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1

Growth, microstructure and electrical properties of sputter-deposited...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Growth, microstructure and electrical properties of sputter-deposited hafnium oxide (HfO2) thin films grown using HfO2 ceramic Growth, microstructure and electrical properties of...

2

Growth mode evolution of hafnium oxide by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HfO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using tetrakis-ethylmethylamido hafnium and H{sub 2}O as precursors on silicon by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The morphology and microstructures at different ALD cycles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Based on the height–height correlation function and power spectral density function, quantitative analysis of surface morphologies was performed. Three characteristic dimensions (?{sub 1}, ?{sub 2}, and ?{sub 3}) corresponding to three surface structures, islands, local and global fluctuations, were identified. The evolution of ALD growth mode at range of the three critical scales was investigated, respectively. It suggests the transformation of growth mode from quasi two-dimensional layer-by-layer to three-dimensional island for global fluctuations.

Nie, Xianglong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan, E-mail: madayan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Xu, Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China and Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi'an University of Arts and Science, Xi'an 710065, Shaanxi (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu, E-mail: ncholu.manyala@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028 (South Africa)] [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028 (South Africa); Charlie Johnson, A. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Patterned growth of single-walled carbon nanotube arrays from a vapor-deposited Fe catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patterned growth of single-walled carbon nanotube arrays from a vapor-deposited Fe catalyst H. B deposition using low-coverage vacuum-deposited iron as a catalyst. Ordered arrays of suspended nanotubes constructed directly on contacting metal electrodes of Pt/Cr patterned with catalysts. Patterning with solid

Golovchenko, Jene A.

5

Understanding the Nanotube Growth Mechanism: A Strategy to Control Nanotube Chirality during Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during chemical vapor deposition synthesis must focus on controlling the structure of the nucleated nanotube seeds. DFT and RMD simulations demonstrate the viability of using the structures of catalyst particles over which nanotube growth proceeds...

Gomez Gualdron, Diego Armando 1983-

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

Bilayer graphene growth by low pressure chemical vapor deposition on copper foil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Successfully integrating graphene in standard processes for applications in electronics relies on the synthesis of high-quality films. In this work we study Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) growth of bilayer ...

Fang, Wenjing, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

IRRADIATION GROWTH IN ZIRCONIUM AT LOW TEMPERATURES BY DIRECT ATHERMAL DEPOSITION OF VACANCIES AT EXTENDED SINKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IRRADIATION GROWTH IN ZIRCONIUM AT LOW TEMPERATURES BY DIRECT ATHERMAL DEPOSITION OF VACANCIES that at high temperatures (where vacancies are mobile) growth can be accounted for using a combination of : #12 vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) as proposed by Woo and Gosele [5,6]. This theory seems

Motta, Arthur T.

8

Initial Structure and Growth Dynamics of YBa2Cu3O7-? during Pulsed Laser Deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial heteroepitaxial growth of YBa2Cu3O7-? films on SrTiO3(001) substrates during pulsed laser deposition shows a growth-mode transition and a change of growth unit. The growth starts with two blocks, each two-thirds the size of the complete unit cell. The first of these blocks grows in a step-flow fashion, whereas the second grows in the layer-by-layer mode. Subsequent deposition occurs layer-by-layer of complete unit cells. These results suggest that the surface diffusion in the heteroepitaxial case is strongly influenced by the competition with formation energies, which is important for the fabrication of heteroepitaxial devices on the unit cell scale.

V. Vonk; K. J. I. Driessen; M. Huijben; G. Rijnders; D. H. A. Blank; H. Rogalla; S. Harkema; H. Graafsma

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

Self-Limiting Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Monolayer Graphene from Ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbide,8 to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrocarbon precursors on transition metals,9-13 economic up to wafer scale,14,15 nickel and copper are the two most commonly used metal substrates. DueC) restricts the growth of graphene to the metal surface.12,17 The uniformity and high quality of the resultant

Maruyama, Shigeo

10

Laser photochemical growth of amorphous silicon at low temperatures and comparison with thermal chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed ArF (193 nm) excimer laser radiation has been used to dissociate disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/, resulting in photochemically controlled deposition of amorphous Si thin films. A high stability HeNe (6328 A) laser was used for precise in situ monitoring of film deposition rates, under varying deposition conditions. A helium window purge nearly eliminated Si film deposition on the chamber windows. With the excimer laser beam parallel to the substrate, deposition of amorphous Si can be controlled entirely by the photon fluence (negligible background thermal growth) at temperatures from room temperature up to /approximately/400/degree/C. Reasonable photolytic deposition rate (>1 A/sec) are combined with 'digital' control of film thickness (/approx gt/0.02 A/laser pulse). Activation energies of 1.50 (+-0.1) eV and 0.09 (+-0.02) eV were found for pyrolytic and photolytic deposition, respectively. 15 refs., 3 figs.

Eres, D.; Lowndes, D.H.; Geohegan, D.B.; Mashburn, D.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

Grigorian, Leonid (Raymond, OH); Hornyak, Louis (Evergreen, CO); Dillon, Anne C (Boulder, CO); Heben, Michael J (Denver, CO)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Cu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a two-step approach for suppressing nucleation of graphene on Cu using chemical vapor deposition. In the first step, as received Cu foils are oxidized in air at temperatures up to 500 C to remove surface impurities and to induce the regrowth of Cu grains during subsequent annealing in H2 flow at 1040 C prior to graphene growth. In the second step, transient reactant cooling is performed by using a brief Ar pulse at the onset of growth to induce collisional deactivation of the carbon growth species. The combination of these two steps results in a three orders of magnitude reduction in the graphene nucleation density, enabling the growth of millimeter-size single crystal graphene grains. A kinetic model shows that suppressing nucleation promotes a cooperative island growth mode that favors the formation of large area single crystal graphene, and it is accompanied by a roughly 3 orders of magnitude increase in the reactive sticking probability of methane compared to that in random nucleation growth.

Regmi, Murari [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rouleau, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Eastman, Jeffrey [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Eres, Gyula [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pulsed Helium Ion Beam Induced Deposition: A Means to High Growth Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sub-nanometer beam of a helium ion microscope was used to study and optimize helium-ion beam induced deposition of PtC nanopillars with the (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Pt(CPCH{sub 3}) precursor. The beam current, beam dwell time, precursor refresh time, and beam focus have been independently varied. Continuous beam exposure resulted in narrow but short pillars, while pulsed exposure resulted in thinner and higher ones. Furthermore, at short dwell times the deposition efficiency was very high, especially for a defocused beam. Efficiencies were measured up to 20 times the value for continuous exposure conditions. The interpretation of the experimental data was aided by a Monte Carlo simulation of the deposition. The results indicate that two regimes are operational in ion beam induced deposition (IBID). In the first one, the adsorbed precursor molecules originally present in the beam interaction region decompose. After the original precursor layer is consumed, further depletion is averted and growth continues by the supply of molecules via adsorption and surface diffusion. Depletion around the beam impact site can be distinguished from depletion on the flanges of the growing pillars. The Monte Carlo simulations for low precursor surface coverage reproduce measured growth rates, but predict considerably narrower pillars, especially at short dwell times. Both the experiments and the simulations show that the pillar width rapidly increases with increasing beam diameter. Optimal writing strategy, good beam focusing, and rapid beam positioning are needed for efficient and precise fabrication of extended and complex nanostructures by He-IBID.

Alkemade, Paul F. A. [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Miro, Hozanna [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Van Veldhoven, Emile [TNO Van Leeuwenhoek Laboratory; Maas, Diederick [TNO Van Leeuwenhoek Laboratory; Smith, Daryl [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Growth mechanism of atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide: A density functional theory approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide (ZnO) using diethylzinc (DEZ) and water is studied using density functional theory. The reaction pathways between the precursors and ZnO surface sites are discussed. Both reactions proceed by the formation of intermediate complexes on the surface. The Gibbs free energy of the formation of these complexes is positive at temperatures above ?120?°C and ?200?°C for DEZ and water half-reactions, respectively. Spectroscopic ellipsometry results show that the growth per cycle changes at approximately the same temperatures.

Afshar, Amir; Cadien, Kenneth C., E-mail: kcadien@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

Effect of buffer layer growth temperature on epitaxial GaN films deposited by magnetron sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epitaxial GaN films were deposited by reactive sputtering of a GaAs target in 100 % nitrogen at 700 deg. C on ZnO buffer layers grown at different substrate temperatures over sapphire substrates. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements and the corresponding analysis show that the growth temperature of buffer layers significantly affects the micro-structural parameters of GaN epilayer, such as lateral coherence length, tilt and twist, while the vertical coherence length remains unaffected. The optimum substrate temperature for buffer layer growth has been found to be 300 deg. C. High epitaxial quality GaN film grown on such a buffer layer exhibited micro strain of 1.8x10{sup -4} along with screw and edge type dislocation densities of 7.87x10{sup 9} and 1.16x10{sup 11}, respectively.

Mohanta, P.; Singh, D.; Kumar, R.; Ganguli, T.; Srinivasa, R. S.; Major, S. S. [Center For Research in Nano-Technology and Science (India); Semiconductor Laser Section, RRCAT, Indore-452013 (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai - 400076 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Studies on initiation, growth and sintering in the formation of utility boiler deposits: Topical technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three laboratory-scale devices were utilized to investigate the mechanisms of the initiation, growth and sintering process involved in the formation of boiler deposits. Sticking apparatus investigations were conducted to study deposit initiation by comparing the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on four types of steel-based heat exchanger materials under the conditions found in a utility boiler and an entrained slagging gasifier. In addition, the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on a reduced steel surface were investigated. All the ash drops studied in this investigation were produced from bituminous coals.

Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Austin, L.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The growth characteristics of microcrystalline Si thin film deposited by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microcrystalline silicon thin film was grown by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) ... with a cylindrical rotary electrode supplied with 150 MHz very-high-frequency power. T...

Jung-Dae Kwon

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Pulsed Laser Deposition | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulsed Laser Deposition Pulsed Laser Deposition EMSL's pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system is designed for epitaxial growth of oxide, ceramic, or synthetic mineral thin films and...

20

Effects of nitrogen on the growth and optical properties of ZnO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ZnO thin films were grown using pulsed laser deposition by ablating a Zn target in various mixtures of O2 and N2. The presence of N2 during deposition was found to affect the growth of the ZnO thin films and their optical properties. Small N2 concentrations during growth led to strong acceptor-related photoluminescence (PL), while larger concentrations affected both the intensity and temperature dependence of the emission peaks. In addition, the PL properties of the annealed ZnO thin films are associated with the N2 concentration during their growth. The possible role of nitrogen in ZnO growth and annealing is discussed.

J B Cui; M A Thomas; Y C Soo; H Kandel; T P Chen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Growth of High Aspect Ratio Nanometer-Scale Magnets with Chemical Vapor Deposition and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...50 pA). A contamination coating around a denser Fig. 4...deposit with the contamination coating is thus stable against oxidation...of nanoscale filaments and thin film nucleation and growth theory...Instruments-ARIS 5100 UHV-STM. 13. An optical microscope provides a view...

Andrew D. Kent; Thomas M. Shaw; Stephan von Molnár; David D. Awschalom

1993-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

Growth of crystalline X-Sic on Si at reduced temperatures by chemical vapor deposition from `silacycllobutane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and TPS resulted in single crystal layer" on Si ( 111) only up to a thickness of 2000 h;. Highly orientedGrowth of crystalline X-Sic on Si at reduced temperatures by chemical vapor deposition from grown by SCB at a temperature of 800 "C. The progress of SiC/Si heterojunction devices has been C3HsSiH2

Steckl, Andrew J.

23

In situ growth of p and n-type graphene thin films and diodes by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the in situ growth of p and n-type graphene thin films by ultraviolet pulsed laser deposition in the presence of argon and nitrogen, respectively. Electron microscopy and Raman studies confirmed the growth, while temperature dependent electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient studies confirmed the polarity type of graphene films. Nitrogen doping at different sites of the honeycomb structure, responsible for n-type conduction, is identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for films grown in nitrogen. A diode-like rectifying behavior is exhibited by p-n junction diodes fabricated using the graphene films.

Sarath Kumar, S. R.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Hedhili, M. N.; Khan, M. A.; Alshareef, H. N., E-mail: husam.alshareef@kaust.edu.sa [Materials Science and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

24

Growth direction of oblique angle electron beam deposited silicon monoxide thin films identified by optical second-harmonic generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oblique angle deposited (OAD) silicon monoxide (SiO) thin films forming tilted columnar structures have been characterized by second-harmonic generation. It was found that OAD SiO leads to a rotationally anisotropic second-harmonic response, depending on the optical angle of incidence. A model for the observed dependence of the second-harmonic signal on optical angle of incidence allows extraction of the growth direction of OAD films. The optically determined growth directions show convincing agreement with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images. In addition to a powerful characterization tool, these results demonstrate the possibilities for designing nonlinear optical devices through SiO OAD.

Vejling Andersen, Søren; Lund Trolle, Mads; Pedersen, Kjeld [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4A, DK-9220 Aalborg Øst (Denmark)] [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4A, DK-9220 Aalborg Øst (Denmark)

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

25

Growth of Fe3N films via chemical vapor deposition of iron acetylacetonate and anhydrous ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polycrystalline Fe3N films have been grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on 50-?m thick polycrystalline Ti substrates using iron acetylacetonate (IAA) and anhydrous ammonia (NH3) in a cold-wall vertical pancake-style reactor. X-ray diffraction data indicated that single phase Fe3N was present in films deposited at and above 600°C; below this temperature no deposition occurred. The composition of the Fe3N films did not vary with changes in the deposition temperature, the NH3 flow rate or the deposition rate at a constant deposition pressure of 100 Torr. The surface macrostructure of the as-deposited films was independent of the deposition temperature and was very similar to that of the uncoated Ti substrate. The microstructure of the films was porous with a thickness variation of ?1 ?m across the surface of the films. Larger grains were produced at 600 and 800°C, while smaller and more uniform grains were produced at 700°C. Energy dispersive X-ray data indicated that films deposited at and above 600°C contained low levels of both carbon and oxygen.

S.L. Roberson; D. Finello; A.D. Banks; R.F. Davis

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ultrahigh growth rate of epitaxial silicon by chemical vapor deposition at low temperature with neopentasilane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- iane SiH4 to disilane Si2H6 , to trisilane, Si3H8 2 leads to increased epitaxy growth rates at the same growth rate was 0.6 nm/min, and the disilane growth rate was 8 nm/min. In this work, we explored the use

28

Diamond growth with CF4 addition inhot-filament chemical vapour deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) was added to standard CH4/H2 mixtures ... in hot-filament-assisted chemical vapour deposition. CF4 concentrations in the range of 0.3% ... a small fraction (CF4 was thermally di...

E. J CORAT; V. J TRAVA-AIROLDI; N. F LEITE; M. C. A NONO…

29

Formation and Growth of Wax Deposit in the Pipelining of Crude Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents a model for the turbulent flow of a waxy crude oil in a pipeline, in which deposition is taken into account ... of heavy molecular weight compounds, usually called waxes. When a sufficiently lo...

S. Correra; D. Merino-Garcia; A. Fasano…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Growth of microcrystalline Si:H and (Si,Ge):H on polyamide substrates using ECR deposition techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on the growth of good quality micro-crystalline Si:H and (Si,Ge):H films on polyamide substrates using a remote plasma ECR deposition technique. They find that under conditions that lead to significant ion bombardment of the substrate, the films are microcrystalline even at relatively low deposition temperatures of about 250 C. A critical factor in inducing microcrystallinity is the presence of a metal coating layer on polyamide. In the absence of such a coating, the films are amorphous, probably because the uncoated polyamide substrate charges up and prevents any further ion bombardment. The quality of the films was measured using both Raman spectroscopy and by studying the activation energy and low-energy absorption coefficient of the films. The sub-gap absorption coefficient was found to follow the crystalline Si absorption curve quite well. The addition of germane to the gas phase shifted the absorption curve to smaller energies.

Erickson, K.; Dalal, V.L.; Chumanov, G.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The growth of CdTe/GaAs heteroepitaxial films by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A process for the growth of CdTe/GaAs heteroepitaxialfilms using metal–organic chemical vapor deposition(MOCVD) has been developed. The initial results of the determination of the deposition mechanism are reported. A pilot production demonstration using experimentally determined operating conditions has been completed. This is the first reported pilot production of CdTe/GaAs using 2 in. diam GaAs substrates in a multiple slice commercially manufactured MOCVD system. The results reported therein demonstrate that MOCVD is a reliable reproducible production worthy process for preparation of CdTe/GaAs heterostructures. These results are applicable to a wide variety of CdTe based device technologies including IR detection fiber optics solar cells and others.

Philip L. Anderson

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 °C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

Wang, Han; Fu, Kan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Modeling of film growth by cluster deposition: The effect of size and energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The density of cluster-assembled thin films depends heavily on the size of the deposited clusters as well as the energy with which they impact the substrate. Using molecular-dynamics simulations we have quantitatively studied variations in the density of thin films grown by deposition of clusters, with diameters between 1 and 9 nm, and at energies ranging from 2 meV to 10 eV per cluster atom. A model explaining the behavior of smaller clusters is presented, and a threshold limit in cluster size, where deviation from this model occurs, is determined. The deviation is shown to be due to a lessened sintering between clusters.

K. Meinander and K. Nordlund

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

34

Real-time optical diagnostics of graphene growth induced by pulsed chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics and mechanisms of graphene growth on Ni films at 720 -880 C have been measured using fast pulses of acetylene and real-time optical diagnostics. In situ UV-Raman spectroscopy was used to unambiguously detect isothermal graphene growth at high temperatures, measure the growth kinetics with ~ 1s temporal resolution, and estimate the fractional precipitation upon cooldown for the first time. Optical reflectivity and videography provided much faster temporal resolution. Both the growth kinetics and the fractional isothermal precipitation were found to be governed by the C2H2 partial pressure in the CVD pulse for a given film thickness and temperature, with up to ~ 94% of graphene growth occurring isothermally within 1 second at 800 C at high partial pressures. At lower partial pressures, isothermal graphene growth is shown to continue 10 seconds after the gas pulse. These flux-dependent growth kinetics are described in the context of a dissolution/precipitation model, where carbon rapidly dissolves into the Ni film and later precipitates driven by gradients in the chemical potential. The combination of pulsed-CVD and real-time optical diagnostics opens new opportunities to understand and control the fast, sub-second growth of graphene on various substrates at high temperatures.

Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Regmi, Murari [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Thonnard, Norbert [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Atomic-level investigation of the growth of Si/Ge by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Si and Ge films can be prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by chemical vapor deposition using disilane and digermane as source gases. These gases offer a high sticking probability, and are suitable for atomic layer epitaxy. Using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we have examined the surface processes associated with the heteroepitaxial growth of Ge/Si. The measured surface-induced shifts and chemical shifts of the Si 2p and Ge 3d core levels allow us to identify the surface species and to determine the surface chemical composition, and this information is correlated with the atomic features observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. Issues related to precursor dissociation, attachment to dangling bonds, diffusion, surface segregation, growth morphology, and pyrolytic reaction pathways will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

Lin, D. [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of (China)] [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of (China); Miller, T.; Chiang, T. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Non-equilibrium deposition of phase pure Cu{sub 2}O thin films at reduced growth temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) is actively studied as a prototypical material for energy conversion and electronic applications. Here we reduce the growth temperature of phase pure Cu{sub 2}O thin films to 300?°C by intentionally controlling solely the kinetic parameter (total chamber pressure, P{sub tot}) at fixed thermodynamic condition (0.25 mTorr pO{sub 2}). A strong non-monotonic effect of P{sub tot} on Cu-O phase formation is found using high-throughput combinatorial-pulsed laser deposition. This discovery creates new opportunities for the growth of Cu{sub 2}O devices with low thermal budget and illustrates the importance of kinetic effects for the synthesis of metastable materials with useful properties.

Subramaniyan, Archana, E-mail: asubrama@mymail.mines.edu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Perkins, John D.; Lany, Stephan; Stevanovic, Vladan; Ginley, David S.; Zakutayev, Andriy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); O’Hayre, Ryan P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Effect of deposition and treatment conditions on growth of nanometer PtSi heterostructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-X I. INTRODUCTION Transition metal silicides have received a great deal of attention due to their use in a number of devices.1­4 Platinum silicide PtSi is an important metal silicide which is widely of silicides are intensely affected by the deposition and technological parameters. It is also confirmed

Zheng, Yufeng

38

Compensator Control For Chemical Vapor Deposition Film Growth Using Reduced Order Design Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a high pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) reactor that in­ cludes multiple species and controls optoelectronic integrated circuits. This can sometimes be addressed, in part, through open­loop optimization [7 reactor with real­time sensing and control as an innovative feature of this proto­ type reactor. Previous

39

Nucleation and growth of the first phase in sputter-deposited Nb/Al multilayer thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of the first phase in the reaction of sputter-deposited Nb/Al multilayer thin films has been studied by power-compensated and heat-flux differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The modulation periods of the films are in the range of 10--500 nm. Both types of calorimetric measurements, performed at a constant heating rate, show the presence of two peaks (A and B) for the formation of the single product phase, NbAl{sub 3}. Isothermal calorimetric scans show that peak A is associated with a nucleation and growth type transformation. The formation of NbAl{sub 3} is thus interpreted as a two-stage process of nucleation and lateral growth to coalescence (peak A) followed by normal growth until the consumption of one or both reactants (peak B). Transmission electron microscopy investigations of samples annealed into the first stage of NbAl{sub 3} formation show the presence of this phase at the Nb/Al interface and its preferential growth along the grain boundaries of the Al layer. The latter highlights the role of reactant phase grain structure in product phase formation.

