a Dependence on the Frequency of the Velocity Signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pechousek, J. [Centre for Nanomaterial Research, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17, listopadu 1192/12, 771 46, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Prochazka, R.; Cuda, J.; Frydrych, J.; Jancik, D. [Centre for Nanomaterial Research, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is focused on a quality characterizing the Moessbauer spectra measured for various frequencies of the velocity signal. Standard electromechanical double-loudspeaker drive and digital PID velocity controller were used for calibration spectra measurement in the frequency interval from 4 up to 100 Hz. Several parameters were evaluated for recommendation of the suitable velocity signal frequency.

  19. Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector For Edge And Core Impurity Transport Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector For Edge And Core Impurity Transport Measurements H. W, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 Abstract A simple Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector has been under High velocity, pneumatic, pellet injection systems are applied routinely for injecting frozen pellets

  20. Nested Velocity Feedback Control -1 Presented at CS 2007 Dr Richard Mitchell 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Richard

    Nested Velocity Feedback Control - 1 Presented at CS 2007 © Dr Richard Mitchell 2007 Nested tolerant to changes in the plant under control #12;Nested Velocity Feedback Control - 2 Presented at CS path #12;Nested Velocity Feedback Control - 3 Presented at CS 2007 © Dr Richard Mitchell 2007 Cherry

  1. amorphous carbon deposited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The contamination was believed 2 NICKELHYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON COMPOSITE FILMS DEPOSITED IN ACETYLENEARGON MICROWAVE PLASMA DISCHARGE CiteSeer Summary:...

  2. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullendore, Arthur W. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  3. ON OIL SHALE MINING IN THE ESTONIA DEPOSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Sokman; V. Kattai; R. Vaher; Y. J. Systra

    age) cut the Estonian oil shale-kukersite deposits. Two younger groups of structures are typical fault

  4. Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  6. Paraffin deposition in offshore oil production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elphingstone, Gerald Mason

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    PARAFFIN DEPOSITION IN OFFSHORE OIL PRODUCTION A Thesis by G E R A L D M A S O N E L P H I N G S T O N E J R . Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M Univers i ty in part ial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of M A S T E R O F S C I E N C E May 1995 Major Subject: Chemica l Engineering PARAFFIN DEPOSITION IN OFFSHORE OIL PRODUCTION A Thesis by G E R A L D M A S O N E L P H I N G S T O N E J R . Submitted to Texas A & M University in part ial...

  7. Electrophoretically-deposited solid film lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, M.T.; Panitz, J.K.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aqueous-based process that uses electrophoresis to attract powdered lubricant in suspension to a charged target was developed. The deposition process yields coatings with low friction, complies with environmental safety regulations, requires minimal equipment, and has several advantages over processes involving organic binders or vacuum techniques. This work focuses on development of the deposition process, includes an analysis of the friction coefficient of the material in sliding contact with stainless steel under a range of conditions, and a functional evaluation of coating performance in a precision mechanical device application. Results show that solid lubricant films with friction coefficients as low as 0.03 can be produced. A 0.03 friction coefficient is superior to solid lubricants with binder systems and is comparable to friction coefficients generated with more costly vacuum techniques.

  8. Cutting-edge issues of core-collapse supernova theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotake, Kei [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science, Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180 (Japan); Nakamura, Ko [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan); Kuroda, Takami [Department Physik, Universität Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Takiwaki, Tomoya [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables.

  9. Electrostatic force assisted deposition of graphene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, Xiaogan (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An embodiment of a method of depositing graphene includes bringing a stamp into contact with a substrate over a contact area. The stamp has at least a few layers of the graphene covering the contact area. An electric field is developed over the contact area. The stamp is removed from the vicinity of the substrate which leaves at least a layer of the graphene substantially covering the contact area.