Barmak, K.; Vivekanand, S.; Ma, F. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials and Engineering; Michaelsen, C. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Materials Research

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

High Growth Rate Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films and Devices Using ECR-PECVD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium films (a-SiGe:H) and devices have been extensively studied because of the tunable band gap for matching the solar spectrum and mature the fabrication techniques. a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells have great potential for commercial manufacture because of very low cost and adaptability to large-scale manufacturing. Although it has been demonstrated that a-SiGe:H thin films and devices with good quality can be produced successfully, some issues regarding growth chemistry have remained yet unexplored, such as the hydrogen and inert-gas dilution, bombardment effect, and chemical annealing, to name a few. The alloying of the SiGe introduces above an order-of-magnitude higher defect density, which degrades the performance of the a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. This degradation becomes worse when high growth-rate deposition is required. Preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon, clustering of Ge and Si, and columnar structure and buried dihydride radicals make the film intolerably bad. The work presented here uses the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECR-PECVD) technique to fabricate a-SiGe:H films and devices with high growth rates. Helium gas, together with a small amount of H{sub 2}, was used as the plasma species. Thickness, optical band gap, conductivity, Urbach energy, mobility-lifetime product, I-V curve, and quantum efficiency were characterized during the process of pursuing good materials. The microstructure of the a-(Si,Ge):H material was probed by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. They found that the advantages of using helium as the main plasma species are: (1) high growth rate--the energetic helium ions break the reactive gas more efficiently than hydrogen ions; (2) homogeneous growth--heavy helium ions impinging on the surface promote the surface mobility of the reactive radicals, so that heteroepitaxy growth as clustering of Ge and Si, columnar structure are reduced; (3) surface hydrogen removal--heavier and more energetic helium ions break the Si-H much easier than hydrogen ions. The preferential attachment of Si-H to Ge-H is reduced. They also found that with the small amount of hydrogen put into the plasma, the superior properties of a-(Si,Ge):H made from pure hydrogen dilution plasma were still maintained. These hydrogen ions help to remove the subsurface weakly bonded hydrogen and buried hydrogen. They also help to passivate the Ge-dangling bond.

Yong Liu

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Epitaxial growth of aligned AlGalnN nanowires by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly ordered and aligned epitaxy of III-Nitride nanowires is demonstrated in this work. <1010> M-axis is identified as a preferential nanowire growth direction through a detailed study of GaN/AlN trunk/branch nanostructures by transmission electron microscopy. Crystallographic selectivity can be used to achieve spatial and orientational control of nanowire growth. Vertically aligned (Al)GaN nanowires are prepared on M-plane AlN substrates. Horizontally ordered nanowires, extending from the M-plane sidewalls of GaN hexagonal mesas or islands demonstrate new opportunities for self-aligned nanowire devices, interconnects, and networks.

Han, Jung (Woodbridge, CT); Su, Jie (New Haven, CT)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

Growth of magnesium oxide thin lms using single molecular precursors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of magnesium oxide thin ®lms using single molecular precursors by metal±organic chemical precursors; Silicon; Sapphire 1. Introduction Magnesium oxide (MgO) thin ®lms have attracted much attention MgO ®lms on Si(100) above 6508C by thermal CVD. Murayama and Shionoya [12] used magnesium 2

Boo, Jin-Hyo

43

Interactions between radical growth precursors on plasma-deposited silicon thin-film surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the interactions between growth precursors, SiH{sub 3} radicals, on surfaces of silicon thin films. The analysis is based on a synergistic combination of density functional theory calculations on the hydrogen-terminated Si(001)-(2x1) surface and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of film growth on surfaces of MD-generated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films. In particular, the authors find that two interacting growth precursors may either form disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and desorb from the surface, or disproportionate, resulting in the formation of a surface dihydride (adsorbed SiH{sub 2} species) and gas-phase silane (SiH{sub 4}). The reaction barrier for disilane formation is found to be strongly dependent on the local chemical environment on the silicon surface and reduces (or vanishes) if one/both of the interacting precursors is/are in a ''fast diffusing state,'' i.e., attached to fivefold coordinated surface Si atoms. Finally, activation energy barriers in excess of 1 eV are obtained for two chemisorbed (i.e., bonded to a fourfold coordinated surface Si atom) SiH{sub 3} radicals. Activation energy barriers for disproportionation follow the same tendency, though, in most cases, higher barriers are obtained compared to disilane formation reactions starting from the same initial configuration. MD simulations confirm that disilane formation and disproportionation reactions also occur on a-Si:H growth surfaces, preferentially in configurations where at least one of the SiH{sub 3} radicals is in a ''diffusive state.'' Our results are in agreement with experimental observations and results of plasma process simulators showing that the primary source for disilane in low-power plasmas may be the substrate surface.

Bakos, Tamas; Valipa, Mayur S.; Maroudas, Dimitrios [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-3110 (United States)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Growth of epitaxial PrO sub 2 thin films on hydrogen terminated Si (111) by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new epitaxial oxide, PrO{sub 2}, has been grown on Si (111) by pulsed laser deposition. X-ray diffraction shows that films are oriented with the PrO{sub 2}(111) direction parallel to the substrate (111). The full width at half maximum for the omega rocking curve on the PrO{sub 2} (222) peak is as low as 0.75{degree}, while phi scans indicate {ital in}-{ital plane} epitaxial alignment to better than one degree. In the best quality films, epitaxy is almost pure type-{ital b} epitaxy which is characteristic of epitaxial CaF{sub 2} on Si. To achieve epitaxy, it is essential to remove the native silicon oxide from the substrate prior to film growth. This is done at room temperature using a wet-chemical hydrogen-termination procedure.

Fork, D.K. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA (USA) Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (USA)); Fenner, D.B. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA (USA) Santa Clara University, Physics Department, Santa Clara, CA (USA)); Geballe, T.H. (Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (USA))

1990-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Epitaxial growth of Si1 ? xGex alloys and Ge on Si(100) by electron-cyclotron-resonance Ar plasma chemical vapor deposition without substrate heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract By using electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) Ar-plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) without substrate heating, the epitaxial growth process of Si1 ? xGex alloy and Ge films deposited directly on dilute-HF-treated Si(100) was investigated. From the reflection high energy electron diffraction patterns of the deposited Si1 ? xGex alloy (x = 0.50, 0.75) and Ge films on Si(100), it is confirmed that epitaxial growth can be realized without substrate heating, and that crystallinity degradation at larger film thickness is observed. The X-ray diffraction peak of the epitaxial films reveals the existence of large compressive strain, which is induced by lattice matching with the Si(100) substrate at smaller film thicknesses, as well as strain relaxation behavior at larger film thicknesses. The Ge fraction of Si1 ? xGex thin film is in good agreement with the normalized GeH4 partial pressure. The Si1 ? xGex deposition rate increases with an increase of GeH4 partial pressure. The GeH4 partial pressure dependence of partial deposition rates [(Si or Ge fraction) × (Si1 ? xGex thickness) / (deposition time)] shows that the Si partial deposition rate is slightly enhanced by the existence of Ge. From these results, it is proposed that the ECR-plasma CVD process can be utilized for Ge fraction control in highly-strained heterostructure formation of group IV semiconductors.

Naofumi Ueno; Masao Sakuraba; Junichi Murota; Shigeo Sato

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Graphene layer growth on silicon substrates with nickel film by pulse arc plasma deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon layer has been grown on a Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si(111) substrate under high vacuum pressure by pulse arc plasma deposition. From the results of Raman spectroscopy for the sample, it is found that graphene was formed by ex-situ annealing of sample grown at room temperature. Furthermore, for the sample grown at high temperature, graphene formation was shown and optimum temperature was around 1000 Degree-Sign C. Transmission electron microscopy observation of the sample suggests that the graphene was grown from step site caused by grain of Ni film. The results show that the pulse arc plasma technique has the possibility for acquiring homogenous graphene layer with controlled layer thickness.

Fujita, K.; Banno, K.; Aryal, H. R.; Egawa, T. [Research Center for Nano-Device and System, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-Ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Epitaxial growth of 3C-SiC by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attractiveness of SiC as an advanced semiconducting material derives from its many superior properties such as high breakdown voltage, high saturated electron drift velocity, high thermal conductivity and resistance to high temperature effects. The authors have grown thin films of SiC by pulsed laser deposition on silicon (100) and vicinal and non-vicinal 6H SiC (0001) substrates using a quadrupled YAG laser and a high purity dense polycrystalline SiC target. Epitaxy on all three substrate types was confirmed by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Composition of the films was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and Scanning Auger Microprobe.

Cosgrove, J.E.; Rosenthal, P.A.; Hamblen, D.; Fenner, D.B. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); Yang, C. [Santa Clara Univ., CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

A quantum chemical study of ZrO2 atomic layer deposition growth reactions on the SiO2 surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum chemical study of ZrO2 atomic layer deposition growth reactions on the SiO2 surface Department, Ford Research Laboratory, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121, USA c Department of Chemistry to replace silicon oxide (SiO2) as the gate dielectric for future generation metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS

Garfunkel, Eric

49

Reliable Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays by Chemical Vapor Deposition and In-situ Measurement of Fundamental Growth Kinetics in Oxygen-free Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for deposition. Electric resistance is widely used as a heatsilicon susceptor as an electric resistance placed inside a

IN, JUNG BIN

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Optimization of InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattice growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for use in infrared emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices (SLSs) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using a variety of growth conditions. Presence of an InGaAsSb interface layer was indicated by x-ray diffraction. This interface effect was minimized by optimizing the purge times, reactant flows, and growth conditions. The optimized growth conditions involved the use of low pressure, short purge times between the growth of the layers, and no reactant flow during the purges. Electron diffraction indicates that CuPt-type compositional ordering occurs in InAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} alloys and SLSs which explains an observed bandgap reduction from previously accepted alloy values.

Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

In Situ Synchrotron Based X-ray Fluorescence and Scattering Measurements During Atomic Layer Deposition: Initial Growth of HfO2 on Si and Ge Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial growth of HfO{sub 2} was studied by means of synchrotron based in situ x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). HfO{sub 2} was deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium and H{sub 2}O on both oxidized and H-terminated Si and Ge surfaces. XRF quantifies the amount of deposited material during each ALD cycle and shows an inhibition period on H-terminated substrates. No inhibition period is observed on oxidized substrates. The evolution of film roughness was monitored using GISAXS. A correlation is found between the inhibition period and the onset of surface roughness.

K Devloo-Casier; J Dendooven; K Ludwig; G Lekens; J DHaen; C Detavernier

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

In Situ X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure Spectroscopy of ZnO Nanowire Growth During Chemical Bath Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical bath deposition (CBD) offers a simple and inexpensive route to deposit semiconductor nanostructures, but lack of fundamental understanding and control of the underlying chemistry has limited its versatility. Here we report the first use of in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during CBD, enabling detailed investigation of both reaction mechanisms and kinetics of ZnO nanowire growth from zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) precursors. Time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were used to quantify Zn(II) speciation in both solution and solid phases. ZnO crystallizes directly from [Zn(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} without long-lived intermediates. Using ZnO nanowire deposition as an example, this study establishes in situ XANES spectroscopy as an excellent quantitative tool to understand CBD of nanomaterials.

McPeak, Kevin M.; Becker, Matthew A.; Britton, Nathan G.; Majidi, Hasti; Bunker, Bruce A.; Baxter, Jason B. (Drexel); (Notre)

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

53

Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1?±?0.01?nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175–300?°C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}–Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3?? cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Feinerman, Alan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Effects of pressure, temperature, and hydrogen during graphene growth on SiC(0001) using propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene growth from a propane flow in a hydrogen environment (propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition (CVD)) on SiC differentiates from other growth methods in that it offers the possibility to obtain various graphene structures on the Si-face depending on growth conditions. The different structures include the (6{radical}3 Multiplication-Sign 6{radical}3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstruction of the graphene/SiC interface, which is commonly observed on the Si-face, but also the rotational disorder which is generally observed on the C-face. In this work, growth mechanisms leading to the formation of the different structures are studied and discussed. For that purpose, we have grown graphene on SiC(0001) (Si-face) using propane-hydrogen CVD at various pressure and temperature and studied these samples extensively by means of low energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Pressure and temperature conditions leading to the formation of the different structures are identified and plotted in a pressure-temperature diagram. This diagram, together with other characterizations (X-ray photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy), is the basis of further discussions on the carbon supply mechanisms and on the kinetics effects. The entire work underlines the important role of hydrogen during growth and its effects on the final graphene structure.

Michon, A.; Vezian, S.; Roudon, E.; Lefebvre, D.; Portail, M. [CNRS-CRHEA, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)] [CNRS-CRHEA, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Zielinski, M.; Chassagne, T. [NOVASiC, Savoie Technolac, Arche Bat 4, BP267, 73375 Le Bourget du Lac (France)] [NOVASiC, Savoie Technolac, Arche Bat 4, BP267, 73375 Le Bourget du Lac (France)

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Growth, microstructure and electrical properties of sputter-deposited hafnium oxide (HfO2) thin films grown using HfO2 ceramic target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hafnium oxide (HfO?) thin films have been made by radio-frequency (rf) magnetron-sputtering onto Si(100) substrates under varying growth temperature (Ts). HfO? ceramic target has been employed for sputtering while varying the Ts from room temperature to 500?C during deposition. The effect of Ts on the growth and microstructure of deposited HfO? films has been studied using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS). The results indicate that the effect of Ts is significant on the growth, surface and interface structure, morphology and chemical composition of the HfO? films. Structural characterization indicates that the HfO? films grown at Ts<200 ?C are amorphous while films grown at Ts>200 ?C are nanocrystalline. An amorphous-to-crystalline transition occurs at Ts=200 ?C. Nanocrystalline HfO? films crystallized in a monoclinic structure with a (-111) orientation. XPS measurements indicated the high surface-chemical quality and stoichiometric nature of the grown HfO? films. An interface layer (IL) formation occurs due to reaction at the HfO?-Si interface for HfO? films deposited at Ts>200 ?C. The thickness of IL increases with increasing Ts. XPS and EDS at the HfO?-Si cross-section indicate the IL is a (Hf, Si)-O compound. The electrical characterization using capacitance-voltage measurements indicate that the dielectric constant decreases from 25 to 16 with increasing Ts.

Aguirre, B.; Vemuri, R. S.; Zubia, David; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kamala Bharathi, K.; Ramana, Chintalapalle V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Direct growth of few-layer graphene on 6H-SiC and 3C-SiC/Si via propane chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to grow graphene on SiC by a direct carbon feeding through propane flow in a chemical vapor deposition reactor. X-ray photoemission and low energy electron diffraction show that propane allows to grow few-layer graphene (FLG) on 6H-SiC(0001). Surprisingly, FLG grown on (0001) face presents a rotational disorder similar to that observed for FLG obtained by annealing on (000-1) face. Thanks to a reduced growth temperature with respect to the classical SiC annealing method, we have also grown FLG/3C-SiC/Si(111) in a single growth sequence. This opens the way for large-scale production of graphene-based devices on silicon substrate.

Michon, A.; Vezian, S.; Portail, M. [CNRS-CRHEA, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Ouerghi, A. [CNRS-LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Zielinski, M.; Chassagne, T. [NOVASiC, Savoie Technolac, Arche Bat 4, BP267, 73375 Le Bourget du Lac (France)

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both ���µCSi and ���±Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products�¢���� electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

Ridgeway, R.G.; Hegedus, S.S.; Podraza, N.J.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Surface modeling of thin film growth: A study of silicon oxide deposition from tetraethoxysilane and silicon deposition from disilane on the Si(100) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this thesis, surface reactions brought about by the pyrolysis of adsorbed TEOS, the modeling of this reaction with ethanol, and the photolysis of adsorbed disilane have been investigated under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, using mainly temperature programmed desorption (TPD). TEOS molecularly desorbs at about 195K when adsorbed on clean Si(100) at low temperatures. When adsorbed at 300K, the primary surface species produced is a mixture of ethoxysiloxanes. Upon heating the surface in vacuum, the adsorbed ethoxysiloxanes decompose the evolve ethylene and hydrogen, with trace production of acetylene and acetaldehyde. In a parallel study, the adsorption and subsequent deposition of ethanol (C[sub 2]H[sub 5]OH, C[sub 2]D[sub 5]OD, and CH[sub 3]CD[sub 2]OH) on Si(100) has been shown to model the TEOS system. The molecular desorption temperature is ca. 150K. When adsorbed at 200K, ethanol dissociatively chemisorbs as an ethoxide and the monohydride species. The adlayer decomposes at higher temperature to evolve ethylene, hydrogen, acetaldehyde, and acetylene. The adsorption and decomposition of ethanol on Si(100)-2x1:H has also been studied in gathering additional information about the competition between distinct decomposition mechanisms, and the nature of the reaction site. In the Si[sub 2]H[sub 6]/Si(100) system, with no UV irradiation, disilane adsorption at 120K produces a chemisorbed SiH[sub x] (x = 1 - 3) layer and, for high exposures, a disilane multilayer. Upon heating the surface in vacuum, molecular desorption is observed at ca. 150K, while hydrogen and silane are evolved at much higher temperatures. For Si[sub 2]H[sub 6] exposure during photo-irradiation, the desorption yields of hydrogen and silane are enhanced. Model studies using the partially and fully deuterated Si(100)-2x1:D surface reveals that the photo-induced surface reaction is dominated by an insertion reaction by the photo-generated silylene species.

Cho, Hee-Chuen.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

High Growth Rate of Epitaxial Silicon-Carbon Alloys by High-Order Silane Precursor and Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rates typically achieved by disilane and silane, respectively, at 575o C. The rate at present is limited precursor HOS than disilane in CVD, even at lower temperatures. Our current growth rates of Si1-yCy alloys

60

Thermal decomposition of ethanol and growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal decomposition of ethanol and growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this study, we have investigated the thermal decomposition of ethanol at various temperatures, as well National Meeting, San Francisco, CA, September 10-14, 2006 1/1 PRES 29 - Thermal decomposition of ethanol

Maruyama, Shigeo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Growth of Epitaxial gamma-Al2O3 Films on Rigid Single-Crystal Ceramic Substrates and Flexible, Single-Crystal-Like Metallic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epitaxial -Al2O3 thin films were grown on diverse substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The high quality of epitaxial growth and cubic structure of -Al2O3 films was confirmed by x-ray diffraction. SrTiO3 and MgO single crystal substrates were used to optimize the growth conditions for epitaxial -Al2O3 film. Under the optimized conditions, epitaxial -Al2O3 thin films were grown on flexible, single-crystal-like, metallic templates. These included untextured Hastelloy substrates with a biaxially textured MgO layer deposited using ion-beam-assisted-deposition and biaxially textured Ni-W metallic tapes with epitaxially grown and a biaxially textured, MgO buffer layer. These biaxially textured, -Al2O3 films on flexible, single-crystal-like substrates are promising for subsequent epitaxial growth of various complex oxide films used for electrical, magnetic and electronic device applications.

Shin, Junsoo [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Growth of InGaAsN for High Efficiency Solar Cells by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

InGaAsN alloys are a promising material for increasing the efficiency of multi-junction solar cells now used for satellite power systems. However, the growth of these dilute N containing alloys has been challenging with further improvements in material quality needed before the solar cell higher efficiencies are realized. Nitrogen/V ratios exceeding 0.981 resulted in lower N incorporation and poor surface morphologies. The growth rate was found to depend on not only the total group III transport for a fixed N/V ratio but also on the N/V ratio. Carbon tetrachloride and dimethylzinc were effective for p-type doping. Disilane was not an effective n-type dopant while SiCl4 did result in n-type material but only a narrow range of electron concentrations (2-5e17cm{sup -3}) were achieved.

ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; BANKS,JAMES C.; GEE,JAMES M.; JONES,ERIC D.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

63

Epitaxial growth of CdTe thin film on cube-textured Ni by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CdTe thin film has been grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Ni(100) substrate. Using x-ray pole figure measurements we observed the epitaxial relationship of {111}CdTe// {001}Ni with [110]CdTe//[010]Ni and [112] CdTe//[100]Ni. The 12 diffraction peaks in the (111) pole figure of CdTe film and their relative positions with respect to the four peak positions in the (111) pole figure of Ni substrate are consistent with four equivalent orientational domains of CdTe with three to four superlattice match of about 0.7% in the [110] direction of CdTe and the [010] direction of Ni. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) images show that the CdTe domains are 30 degrees orientated from each other.

GIARE, C [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); RAO, S [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); RILEY, M [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); CHEN, L [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Goyal, Amit [ORNL; BHAT, I [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); LU, T [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); WANG, G [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of acidic deposition on nutrient uptake, nutrient cycling and growth processes of vegetation in the spruce-fir ecosystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in three years of field research designed to evaluate biological and chemical indicators of the current and future health of the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir ecosystem. The emphasis of this research has been on the identification and understanding of mechanisms through which current levels of acidic deposition are impacting ecosystem processes. The identification of these principal mechanisms and key biological indicators of change was designed to improve our capabilities to detect, monitor, and assess the effects of air quality regulations and attendant future air quality changes on ecosystem response. Individual research tasks focused on the following research areas: (1) the significance of foliar uptake of atmospheric sources of nitrogen in relationship to plant utilization of N from available soil reserves; (2) linkages between atmospheric inputs to the soil surface, solution chemistry, and decomposition in the upper organic soil horizons; (3) effects of soil solution chemistry on uptake of cations and aluminum by fine roots; and (4) the effects of varying rates of calcium supply on carbon metabolism of Fraser fir and red spruce, and the relationship between calcium levels in wood cells and integrity of wood formed in bole and branches. Each of the individual tasks was designed to focus upon a mechanism or process that we consider critical to understanding chemical and biological linkages. These linkages will be important determinants in understanding the basis of past and potential future responses of the high elevation Southern Appalachian Forest to acidic deposition and other co-occurring environmental stresses. This report contains (1) background and rationale for the research undertaken in 1992-94; (2) a summary of principal research findings; (3) publications from this research; and (4) characterization of data sets produced by this research which will be the basis of future research, analyses and/or publications.

McLaughlin, S.B.; Garten, C.T.; Wullschleger, S.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1996-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

65

Success Story: Chrome Deposit Corporation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study describes how Chrome Deposit Corporation was able to reduce plant-wide energy use, minimize its environmental impact, and improve energy management practices amidst ongoing growth.

66

Epitaxial growth of B-doped Si on Si(100) by electron-cyclotron-resonance Ar plasma chemical vapor deposition in a SiH4–B2H6–H2 gas mixture without substrate heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Characteristics of B-doped Si epitaxial growth on Si(100) by using electron-cyclotron-resonance Ar plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition without substrate heating in a SiH4–B2H6–H2–Ar gas mixture were investigated. B concentration in the deposited films increases with decreasing microwave power for plasma generation. At the microwave power of 125 W, the B concentration increases up to 5 × 1021 cm? 3. Deposition rate of the B-doped Si tends to be enhanced at the higher B2H6 partial pressure. Resistivity of the B-doped Si film tends to increase with decreasing the microwave power. Referring Irvin curve, in the case of 200 W, the carrier concentration is estimated to be at least about 1017 cm? 3 at the B concentration of 1021 cm? 3. After heat treatment in N2 atmosphere at 200 °C and 300 °C for 2 h, the resistivity drastically decreases to the value which corresponds to carrier concentration of around 1019 cm? 3. From Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurement, it is found that hydrogen incorporated in the as-deposited film desorbed by the heat treatment.

Yusuke Abe; Masao Sakuraba; Junichi Murota

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Process sensing and metrology in gate oxide growth by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition from SiH4 and N2O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SiO2 film. An optimal process window had been previously identified at a total pressure of 5 Torr, but also quantitative metrology for the film deposition process. © 1999 American Vacuum Society. S0734-211X the wafer. Radiative heating of the wafer was achieved through a quartz window by an array of halogen lamps

Rubloff, Gary W.

68

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

69

Growth-induced magnetic anisotropy and clustering in vapor-deposited Co-Pt alloy films A. L. Shapiro, P. W. Rooney, M. Q. Tran, and F. Hellman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Shapiro, P. W. Rooney, M. Q. Tran, and F. Hellman Department of Physics, University of California to 800 °C. Films grown at moderate temperatures 200­400 °C exhibit remarkable growth-induced properties chemical order develops, such that below 800 °C, near the Co0.50Pt0.50 composition, CoxPt1 x exhibits Cu

Hellman, Frances

70

Computational study of wax deposition in pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax deposition in subsea pipelines is one of the flow assurance problems for oil and gas production. In contrast to many studies about single phase wax deposition gas-oil wax deposition studies are very limited. The wax deposition mechanism and model prediction are restricted by many factors such as hydrodynamic and thermal when multiphase flow is involved. Wax deposition modeling becomes complicated under multiphase flowing conditions. wax deposition is depended by the flow pattern. The stratified flow is one of the most common flow patterns in the actual subsea gas-oil flowing conditions. In this work numerical methods are used to study wax deposition in oil-gas stratified flow through a pipe. Based on the flow analysis about stratified flow the non-isothermal heat and mass transfer is calculated. The temperature profile of the oil and the concentration profile of wax in oil are obtained. The change of the oil-gas interface i.e. the liquid holdup throughout the pipe must be taken into the heat and mass balance. The valid wax deposition surface must be taken into the wax deposition modeling by establishing function of the liquid holdup and the wetted area by oil. The molecular diffusion is as the deposition mechanism. The increase of the wax fraction in the deposit as a function of time depends on the mass flux from the oil deposit interface into the gel and the growth of the deposit thickness depends on the difference between the mass flux from the bulk oil to the oil deposit interface and the mass flux from the interface into the deposit. In addition the growth of the wax deposit as a function of time along with the effect oil flow rate gas flow rate and the inlet temperature are discussed. The presence of gas significantly reduces the severity of wax deposition by altering the heat and mass transfer characteristics.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Deposition Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulsed Plasma Processing Pulsed Plasma Processing NEW: Downloadable: Invited Talk "Pulsed Metal Plasmas," presented at the 2006 AVS Meeting, San Francisco, California, November 15, 2006. (PDF, file size 8 MB). Plasma Sources for Window Coatings Deposition processes for low-emittance and solar control coatings can be improved through the use of advanced plasma technology developed at LBNL. A new type of constricted glow-discharge plasma source was selected for the 1997 R&D 100 Award. Invented by LBNL researchers Andre Anders, Mike Rubin, and Mike Dickinson, the source was designed to be compatible with industrial vacuum deposition equipment and practice. Construction is simple, rugged and inexpensive. It can operate indefinitely over a wide range of chamber pressure without any consumable parts such as filaments or grids. Several different gases including Argon, Oxygen and Nitrogen have been tested successfully.

72

Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium...

73

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Growth Energetics of Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growth energetics of carbon nanotubes during arc discharge conditions are investigated. Ab initio molecular dynamics calcualtions show that the electric field alone cannot stabilize the growth of open metallic tubes. The addition of atoms and small clusters to tubes were studied using realistic atomic potentials. Deposition on tubes narrower than Å3 nm leads to nucleation of curved defects (adjacent pentagon pairs) and eventual tube closure, while deposition on wider tubes favors the formation of hexagons and isolated pentagons, thereby promoting open-ended growth.

A. Maiti; C. J. Brabec; C. M. Roland; J. Bernholc

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition with Self-Aligned Nanorod Structure...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Self-Aligned Nanorod Structure. Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition with Self-Aligned Nanorod Structure. Abstract: Suppressing lithium (Li) dendrite growth is one of the most...

76

Sandy Depositional Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Why is the study of sandy depositional systems central to the understanding of sand and sandstone? From earliest times geologists have wanted to know where and under what conditions a sandstone was deposited—t...

F. J. Pettijohn; Paul Edwin Potter; Raymond Siever

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Growth of cubic SiC thin films on Si,,001... by high vacuum chemical vapor deposition using 1,3-disilabutane and an investigation of the effect of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea K.-W. Lee, M. M. Sung, and Y. Kim Thin by sublimation and liquid phase epitaxial growth is not commer- cially available in sizes above 2 in. Moreover

Boo, Jin-Hyo

78

Original article Growth stresses in tension wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Growth stresses in tension wood: role of microfibrils and lignification T Okuyama the growth stress generation in the region of normal and tension woods. growth stress/ tension wood in normal and ten- sion wood. The compressive stress from the deposition of lignin controls the level

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

79

direct_deposit_111609  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: DO NOT complete this form until you are ready to submit it to the Payroll Department. DIRECT DEPOSIT REQUEST Directions: 1. Provide required information neatly, legibly; 2. If Checking Account Direct Deposit, include a voided check. a. DO NOT submit a deposit slip! 3. If Savings Account Direct Deposit, include a copy of savings card. 4. Sign this form; 5. Inter-office mail it to Craft Payroll at "P238." DIRECT DEPOSITION AUTHORIZATION I hereby authorize Los Alamos National Laboratory, hereinafter called The Laboratory, to initiate credit entries and, if necessary, debit entries and adjustments for any credit entries in error to my account listed on this form. If deposit is for:

80

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Final subcontract report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher order silanes has been studied for fabricating amorphous hydrogenated silicon thin-film solar cells. Intrinsic and doped a-Si:H films were deposited in a reduced-pressure, tubular-flow reactor, using disilane feed-gas. Conditions for depositing intrinsic films at growth rates up to 10 A/s were identified. Electrical and optical properties, including dark conductivity, photoconductivity, activation energy, optical absorption, band-gap and sub-band-gap absorption properties of CVD intrinsic material were characterized. Parameter space for depositing intrinsic and doped films, suitable for device analysis, was identified.

Rocheleau, R.E.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Spores from Devonian Deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN a well-illustrated paper on "Spores from Devonian Deposits, Mimerdalen, Spitsbergen" (Norsk. Polarinstitutt Skrifter, No. 132, 1964), Jorunn Os Vigran deals with the dispersed ...

1965-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

EMSL - ion deposition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

deposition en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and-labora...

83

EMSL - Deposition and Microfabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion beam for nanolithography and deposition and manipulation of structures at the nano scale* Microfabrication suite for designing and etching complex patterns into varied...

84

Solution deposition assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

85

Nanoscale Growth Twins in Sputtered Copper Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................. 7 I.1.3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) .................................... 8 I.2. Fabrication of copper thin films .................................................... 12... to the exposure of the film growth surface to the solution, impurities may be introduced. I.1.3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) CVD is a chemical process used to produce high-purity, high-performance thin films and often used in the semiconductor industry...

Anderoglu, Osman

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

86

Heteroepitaxy of group IV-VI nitrides by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heteroepitaxial growth of selected group IV-VI nitrides on various orientations of sapphire (?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is demonstrated using atomic layer deposition. High quality, epitaxial films are produced at significantly lower temperatures than required by conventional deposition methods. Characterization of electrical and superconducting properties of epitaxial films reveals a reduced room temperature resistivity and increased residual resistance ratio for films deposited on sapphire compared to polycrystalline samples deposited concurrently on fused quartz substrates.

Klug, Jeffrey A., E-mail: jklug@anl.gov; Groll, Nickolas R.; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Becker, Nicholas G.; Cao, Chaoyue; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Weimer, Matthew S. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

Perspectives on Deposition Velocity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deposition Deposition Velocity ... Going down the rabbit hole to explain that sinking feeling Brian DiNunno, Ph.D. Project Enhancement Corporation June 6 th , 2012 Discussion Framework ï‚— Development of the HSS Deposition Velocity Safety Bulletin ï‚— Broader discussion of appropriate conservatism within dispersion modeling and DOE-STD-3009 DOE-STD-3009 Dose Comparison "General discussion is provided for source term calculation and dose estimation, as well as prescriptive guidance for the latter. The intent is that calculations be based on reasonably conservative estimates of the various input parameters." - DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A.3 DOE-STD-3009 Dispersion

88

EMSL: Capabilities: Deposition and Microfabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Additional Information Meet the Deposition and Microfabrication Experts Related EMSL User Projects Deposition and Microfabrication Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Deposition and Microfabrication brochure Designed to augment research important to a variety of disciplines, EMSL's Deposition and Microfabrication Capability tackles serious scientific challenges from a microscopic perspective. From deposition instruments that emphasize oxide films and interfaces to a state-of-the-art microfabrication suite, EMSL has equipment to tailor surfaces, as diverse as single-crystal thin films or nanostructures, or create the microenvironments needed for direct experimentation at micron scales. Users benefit from coupling deposition and microfabrication applications

89

Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wilson 2003). The use of citric acid as a dispersant allowed the deposition of thin...poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles embedded...stent for local drug delivery. Polyacrylic acid was used as surfactant because...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Graphene Growth and Device Integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

screens, photonic applications, energy generation, and batteries [3], [12], [13]. The first graphene filmsINVITED P A P E R Graphene Growth and Device Integration This paper describes one of the emerging methods for growing grapheneVthe chemical vapor deposition methodVwhich is based on a catalytic reaction

91

Saddle-field glow-discharge deposition of amorphous semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a dc saddle-field glow-discharge deposition procedure which combines the positive attributes of the conventional dc and rf glow-discharge techniques. Preliminary mass spectra analyses of both silane and methane glow-discharges demonstrates that ions constitute a significant fraction of the species reaching the film surface. Growth rate analyses suggest that ions play a significant role in the saddle-field glow-discharge deposition of amorphous semiconducting films.

Gaspari, F.; Sidhu, L.S.; O`Leary, S.K.; Zukotynski, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Vacuum arc deposition devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N. [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Instrument Series: Deposition and Microfabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Sputter Deposition System Only available at EMSL, the Discovery ® Deposition System has been customized to be a fully automated multi-functional "hybrid" instrument with several modes for thin film processing, including multi-target sputtering, effusion cell deposition, electron beam deposition, and in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) materials characterization. Unlike most systems, the Discovery ® Deposition System's unique configuration offers operational flexibility, efficiency, and control, allowing a range of applications and materials to be processed simultaneously. Because it is software controlled, users can provide their own "recipes" and have a complete log of what happens throughout the

94

Chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from disilane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited at growth rates of 1 to 30 A/s by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane source gas at 24 torr total pressure in a tubular reactor. The effects of substrate temperature and gas holding time (flow rate) on film growth rate and effluent gas composition were measured at temperatures ranging from 360{sup 0} to 485{sup 0}C and gas holding times from 3 to 62s. Effluent gases determined by gas chromatography included silane, disilane and other higher order silanes. A chemical reaction engineering model, based on a silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion gas phase reaction network and film growth from both SiH/sub 2/ and high molecular weight silicon species, Si/sub n/H/sub 2n/, was developed. The model predictions were in good agreement with experimentally determined growth rates and effluent gas compositions.

Bogaert, R.J.; Russell, T.W.F.; Klein, M.T. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rocheleau, R.E.; Baron, B.N. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (USA). Inst. of Energy Conversion)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism of dense vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition method was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques.

Takashima, A.

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Deposition of biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia by ion-beam-assisted deposition.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biaxially textured yttria (8 mol %)-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films were deposited on randomly oriented Hastelloy C and Stainless Steel 304 at room temperature as a buffer layer for subsequent deposition of oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} films. The 0.16-1.3 {micro}m thick YSZ films were deposited by e-beam evaporation at rates of 1.2-3.2 {angstrom}/sec. Biaxially textured films were produced with an Ar/O{sub 2} ion beam directed at the substrate during film growth. X-ray diffraction was used to study in-plane and out-of-plane orientation as a function of ion-bombardment angle, film thickness, ion-to-atom flux ratio, and substrate material. In-plane and out-of-plane average-misorientation angles on these YSZ films that were deposited by ion-beam-assisted deposition were as low as 17 and 5.4{degree}, respectively, on as-received substrates.

Chudzik, M. P.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

Process and Hardware for Deposition of Complex Thin-film Alloys...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For example, a ternary alloy of Cd1-xMgxTe can be made by feeding Mg vapor to a CdTe CSS deposition source. Many other material combinations are possible for growth of thin...

98

Sputter deposition of semiconductor superlattices for thermoelectric applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical dramatic improvement of the thermoelectric properties of materials by using quantum confinement in novel semiconductor nanostructures has lead to considerable interest in the thermoelectric community. Therefore, we are exploring the critical materials issues for fabrication of quantum confined structures by magnetron sputtering in the lead telluride and bismuth telluride families of materials. We have synthesized modulated structures from thermoelectric materials with bilayer periods of as little as 3.2 nm and shown that they are stable at deposition temperatures high enough to grow quality films. Issues critical to high quality film growth have been investigated such as nucleation and growth conditions and their effect on crystal orientation and growth morphology. These investigations show that nucleating the film at a temperature below the growth temperature of optimum electronic properties produces high quality films. Our work with sputter deposition, which is inherently a high rate deposition process, builds the technological base necessary to develop economical production of these advanced materials. High deposition rate is critical since, even if efficiencies comparable with CFC based refrigeration systems can be achieved, large quantities of quantum confined materials will be necessary for cost-competitive uses.

Wagner, A.V.; Foreman, R.J.; Farmer, J.C.; Barbee, T.W.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hybrid Thin Film Deposition System | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hybrid Thin Film Deposition System Hybrid Thin Film Deposition System Only available at EMSL, the Discovery Deposition System has been customized to be a fully automated...

100

OPTIMAL DESIGN OF A HIGH PRESSURE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION REACTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMAL DESIGN OF A HIGH PRESSURE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION REACTOR K.J. BACHMANN of computer simulations as an optimal design tool which lessens the costs in time and effort in experimental vapor deposition (HPOMCVD) reactor for use in thin film crystal growth. The advantages of such a reactor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

On the optimization of a dc arcjet diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the optimization of a dc arcjet diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor S. W. Reevea) and W. A precursor in our dc arcjet reactor.1 Based on conclusions drawn from that work, an optimization strategy diamond film growth in a dc arcjet chemical vapor deposition reactor has been developed. Introducing

Dandy, David

102

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

103

Pulsed laser deposition growth of heteroepitaxial YBa2Cu3O7/La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 superlattices on NdGaO3 and Sr0.7La0.3Al0.65Ta0.35O3 substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heteroepitaxial superlattices of [YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}(n)/La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}(m)]{sub x} (YBCO/LCMO), where n and m are the number of YBCO and LCMO monolayers and x the number of bilayer repetitions, have been grown with pulsed laser deposition on NdGaO{sub 3} (110) and Sr{sub 0.7}La{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.65}Ta{sub 0.35}O{sub 3} (001). These substrates are well lattice matched with YBCO and LCMO and, unlike the commonly used SrTiO{sub 3}, they do not give rise to complex and uncontrolled strain effects at low temperature. The growth dynamics and the structure have been studied in situ with reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex situ with scanning transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and neutron reflectometry. The individual layers are found to be flat and continuous over long lateral distances with sharp and coherent interfaces and with a well-defined thickness of the individual layer. The only visible defects are antiphase boundaries in the YBCO layers that originate from perovskite unit-cell height steps at the interfaces with the LCMO layers. We also find that the first YBCO monolayer at the interface with LCMO has an unusual growth dynamics and is lacking the CuO chain layer, while the subsequent YBCO layers have the regular Y-123 structure. Accordingly, the CuO{sub 2} bilayers at both the LCMO/YBCO and the YBCO/LCMO interfaces are lacking one of their neighboring CuO chain layers and, thus, half of their hole-doping reservoir. Nevertheless, from electric transport measurements on a superlattice with n = 2 we obtain evidence that the interfacial CuO{sub 2} bilayers remain conducting and even exhibit the onset of a superconducting transition at very low temperature. Finally, we show from dc magnetization and neutron reflectometry measurements that the LCMO layers are strongly ferromagnetic.

Malik, V. K. [University of Fribourg; Marozau, I. [University of Fribourg; Das, S. [University of Fribourg; Doggett, B. [University of Fribourg; Satapathy, D. K. [University of Fribourg; Uribe-Laverde, M. A. [University of Fribourg; Biskup, Nevenko [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Schneider, C. W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Marcelot, C. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Stahn, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Bernhard, C. [University of Fribourg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Graphene growth with giant domains using chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N. Martensson, Controlling graphene corrugation on lattice-in patterned epitaxial graphene, Science, 2006, 312(5777), 92009, 4(6), 17 A. K. Geim, Graphene: Status and Prospects,

Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Silicon nucleation and film evolution on silicon dioxide using disilane: Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of very smooth silicon at high deposition rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and H{sub 2} for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) of silicon on SiO{sub 2} has been performed at temperatures ranging from 590 to 900 C and pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 Torr. Deposition at 590 C yields amorphous silicon films with the corresponding ultrasmooth surface with a deposition rate of 68 nm/min. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of a sample deposited at 625 C and 1 Torr reveals a bilayer structure which is amorphous at the growth surface and crystallized at the oxide interface. Higher temperatures yield polycrystalline films where the surface roughness depends strongly on both deposition pressure and temperature. Silane-based amorphous silicon deposition in conventional systems yields the expected ultrasmooth surfaces, but at greatly reduced deposition rates unsuitable for single-wafer processing. However, disilane, over the process window considered here, yields growth rates high enough to be appropriate for single-wafer manufacturing, thus providing a viable means for deposition of very smooth silicon films on SiO{sub 2} in a single-wafer environment.

Violette, K.E.; Oeztuerk, M.C.; Christensen, K.N.; Maher, D.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Low-temperature solid-phase crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering with substrate bias  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystallization properties of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film deposited by rf magnetron sputter deposition with substrate bias have been thoroughly characterized. The crystallization kinetics for films deposited with substrate bias is enhanced relative to unbiased a-Si by films. The enhanced crystallization for substrate biased a-Si films are attributed to ion enhanced nucleation of crystallites during sputter deposition which subsequently grow during the postdeposition anneal. Conversely films sputter deposited without substrate bias have more intrinsic defects and residual oxygen which enhance nucleation and retard growth, respectively, and lead to a large number of small crystallites.

Jun, Seung-Ik; Rack, Philip D.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Simpson, Michael L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Molecular Scale Engineering and Nanoscale Technologies Research Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

OCTOBER 1990 DEPOSITION AND REMOVAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, shielding, resuspension, indoor deposition, the relative airborne con- centrations indoors and outdoors RESUSPENSION; PLANTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTION; REMEDIAL ACTION; SHIELDING; SURFACE CONTAMINATION; URBAN effected by road traffic, and street cleaning the degree of resuspension, i.e. the return of deposited

108

Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

Magnetism of Chinese loess deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......April 1984 research-article Articles Magnetism of Chinese loess deposits Friedrich Heller...astr. Soc. (1984) 77, 125-141 Magnetism of Chinese loess deposits Friedrich Heller...considerable improvement of NRM cleaning. Often Magnetism of Chinese loess LOG R h ' M A H B......