  10. Apparatus and method for photochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott C. (Wilmington, DE); Rocheleau, Richard E. (Wilmington, DE)

    1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A photochemical vapor deposition apparatus includes a reactor housing having a window in one wall above a reaction chamber in the housing. A transparent curtain divides the reaction chamber into a reaction zone and a flush zone. At least one substrate is mounted in the reaction zone in light communication with the window so that ultraviolet radiation may penetrate through the window into the reaction zone. The window is kept clear by a gas flowing through the flush zone.

  11. Stationary phase deposition based on onium salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Dirk, Shawn M. (Albuquerque, NM); Trudell, Daniel E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Onium salt chemistry can be used to deposit very uniform thickness stationary phases on the wall of a gas chromatography column. In particular, the stationary phase can be bonded to non-silicon based columns, especially microfabricated metal columns. Non-silicon microfabricated columns may be manufactured and processed at a fraction of the cost of silicon-based columns. In addition, the method can be used to phase-coat conventional capillary columns or silicon-based microfabricated columns.

  12. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe Second Workshop onDeposited Rock Jump to:

  13. Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS POLAR LAYERED DEPOSITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    acquired a unique dataset over the north polar layered deposits and residual ices. Here, we reviewMonday, March 12, 2007 MARS POLAR LAYERED DEPOSITS 2:30 p.m. Marina Plaza Ballroom Chairs: R. J. Phillips J. J. Plaut 2:30 p.m. Tanaka K. L. * North Polar Layered Deposits on Mars as Revealed by Hi

  14. Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Emily M.

    '' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

  15. UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, David P.

    UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE A thesis submitted deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide on crystalline silicon and anodized aluminum substrates. A homemade ALD system is used with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water as precursors to deposit uniform aluminum oxide

  16. ISSN 1745-9648 Synchronisation and Staggering of Deposit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Working Paper 07-14 Abstract: This study examines the frequency and form of deposit account interest rateISSN 1745-9648 Synchronisation and Staggering of Deposit Account Interest Rate Changes by John K change. Specifically, the question of whether deposit interest rate change is synchronised with other

  17. Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sievers, Robert E. (Boulder, CO); Hansen, Brian N. (Boulder, CO)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

  18. The effect of rainfall on the velocity distribution in shallow channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Larry Joe

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , gave the following equation for uniform two-dimensional open channel f low v v max ~2. Iog y Ve~~ in which v is the velocity at any distance, y, above the channel bed, v Is the maximum velocity, g is the acceleration of gravity, d is the Illa X... piezometer located at the same longi- tudinal position along the flume at the tip of the ve'locity probe. The velocity coefficient of the total head probe was obtained by two methods. 29 One method was determining the velocity by observing the time...

  19. Validation of velocity map imaging conditions over larger areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, Mike; Koehler, Sven P. K. [School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Moor Row, CA24 3HA Whitehaven (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have established through simulations and experiments the area over which Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) conditions prevail. We designed a VMI setup in which we can vary the ionization position perpendicular to the center axis of the time-of-flight spectrometer. We show that weak extraction conditions are far superior over standard three-plate setups if the aim is to increase the ionization volume without distorting VMI conditions. This is important for a number of crossed molecular beam experiments that already utilize weak extraction conditions, but to a greater extent for surface studies where fragments are desorbed or scattered off a surface in all directions. Our results on the dissociation of NO{sub 2} at 226 nm show that ionization of the fragments can occur up to {+-}5.5 mm away from the center axis of the time-of-flight spectrometer without affecting resolution or arrival position.

  20. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Edwin F. (Alamo, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  1. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  2. Issues in midterm analysis and forecasting 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues in Midterm Analysis and Forecasting 1998 (Issues) presents a series of nine papers covering topics in analysis and modeling that underlie the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), as well as other significant issues in midterm energy markets. AEO98, DOE/EIA-0383(98), published in December 1997, presents national forecasts of energy production, demand, imports, and prices through the year 2020 for five cases -- a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. The forecasts were prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), using EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The papers included in Issues describe underlying analyses for the projections in AEO98 and the forthcoming Annual Energy Outlook 1999 and for other products of EIA`s Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Their purpose is to provide public access to analytical work done in preparation for the midterm projections and other unpublished analyses. Specific topics were chosen for their relevance to current energy issues or to highlight modeling activities in NEMS. 59 figs., 44 tabs.

  3. Deposition of biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia by ion-beam-assisted deposition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudzik, M. P.

    1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Biaxially textured yttria (8 mol %)-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films were deposited on randomly oriented Hastelloy C and Stainless Steel 304 at room temperature as a buffer layer for subsequent deposition of oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} films. The 0.16-1.3 {micro}m thick YSZ films were deposited by e-beam evaporation at rates of 1.2-3.2 {angstrom}/sec. Biaxially textured films were produced with an Ar/O{sub 2} ion beam directed at the substrate during film growth. X-ray diffraction was used to study in-plane and out-of-plane orientation as a function of ion-bombardment angle, film thickness, ion-to-atom flux ratio, and substrate material. In-plane and out-of-plane average-misorientation angles on these YSZ films that were deposited by ion-beam-assisted deposition were as low as 17 and 5.4{degree}, respectively, on as-received substrates.

  4. DUSEL Facility Cooling Water Scaling Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, W D

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation (crystal growth) in supersaturated solutions is governed by both kenetic and thermodynamic processes. This is an important and evolving field of research, especially for the petroleum industry. There are several types of precipitates including sulfate compounds (ie. barium sulfate) and calcium compounds (ie. calcium carbonate). The chemical makeup of the mine water has relatively large concentrations of sulfate as compared to calcium, so we may expect that sulfate type reactions. The kinetics of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO4 {center_dot} 2H20, gypsum) scale formation on heat exchanger surfaces from aqueous solutions has been studied by a highly reproducible technique. It has been found that gypsum scale formation takes place directly on the surface of the heat exchanger without any bulk or spontaneous precipitation in the reaction cell. The kinetic data also indicate that the rate of scale formation is a function of surface area and the metallurgy of the heat exchanger. As we don't have detailed information about the heat exchanger, we can only infer that this will be an issue for us. Supersaturations of various compounds are affected differently by temperature, pressure and pH. Pressure has only a slight affect on the solubility, whereas temperature is a much more sensitive parameter (Figure 1). The affect of temperature is reversed for calcium carbonate and barium sulfate solubilities. As temperature increases, barium sulfate solubility concentrations increase and scaling decreases. For calcium carbonate, the scaling tendencies increase with increasing temperature. This is all relative, as the temperatures and pressures of the referenced experiments range from 122 to 356 F. Their pressures range from 200 to 4000 psi. Because the cooling water system isn't likely to see pressures above 200 psi, it's unclear if this pressure/scaling relationship will be significant or even apparent. The most common scale minerals found in the oilfield include calcium carbonates (CaCO3, mainly calcite) and alkaline-earth metal sulfates (barite BaSO4, celestite SrSO4, anhydrite CaSO4, hemihydrate CaSO4 1/2H2O, and gypsum CaSO4 2H2O or calcium sulfate). The cause of scaling can be difficult to identify in real oil and gas wells. However, pressure and temperature changes during the flow of fluids are primary reasons for the formation of carbonate scales, because the escape of CO2 and/or H2S gases out of the brine solution, as pressure is lowered, tends to elevate the pH of the brine and result in super-saturation with respect to carbonates. Concerning sulfate scales, the common cause is commingling of different sources of brines either due to breakthrough of injected incompatible waters or mixing of two different brines from different zones of the reservoir formation. A decrease in temperature tends to cause barite to precipitate, opposite of calcite. In addition, pressure drops tend to cause all scale minerals to precipitate due to the pressure dependence of the solubility product. And we can expect that there will be a pressure drop across the heat exchanger. Weather or not this will be offset by the rise in pressure remains to be seen. It's typically left to field testing to prove out. Progress has been made toward the control and treatment of the scale deposits, although most of the reaction mechanisms are still not well understood. Often the most efficient and economic treatment for scale formation is to apply threshold chemical inhibitors. Threshold scale inhibitors are like catalysts and have inhibition efficiency at very low concentrations (commonly less than a few mg/L), far below the stoichiometric concentrations of the crystal lattice ions in solution. There are many chemical classes of inhibitors and even more brands on the market. Based on the water chemistry it is anticipated that there is a high likelihood for sulfate compound precipitation and scaling. This may be dependent on the temperature and pressure, which vary throughout the system. Therefore, various types and amounts of scaling may occur at different