Friedrich Heller; Liu Tungsheng

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hydrothermal Deposition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Deposition Hydrothermal Deposition Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Deposition Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Deposition: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Quartz veins indicate ancient fluid flow, possibly the result of a hydrothermal system (reference: http://www.nvcc.edu/home/cbentley/dc_rocks/) Tufa mounds indicate the location of extinct hot springs. In this photo they show the ancient extent of the surface manifestations at Mono Lake, CA (reference: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/climatechange/page.aspx?id=170704)(photo by Scott Stine) Hydrothermal water carries minerals as it travels through the crust. These minerals are often deposited as pressure decreases as the fluid approaches

111

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two-Phase Studies, with a focus on heat transfer and paraffin deposition at various pipe inclinations, which will be used to enhance the paraffin deposition code for gas-liquid flow in pipes. (3) Deposition Physics and Water Impact Studies, which will address the aging process, improve our ability to characterize paraffin deposits and enhance our understanding of the role water plays in paraffin deposition in deepwater pipelines. As in the previous two studies, knowledge gained in this suite of studies will be integrated into a state-of-the-art three-phase paraffin deposition computer program.

Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

An Optimized Nanoparticle Separator Enabled by Electron Beam Induced Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Size based separations technologies will inevitably benefit from advances in nanotechnology. Direct write nanofabrication provides a useful mechanism to deposit/etch nanoscale elements in environments otherwise inaccessible to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, electron beam induced deposition (EBID) was used to deposit an array of nanoscale features in a 3D environment with minimal material proximity effects outside the beam interaction region (BIR). Specifically, the membrane component of a nanoparticle separator was fabricated by depositing a linear array of sharply tipped nanopillars, with a singular pitch, designed for sub 50nm nanoparticle permeability. The nanopillar membrane was used in a dual capacity to control the flow of nanoparticles in the transaxial direction of the array while facilitating the sealing of the cellular sized compartment in the paraxial direction. An optimized growth recipe resulted which (1) maximized the growth efficiency of the membrane (which minimizes proximity effects), (2) preserved the fidelity of spacing between nanopillars (which maximizes the size based gating quality of the membrane) while (3) maintaining sharp nanopillar apexes for impaling an optically transparent polymeric lid critical for device sealing.

Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Property transformation of graphene with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited directly by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films are deposited directly onto graphene by H{sub 2}O-based atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the films are pinhole-free and continuously cover the graphene surface. The growth process of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films does not introduce any detective defects in graphene, suppresses the hysteresis effect and tunes the graphene doping to n-type. The self-cleaning of ALD growth process, together with the physically absorbed H{sub 2}O and oxygen-deficient ALD environment consumes OH{sup ?} bonds, suppresses the p-doping of graphene, shifts Dirac point to negative gate bias and enhances the electron mobility.

Zheng, Li; Cao, Duo; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh-cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shen, Dashen [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ion bombardment in silane VHF deposition plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of mass resolved ion energy distributions at the grounded substrate in an RF glow discharge allows to determine the ion flux and the ion energy flux towards the surface of a growing hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer. This provides the means to study the influence of ions on the structural properties of a-Si:H. Here the authors focus on the {alpha}-{gamma}{prime} transition as occurs in silane-hydrogen plasmas at an RF frequency of 50 MHz and a substrate temperature of 250 C. The structural properties of the layers appear to depend on the kinetic energy of the arriving ions. This is supported by measurements of ion fluxes under other deposition conditions and by characterization of the corresponding layers. The influence of ions on the growth is discussed in terms of their flux, and the amount of delivered kinetic and potential energy to the growing film. The measurements suggest that a threshold energy of about 5 eV per deposited atom is needed for the construction of a dense amorphous silicon network.

Hamers, E.A.G.; Bezemer, J.; Meiling, H.; Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Van Der Weg, W.F.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

On the dry deposition of submicron particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The air-surface exchange of particles can have a strong role in determining the amount, size, and chemical composition of particles in the troposphere. Here the authors consider only dry processes (deposition processes not directly aided by precipitation) and mostly address particles less than about 2 {micro}m in diameter (often referred to as submicron particles because most of such particles are less than 1 {micro}m in diameter). The processes that control the dry exchange of particulate material between the atmosphere and the surface of the Earth are numerous, highly varied, and sometimes poorly understood. As a result, determining which of the surface processes to parameterize or simulate in modeling the tropospheric mass budget of a particulate substance can be a significant challenge. Dry deposition, for example, can be controlled by a combination of Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, and gravitational settling, depending on the size of the particles, the roughness of the surface on both micrometeorological and microscopic scales, the geometrical structure of vegetative canopies, and other surface characteristics such as wetness. Particles can be added to the lower atmosphere by resuspension from land surfaces and sea spray. The roles of rapid gas-to-particle conversion and growth or shrinkage of particles as a result of water condensation or evaporation in the lower few meters of the atmosphere can also have a significant impact on particle concentrations in the lower atmosphere. Here, a few micrometeorological observations and inferences on particle air-surface exchange are briefly addressed.

Wesely, M. L.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth by W. G. Breiland, L. A. Bruskas, A. A. Allerman, and T. W. Hargett Motivation-Temperature is a critical factor in the growth of thin films by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is particularly important in compound semiconductor growth because one is often challenged to grow materials with specific chemical compositions in order to maintain stringent lattice-matching conditions or to achieve specified bandgap values. Optical pyrometry can be used to measure surface temperatures, but the thin film growth causes significant changes in the emissivity of the surface, leading to severe errors in the pyrometer measurement. To avoid these errors, emissivity changes must be measured and

117

Other Hydrothermal Deposits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrothermal deposits dot the landscape at the Hverir Geothermal Area, Iceland. Photo by Darren Atkins User-specified field for unlisted hydrothermally deposited rock and...

118

Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials, Elsevier, .O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

Ozer, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Sandia National Laboratories: ion beam assisted deposition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion beam assisted deposition Sandia, Los Alamos, Superconducting Technologies Inc., & Superpower: Solution Deposition Planarization On March 20, 2013, in CINT, Facilities, Grid...

120

Linked Deposit Loan Program (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Linked Deposit Program provides loan financing for small businesses of up to $100,000 for up to 7 years. The State Investment Commission invests funds from the state's Abandoned Property Cash...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Molar Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molar Growth Molar Growth Name: Daniel Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What animals have molars that grow continuously ? Replies: No mammals that I or my colleagues are aware of, only some few whose incisors grow continuously. J. Elliott Most vertebrates are "polyphyodonts" meaning that they replace teeth continuously through out their lives. All the teeth aren't replaced at once, but in waves so that the animals always have functional teeth around those that are lost. Most mammals are "diphyodonts", which means that they have only 2 sets of teeth: baby teeth and adult teeth. The teeth of herbivore mammals, those which eat grasses, seem to grow throughout their lives. But really, the teeth are very long and extend far down into the jaws. They gradually move up in the jaw toward the surface over time, with the area beneath them filling in with bone.

122

Asphalt deposition in miscible floods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. . 22 23 8. REFERENCES. 24 9. APPENDIX. 26 LIST OF TABLES Table Page I II IV Properties of the Crude Oils Studied Average Core Properties for Different Tests Average Perrneabilities of Different Sections of Core Before and After... Displacement with Liquefied Petroleum Gas Percent Reduction in Permeability in Different Sections of Core Due to Asphalt Deposition Average Recoveries of Four Crude Oils and Increase in Swept Area due to Plugging by Asphalt Deposition 27 29 ABSTRACT...

Hasan, Syed Mir Ahmed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

125

Vapor deposition of hardened niobium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

Blocher, Jr., John M. (Columbus, OH); Veigel, Neil D. (Columbus, OH); Landrigan, Richard B. (Columbus, OH)

1983-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

Depositional systems distribution of the lower Oligocene Vicksburg Formation, TX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lower Oligocene Vicksburg Formation of Texas is situated between the upper Eocene Jackson Group and the upper Oligocene Frio Formation. The paleogeography of the Texas Gulf coastal plain during the early Oligocene is typical of a progradational passive continental margin. However, a detailed regional depositional systems analysis of stratigraphic units, such as the Vicksburg, within a mature petroleum basin can yield results beneficial in both exploration and development. Stratigraphic plays are determined from the distribution of depositional systems, and reservoir characteristics are heavily influenced by conditions of sedimentation. Two primary depocenters (and exploration fairways) of the Texas Vicksburg were the Houston Embayment and the Rio Grande Embayment; they were separated by a deep-rooted structural nose in central Texas: the San Marcos arch. Within the embayments, deltaic depositional systems merged along strike with barrier/strand plain systems. Updip, fluvial systems traversed coastal plain units. On the seaward edge of the paralic systems, sand and mud deposits prograded across, and built up over, the relict Jackson shelf and shelf margin. Contemporaneous growth faulting controlled deltaic depositional patterns in the Rio Grande Embayment and, to a lesser degree, in the Houston Embayment. A barrier/strand plain system within an interdeltaic coastal bight extended across the northern flank of the San Marcos arch. Several minor wave-dominated delta complexes were interspersed within this regional setting. The southern flank of the arch was influenced by the fluvial systems of the Rio Grande Embayment that established another wave-dominated delta. Deposition of the Vicksburg progradational paralic sediments was initiated seaward of the Jackson coastal position. A brief, minor transgression interrupted the progradational pattern during middle Vicksburg deposition.

Coleman, J.; Galloway, W.E. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Single-crystal nanowires grown via electron-beam-induced deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) is a useful technique for direct-writing of 3-dimensional dielectric, semiconductor, and metallic materials with nanoscale precision and resolution. The EBID process, however, has been limited in many cases because precursor byproducts (typically from organic precursors like W(CO)6) are incorporated into the deposited material resulting in contaminated and amorphous structures. In this manuscript, we have investigated the structure and composition of EBID tungsten nanostructures as-deposited from a tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) precursor. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and electron spectroscopy were employed to determine the effects that the electron beam scanning conditions have on the deposit characteristics. The results show that slow, one-dimensional lateral scanning produces textured -tungsten nanowire cores surrounded by an oxide secondary layer, while stationary vertical growth leads to single-crystal [100]-oriented W3O nanowires. Furthermore we correlate how the growth kinetics affect the resultant nanowire structure and composition.

Klein, Kate L [ORNL; Randolph, Steven J [ORNL; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Rack, Philip D [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

Fan, John C. C. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Tsaur, Bor-Yeu (Arlington, MA); Gale, Ronald P. (Bedford, MA); Davis, Frances M. (Framingham, MA)

1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

Fan, John C. C. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Tsaur, Bor-Yeu (Arlington, MA); Gale, Ronald P. (Bedford, MA); Davis, Frances M. (Framingham, MA)

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Economic Growth Policies & Economic Growth Theory Influences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this thesis is to describe the presence of theories for economic growth in municipalities’ economic growth strategies, and to compare the… (more)

Hallden, Sophie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Semiannual report, 1 May 1984-31 October 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of research done by the Institute of Energy Conversion for the Solar Energy Research Institute in 1984 on high-efficiency, stable, amorphous silicon solar cells, fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane at high growth rates. The kinetics of CVD with higher order silanes were modelled for a tubular reactor with static substrates. A gas-phase reaction network was adopted, based on published silylene insertion and decomposition pathways. Mass balances for hydrogen and all saturated silanes through octasilane were derived. Boron-doped a-Si:H p-layers were deposited by CVD at 200/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C. Band gap and conductivity depended strongly on the diborane fraction in the feed gas, independent of substrate temperature. The effects of intrinsic layer deposition temperature and growth rate on material properties and device performance were studied. Cell parameters of p-i-n cells were correlated with i-layer deposition temperature and growth rate. Fill factor and short-circuit current depended on deposition conditions, while open-circuit voltage did not. Effects of diborane additions to the feed gas during i-layer deposition were studied. Experimental evidence and calculations indicate high resistance at the back contact.

Baron, B.N.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Hegedus, S.S.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Fundamental Proximity Effects in Focused electron Beam Induced Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique.

Plank, Harald [Graz University of Technology; Smith, Daryl [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Haber, Thomas [Graz University of Technology; Rack, Philip D [ORNL; Hofer, Ferdinand [Graz University of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27?cm{sup ?1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

Troppenz, Gerald V., E-mail: gerald.troppenz@helmholtz-berlin.de; Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut für Silizium Photovoltaik, Kekuléstr. 5, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Potpourri of deposition and resuspension questions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty questions and answers are listed dealing with particulate deposition, resuspension, and precipitation scavenging.

Slinn, W.G.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Eyeball Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Eyeball Growth Eyeball Growth Name: Jade Hawk Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Okay, I know I'm supposed to be able to answer questions here, but a friend who teaches grades 7 & 8 general science wants to know if the human eyeball is fully grown at birth. I checked my references, which are rather limited when it comes to human physiology, and found nothing. Can anyone help? Replies: The eye will still develop in size, pigmentation, and neurologically but I don't have the details here at hand. A kitten is born with eyes even more immature than human babies. Besides having sealed eyes that take about a week to open, they have retinas that a avascularized and need to undergo neovascularization to properly nourish and oxygenate the tissue. We have used the kitten to study retinopathy of prematurity, a condition caused in part by increased inspired oxygen. The kitten is also used in the study of diabetic retinopathy which a I think is the leading cause of blindness in the US. Look up publications by Dale Phelps, MD.

136

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Bimodal Island Size Distribution in Heteroepitaxial Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bimodal size distribution of two-dimensional islands is inferred during interface formation in heteroepitaxial growth of bismuth ferrite on (001) oriented SrTiO3 by sputter deposition. Features observed by in situ x-ray scattering are explained by a model where coalescence of islands determines the growth kinetics with negligible surface diffusion on SrTiO3. Small clusters maintain a compact shape as they coalesce, while clusters beyond a critical size impinge to form large irregular connected islands and a population of smaller clusters forms in the spaces between the larger ones.

P.?V. Chinta and R.?L. Headrick

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Direct growth of graphene on Si(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the need of integrated circuit in the current silicon technology, the formation of graphene on Si wafer is highly desirable, but is still a challenge for the scientific community. In this context, we report the direct growth of graphene on Si(111) wafer under appropriate conditions using an electron beam evaporator. The structural quality of the material is investigated in detail by reflection high energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. Our experimental results confirm that the quality of graphene is strongly dependent on the growth time during carbon atoms deposition.

Thanh Trung, Pham, E-mail: phamtha@fundp.ac.be; Joucken, Frédéric; Colomer, Jean-François; Robert, Sporken [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), 61 Rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Raskin, Jean-Pierre [Electrical Engineering (ELEN), Institute of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Université catholique de Louvain UCL, 3 place du Levant, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Hackens, Benoît; Santos, Cristiane N. [Nanoscopic physics (NAPS), Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (IMCN), Université catholique de Louvain UCL, 2 chemin du Cyclotron, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

Vacuum vapor deposition gun assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vapor deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, a hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

Zeren, Joseph D. (Boulder, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Interglacial Deposits at Bobbitshole, Ipswich  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bobbitshole, Ipswich R. G. West The stratigraphy and palaeobotany...occupy a lake basin in a valley cut in the local plateau...Interglacial in north-west Europe, with which the...and clays deposited in a valley cut in boulder clay assigned...Bobbitshole, Ipswich West Richard Gilbert Author...

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method to inhibit deposit formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for inhibiting deposit formation on the contact surfaces of structures confining heated hydrocarbon fluid which exhibits substantial fouling. The process consists of introducing into the hydrocarbon fluid at least an inhibiting amount of thiophene-containing polycondensed aromatic/naphthenic compounds of number average molecular weight (M-bar n) from 200 to 1,000.

Dickakian, G.B.

1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 2: dry deposition and resuspension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the headings: dry deposition of gases, dry deposition of particles, wind erosion, plutonium deposition and resuspension, air-sea exchange, tropical and polar, global scale, and future studies.

Pruppacher, H.R.; Semanin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dynamics of growth roughening and smoothening on Ge (001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements of the evolution of surface morphology during molecular beam epitaxy of Ge on Ge (001) and subsequent annealing. We find that there is a critical ''growth roughening'' temperature (375 C) above which a smooth surface remains smooth during growth, but below which it roughens during growth. Surprisingly, smooth starting surfaces never appear to roughen without bound, but reach steady-state roughnesses which depend on temperature and deposition rate. The results can be fit empirically with simple phenomenological equations based on a competition between growth roughening and growth smoothening of a ''pseudo-statistical'' surface. Furthermore, growth-roughened surfaces tend to smoothen, after growth, at a rate consistent with an Ostwald-like ripening mechanism. 4 figs.

Chason, E.; Tsao, J.Y.; Horn, K.M.; Picraux, S.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon films from disilane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon films for fabrication of solar cells have been deposited by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) using a tubular flow reactor. A mathematical description for the CVD reactor was developed and solved by a numerical procedure. The proposed chemical reaction network for the model is based on silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion in the gas phase and film growth from SiH/sub 2/ and silicon polymers (Si/sub n/N/sub 2n/, n approx. 10). Estimates of the rate constants have been obtained for trisilane decomposition, silicon polymer formation, and polymer dehydrogenation. The silane unimolecular decomposition rate constants were corrected for pressure effects. The model behavior is compared to the experimental results over the range of conditions: reactor temperature (360 to 485/sup 0/C), pressures (2 to 48 torr), and gas holding time (1 to 70 s). Within the above range of conditions, film growth rate varies from 0.01 to 30 A/s. Results indicate that silicon polymers are the main film precursors for gas holding times greater than 3 s. Film growth by silylene only becomes important at short holding times, large inert gas dilution, and positions near the beginning of the reactor hot zone.

Bogaert, R.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition.

Trkula, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fabrication of alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique has been proposed for the fabrication of atmospheric corrosion resistant alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition. We produced photocathodes with a highly homogeneous photoemissive layer well-adherent to the substrate. The photocathodes were mounted in a vacuum photodiode, and a tungsten grid was used as an anode. Using pulsed UV lasers, we carried out experiments aimed at evaluating the quantum efficiency of the photocathodes. With a dc voltage applied between the photocathode and anode grid, we measured a shunt signal proportional to the total charge emitted by the cathode exposed to UV laser light. The proposed deposition technique enables one to produce photocathodes with photoemissive layers highly uniform in quantum efficiency, which is its main advantage over thin film growth by resistive evaporation. (laser technologies)

Brendel', V M; Bukin, V V; Garnov, Sergei V; Bagdasarov, V Kh; Denisov, N N; Garanin, Sergey G; Terekhin, V A; Trutnev, Yurii A

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Densification of functional plasma polymers by momentum transfer during film growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Functional plasma polymers were deposited from pure ethylene discharges and with the addition of carbon dioxide or ammonia. The incorporation of oxygen and nitrogen-containing functional groups depends on the fragmentation in the gas phase as well as on the densification during film growth. While a minimum energy per deposited carbon atom is required for cross-linking, the densification and accompanying reduction of functional group incorporation was found to scale linearly with momentum transfer through ion bombardment during film growth.

Hegemann, Dirk; Koerner, Enrico; Blanchard, Noemi; Drabik, Martin; Guimond, Sebastien [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland)

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Growth of Carbon Support for Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of Carbon Support for Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell by Pulsed-Laser Deposition (PLDGDL)(catalyst) (pulsed laser deposition PLD) (plasma plume) () #12;III Abstract key word: Fuel CellPulsed Laser. People begin to develop fuel cells for seeking alternative energy sources. Fuel cell use the chemical

150

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Resuspension of wall deposits in spray dryers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wall deposition occurs in spray dryers when dried or partially dried particles contact and adhere to the walls during operation, thus reducing the yield of product collected. Wall deposits also present a product ...

M. J. Hanus; T. A. G. Langrish

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

Olsson, Ylva Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Highly Conformal Thin Films of Tungsten Nitride Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition from a Novel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) deposition temperatures under 350 °C (due to the thermal instability of low-k materials); (8) good growth, and electrically conducting. All of the films showed good adhesion to the substrates, were acid-resistant, and did resistivity than aluminum, 1.7 versus 2.7 µ-cm, respectively (bulk values). This property of copper enables

154

Decomposition of Ethanol and Dimethyl Ether During Chemical Vapour deposition Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Decomposition of Ethanol and Dimethyl Ether During Chemical Vapour deposition Synthesis of Single-phase thermal decomposition of ethanol and dimethyl ether (DME) at typical SWNT growth conditions using to the predicted decomposition mechanism. Signature peak intensities indicated concentrations of both ethanol

Maruyama, Shigeo

155

Cobalt Ultrathin Film Catalyzed Ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cobalt Ultrathin Film Catalyzed Ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) using a cobalt ultrathin film (1 nm) as the catalyst and ethanol as carbon feedstock flow during the growth. The trace amount of self-contained water (0.2-5 wt %) in ethanol may act

Hone, James

156

An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes M Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition of various nanotube surface and edge reactions (e.g. adsorption of hydrocarbons and hydrogen onto the surface

Grujicic, Mica

157

Deposition of thin silicon layers on transferred large area graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical vapor deposition of Si onto transferred graphene is investigated. At elevated temperatures, Si nucleates preferably on wrinkles and multilayer graphene islands. In some cases, however, Si can be quasi-selectively grown only on the monolayer graphene regions while the multilayer islands remain uncovered. Experimental insights and ab initio calculations show that variations in the removal efficiency of carbon residuals after the transfer process can be responsible for this behavior. Low-temperature Si seed layer results in improved wetting and enables homogeneous growth. This is an important step towards realization of electronic devices in which graphene is embedded between two Si layers.

Lupina, Grzegorz, E-mail: lupina@ihp-microelectronics.com; Kitzmann, Julia; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Dabrowski, Jarek; Wolff, Andre; Mehr, Wolfgang [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)] [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition with Self-Aligned Nanorod Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suppressing lithium (Li) dendrite growth is one of the most critical challenges for the development of Li metal batteries. We recently proposed a novel self-healing electrostatic shield (SHES) mechanism which can fundamentally change the Li deposition behavior and lead to the growth of dendrite-free Li films. Here, we report for the first time that the as-deposited dendrite-free Li films grown with assistance of SHES additive are actually composed of highly-aligned and compacted Li nanorods with hemispherical tips. Both surface and cross sectional morphology evolution of the Li films during repeated Li deposition/stripping processes were systematically investigated. A new model has been established to explain the formation and evolution of the Li nanorods. A fundamental understanding on the internal structure and evolution of Li metal films may lead to new approaches to stabilize the long term cycling stability of Li metal anode.

Zhang, Yaohui; Qian, Jiangfeng; Xu, Wu; Russell, Selena M.; Chen, Xilin; Nasybulin, Eduard; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Mei, Donghai; Cao, Ruiguo; Ding, Fei; Cresce, Arthur V.; Xu, Kang; Zhang, Jiguang

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

159

Essays on Banking Crises and Deposit Insurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the deposit insurance system while the second essay studies the impact of international illiquidity on domestic banking crises. The Recent Deposit Insurance Reform in the U.S. raised the coverage limit for certain types of deposits. In chapter II, I study...

Wang, Wen-Yao

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Accelerated electrospark deposition and the wear behavior of coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a coating process that ... such as pulse energy, pulse frequency, and deposition time are presented. Electrospark deposition coating by the new equipment on AISI...

P. -Z. Wang; G. -S. Pan; Y. Zhou; J. -X. Qu…

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Florida Growth Fund (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Florida Growth Fund can provide investments in technology and growth-related companies through co-investments with other institutional investors. The Fund awards preference to companies...

162

Political connections, bank deposits, and formal deposit insurance: Evidence from an emerging economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Political connections, bank deposits, and formal deposit insurance: Evidence from an emerging the impact of banks' political connections on their ability to collect deposits under two different deposit, regardless of their type (state-owned or private entities), politically connected banks are able to attract

Boyer, Edmond

163

Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated. 8 figs.

Jankowski, A.F.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Rambach, G.D.; Randich, E.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rambach, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA); Randich, Erik (Endinboro, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rambach, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA); Randich, Erik (Endinboro, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

Berkman, Samuel (Florham Park, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Particle deposition in granular media: Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses topics on particle deposition in granular media. The six topics discussed are: experimental determination of initial collection efficiency in granular beds - an assessment of the effect of instrument sensitivity and the extent of particle bounce-off; deposition of polydispersed aerosols in granular media; in situ observation of aerosol deposition in a two-dimensional model filter; solid velocity in cross-flow granular moving bed; aerosol deposition in granular moving bed; and aerosol deposition in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed. (LSP)

Tien, Chi

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Dynamics of growth roughening and smoothening on Ge (001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements of the evolution of surface morphology during molecular-beam epitaxy of Ge on Ge(001) and subsequent annealing. We find that there is a critical ''kinetic roughening'' temperature (375 /sup 0/C) above which a smooth surface remains smooth during growth, but below which it roughens during growth. Surprisingly, smooth starting surfaces never appear to roughen without bound, but reach steady-state roughnesses which depend on temperature and deposition rate. The results can be fit empirically with simple phenomenological equations based on a competition between growth roughening and growth smoothening of a ''pseudo-statistical'' surface. Furthermore, growth-roughened surfaces tend to smoothen, after growth, at a rate consistent with a third-order power-law ripening mechanism.

Chason, E.; Tsao, J.Y.; Horn, K.M.; Picraux, S.T.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Investigations of chemical vapor deposition of GaN using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors apply synchrotron x-ray analysis techniques to probe the surface structure of GaN films during synthesis by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Their approach is to observe the evolution of surface structure and morphology in real time using grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS). This technique combines the ability of x-rays to penetrate the chemical vapor deposition environment for in situ measurements, with the sensitivity of GIXS to atomic scale structure. In this paper they present examples from some of their studies of growth modes and surface evolution as a function of process conditions that illustrate the capabilities of synchrotron x-ray analysis during MOCVD growth. They focus on studies of the homoepitaxial growth mode, island coarsening dynamics, and effects of impurities.

Thompson, C.; Stephenson, G. B.; Eastman, J. A.; Munkholm, A.; Auciello, O.; Murty, M. V. R.; Fini, P.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

Roughening, deroughening, and nonuniversal scaling of the interface width in electrophoretic deposition of polymer chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth and roughness of the interface of deposited polymer chains driven by a field onto an impenetrable adsorbing surface are studied by computer simulations in (2+1) dimensions. The evolution of the interface width W shows a crossover from short-time growth described by the exponent beta1 to a long-time growth with exponent beta2 (>beta1). The saturated width increases, i.e., the interface roughens, with the molecular weight Lc, but the roughness exponent alpha (from Ws~L^alpha) becomes negative in contrast to models for particle deposition; alpha depends on the chain length--a nonuniversal scaling with the substrate length L. Roughening and deroughening occur as the field E and the temperature T compete such that Ws=(A+BT)E^-1/2.

Frank W. Bentrem; R. B. Pandey; Fereydoon Family

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

DOE Workshop - Deposition Velocity Status  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivering DOE's Vision for the Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Safely Delivering the Department of Energy's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission DOE Workshop Deposition Velocity Status Mike Hitchler, Manager Nuclear Facility Safety June 5, 2012 Safely Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Existing UCOR Analyses * UCOR facilities at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) use various plume models depending on when they were developed and by whom. - Some use MACCS or MACCS2 for dispersion evaluation. (~5 locations) - LLLW uses ingestion modeling (multiple locations)

172

Metal deposition using seed layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Crystal growth and roughening of solid D{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near the triple point, growth shapes of vapor deposited hexagonal close packed D{sub 2} crystals reveal two crystal orientations contain facets which persist up to the melt. This observation is in contrast with previous experiments on rare gas solids and H{sub 2} where the highest T{sub r} measured is 0.8 T{sub tp}.

Kozioziemski, B.J.; Collins, G.W.; Bernat, T.P.

1997-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Effects of catalyst pretreatment for carbon nanotube growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of pretreatment of iron catalyst for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. CNTs were grown on Fe/A1203 (1/10 nm) thin-film catalyst deposited on silicon substrates via exposure to C2H4 in a thermal chemical ...

Morgan, Caitlin D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A theoretical investigation of gas source growth of the Si(001) surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as disilane is technologically important, as well as scientifically interesting. The aspects of growth covered of silicon from adsorption of fragments of disilane to nucleation of dimer strings. The theoretical methods. The behaviour of hydrogen is vital to understanding growth, as large amounts are deposited during disilane

Bowler, David

176

Modeling particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fouling of fin-and-tube heat exchangers by particle deposition leads to diminished effectiveness in supplying ventilation and air conditioning. This paper explores mechanisms that cause particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces. We present a model that accounts for impaction, diffusion, gravitational settling, and turbulence. Simulation results suggest that some submicron particles deposit in the heat exchanger core, but do not cause significant performance impacts. Particles between 1 and 10 {micro}m deposit with probabilities ranging from 1-20% with fin edge impaction representing the dominant mechanism. Particles larger than 10 {micro}m deposit by impaction on refrigerant tubes, gravitational settling on fin corrugations, and mechanisms associated with turbulent airflow. The model results agree reasonably well with experimental data, but the deposition of larger particles at high velocities is underpredicted. Geometric factors, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy.

Siegel, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

2 - Products Using Vacuum Deposited Coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Most of the vacuum coating done is thin metal coating for packaging applications covering many aspects of packaging. The metal coatings can be bright and highly reflective providing more advertising impact than metallic inks, which are duller. The metalized polymer webs can be used directly by heat sealing, laminated to other webs, or have the metallic layer transferred onto other surfaces by a stamping process. These and other variations make the aluminized film very versatile as a packaging material. The more important feature of the metal coating is that it provides a barrier performance against oxygen, water, and light. The barrier performance of the metal thin film depends on the thickness of the coating and the cleanliness of the coating. The use of lacquers or transparent colored inks enables metalized papers to be overprinted and used to make more reflective printed products than can be achieved by metallic inks. Many of these applications of metalized paper are purely esthetic. Holograms are bright, usually reflective, patterns or images that are used as decorative packaging and/or as security devices. Where holograms are used for packaging, they can be in the form of a small area integrated into the pack design or as a patterned background to the whole pack. This chapter provides examples of a large variety of products that make use of vacuum deposited coatings onto flexible substrates. Some of these may not be obvious to the users. The products range from flexible packaging, capacitors, pyrotechnics, flake fillers for paints and inks, holographic devices, transparent conducting coatings, thin film batteries, electronic circuits through to the current high market growth products such as displays, photovoltaics (solar cells), and high barrier coatings.

Charles A. Bishop

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Oil shale fueled FBC power plant – Ash deposits and fouling problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 41 MWth oil shale fired demonstration power plant was built in 1989 by PAMA in Mishor Rotem, Negev, Israel. The raw material for the plant is the local “oil shale”, which is in fact organic-rich marl. Since then, and until today, the unit is operated at high reliability and availability. At first, heavy soft fouling occurred due to the Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC) mode of operation, which caused a considerable reduction in the heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchangers. By going over to the Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) mode of operation the soft fouling phenomenon stopped at once, the heat transfer coefficient improved, and the power plant could be operated at its designed values. After five months of operation at the FBC mode the boiler had to be shut down because Hard Deposits (HD) blocked physically the passes in the boiler. These deposits could be removed only with the help of mechanical devices. During the first two years the boiler had to be stopped, at least, three times a year for deposit cleaning purposes. Research conducted at the plant and in the laboratories of the Geological Survey of Israel enabled us to understand the mechanism of formation of these deposits. The results showed that the HD are formed in two stages: (1) Deposition of very fine ash particles on the pipes of the boiler, as a result of the impact of larger particles on the pipes. The fine particles adhere to the pipes and to each other, and step by step build the deposit. The growth of the deposit on the pipe surface is always perpendicular to the particles flow direction. (2) The deposits harden due to chemical reactions. The joint experiments at the plant and at the laboratories of the Geological Survey showed:(A) The rate of deposition depends mainly on the lime concentration in the fly ash. (B) The lime concentration in the fly ash is a function of the clays concentration in the oil shale. (C) The increase and hardening of the deposit with time is due to solid–gas reactions within the deposit. At first recarbonation occurs, reaction between CaO in the deposit and CO2 (produced by the combustion) in the flue gas to form CaCO3 (bonded deposits), and then sulfatization; the reactions of the sulfatization are: (1) SO2 in the flue gas with CaO and CaCO3 in the deposit, leading to the formation of anhydrite CaSO4; and (2) SO2 in the flue gas with the amorphous silicates in the deposit forming hydroxylellestadite Ca10(SiO4)3(SO4)3(OH)2. These minerals are the hard deposits. The conclusions following these findings for the combustion of oil shales with a significant Ca-carbonate content are:(A) The FBC is the preferred mode of combustion. (B) The rate of deposition in the boiler depends mainly on the lime (free CaO) concentration in the Fly \\{ASh\\} (FAS). (C) The ratio Ca-carbonates to silicates (Al, Fe, etc.), in the oil shale feed, determines the concentration of lime in the FAS. (D) The rate of deposition in the boiler depends also on the geometry of the boiler and on the particles aerodynamic conditions in it. Following these conclusions, the plant was able to reduce the shutdowns to twice a year. Furthermore, based on the understanding of the deposit formation mechanism, it will be possible to minimize shutdowns, for deposit cleaning, to only once a year in future similar oil shale fuelled power plants.

O. Yoffe; A. Wohlfarth; Y. Nathan; S. Cohen; T. Minster

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nanostructured silicon thin films deposited by PECVD in the presence of silicon nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructured silicon thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperature (100 C) in the presence of silicon nanoparticles. The nanostructure of the films was revealed by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, which showed ordered silicon domains (1--2 nm) embedded in an amorphous silicon matrix. These ordered domains are due to the particles created in the discharge that contribute to the film growth. One consequence of the incorporation of nanoparticles is the accelerated crystallization of the nanostructured silicon thin films when compared to standard a-Si:H, as shown by the electrical characterization during the annealing.

Viera, G.; Cabarrocas, P.R.; Hamma, S.; Sharma, S.N.; Costa, J.; Bertran, E.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Orderly Deposition of Uncontaminated Graphene - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Orderly Deposition of Uncontaminated Graphene Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryXiaogan Liang of Berkeley Lab has...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Paraffin deposition in offshore oil production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The extreme environmental conditions typically encountered in offshore oil operations lead to a number of problems. Cool deep sea temperatures promote particle formation and deposition… (more)

Elphingstone, Gerald Mason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Predicting particle selection by deposit feeders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jul 15, 1977 ... Abstract. A feeding model for a generalized, benthic deposit feeder is derived from a filter- ... study was supported by Energy and Research De-.

2000-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

Wet and dry deposition of Chernobyl releases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... (refs 16-18). An analysis of the available monitoring data indicates that the product wrf{ for deposition of 131I and 137Cs

M. J. Clark; F. B. Smith

1988-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

184

III-V Nanowire Array Growth by Selective Area Epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

III-V semiconductor nanowires are unique material phase due to their high aspect ratio, large surface area, and strong quantum confinement. This affords the opportunity to control charge transport and optical properties for electrical and photonic applications. Nanoscale selective area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth (NS-SAG) is a promising technique to maximize control of nanowire diameter and position, which are essential for device application. In this work, InP and GaAs nanowire arrays are grown by NS-SAG. We observe enhanced sidewall growth and array uniformity disorder in high growth rate condition. Disorder in surface morphology and array uniformity of InP nanowire array is explained by enhanced growth on the sidewall and stacking faults. We also find that AsH{sub 3} decomposition on the sidewall affects the growth behavior of GaAs nanowire arrays.

Chu, Hyung-Joon; Stewart, Lawrence [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California (United States); Yeh, Tingwei [Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of Southern California 3651 Watt Way, VHE-314, Los Angeles, CA90089 (United States); Dapkus, P. Daniel [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California (United States); Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of Southern California 3651 Watt Way, VHE-314, Los Angeles, CA90089 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

Colloidal particle deposition in turbulent flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the initial deposition of monodispersed spherical colloidal particles from a steady fully developed turbulent flow onto conduit walls. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential is attractive, particle deposition is shown to be often governed by turbulent hydrodynamics. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential possess a repulsive maximum, particle deposition to first order is uniform and depends solely on electrical interaction effects. The developed theoretical model specialized to orifice deposition with the use of Harwell Flow3D turbulence modelling software qualitatively described the deposition of 0.5 {mu}m silica particles onto glass orifices from an aqueous suspension. The effect of the electrical double layer on the rate of colloidal particle deposition in laminar flow has been described by Spielman and Friedlander (1), Dahneke (2), Bowen et al. (3) and Bowen and Epstein (4). This article describes the extension of their work to colloidal particle deposition under steady fully developed turbulent flow conditions. This article also reports the results of orifice particle deposition experiments which were conducted to qualitatively investigate the developed theoretical model.

Morton, D.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition Noelle E. Selin and Christopher D. Holmes mercury oxidation [Selin & Jacob, Atmos. Env. 2008] 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 Influences on Mercury Wet Deposition · Hg wet dep = f(precipitation, [Hg(II)+Hg(P)]) Correlation (r2) between

Selin, Noelle Eckley

187

Simulation of Coal Ash Particle Deposition Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of Coal Ash Particle Deposition Experiments† ... Ichikawa et al.(7) measured deposition behavior for ash particles from ashing tests for a series of five coals, using a nominally 1 m tall × 60 mm diameter ash-heating tube that was fitted with a cooled, temperature-controlled particle impact probe oriented at a 30° angle to the atmospheric pressure air flow. ...

Weiguo Ai; John M. Kuhlman

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

188

MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-49339 MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS J.A. Siegel1,3 * and W.W. Nazaroff2 Department of Energy under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy. INDEX TERMS HVAC, Fouling

189

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sensitivity of ballistic deposition to pseudorandom number generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ballistic deposition (BD) serves as a prototype for studies of dynamic scaling phenomena in nonequilibrium growth processes. In BD, particles are sequentially added to a growing surface at randomly selected positions. The model is typically investigated by computer simulations where randomness is implemented by pseudorandom number generators (PRNGs). The implicit assumption that PRNGs adequately represent true randomness is tested in this study via a statistical analysis of the width of the BD interface. We study the width of the interface over time scales orders of magnitude longer than the expected model relaxation time, yet much smaller than the period of the PRNG, and observe fluctuations which still appear to be correlated. Distinct dynamic behavior is observed for an implementation with a different PRNG, further indicating a strong coupling between the model and the PRNGs (even with PRNGs that pass extensive statistical tests). Thus we demonstrate a breakdown of basic sampling assumptions, and of the ergodic exploration of phase space.

Raissa M. D’Souza; Yaneer Bar-Yam; Mehran Kardar

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Initial growth on microcrystalline silicon on atomically flat hetero-substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial growth of microcrystalline silicon ({micro}c-Si:H) deposited on an atomically flat GaAs (001) wafer using a RF glow-discharge decomposition of hydrogen diluted monosilane gas mixture has been studied by means of atomic force microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). It is shown that the initial growth of {micro}c-Si:H deposited at a substrate temperature of 50--250 C consists of four successive stages, i.e., (1) a layer-by-layer growth of a-Si:H up to d {approximately}5 {angstrom}, (2) island formation of a-Si:H, (3) the coalescence of the islands and the nucleation of microcrystalline at d{approximately}10{approximately}40 {angstrom} depending on the growth temperature, and (4) a rapid roughening with microcrystalline growth.

Saitoh, K.; Kondo, M.; Matsuda, A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Methods for predicting wax precipitation and deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of wax from wells and flowlines can account for significant additional operating costs. To evaluate these potential costs, the operating conditions that allow waxes to precipitate in the wellbore must be identified, and deposition rates must be estimated to determine the costs associated with removal of wax deposits. Presented in this paper are laboratory and analytic methods that can be used to estimate both the critical operating conditions and the deposition rates. The laboratory tests and analysis presented may be used to characterize any type of oil.

Weingarten, J.S.; Euchner, J.A.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Semiannual report, 1 May 1983-31 October 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of intrinsic and phosphorus-doped n-type amorphous silicon films deposited by LPCVD from disilane in a laminar flow tubular reactor. These films were analyzed using SIMs, ESR measurements, optical absorption, and conductivity in light and dark. CVD deposited i layers were used to make platinum Schottky barrier devices and hybrid cells utilizing glow discharge deposited layers in both the ITO/nip/Mo and ITO/pin/Mo configurations. The highest efficiency of hybrid cells with the ITO/ni(CVD)/p(GD)/Mo structure was approximately 1.5%. The highest efficiencies were obtained with thin i layers. The highest efficiency for the ITO/p(GD)/in(CVD)/Mo configuration was 4.0%. A chemical model was developed describing the gas phase reactions and film growth; the model quantitatively describes the effluent composition when the measured growth rate is input. Kinetic rate expressions and constants for growth from higher silanes are being determined for a wide range of reaction conditions.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array Functionalization for Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Platinum Electrocatalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uniform metal deposition onto high surface area supports is a key challenge of developing successful efficient catalyst materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) circumvents permeation difficulties, but relies on gas-surface reactions to initiate growth. Our work demonstrates that modified surfaces within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays, from plasma and molecular precursor treatments, can lead to improved catalyst deposition. Gas phase functionalization influences the number of ALD nucleation sites and the onset of ALD growth and, in turn, affects the uniformity of the coating along the length of the CNTs within the aligned arrays. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route are identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The most effective functionalization routes increase the prevalence of oxygen moieties at defect sites on the carbon surfaces. The striking effects of the functionalization are demonstrated with ALD Pt growth as a function of surface treatment and ALD cycles examined by electron microscopy of the arrays and the individual CNTs. Finally, we demonstrate applicability of these materials as fuel cell electrocatalysts and show that surface functionalization affects their performance towards oxygen reduction reaction.