  5. Effects of copper deposition on boiler waterside surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wangerin, M.C.; Rondum, K.D. [Ashland Chemical Co., Boonton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative importance of metal oxide corrosion products in waterside deposits, as opposed to traditional scale-forming constituents, is discussed, and the sources of copper and copper oxide boiler deposits are reviewed. Also reviewed are explanations of some of the problems associated with the presence of deposits and especially, copper-containing deposits. These include those due to a reduction in heat transfer and tube metal overheating, as well as various corrosion mechanisms. Case histories, which illustrate certain deleterious mechanisms due to the presence of such deposition, are also presented.

  6. Department of Energy Issues Draft Renewable Energy and Efficient...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Issues Draft Renewable Energy and Efficient Energy Projects Solicitation to Foster Clean Energy Innovation Department of Energy Issues Draft Renewable Energy...

  7. Open Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed Hydrogen Storage at SAE-International Open Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed Hydrogen...

  8. Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials 2013 DOE...

  9. Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and...

  10. Fuel Quality Issues in Stationary Fuel Cell Systems | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Quality Issues in Stationary Fuel Cell Systems Fuel Quality Issues in Stationary Fuel Cell Systems This report, prepared by Argonne National Laboratory, looks at impurities...

  11. UESC Contracting Officer Issues Round-Up | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    UESC Contracting Officer Issues Round-Up UESC Contracting Officer Issues Round-Up Presentation-given at the Spring 2013 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG)...

  12. UESC Contracting Officer Issues Round-Up | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Contracting Officer Issues Round-Up UESC Contracting Officer Issues Round-Up Presentation-given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG)...

  13. President Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for the Impacts...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    President Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for the Impacts of Climate Change; Tribal Leaders to Serve on Task Force President Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for...

  14. Nuclear Safety Enforcement Letter issued to Sandia Corporation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Enforcement Letter issued to Sandia Corporation Nuclear Safety Enforcement Letter issued to Sandia Corporation 9222014 Enforcement Letter, Sandia Corporation, September 22, 2014...

  15. LM Issues Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LM Issues Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on the Uranium Leasing Program LM Issues Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on the Uranium Leasing...

  16. DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National...

  17. Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada Geothermal Project Department of Energy Issues Loan Guarantee Supported by Recovery Act for Nevada...

  18. EERE Announces Notice of Intent to Issue Fuel Cell Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EERE Announces Notice of Intent to Issue Fuel Cell Technologies Incubator: Innovations in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fuels Technologies FOA EERE Announces Notice of Intent to Issue...

  19. Verifying the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercializati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercialization of Ethanol Containing Diesel Fuels Verifying the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercialization of...

  20. Department of Energy Issues Requests for Applications for Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Issues Requests for Applications for Nuclear-Related Science and Engineering Scholarships and Fellowships Department of Energy Issues Requests for Applications...

  1. Department of Energy Issues Draft Loan Guarantee Solicitation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Issues Draft Loan Guarantee Solicitation for Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Department of Energy Issues Draft Loan Guarantee Solicitation for Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects...

  2. Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity for Integrated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity for Integrated PV and Energy Storage Systems Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity for Integrated PV and Energy Storage...

  3. Public Roundtable- Data Access and Privacy Issues Related to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Public Roundtable- Data Access and Privacy Issues Related to Smart Grid Technologies Public Roundtable- Data Access and Privacy Issues Related to Smart Grid Technologies Transcript...

  4. Energy Department Announces Notice of Intent to Issue Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity Announcement for Targeted Algal Biofuels and Bioproducts Energy Department Announces Notice of Intent to Issue Funding...

  5. DOE Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services DOE Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services November 14, 2011 -...

  6. Decoupling: Mechanics and Issues, Presentation to the New Mexico...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Decoupling: Mechanics and Issues, Presentation to the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission Energy Efficiency Incentives Workshop Decoupling: Mechanics and Issues, Presentation...

  7. Outage management and health physics issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: India: a potential commercial opportunity, a U.S. Department of Commerce Report, by Joe Neuhoff and Justin Rathke; The changing climate for nuclear energy, by Skip Bowman, Nuclear Energy Insitute; Selecting protective clothing, by J. Mark Price, Southern California Edison; and Succssful refurbishment outage, by Sudesh K. Gambhir, Omaha Public Power District. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Containment radiation monitoring spiking, by Michael W. Lantz and Robert Routolo, Arizona Public Service Company; Improved outage performance, by Michael Powell and Troy Wilfong, Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Stop repacking valves and achieve leak-free performance, by Kenneth Hart, PPL Susquehanna LLC; and Head assembly upgrade package, by Timothy Petit, Dominion Nuclear.

  8. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  9. Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Riland; D.R. Bowman; R.J. Tighe

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed.

  10. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major interviews, articles and reports in this issue include: Increasing momentum, by Gary Taylor, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; An acceptable investment, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, Inc.; Fuel recycling for the U.S. and abroad, by Philippe Knoche, Areva, France; We're bullish on nuclear power, by Dan R. Keuter, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; Ten key actions for decommissioning, by Lawrence E. Boing, Argonne National Laboratory; Safe, efficient and cost-effective decommissioning, by Dr. Claudio Pescatore and Torsten Eng, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), France; and, Plant profile: SONGS decommissioning.

  11. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: An interesting year ahead of us, by Tom Christopher, AREVA NP Inc.; U.S.-India Civil Nuclear Cooperation; Decontamination and recycling of retired components, by Sean P. Brushart, Electric Power Research Institute; and, ANO is 33 and going strong, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The industry innovation article is: Continuous improvement process, by ReNae Kowalewski, Arkansas Nuclear One.

  12. The World of Dark Shadows Issue 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. Pea chtree, Atlanta. Ga., 30309. Due to reasons beyond our control, Jeff Thompson's serial does not appear this issue . I'd like to thank the following people who were instrumental in adding 20 pages to this issue: Daniel Redington, Jr., Anita... together a package of DS fan material and sent it to Worldvision Enterprises to demonstl-ate the interest in DS is still here . Al1 fan clubs we.re invited to partici pa te in this effort. Anita Henke recently received a letter from Norldvision (660...

  13. Nutrient Management Issues inNutrient Management Issues in TennesseeTennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 large CAFOsCAFOs permittedpermitted All swineAll swine 136 medium136 medium CAFOs issued by Dept. of EnvironmentPermits issued by Dept. of Environment and Conservation (TDEC and enforcementenforcement www.state.tn.us/environment/permits/cafo.htmwww.state.tn.us/environment/permits/cafo.htm Tennessee

  14. Rangeland Hydrology:Rangeland Hydrology: Research Issues andResearch Issues and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland Hydrology:Rangeland Hydrology: Research Issues andResearch Issues and QuestionsQuestions Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University Hydrologic Model Schematic state variables e.g. snow, soil moisture Hydrologic Models streamflow Meteorological Data ( )station, gridded Land Cover

  15. CONNET -DESIGN ISSUES1 Issues in Designing a European Technology Transfer Network for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amor, Robert

    CONNET - DESIGN ISSUES1 Issues in Designing a European Technology Transfer Network of European Union's Technology Transfer Network such a one-stop-shop for the construction industry of Europe and techniques that enable technology transfer to SMEs as well as provide new business opportunities and models

  16. Date Issue Brief # ISSUE BRIEF Natural Gas: A Bridge to a Low?Carbon Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen P. A. Brown; Alan J. Krupnick; Margaret A. Walls; Stephen P. A. Brown; Alan J. Krupnick; Margaret A. Walls

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issue Brief 09?11Resources for the Future Resources for the Future is an independent, nonpartisan think tank that, through its social science research, enables policymakers and stakeholders to make better, more informed decisions about energy, environmental, natural resource, and public health issues. Headquartered in Washington, DC, its research scope comprises programs in nations around the world.