Dameron, A. A.; Pylypenko, S.; Bult, J. B.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Bochert, C.; Leong, G. J.; Frisco, S. L.; Simpson, L.; Dinh, H. N.; Pivovar, B.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thermal Stability and Substitutional Carbon Incorporation far above Solid-Solubility in Si1-xCx and Si1-x-yGexCy Layers Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cx and Si1-x-yGexCy Layers Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition using Disilane M. S. Carroll*, J. C. Sturm on (100) silicon substrates by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) with disilane source gas and disilane is known to produce higher silicon epitaxial growth rates for similar partial

198

Selective deposition of silicon and silicon-germanium alloys by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective deposition of SiGe alloys by rapid thermal deposition has been studied using a commercially available Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (RTCVD) cluster tool. The precursors used in this work were dichlorosilane and germane diluted in either hydrogen or argon. An initial characterization was performed to find the appropriate temperature and GeH{sub 4} flow ranges to deposit epitaxial layers with low surface roughness. For layers with higher germanium concentration lower deposition temperatures are required to minimize surface roughness. The effects of the dilutant gas on the deposition were examined. An H{sub 2} dilutant affects the deposition by consuming chlorine released by the SiCl{sub 2}H{sub 2} and forming HCl. When Ar is used as the dilutant, more chlorine is available for other reactions that can result in etching of the silicon surface. Finally, the effects of pre-deposition treatment were determined. When compared to a wet HF dip, a gas/vapor phase HF/methanol native oxide removal treatment appears to increase the initiation time for the epitaxial deposition reaction. This is most likely due to increased fluorine termination of the surface. When a wet HF or HF/methanol native oxide removal is followed by a UV-Cl{sub 2} process, the deposition reaction initiation time is reduced. The UV-Cl{sub 2} process was also found to etch silicon through the native oxide.

Grant, J.M.; Ang, M.; Allen, L.R. [Sharp Microelectronics Technology, Inc., Camas, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercriti...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method. Deposition of Platinum Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes by Supercritical Fluid Method....

200

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Abstract A close spatial relationship exists between Quaternary borate deposits and moderate to high...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Supercritical Fluid Immersion Deposition: A New Process for Selective...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

property of immersion deposition, enables the SFID technique to selectively deposit metal films in small features. SFID may also provide a new method to fabricate palladium...

202

The Process Fundamentals and Parameters of Electro-Spark Deposition.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Electrospark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-bonding process that is capable of depositing wear and corrosion resistance coating to repair, to improve and to extend the… (more)

Tang, Siu Kei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Resuspension and dry deposition research needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author concludes that better predictive models are needed for the signifcant health, ecological, and economic impacts of resuspended particles and their subsequent dry deposition. Both chemical and radioactive aerosols are discussed. (PSB)

Sehmel, G.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Linked Deposit Loan Program (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Linked Deposit Loan Program is targeted at small, private firms with 50 or fewer employees and gross annual revenues of $5 million or less comes. This loan offered through the West Virginia...

205

Small Business Linked Deposit Program (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Small Business Linked Deposit Program provides below-market interest rates for qualified small businesses and certified industrial parks through local financing sources. Loans are for a two...

206

CALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION IN GEOTHERMAL WELLBORES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal energy exploration and development are most important. Geothermal resources in Costa Rica have of energy development in Costa Rica. The Miravalles geothermCALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION IN GEOTHERMAL WELLBORES MIRAVALLES GEOTHERMAL FIELD COSTA RICA

Stanford University

207

Part I: Typology of Uranium Deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variety of global and regional classification schemes for uranium deposits have been proposed in the past by a number of geoscientists including Heinrich (1958), Roubault (1958), Ruzicka (1971), Ziegler (197...

Franz J. Dahlkamp

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Dating Fan Deposits with Cosmogenic Nuclides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boulders are preferable to smaller clasts in that ... time since deposition on the fan. Large boulders are produced through rapid large-scale mass ... to the fan in debris flows or other flood events. Although in...

Susan Ivy-Ochs; Miriam Dühnforth…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Depositional setting, structural style, and sandstone distribution in three geopressured geothermal areas, Texas Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three areas in the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain were studied using electric logs and seismic-reflection data to interpret their depositional and structural history and to compare their potential as geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. The Cuero study area, on the lower Wilcox (upper Paleocene) growth-fault trend, is characterized by closely and evenly spaced, subparallel, down-to-the-basin growth faults, relatively small expansion ratios, and minor block rotation. Distributary-channel sandstones in the geopressured lower Wilcox Group of the South Cook fault block appear to be the best geothermal aquifers in the Cuero area. The Blessing study area, on the lower Frio (Oligocene) growth-fault trend, shows wider and more variable fault spacing and much greater expansion ratios and block rotation, particularly during early Frio time. Thick geopressured sandstone aquifers are laterally more extensive in the Blessing area than in the Cuero area. The Pleasant Bayou study area, like the Blessing area, is on the Frio growth-fault trand, and its early structural development was similar rapid movement of widely spaced faults resulted in large expansion ratios and major block rotation. However, a late-stage pattern of salt uplift and withdrawal complicated the structural style. Thick geopressured lower Frio sandstone aquifers are highly permeable and laterally extensive, as in the Blessing area. In all three areas, geopressured aquifers were created where early, rapid movement along down-to-the-basin growth faults juxtaposed shallow-water sands against older shales, probably deposited in slope environments. Major transgressions followed the deposition of reservoir sands and probably also influenced the hydraulic isolation that allowed the build up of abnormal pressures. 26 refs., 49 figs., 8 tabs.

Winker, C.D.; Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Garcia, D.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

Rajh, Tijana (Naperville, IL); Meshkov, Natalia (Downers Grove, IL); Nedelijkovic, Jovan M. (Belgrade, YU); Skubal, Laura R. (West Brooklyn, IL); Tiede, David M. (Elmhurst, IL); Thurnauer, Marion (Downers Grove, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

Rajh, Tijana (Naperville, IL); Meshkov, Natalia (Downers Grove, IL); Nedelijkovic, Jovan M. (Belgrade, YU); Skubal, Laura R. (West Brooklyn, IL); Tiede, David M. (Elmhurst, IL); Thurnauer, Marion (Downers Grove, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

On the effect of wax content on paraffin wax deposition in a batch oscillatory baffled tube apparatus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deposition of paraffin wax is one of the major problems facing in the petroleum industries with the main implication being wax blockage in oil and gas pipelines especially for offshore production. The objectives of this work are to investigate the effect of applying oscillatory motion on wax deposition in an oscillatory baffled tube apparatus, a relatively new mixing technology that offers more uniform mixing and solid suspension than traditional devices; and are to understand the mechanism and kinetics of the wax crystallisation in accordance to the Avrami theory. The wax deposition was determined gravimetrically. The results indicate that the oscillatory motion has two opposite effects on the percentage of wax deposition: at low concentration of wax in solution, the presence of oscillation significantly reduces the wax deposition, e.g. 40–60% without the presence of any solvent or wax inhibitor; and completely prevents 100% wax gelation from occurring – the beneficial effect; at higher wax contents, however, the introduction of oscillatory motion not only promotes wax deposition, but also accelerates the crystal growth to achieve 100% wax deposition – the detrimental effect.

Lukman Ismail; Robin E. Westacott; Xiongwei Ni

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Growth dynamics at a metal-metal interface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A determination of the sticking coefficient of sputter-deposited metal films on freshly deposited metal surfaces is described in detail. The systems investigated were Mo deposited on Ta and Ta on Mo. Also described is a detailed determination of the structure of Mo-Ta interfaces using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and a combination of x-ray diffraction techniques. Within a few angstroms of each interface we find that the lattice is stretched in the growth direction and has an excess of defects relative to the ‘‘bulk’’ lattice. We also find that Mo/Ta superlattices fabricated with wavelengths in the range 20 to 120 A? exhibit structural coherence extending over a number of superlattice layers.

Wayne R. Bennett; J. A. Leavitt; Charles M. Falco

1987-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hydrocarbon and Deposit Morphology Effects on EGR Cooler Deposit Stability and Removal  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This paper reports on studies carried out at ORNL to examine the shear force required to remove particles from a well-developed EGR cooler deposit.

215

Ion-beam-induced epitaxial vapor-phase growth: A molecular-dynamics study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-energy ions which bombard a vapor-deposited film of low adatom mobility during growth mobilize surface atoms in the vicinity of the ion impact, causing a modification in the evolving microstructure. In a two-dimensional molecular-dynamics simulation where inert-gas ions strike a growing film of Lennard-Jones particles, it is demonstrated that ion bombardment during growth causes the filling of voids quenched in during vapor condensation and induces homoepitaxial growth. The dependence of film density and degree of homoepitaxial growth on the ion-to-vapor arrival rate ratio and ion energy is studied in detail.

Karl-Heinz Müller

1987-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Interfacial oxide re-growth in thin film metal oxide III-V semiconductor systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs and HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interfaces after atomic layer deposition are studied using in situ monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Samples are deliberately exposed to atmospheric conditions and interfacial oxide re-growth is observed. The extent of this re-growth is found to depend on the dielectric material and the exposure temperature. Comparisons with previous studies show that ex situ characterization can result in misleading conclusions about the interface reactions occurring during the metal oxide deposition process.

McDonnell, S.; Dong, H.; Hawkins, J. M.; Brennan, B.; Milojevic, M.; Aguirre-Tostado, F. S.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Hinkle, C. L.; Kim, J.; Wallace, R. M.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

217

Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000?°C growth temperature.

Sun, Jie, E-mail: jie.sun@chalmers.se; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August [Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Nam, Youngwoo [Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cole, Matthew T. [Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0FA Cambridge (United Kingdom); Teo, Kenneth B. K. [AIXTRON Nanoinstruments Ltd., Swavesey, CB24 4FQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Woo Park, Yung [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

Pulsed Laser Deposition of Photoresponsive Two-Dimensional GaSe Nanosheet Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we explore pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a well known and versatile synthesis method principally used for epitaxial oxide thin film growth, for the synthesis of functional metal chalcogenide (GaSe) nanosheet networks by stoichiometric transfer of laser vaporized material from bulk GaSe targets in Ar background gas. Uniform coverage of interconnected, crystalline, few-layer, photoresponsive GaSe nanosheets in both in-plane and out-of-plane orientations were achieved under different ablation plume conditions over ~1.5 cm2 areas. Plume propagation was characterized by in situ ICCD-imaging. High (1 Torr) Ar background gas pressures were found to be crucial for the stoichiometric growth of GaSe nanosheet networks. Individual 1-3 layer GaSe triangular nanosheets of ~ 200 nm domain size were formed within 30 laser pulses, coalescing to form nanosheet networks in as few as 100 laser pulses. The thickness of the deposited networks increased linearly with pulse number, adding layers in a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode while maintaining a surface roughness of 2 GaSe layers for increasing overall thickness. Field effect transistors using these interconnected crystalline GaSe networks showed p-type semiconducting characteristics with mobilities reaching as high as 0.1 cm2V-1s-1. Spectrally-resolved photoresponsivities and external quantum efficiencies ranged from 0.4 AW-1 and 100% at 700 nm, to 1.4 AW-1 and 600 % at 240 nm, respectively. Pulsed laser deposition under these conditions appears to provide a versatile and rapid approach to stoichiometrically transfer and deposit photoresponsive networks of 2D nanosheets with digital thickness control and substrate-scale uniformity for a variety of applications.

Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud [ORNL; Gresback, Ryan G [ORNL; Tian, Mengkun [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Duscher, Gerd [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Geohegan, David B [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Disilane: A new silicon doping source in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disilane (Si2H6) is presented as a new silicon doping source in the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs together with comparison results obtained using the conventional silane (SiH4) doping source. The dopingcharacteristics of disilane were studied over a wide range of growth conditions: temperature gas phase stoichiometry and disilane concentration in the growth ambient. Silicon incorporation by means of disilane pyrolysis showed no temperature dependence in sharp contrast to the strong temperature activated dependence found when employing silane. The decomposition reaction of disilane proved to be very efficient reducing the amount of dopant gas required by about two orders of magnitude at the lower growth temperatures. Electrical measurements on disilane?doped GaAs yield the same high mobilities as obtained in silane?doped GaAs films indicative of low compensation.

T. F. Kuech; B. S. Meyerson; E. Veuhoff

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus. 9 figs.

Warner, B.E.; McLean, W. II

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Source-attribution for atmospheric mercury deposition: Where does the mercury in mercury deposition come from?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Source-attribution for atmospheric mercury deposition: Where does the mercury in mercury of the Mercury Working Group, Office of Air Quality, Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) April 21, 2005 #12;2 For mercury, how important is atmospheric deposition relative to other loading

222

Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten.

Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Frank (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, A. Wayne (Albuquerque, NM); Omstead, Thomas R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Role of gas phase reactions in subatmospheric chemical-vapor deposition ozone/TEOS processes for oxide deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-vapor deposition. Our results for oxide deposition show optimum process window around 200 Torr for producing films a po- tentially optimum process window in which film properties, deposition rates, film uniformity requires high quality dielectric films that can be deposited rapidly and conformally on high aspect ratio

Rubloff, Gary W.

224

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of October 1 to December 31, 1996. In particular, the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. The computational model for simulating particle transport in turbulent flows was used to analyze the dispersion and deposition of particles in a recirculating flow region. The predictions of the particle resuspension model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as we as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data. Considerable progress was also made in the direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of glass fiber in the aerosol wind tunnel was also obtained.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

226

Glow discharge plasma deposition of thin films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A glow discharge plasma reactor for deposition of thin films from a reactive RF glow discharge is provided with a screen positioned between the walls of the chamber and the cathode to confine the glow discharge region to within the region defined by the screen and the cathode. A substrate for receiving deposition material from a reactive gas is positioned outside the screened region. The screen is electrically connected to the system ground to thereby serve as the anode of the system. The energy of the reactive gas species is reduced as they diffuse through the screen to the substrate. Reactive gas is conducted directly into the glow discharge region through a centrally positioned distribution head to reduce contamination effects otherwise caused by secondary reaction products and impurities deposited on the reactor walls.

Weakliem, Herbert A. (Pennington, NJ); Vossen, Jr., John L. (Bridgewater, NJ)

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

Erbil, A.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

229

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

230

Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

Noll, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Polymer-assisted deposition of films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer assisted deposition process for deposition of metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be conformal on a variety of substrates including non-planar substrates. In some instances, the films can be epitaxial in structure and can be of optical quality. The process can be organic solvent-free.

McCleskey,Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell,Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia,Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Lin,Yuan (Chandler, AZ)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains Nitrogen is necessary for life on earth, but getting too much of it can be harmful. Recent research in delicate alpine watersheds of the western United States has suggested that the amount... Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains Conservation of mass: It?s not just a good idea, it?s the law Nitrogen, along with every other element in nature, obeys certain physical laws. The first of those laws, the law of conservation of mass...

Upadhyay, Jeetendra; Auvermann, Brent W.; Bush, K. Jack; Mukhtar, Saqib

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Inclined substrate deposition of magnesium oxide for YBCO-coated conductors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) were grown on MgO buffered metallic substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The MgO buffer films, which provide the initial biaxial texture, had been grown on polished Hastelloy C276 (HC) tapes using inclined substrate deposition (ISD). The ISD process is promising for the fabrication of coated superconductor wires because it produces biaxially textured template films on nontextured substrate at high deposition rates. Biaxially aligned MgO films were deposited at deposition rates of 20 to 100 {angstrom}/sec. The buffer films were deposited on these template films before ablation of the YBCO films by PLD. The microstructure was studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. X-ray pole figure analysis and {phi}- and {omega}-scans were used for texture characterization. Good in- and out-of-plane textures were observed on the ISD MgO films ({approx}1.5 {micro}m thick). The full width at half maximums were 9.2{sup o} for the MgO (002) {phi}-scan and 5.4{sup o} for the {omega}-scan. Cube-on-cube epitaxial growth of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) films on the ISD MgO films was also achieved by PLD. A superconducting critical temperature of 90 K, with a sharp transition, and transport critical current density of >2.5 x 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} were obtained on a 0.5-{micro}m-thick, 0.5-cm-wide, and 1-cm-long YBCO film with MgO buffer layer at 77 K in self-field.

Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Koritala, R. E.; Dorris, S. E.; Maroni, V. A.; Balachandran, U.

2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fabrication of ZnO nanorod using spray-pyrolysis and chemical bath deposition method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZnO thin films with nanorod structure were deposited using Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis method for seed growth, and Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) for nanorod growth. High purity Zn-hydrate and Urea are used to control Ph were dissolved in ethanol and aqua bidest in Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process. Glass substrate was placed above the heater plate of reaction chamber, and subsequently sprayed with the range duration of 5, 10 and 20 minutes at the temperatures of 3500 C. As for the Chemical Bath Deposition, the glass substrate with ZnO seed on the surface was immerse to Zn-hydrate, HMTA (Hexa Methylene Tetra Amine) and deionized water solution for duration of 3, 5 and 7 hour and temperatures of 600 C, washed in distilled water, dried, and annealed at 3500 C for an hour. The characterization of samples was carried out to reveal the surface morphology using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the data, the combination of 5 minutes of Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process and 3 hour of CBD has showed the best structure of nanorod. Meanwhile the longer Spraying process and CBD yield the bigger nanorod structure that have been made, and it makes the films more dense which make the nanorod collide each other and as a result produce unsymetric nanorod structure.

Ramadhani, Muhammad F., E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Pasaribu, Maruli A. H., E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Yuliarto, Brian, E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Nugraha, E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id [Advanced Functional Materials Laboratory, Engineering Physics Department Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

Initiation of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on polymer substrates by water plasma pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of surface hydroxyl content in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide (AO) on polymers is demonstrated by performing an atomic layer deposition of AO onto a variety of polymer types, before and after pretreatment in a plasma struck in water vapor. The treatment and deposition reactions are performed in situ in a high vacuum chamber that is interfaced to an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer to prevent adventitious exposure to atmospheric contaminants. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to follow the surface chemistries of the polymers, including theformation of surface hydroxyls and subsequent growth of AO by ALD. Using dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide and water as reactants, ALD is obtained for water-plasma-treated poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN). For PS, PP, and PEN, initial growth rates of AO on the native (untreated) polymers are at least an order of magnitude lower than on the same polymer surface following the plasma treatment. By contrast, native PVA is shown to initiate ALD of AO as a result of the presence of intrinsic surface hydroxyls that are derived from the repeat unit of this polymer.

Steven Brandt, E.; Grace, Jeremy M. [Eastman Kodak Company, 1999 Lake Avenue, Rochester, New York 14650-2022 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Advances in the electrospark deposition coating process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a pulsed?arc microwelding process using short?duration high?current electrical pulses to deposit an electrode material on a metallic substrate. It is one of the few methods available by which a fused metallurgically bonded coating can be applied with such a low total heat input that the bulk substrate material remains at or near ambient temperatures. The short duration of the electrical pulse allows an extremely rapid solidification of the deposited material and results in an exceptionally fine?grained homogeneous coating that approaches (and with some materials actually is) an amorphous structure. This structure is believed to contribute to the good tribological and corrosion performance observed for hardsurfacing materials used in the demanding environments of high temperatures liquid metals and neutron irradiation. A brief historical review of the process is provided followed by descriptions of the present state of the art and of the performance and applications of electrospark deposition coating in liquid–metal?cooled nuclear reactors.

Roger N. Johnson; G. L. Sheldon

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electroless Nanoparticle Film Deposition Compatible with Photolithography,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electroless Nanoparticle Film Deposition Compatible with Photolithography, Microcontact Printing; Revised Manuscript Received October 14, 2002 ABSTRACT Nanoparticles of Au, Pd, and Pt form spontaneously In this paper, we demonstrate that Au, Pd, and Pt nanoparticle films, produced through a spontaneous electroless

Porter Jr., Lon A.

239

CALCULATION OF ION ENERGY-DEPOSITION SPECTRA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATION OF ION ENERGY-DEPOSITION SPECTRA IN SILICON, LITHIUM-FLUORIDE, BORON, AND BORON CARBIDE by J.K. Shultis and D.S. McGregor Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas 55606 published as Report 299 ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION College

Shultis, J. Kenneth

240

Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An aluminum oxide film is deposited on a heated substrate by CVD from one or more alkylaluminum alkoxide compounds having composition R.sub.n Al.sub.2 (OR').sub.6-n, wherein R and R' are alkyl groups and n is in the range of 1 to 5.

Gordon, Roy (Cambridge, MA); Kramer, Keith (Cleveland, OH); Liu, Xinye (Cambridge, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ADEPT. aerosol deposition in cylindrical pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADEPT calculates the deposition of aerosols in straight cylindrical pipes during turbulent air flow. Aerosol deposition is calculated in a time-dependent manner based on empirical correlations for turbulent flow in pipes. The calculated deposition during a single time interval is cumulative with that of previous time intervals and results in a decreasing inner diameter of the pipe. The calculated deposition is assumed uniform over the length of the pipe. The entering aerosol distribution is specified by the user in the form of a log-normal distribution of accumulated mass versus particle size and may be time dependent. Entering flow conditions are also specified by the user and may also be time dependent. For simplicity and generality, the geometry implicit in the program is that of a cylindrical pipe with no bends or fittings. The flow is turbulent and monodirectional; only one set of inlet conditions may be applied at a given time. The flow parameters are not calculated along the length of pipe; therefore, the dynamic behavior of the aerosol within the pipe as well as the effects of reentrainment cannot be determined explicitly. A typical problem requires 2 minutes of CPU time.