  17. http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/issue-ptrsa Submitted to Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A -Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    strong correlation between rates of metals usage and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) (R2 = 0.79), with per on the order of a third of the total worldwide primary energy use per year (~ 160 EJ), and contributing://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/issue-ptrsa Submitted to Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A - Issue #12;ForReview Only 1 The Energy Required to Produce Materials

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: atomic layer deposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wavearc-fault circuitatomic layer deposition

  19. Indiana Energy Conference "Exploring Emerging Energy Issues"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Indiana Energy Conference "Exploring Emerging Energy Issues" Wednesday, October 3, 2012 University. Speakers/Panelists: Bernie Paul, Energy Consultant John Kinsman, Edison Electric Institute Are They Moving the U.S. Beyond Coal? Are regulations from the EPA moving too quickly and leading us away from coal

  20. Inside This Issue Using "My 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    ://blink.ucsd.edu/technology/network/connections/off-campus/). For more information about our electronic book collections or other collections issues, contact Jeff Williams at j12williams@ucsd.edu or (858) 822-2218. Cool Tips & Tricks - A Quarterly Series to Enhance Your

  1. Renewable energy 1998: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the following five papers: Renewable electricity purchases: History and recent developments; Transmission pricing issues for electricity generation from renewable resources; Analysis of geothermal heat pump manufacturers survey data; A view of the forest products industry from a wood energy perspective; and Wind energy developments: Incentives in selected countries. A glossary is included. 19 figs., 27 tabs.

  2. Also inside this issue: Bioengineering Better Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Also inside this issue: Bioengineering Better Biomass DOE JGI/EMSL Collaborative Science Projects and degrade carbon. This is an image of the Mn(II)-oxidizing fungus Stilbella aciculosa ­ the fungal biomass Better Biomass Feedstock Science Highlights 15 Clouds up Close Improving Catalysts Pore Challenge

  3. Energy issues of GPU computing Stphane Vialle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vialle, Stéphane

    Energy issues of GPU computing clusters Stéphane Vialle SUPELEC­ UMI GTCNRS 2958 & Al code development and maintenance How many software engineers can do it ? Computing nodes requiring more » ? But we expect : · To run faster and / or · To save energy (Watt.Hours) #12;1 First experiment

  4. 5 Data Quality Issues and Geographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    introduces the readers to theoretical concepts regarding quality management and risk management on this theoretical foundation, this chapter then presents a pragmatic approach of quality and risk management99 5 Data Quality Issues and Geographic Knowledge Discovery Marc Gervais Department of Geomatics

  5. Inside this issue: Green Holiday Tips 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    Inside this issue: Message 1 Green Holiday Tips 2 Real vs. Fake Tree 3 Semester wrap up: Energy a record number of CFL bulbs being distributed in the living residences, had another great energy campaign such as compost bins, bird feeders, energy/water saving appliances, bikes or bus passes make great gifts! Make

  6. Selected Intellectual Property Issues in Standardization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spring, Michael B.

    Selected Intellectual Property Issues in Standardization Martin B.H. Weiss Michael B. Spring of a standard: development, where the content of the standard is created; distribution, where documentation on the standard is shared with the vendor and user community; and implementation, where products and processes

  7. Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emissions Trading Workshop Debbie Reed DRD Associates Purdue University Washington, DC Friday, April 30 Cycles ISSUE: C & N losses from agricultural systems = costly to ag, society SOLUTION: Farmers) Smaller, diffuse, non-point sources = not efficient targets, regulated reductions are too costly Ag = non

  8. In This Issue United States and European

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Corn Rootworm Results of an Indiana Farmer Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 37th Top Farmer Crop Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 ew issues in United States (U.S.) agriculture, biotechnology has the potential to lower production costs by reducing input usage. Biotechnology also has

  9. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to evaluate the impacts of fish and wildlife resources of all renewable energy sources (past, proposed1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Renewable Energy *Preliminary draft, please refer fish and wildlife impacts associated with renewable energy development. The Council also received

  10. Service Oriented Architecture Introduction and Research Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Service Oriented Architecture Introduction and Research Issues 2008.07.16 In-Gwon Song KAIST SE LAB 2008 #12;Contents Introduction Understanding service oriented architecture(SOA) Definitions Trends Oriented Architecture(SOA) Service Service Service RegistryDiscover Register A system built with SOA 3

  11. Critical Electric Power Issues in Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical Electric Power Issues in Pennsylvania: Transmission, Distributed Generation and Continuing Services when the Grid Fails Produced by the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center for the Pa-268-3003, apt@cmu.edu. Executive Director of the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center at Carnegie Mellon

  12. Special issue on Speech Enhancement 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gannot, Sharon

    Editorial Special issue on Speech Enhancement 1. Introduction Speech quality is severely degraded and environment. Speech enhancement algorithms which improve the quality of speech and reduce or eliminate of microphones used to collect the acoustic signal and noise, different speech enhancement algorithms have been

  13. Neutrino astrophysics : recent advances and open issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volpe, Cristina

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We highlight recent advances in neutrino astrophysics, the open issues and the interplay with neutrino properties. We emphasize the important progress in our understanding of neutrino flavor conversion in media. We discuss the case of solar neutrinos, of core-collapse supernova neutrinos and of SN1987A, and of the recently discovered ultra-high energy neutrinos whose origin is to be determined.

  14. Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: "Seeking Sustainability"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    and Introduction - Dr. B. Bruce Bare, Dean, College of Forest Resources 10:20 - 10:45 Sustainability in the FaceDenman Forestry Issues Series presents: "Seeking Sustainability" Monday, November 18, 2002, 10AM how to manage natural resources in a sustainable way. The question of sustainability is a complex one

  15. Situational Awareness: Personalizing Issue Tracking Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    Situational Awareness: Personalizing Issue Tracking Systems Olga Baysal, Reid Holmes, and Michael W. Godfrey Software Architecture Group (SWAG) David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science, University role in ongoing software development; they are used by developers to support collaborative bug fixing

  16. ISSUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ISSUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH ONCE-THROUGH COOLING of the Studies Used to Detect Impacts to Marine Environments by California's Coastal Power Plants Using Once of Assumptions, Methods, and Analyses Used In Recent Studies to Assess the Impacts of Power Plants That Use

  17. ISSUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ISSUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH ONCE-THROUGH COOLING AT CALIFORNIA'S COASTAL POWER PLANTS In Support of the 2005 Environmental Performance Report and 2005 Integrated Principal Authors Dr. Noel Davis, Chambers Group James Schoonmaker, Aspen Environmental Group Robert

  18. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish *preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:07 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section D. 7 Title: Resident Fish Mitigation (pg 22-23) Overview Generally, entities recommend that the existing language

  19. the Physics Illinois inside this issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    the Physics Illinois Bulletin inside this issue: Dark Energy Survey's first light Illinois 2012 Vol. 1 No. 1 Department of Physics College of Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign #12;To Illinois Physics colleagues, alumni, and friends, We in the Department of Physics

  20. Attitudes towards Aboriginal issues in Saskatchewan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Attitudes towards Aboriginal issues in Saskatchewan: A research brief January 2012 SaskatchewanGrane, St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan Dr. Loleen Berdahl, University of Saskatchewan Dr and growing part of the Saskatchewan population. As of the 2006 Census (2011 Census data is not yet available