Fazekas, P.; Tewarson, S.C (Burns and Roe, Oradell, NJ (United States))

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ADEPT. Aerosol Deposition in Cylindrical Pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADEPT calculates the deposition of aerosols in straight cylindrical pipes during turbulent air flow. Aerosol deposition is calculated in a time-dependent manner based on empirical correlations for turbulent flow in pipes. The calculated deposition during a single time interval is cumulative with that of previous time intervals and results in a decreasing inner diameter of the pipe. The calculated deposition is assumed uniform over the length of the pipe. The entering aerosol distribution is specified by the user in the form of a log-normal distribution of accumulated mass versus particle size and may be time dependent. Entering flow conditions are also specified by the user and may also be time dependent. For simplicity and generality, the geometry implicit in the program is that of a cylindrical pipe with no bends or fittings. The flow is turbulent and monodirectional; only one set of inlet conditions may be applied at a given time. The flow parameters are not calculated along the length of pipe; therefore, the dynamic behavior of the aerosol within the pipe as well as the effects of reentrainment cannot be determined explicitly. A typical problem requires 2 minutes of CPU time.

Fazekas, P.; Tewarson, S.C [Burns and Roe, Oradell, NJ (United States)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Deposition and characterization of polycrystalline silicon films on glass for thin film solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors deposit phosphorus-doped, amorphous Si by low pressure chemical vapor deposition and subsequently crystallize the films by furnace annealing at a temperature of 600 C. Optical in-situ monitoring allows one to control the crystallization process. Phosphorus doping leads to faster crystallization and a grain size enhancement with a maximum grain size of 15 {micro}m. Using transmission electron microscopy they find a log-normal grain size distribution in their films. They demonstrate that this distribution not only arises from solid phase crystallization of amorphous Si but also from other crystallization processes based on random nucleation and growth. The log-normal grain size distribution seems to be a general feature of polycrystalline semiconductors.

Bergmann, R.B.; Krinke, J.; Strunk, H.P.; Werner, J.H.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Nanoporosity induced by ion implantation in deposited amorphous Ge thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of a nano-porous structure in amorphous Ge thin film (sputter-deposited on SiO{sub 2}) during ion irradiation at room temperature with 300 keV Ge{sup +} has been observed. The porous film showed a sponge-like structure substantially different from the columnar structure reported for ion implanted bulk Ge. The voids size and structure resulted to be strongly affected by the material preparation, while the volume expansion turned out to be determined only by the nuclear deposition energy. In SiGe alloys, the swelling occurs only if the Ge concentration is above 90%. These findings rely on peculiar characteristics related to the mechanism of voids nucleation and growth, but they are crucial for future applications of active nanostructured layers such as low cost chemical and biochemical sensing devices or electrodes in batteries.

Romano, L.; Impellizzeri, G.; Ruffino, F.; Miritello, M.; Grimaldi, M. G. [IMM-CNR MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Bosco, L. [Scuola Superiore di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 9, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Supercritical Fluid Immersion Deposition: A New Process for Selective Deposition of Metal Films on Silicon Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 is used as a new solvent for immersion deposition, a galvanic displacement process traditionally carried out in aqueous HF solutions containing metal ions, to selectively develop metal films on featured or non-featured silicon substrates. Components of supercritical fluid immersion deposition (SFID) solutions for fabricating Cu and Pd films on silicon substrates are described along with the corresponding experimental setup and procedure. Only silicon substrates exposed and reactive to SFID solutions can be coated. The highly pressurized and gas-like supercritical CO2, combined with the galvanic displacement property of immersion deposition, enables the SFID technique to selectively deposit metal films in small features. SFID may also provide a new method to fabricate palladium silicide in small features or to metallize porous silicon.

Ye, Xiangrong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe; Young, James S.; Engelhard, Mark H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effects of oxygen on the growth characteristics of carbon nanotubes on conductive substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of oxygen on Fe-catalyzed carbon nanotube (CNT) growth on Ta substrates was studied. CNTs were grown on Fe thin-film catalysts deposited on silicon substrates via exposure to C?H? in a thermal chemical vapor ...

Bonaparte, Ryan K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b , Y.F. Zheng a , C.S. Lee a , N was used to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a hot-®lament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system in the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT)s. The CNTs synthesized from carbon monoxide validate

Zheng, Yufeng

248

Journal of Crystal Growth 300 (2007) 431439 Low-energy ion-assisted control of interfacial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Crystal Growth 300 (2007) 431­439 Low-energy ion-assisted control of interfacial Science and Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia been used to simulate the argon ion-assisted deposition of Cu/Co/Cu multilayers and to explore ion beam

Wadley, Haydn

249

Deposition of TiN and HfO{sub 2} in a commercial 200 mm remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe a remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor (Oxford Instruments FlexAL trade mark sign ) that includes an inductively coupled plasma source and a load lock capable of handling substrates up to 200 mm in diameter. The deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) is described for the combination of the metal-halide precursor TiCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma and the combination of the metallorganic precursor Hf[N(CH{sub 3})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 4} and O{sub 2} plasma, respectively. The influence of the plasma exposure time and substrate temperature has been studied and compositional, structural, and electrical properties are reported. TiN films with a low Cl impurity content were obtained at 350 deg. C at a growth rate of 0.35 A /cycle with an electrical resistivity as low as 150 {mu}{omega} cm. Carbon-free (detection limit <2 at. %) HfO{sub 2} films were obtained at a growth rate of 1.0 A /cycle at 290 deg. C. The thickness and resisitivity nonuniformity was <5% for the TiN and the thickness uniformality was <2% for the HfO{sub 2} films as determined over 200 mm wafers.

Heil, S. B. S.; Hemmen, J. L. van; Hodson, C. J.; Singh, N.; Klootwijk, J. H.; Roozeboom, F.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Yatton BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Epitaxial growth of nickel on Si(100) by dc magnetron sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of the substrate temperature on the growth of highly textured Ni(111) and epitaxial Ni(200) with the relationships Ni[100] parallel Si[110] and Ni(001) parallel Si(001) on hydrogen terminated Si(100) wafer substrates by means of direct current magnetron sputtering is reported. In order to minimize crystal defect formation and to achieve a high quality epitaxial growth of Ni on Si, a two step deposition process was developed whereby different deposition conditions were used for an initial nickel seed layer and the remaining nickel film. The in-plane and out-of-plane structural properties of the films were investigated using x-ray scattering techniques, whereas magneto-optical Kerr effect and neutron reflectometry were used to confirm the magnetic nature of the epitaxially deposited nickel films.

Kreuzpaintner, W.; Stoermer, M.; Lott, D.; Solina, D.; Schreyer, A. [GKSS Forschungszentrum GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cobalt cluster-assembled thin films deposited by low energy cluster beam deposition: Structural and magnetic investigations of deposited layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cobalt cluster-assembled thin films were deposited on amorphous-carbon-coated copper grids and on silicon substrates at room temperature by low energy cluster beam deposition. Characterizations using high-resolution transmission electronic microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal randomly stacked agglomerates of 9-11 nm diameter, which are themselves composed of small 3.6 nm diameter fcc cobalt clusters. The films are ferromagnetic up to room temperature and above, which implies that the clusters are exchange coupled. The approach to saturation is analyzed within the random anisotropy model. The values of the exchange coefficient A and the anisotropy constant K then derived are discussed. The temperature dependence of the coercivity below 100 K is discussed in terms of thermal activation effects. All results indicate that the fundamental entity governing the magnetic behaviors is constituted by the 9-11 nm diameter agglomerates rather than by the clusters themselves.

Dumas-Bouchiat, F.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Rossignol, F.; Champeaux, C.; Trolliard, G.; Catherinot, A.; Givord, D. [Centre de Projet Films Minces et Microdispositifs pour Telecommunications, SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, ENSCI, 47 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87065 Limoges Cedex (France); Centre de Projet Films Minces et Microdispositifs pour Telecommunications, SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Centre de Projet Films Minces et Microdispositifs pour Telecommunications, SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Laboratoire Louis Neel, UPR CNRS 5051, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Low Temperature Direct Growth of Graphene Films on Transparent Substrates by Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphene in fields like electronics and optoelectronics.useful for electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaic

Antoine, Geoffrey Sandosh Jeffy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A mechanism for crystal twinning in the growth of diamond by chemical vapour deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unpublished data; Muller-Sebert...dilute amount of a hydrocarbon (0.1-4...plasma or combustion flame. The gas...concentration of the hydrocarbon (usually methane...energetics of hydrocarbon molecules with...per atom. The heat of reactions...justified by data indicating the...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Stress induced phase transition in Gd2O3 films by ion beam assisted reactive electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The structural evolution of thick polycrystalline gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) films deposited by reactive electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) is investigated. High deposition rates (> 5 Å/s) lead to the growth of mixed phase films which are of the cubic phase near the film/substrate interface before forming monoclinic phase as distance from the interface increases. By decreasing the deposition rate to phase. The growth of the thermodynamically stable cubic phase under these conditions is attributed to both higher surface mobility of the adatoms during growth and to increased tensile stress within the film. Ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) was then performed to introduce compressive stress into the film resulting in the formation of the monoclinic phase. Wafer curvature, X-ray diffraction, confocal Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy are utilized to characterize the film and present evidence for the existence of a stress-induced phase transition in the Gd2O3 films.

Daniel A. Grave; Michael P. Schmitt; Joshua A. Robinson; Douglas E. Wolfe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ARM - Measurement - Hygroscopic growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsHygroscopic growth govMeasurementsHygroscopic growth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hygroscopic growth The rate that aerosol particles grow at relative humidity values less than 100 percent. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

256

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

257

Plant Tumor Growth Rates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Tumor Growth Rates Plant Tumor Growth Rates Name: Gina and Maria Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing a science fair project on if B. Carotene, Green tea, and Grape Seed Extract helps plants against the crown gall disease. We injected sunflowers with agrobacterium tum. one week ago (Sun. Feb. 27, 2000). Our questions is how long will it take for the tumors to grow? We scratched the surface of the stems and injected the agrobacterium in the wound. Also which do you think, in your opinion, will do the best, if any? Our science fair is April 13, do you think we'll have growth before then, atleast enough time to do our conclusion and results? Thank you, any information you forward will be very helpful. Replies: Sunflowers form galls relatively quickly. I usually get them in two weeks at least. Good luck.

258

Research District Seeing Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald (May 2012) - excerpt follows: It’s been a while since I’ve updated you on the Tri-Cities Research District, most certainly not for lack of new activity over the past several months. In fact, much has happened, and there’s more to come. I think many of us see new land development and construction as indicative of current or impending economic growth. So those of you who have ventured into North Richland either via Stevens Drive or George Washington Way lately have probably begun sensing and anticipating that such growth is afoot.

Madison, Alison L.

2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

Growth of CdTe Films on Amorphous Substrates Using CaF2 Nanorods as a Buffer Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of CdTe Films on Amorphous Substrates Using CaF2 Nanorods as a Buffer Layer NICHOLAS LICAUSI biaxially textured CdTe films were grown on biaxial CaF2 buffer layers. The CaF2 nanorods were grown by oblique angle vapor deposition and possessed a {111}h121i biaxial texture. The CdTe film was deposited

Wang, Gwo-Ching

260

Aeolian depositional landforms of the south eastern Mojave Desert, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote sensing and photo interpretation techniques are used to describe and map aeolian deposits found along two sediment transport corridors in the south eastern Mojave Desert. The first pathway and associated sand deposits extend eastward from...

Alvis, William Thomas

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Study of Paraffin Wax Deposition in Seasonally Pigged Pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waxy crude oil pipelines are pigged periodically to scrape the adhered wax deposit from the pipe wall and remove it from the pipeline. If wax deposition on the pipe wall is not ... severe and there is not much ch...

Wang Wenda; Huang Qiyu; Huang Jun; Pang Quan…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

All graphene electromechanical switch fabricated by chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate an electromechanical switch comprising two polycrystalline graphene films; each deposited using ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition. The top film is pulled into electrical contact with the bottom film ...

Milaninia, Kaveh M.

263

Occurrence of Boron Phosphate in Fireside Deposit from an Economizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... recently examined here. This deposit was one of several typical deposits from the fireside of economizers and boiler tubes of certain high-pressure boiler plants which were examined in 1942 and ... by the Central Electricity Board.

L. M. CLARK; J. HASLAM

1945-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 367GTR-NRS-P-105 IMPACTS OF NITROGEN AND SULFUR DEPOSITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and S is greater than the critical load may be examples of such forest conditions. When critical loads are exceeded a positive or negative impact on tree growth may depend largely upon whether the critical load is exceeded by the deposition level, and it may follow an inverted U-shaped relationship similar to that which was hypothesized

265

Hydrogen incorporation during deposition of a-Si:H from an intense source of SiH{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incorporation of hydrogen during the fast deposition of a-Si:H from an expanding thermal arc is investigated by means of isotope labeling of the precursor gases silane and hydrogen. It is found that hydrogen in a-Si:H originates dominantly from the silyl radical. A small fraction of the hydrogen in a-Si:H is due to exchange reaction of atomic hydrogen in the plasma with hydrogen chemisorbed on the surface during growth.

Van de Sanden, M.C.M.; Severens, R.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Van de Pas, F.; Van Ijzendoorn, L.; Schram, D.C.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide films using plasma-activated triisopropylsilane as a precursor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process was developed as a growth technique of SiO{sub 2} thin films using a plasma-activated triisopropylsilane [TIPS, ((iPr){sub 3}SiH)] precursor. TIPS was activated by an argon plasma at the precursor injection stage of the process. Using the activated TIPS, it was possible to control the growth rate per cycle of the deposited films by adjusting the plasma ignition time. The PEALD technique allowed deposition of SiO{sub 2} films at temperatures as low as 50?°C without carbon impurities. In addition, films obtained with plasma ignition times of 3?s and 10?s had similar values of root-mean-square surface roughness. In order to evaluate the suitability of TIPS as a precursor for low-temperature deposition of SiO{sub 2} films, the vapor pressure of TIPS was measured. The thermal stability and the reactivity of the gas-phase TIPS with respect to water vapor were also investigated by analyzing the intensity changes of the C–H and Si–H peaks in the Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of TIPS.

Jeon, Ki-Moon [Vacuum Center, Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dae Jeon University, Daejeon 300-716 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae-Su [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dae Jeon University, Daejeon 300-716 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Ju-Young [Vacuum Center, Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340, South Korea and Department of Nano and Bio Surface Science, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Lee, Sang [Center of Nanomaterials Characterization, Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340, South Korea and Department of Nano Science, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sang-Woo, E-mail: swkang@kriss.re.kr [Vacuum Center, Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340, South Korea and Department of Advanced Device Technology, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Infrared laser-based monitoring of the silane dissociation during deposition of silicon thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The silane dissociation efficiency, or depletion fraction, is an important plasma parameter by means of which the film growth rate and the amorphous-to-microcrystalline silicon transition regime can be monitored in situ. In this letter we implement a homebuilt quantum cascade laser-based absorption spectrometer to measure the silane dissociation efficiency in an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This infrared laser-based diagnostic technique is compact, sensitive, and nonintrusive. Its resolution is good enough to resolve Doppler-broadened rotovibrational absorption lines of silane. The latter feature various absorption strengths, thereby enabling depletion measurements over a wide range of process conditions.

Bartlome, R.; Feltrin, A.; Ballif, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue A.-L. Breguet 2, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

1988-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

269

ON OIL SHALE MINING IN THE ESTONIA DEPOSIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

age) cut the Estonian oil shale-kukersite deposits. Two younger groups of structures are typical fault

K. Sokman; V. Kattai; R. Vaher; Y. J. Systra

270

Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

Mullendore, A.W.

1988-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Deposition of Contiguous Metal Adlayer on Transition Metal Nanostructu...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Abstract Primary Lab Date Application 20100099012 Application 20100099012 Electrocatalyst Synthesized by Depositing a Contiguous Metal Adlayer on Transition Metal...

272

Deposition of nanolayers by means of dense plasma focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In our preliminary experiments, reported in this paper, dense plasma focus (DPF) device is used for deposition...

M. Chernyshova; I. Ivanova-Stanik; L. Karpi?ski…

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electrostatic force assisted deposition of graphene  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An embodiment of a method of depositing graphene includes bringing a stamp into contact with a substrate over a contact area. The stamp has at least a few layers of the graphene covering the contact area. An electric field is developed over the contact area. The stamp is removed from the vicinity of the substrate which leaves at least a layer of the graphene substantially covering the contact area.

Liang, Xiaogan (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Stationary phase deposition based on onium salts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Onium salt chemistry can be used to deposit very uniform thickness stationary phases on the wall of a gas chromatography column. In particular, the stationary phase can be bonded to non-silicon based columns, especially microfabricated metal columns. Non-silicon microfabricated columns may be manufactured and processed at a fraction of the cost of silicon-based columns. In addition, the method can be used to phase-coat conventional capillary columns or silicon-based microfabricated columns.

Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Dirk, Shawn M. (Albuquerque, NM); Trudell, Daniel E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thin film deposition of barium strontium oxide by rf magnetron sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barium strontium oxide [(BaSr)O] thin films approximately 1 {mu}m in thickness were deposited on tungsten substrates using rf magnetron sputter deposition for thermionic cathode applications. Three substrate temperatures ranging from 25 to 700 deg. C were used in the deposition processes to create oxide films with different surface morphologies and crystalline structures. The films were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and their surface morphologies were correlated to their thermionic emission properties. The results showed that the surface morphology and crystalline structure of the oxide films strongly affected the emission properties. The oxide film deposited at the lowest substrate temperature of 25 deg. C showed a rough surface and a crystalline structure consisting of nanograins. At higher substrate temperatures, the oxide films exhibited smooth surfaces and close-packed crystalline structures with larger grains. The work function of the oxide films was reduced and the emission current density increased as a result of the increase in the growth temperature. The (BaSr)O film made at 700 deg. C exhibited the lowest work function of 1.57 eV and the largest emission current density of 1.60 A/cm{sup 2} at 1198 K under an electrical field of 0.88 V/{mu}m. The emission current density and the work function of the (BaSr)O thin film cathodes were stable over the testing period of 8 h. Compared to the traditional cathode fabrication process, which involves the coating of carbonates followed by an activation process, rf magnetron sputtering has a greater ability to control the deposition parameters, which makes it a valuable alternative technique to fabricate oxide cathodes.

Liu Yan; Day, Christopher M.; Little, Scott A.; Jin, Feng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana 47306 (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

Sievers, Robert E. (Boulder, CO); Hansen, Brian N. (Boulder, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of October I to December 31, 1997. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was continued. Variations of vorticity contours which are averaged over a short time duration are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. Sample particle trajectories are obtained and discussed. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data and discussed. Particle resuspension process in turbulent flows are studied. The model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as well as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of July 1 to September 30, 1997. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was continued. Variations of vorticity contours which are averaged over a short time duration are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. Sample particle trajectories are obtained and discussed. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data and discussed. Particle resuspension process in turbulent flows are studied. The model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as well as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Growth & Development / Parental Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

participate; if one parents is lost, fledging rates usually drop #12;Winkler reduced clutch size from 5 to 3Growth & Development / Parental Care #12;Embryonic Development Although the sequence of 42 stages the egg The hatching muscle helps the chick break out of the egg Parents typically dispose of the egg

Butler, Christopher J.

280

TRANSFORMED DSM TARGETS GROWTH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRANSFORMED DSM TARGETS GROWTH ... DSM CHIEF Executive Officer Feike Sijbesma refers to Charles Darwin when talking about his company’s transformation. ... In the past 10 years, DSM has transformed itself, shifting its portfolio from petrochemicals and specialties to life sciences and materials. ...

PAIGE MARIE MORSE

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Vacuum-Deposited Planar Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vacuum-Deposited Planar Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells ... Bilayer heterojunction solar cells were fabricated by sequential deposition of P3HT and C60 and the photovoltaic response measured. ... organic solar cells; conjugated polymers; poly(3-hexylthiophene); vacuum thermal deposition; thin films ...

Peter Kovacik; Giuseppe Sforazzini; Andrew G. Cook; Shawn M. Willis; Patrick S. Grant; Hazel E. Assender; Andrew A. R. Watt

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

282

RISO-M-2438 Dry deposition and resuspension of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO RISO-M-2438 2 S Dry deposition and resuspension of particulate matter in city environments N 1984 få #12;RIS�-M-2438 DRY DEPOSITION AND RESUSPENSION OF PARITUCLATE NATTER IN CITY ENVIRONMENTS N.O. Jensen Abstract. The report describes, mostly in qualitative terms, the deposition and resuspension

283

Model calculates was deposition for North Sea oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for calculation of wax formation and deposition in pipelines and process equipment has been developed along with a new method for wax-equilibrium calculations using input from TBP distillation cuts. Selected results from the wax formation and deposition model have been compared with laboratory data from wax equilibrium and deposition experiments, and there have been some field applications of the model.

Majeed, A.; Bringedal, B.; Overa, S. (Norsk Hydro, Stabekk (NO))

1990-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

284

Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

Elliott, Emily M.

285

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE A thesis submitted deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide on crystalline silicon and anodized aluminum substrates. A homemade ALD system is used with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water as precursors to deposit uniform aluminum oxide

Belanger, David P.

286

Quantitative determination of energy enhanced interlayer transport in pulsed laser deposition of SrTiO3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the analysis of single-shot surface x-ray diffraction transients in terms of time-dependent coverages allows quantitative determination of interlayer transport in pulsed-laser deposition of SrTiO3. The fast interlayer transport during and immediately after the arrival of the laser plume and before crystallization represents the dominant mechanism for redistribution of the deposited material that is completed on a ?s-range or faster time scale. Following crystallization interlayer transport is more than four orders of magnitude slower because it is driven only by sluggish thermally activated processes, which represent a small fraction of total interlayer transport that decreases with increasing laser repetition rate. The analysis of growth kinetics shows that it is fast interlayer transport driven by hyperthermal energy species and not thermal annealing that governs layer completion that determines the growth mode and the formation of atomically sharp interfaces in pulsed-laser deposition of epitaxial oxide films and similar energy-enhanced growth processes.

Gyula Eres; J. Z. Tischler; C. M. Rouleau; P. Zschack; H. M. Christen; B. C. Larson

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

TiOx Films Deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition Method in Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method applying atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (ADBD) plasma was used for TiOx thin films deposition employing titanium (IV) isopropoxide and oxygen as rea...

Y. Klenko; J. Pichal

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

High rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon films by high-pressure radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (?c-Si:H) thin films were prepared by high-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) with a screened plasma. The deposition ra...

BingQing Zhou; MeiFang Zhu; FengZhen Liu…

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Effect of substrate temperature on the electrospark deposition, structure, and mechanical properties of coatings. II. Coating deposition features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between deposition temperature, coating inhomogeneity, and temperature of cathode spots is studied. It is shown that the spark deposition of coatings proceeds in the area of cathode spots; the...

V. D. Belik; R. V. Litvin; M. S. Kovalchenko

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Versatile high rate plasma deposition and processing with very high frequency excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interest in plasma deposition using very high frequency (VHF) excitation arose after the preparation of a-Si:H at high growth rates was demonstrated. Subsequently the improved process flexibility and the control of material properties offered by the variation of the plasma excitation frequency was recognized. The preparation of amorphous and microcrystalline thin films in a VHF-plasma is described. The increased growth rates have been attributed to an enhancement of film precursor formation at VHF, to the decreased sheath thickness as well as to an enhancement of the surface reactivity by positive ions. Plasma diagnostic investigations show that the parameters mainly affected by the excitation frequency are the ion flux to the electrodes as well as the sheaths potentials and widths, rather than the plasma density. 55 refs., 13 figs.

Heintze, M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices. Annual technical progress report, 1 May 1984-30 April 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intrinsic and doped a-Si:H films were deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for disilane. Intrinsic layers were deposited at growth rates as high as 50 A/s. A chemical reaction engineering model that quantitatively describes the CVD reactor behavior has been developed. CVD intrinsic material was characterized by measurements of impurities, optical band gap, photoconductivity, activation energy, diffusion length, and density of states. Photovoltaic cells of the p-i-n type with efficiencies of 4% and 3.6% were fabricated using CVD intrinsic layers deposited at 1 A/s and 9 A/s, respectively. A maximum short-circuit current of 11 mA/cm/sup 2/ under 87.5 MW/cm/sup 2/ ELH illumination was obtained with boron-compensated CVD intrinsic material. Efficiency-limiting mechanisms in CVD cells were quantitatively analyzed and related to fundamental properties.

Baron, B.N.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Hegedus, S.S.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A new pulsed laser deposition technique: Scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 deg. C.

Fischer, D.; Jansen, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Fuente, G. F. de la [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio October 6, 2010 - 2:26pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Editor's Note: Yesterday Secretary Chu announced that solar panels and a solar hot water heater will be added to the White House by the end of next spring. This entry is cross-posted from the Energy Empowers blog and deals with how the continued growth of solar power is not only a boon for industry, but for local economies as well. The solar industry saw growth in 2010. Market research company Solarbuzz reports that global demand soared by 54 percent in the second quarter of 2010. The research firm reports that in the United States, the annual number of total watts installed moved from 485 MW in all of 2009 to 2.3 GW

294

Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio October 6, 2010 - 2:26pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Editor's Note: Yesterday Secretary Chu announced that solar panels and a solar hot water heater will be added to the White House by the end of next spring. This entry is cross-posted from the Energy Empowers blog and deals with how the continued growth of solar power is not only a boon for industry, but for local economies as well. The solar industry saw growth in 2010. Market research company Solarbuzz reports that global demand soared by 54 percent in the second quarter of 2010. The research firm reports that in the United States, the annual number of total watts installed moved from 485 MW in all of 2009 to 2.3 GW

295

Pine Tree Growth Locations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pine Tree Growth Locations Pine Tree Growth Locations Name: Amielee Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do pine trees not grow south of the equator? Replies: Dear Amielee, The natural distribution of the pines is the northern hemisphere: http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/tree/eukaryotes/green_plants/embryophytes/conif ers/pinaceae/pinus/pinus.html However, pines have become introduced into the southern hemisphere through cultivation: http://www.woodweb.com/~treetalk/Radiata_Pine/wowhome.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, Ph.D. Hi Amielee Some pine trees do live south of the equator but we (I live in Australia) do not have the huge forests of native conifers that you have in the northern hemisphere. Even in the northern hemisphere conifers are only found in two forest types: 1. Tiaga

296

Web Growth of Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel process for growth of diamond?lattice semiconductors is described and a model is proposed for the growth mechanism. For germanium the process yields extended thin flat sheets typically 1 cm wide and 0.1 mm thick of good crystalline quality and relatively flat {111} surfaces. The sheet or web freezes from a liquid film drawn up by surface tension between two coplanar dendrites which originate from a single seed and are grown from the melt simultaneously with the sheet. Resistivity throughout the sheet is quite uniform. Etching of germanium webs shows them to be essentially dislocation?free and does not reveal any microsegregation of impurities. Silicon and indium antimonide have also been grown in this manner.

S. O'Hara; A. I. Bennett

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: 2.5% Aug '12 to Aug '13: -1.3% YTD '12 to YTD '13: 1.5% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: -0.8%

298

Fostering Growth | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fostering Growth Fostering Growth The solar energy industry in the United States is growing rapidly as the price of solar panels has decreased over the past decade. U.S. solar...

299

Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjusted Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,500 5,000 5,500 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -7.4% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -0.1% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -0.1% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -16.8% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -3.2% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -3.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -9.3% Jan '99 to Jan '00: +3.5% YTD '99 to YTD '00: +3.5% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

300

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June '99 to July '99: -5.4% June '99 to July '99: -5.4% July '98 to July '99: +3.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.3% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: -0.5% July '98 to July '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +0.5% July '98 to July '99: +1.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +1.5% July '98 to July '99: +10.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.2%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +8.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +6.0% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +4.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +2.4% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +3.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +32.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +2.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.5%

302

The Growth of Fishes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Growth of Fishes Growth of Fishes Nature Bulletin No. 272-A June 3, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE GROWTH OF FISHES Baby fish, by the millions, are hatching now every day in our lakes, streams and ponds. Some kinds come from eggs sown broadcast among water plants; others from eggs laid in clusters or nests; some from masses of eggs hidden in underwater holes; while the eggs of many little fish, such as minnows and darters, are attached in neat patches to the underside of rocks or sunken logs. For some time before hatching, the young fish can be seen wriggling inside the eggs. Newly hatched baby fish -- or fry, as they should be called -- look much alike, regardless of the size or appearance of their parents. Each is almost transparent except for the large dark eyes and a bulging stomach which encloses yolk from the egg. Under a magnifying glass, the pumping red heart can be seen and the mouth gulping water. The tiny fins are beginning to form, a few dots of dark pigment may show in the skin, but there is little or no sign of scales. They vary from an eighth to a half inch or more in length, depending upon the species and the size of the egg.

303

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +1.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -1.9% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -0.1% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -1.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: +22.3% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +21.1%

304

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.4% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.1% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: 0.0% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: +7.3% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +8.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +8.3%

305

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +5.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.5% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: -0.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +1.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +2.5% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +6.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +9.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +2.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.2%

306

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: +2.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.4% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -0.2% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -1.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -2.1% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -6.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.6%

307

Molecular Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

They were fabricated by compressing a CNT aerogel produced as an output from a chemical vapor deposition furnace. ... The CNT3 specimens may be harder in general to coat due to their smaller diameter in comparison to the other materials. ... (1) Data tables for mechanical test results parallel and perpendicular to the CNT sheet orientation; (2) additional SEM and TEM images of coated CNT materials; (3) additional EDS spectra of MLD coatings on CNTs, and comparison to Al2O3 ALD coating on CNTs. ...

Joseph J. Brown; Robert A. Hall; Paul E. Kladitis; Steven M. George; Victor M. Bright

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Graphene Monolayer Rotation on Ni(111) Facilities Bilayer Graphene Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthesis of bilayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition is of importance for graphene-based field effect devices. Here, we demonstrate that bilayer graphene preferentially grows by carbon-segregation under graphene sheets that are rotated relative to a Ni(111) substrate. Rotated graphene monolayer films can be synthesized at growth temperatures above 650 C on a Ni(111) thin-film. The segregated second graphene layer is in registry with the Ni(111) substrate and this suppresses further C-segregation, effectively self-limiting graphene formation to two layers.

Batzill M.; Sutter P.; Dahal, A.; Addou, R.

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Growth of manganese filled carbon nanofibers in the vapor phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the vapor phase growth of partially filled graphitic fibers, 20-30 nm in diameter and up to a micron in length, during a manganese catalyzed carbon electric arc discharge. The fiber morphology resembles that of catalytic chemical vapor deposited carbon filaments but the inside hollow contains intermittent precipitates and continuous filling of Mn that at times occupy >50% of fiber lengths. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss line spectra show that the fillings form as solid cores and may correspond to pure metal.

P. M. Ajayan; C. Colliex; J. M. Lambert; P. Bernier; L. Barbedette; M. Tence; O. Stephan

1994-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

The effects of surface contamination on the biaxially textured substrate for YBCO thick film deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The epitaxial growth of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) films on biaxially textured substrates is one of the most promising technique for the fabrication of high current superconducting tapes operating at high temperature. Ni is very attractive as substrate because it easily develops a/ (100)[001] cubic texture. The low oxidation resistance represents the main drawback of the Ni substrate. In order to better assess the role of oxygen on the Ni substrates, a surface physics technique as Auger spectroscopy has been used. It has allowed to evaluate the amount of impurities for different Ni processing and exposure to the air. The results demonstrate that the surface contamination can be efficiently removed by RF sputtering before buffer layer deposition. This procedure allows to obtain CeO{sub 2}/Pd/Ni architecture by laser ablation with a good epitaxy both of Pd and CeO{sub 2} films. On the contrary, when CeO{sub 2} is directly deposited on Ni a low epitaxy is obtained. The Auger analysis confirms that the formation of (111) NiO at the Ni-CeO{sub 2} interface hampers the epitaxial growth of the ceria film.

Apicella, M.L.; Boffa, V.; Celentano, G.; Fabbri, F.; Petrisor, T. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy)] [ENEA Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy)

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

Step-coverage simulation for tetraethoxysilane and ozone atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simulation model for atmospheric pressure (AP) CVD has bee developed using one-dimensional diffusion and mass conservation equations. The model was applied to trench step-coverage of the tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and O[sub 3] CVD, in which it was not necessary to consider lateral diffusion because of narrow (and deep) trenches. For nondoped silicate glass (NSG), the step-coverage of a 4.5 aspect ratio trench showed a good fit if a sticking probability of 0.0039 was assumed for the 0.6% ozone (in oxygen) deposition and of 0.0026 for the 6% ozone deposition (both 400 C). The reaction rate constant was compared with the diffusion mass-transfer coefficient, and the reaction proved to be limited by diffusion of the reactant, TEOS, which directly participated in the CVD reaction. For the 2 m/o phosphosilicate glass (PSG) step-coverage, which had a slight overhang, the model matched the obtained results well only when an active growth species with a high sticking probability of 1.0 was added to the growth species of nondoped oxide. This analytical simulation method satisfactorily explains the experimental data.

Fujino, K. (Semiconductor Process Lab., Toyko (Japan)); Egashira, Y.; Shimogaki, Y.; Komiyama, H. (Univ. of Tokyo, (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

313

The algorithm of drawing the contour lines of the surfaces that resulted from the intersection of a plane with a deposit or a deposit unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present an algorithm of drawing the contour lines of the surfaces that resulted from the intersection of a plane with a deposit or a deposit unit. Some of the general data and the thorough data relative to the knowledge of a deposit ... Keywords: contour line, deposit, deposit unit, model, section, surface

Nicolae Dobritoiu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Laser techniques for studying chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used to produce thin films for microelectronics, protective coatings and other materials processing applications. Despite the large number of applications, however, little is known about the fundamental chemistry and physics of most CVD processes. CVD recipes have generally been determined empirically, but as process requirements become more stringent, a more basic understanding will be needed to improve reactor design and speed process optimization. In situ measurements of the reacting gas are important steps toward gaining such an understanding, both from the standpoint of characterizing the reactor and testing models of a CVD process. Our work, a coordinated program of experimental and theoretical research in the fundamental mechanisms of CVD, illustrates the application of laser techniques to the understanding of a CVD system. We have used a number of laser-based techniques to probe CVD systems and have compared our measurements with predictions from computer models, primarily for the silane CVD system. The silane CVD model solves the two-dimensional, steady-state boundary layer equations of fluid flow coupled to 26 elementary chemical reactions describing the thermal decomposition of silane and the subsequent reactions of intermediate species that result in the deposition of a silicon film.

Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Carbon deposition in steam reforming and methanation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this review is to survey recent studies of carbon deposition on metals used as catalysts in steam reforming and methanation, emphasizing research where significant progress has been made. Where possible, an attempt is made to treat the fundamental nature of carbon formation and deactivation by carbon and the relationships between these two phenomena. Steam reforming and methanation are emphasized in this review because (1) deactivation of catalysts by carbon deposits is a serious concern in both processes, (2) much of the previous research with carbon formation on metals involved one or the other of these two reactions, and (3) there are interesting differences and similarities between these two reactions; for example, methanation is typically carried out at moderate reaction temperatures (200-450/sup 0/C) while steam reforming is typically carried out at significantly higher reaction temperatures (600-900/sup 0/C). Yet the two reactions are very closely related, since methane steam reforming is the reverse of methanation of CO. Moreover, there is evidence that some of the carbons formed in these two different processes are similar in their morphology.

Bartholomew, C.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition system for high-rate deposition of functional materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The atmospheric pressure plasmachemical vapor deposition(CVD) system has been developed to fabricate functional thin films at very high deposition rate. The atmospheric pressure plasma in which high-density radicals are created has been effectively used to depositthin films. Combination of the newly designed rotary electrode and the 150 MHz very high frequency power supply makes it possible not only to generate the high-density atmospheric pressure plasma but also to avoid ion bombardment against the film. By virtue of these noble characteristics of the system high quality films can be fabricated at an unprecedented high deposition rate. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the atmospheric pressure plasmaCVD system hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a- Si:H ) films were prepared in gas mixtures containing He H 2 and SiH 4 . The results showed that homogeneous a- Si:H films grew when substrates were heated at 200?°C. Extremely high deposition rate which was more than 100 times faster than that of the conventional low-pressure plasma CVD technique was realized.

Y. Mori; K. Yoshii; H. Kakiuchi; K. Yasutake

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Real-time ESR observation during film growth of a-Si:H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ electron-spin-resonance (ESR) measurements of film growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) using a remote hydrogen plasma technique have been performed. The Si dangling-bond signal in a-Si:H during and after deposition has been detected, in addition to the gas-phase ESR signals both of atomic hydrogen and photo-excited SiH{sub x} molecules. Dynamic changes of the Si dangling-bond signal intensity were observed when the deposition started and stopped, which has suggested the existence of a subsurface region with higher spin density than that in the bulk region.

Yamasaki, S.; Umeda, T.; Isoya, J.; Tanaka, K.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Numerical simulations of particle growth in a silicon-CVD fluidized bed reactor via a CFD–PBM coupled model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A Eulerian–Eulerian two-fluid model coupled with population balance equations was applied to simulate the evolution of silicon particle growth by chemical vapor deposition of silane pyrolysis in a three-dimensional slugging fluidized bed reactor using FLUENT. The simulation of the particle growth considering surface deposition, cluster scavenging, aggregation and wall deposition was carried out after the verification of flow and heat transfer characteristics based on the well-accepted correlations. The results showed that the scavenging effect was responsible for the particle growth, and the growth rate agreed well with the experimental data by Tejero-Ezpeleta et al. (2004) when the scavenging factor was set to 0.1 under the condition of 923 K and atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the formation of light silicon hydrides by silane homogeneous pyrolysis in the dilute phase was also investigated in the form of CHMEKIN mechanism, which showed that disilane turned to be the main silicon hydride and the silane conversion was underestimated by 12.5%. Finally, the effects of operating conditions on the growth rate were studied in detail with the observation of defluidization phenomenon during the evolution of particle growth.

Si-Si Liu; Wen-De Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Lognormal Size Distribution Theory for Deposition of Polydisperse Aerosol Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The moments method of the lognormal size distribution theory was applied to the deposition equation of a radioactive aerosol within a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor for analysis of postulated accidents. The deposition coefficient of Crump and Seinfeld was utilized to represent the Brownian and turbulent diffusions and the gravitational sedimentation. The deposition equation was converted into a set of three ordinary differential equations. This approach takes the view point that the size distribution of an aerosol is represented by a time-dependent lognormal size distribution function during the deposition process. Numerical calculations have been performed, and the results were found to be in good agreement with the exact solution. The derived model for aerosol deposition is convenient to use in a numerical general dynamic equation solution routine based on the moments method, where nucleation, condensation, coagulation, and deposition need to be solved simultaneously.

Park, S.H.; Lee, K.W. [Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

The formation of a single-pulse electrospark deposition spot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigation of the formation mechanism of the rotating-type electrospark deposition (ESD) was presented, based on studying the single-pulse electrospark deposition spot. Four different substrate/electrode couples were selected to produce single-pulse deposition spots. The similar morphology of the spots and element migration tendency were detected. A heuristic physical model was established to interpret this deposition process. The concept of “gush and splash effect” was originally proposed and proved as the dominant factor in the formation mechanism of the single-pulse electrospark deposition spot. In addition, the rotation behavior of the electrode was identified to impact on the formation of the single-pulse deposition spot.

Jun Liu; Ruijun Wang; Yiyu Qian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

Grubbs, Robert K. (Albuquerque, NM); Bogart, Gregory R. (Corrales, NM); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Direct ion flux measurements at high-pressure-depletion conditions for microcrystalline silicon deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contribution of ions to the growth of microcrystalline silicon thin films has been investigated in the well-known high-pressure-depletion (HPD) regime by coupling thin-film analysis with plasma studies. The ion flux, measured by means of a capacitive probe, has been studied in two regimes, i.e., the amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition regime and a low-to-high power regime; the latter regime had been investigated to evaluate the impact of the plasma power on the ion flux in collisional plasmas. The ion flux was found not to change considerably under the conditions where the deposited material undergoes a transition from the amorphous to the microcrystalline silicon phase; for solar-grade material, an ion-to-Si deposition flux of ?0.30 has been determined. As an upper-estimation of the ion energy, a mean ion energy of ?19 eV has been measured under low-pressure conditions (<1 mbar) by means of a retarding field energy analyzer. Combining this upper-estimate with an ion per deposited Si atom ratio of ?0.30, it is concluded that less than 6 eV is available per deposited Si atom. The addition of a small amount of SiH{sub 4} to an H{sub 2} plasma resulted in an increase of the ion flux by about 30% for higher power values, whereas the electron density, deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, decreased. The electron temperature, also deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, reveals a slight decrease with power. Although the dominant ion in the HPD regime is SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, i.e., a change from H{sub 3}{sup +} in pure hydrogen HPD conditions, the measured larger ion loss can be explained by assuming steeper electron density profiles. These results, therefore, confirm the results reported so far: the ion-to-Si deposition flux is relatively large but has neither influence on the microcrystalline silicon film properties nor on the phase transition. Possible explanations are the reported high atomic hydrogen to deposition flux ratio, mitigating the detrimental effects of an excessive ion flux.

Bronneberg, A. C.; Kang, X.; Palmans, J.; Janssen, P. H. J.; Lorne, T. [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Creatore, M. [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands) [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Solliance Solar Research, High Tech Campus 5, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sanden, M. C. M. van de [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), P.O. Box 1207, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Growth faults and salt tectonics in Houston diapir province: relative timing and exploration significance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil and gas accumulation in Gulf Coast Tertiary strata is contolled mainly by regional growth faults and by salt-related structures. Salt forms the most prominent set of structures in the Houston diapir province of southeast Texas. Recent work in three study areas shows that the Tertiary growth-fault trends, so well displayed along strike to the south-west, continue through this salt basin as well, but they have been deformed by later salt movement. In the Katy area, seismic data disclose early (pre-Wilcox) salt pillows downdip of the Cretaceous reef trend. Salt stocks were injected upward from the pillows during Clayborne deposition, and were flanked by deep withdrawal basins and turtle structures. In Brazoria County, a major lower Frio growth-fault trend affecting the Houston delta system, was deformed by later salt domes, by a salt-withdrawal basin, and by a possible turtle structure at Chocolate Bayou. A productive geopressured aquifer exists in the salt-withdrawal basin bounded by the previously formed growth faults. In Jefferson County, in contrast, salt-tectonic activity and growth faulting appear to have been coeval. Early salt-cored ridges continued to rise throughout Frio deposition; growth faults occur both updip and downdip. Hydrocarbons accumulated over the salt domes in growth-fault anticlines and in stratigraphic traps. Recognition that shelf-margin growth faulting preceded the development of the present pattern of domes and basins has important implications for hydrocarbon exploration. Growth faults may be migration paths for hydrocarbons; furthermore, early formed traps, distorted by salt movement, may still be found to contain hydrocarbons.

Ewing, T.E.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

Hsu, George C. (La Crescenta, CA); Rohatgi, Naresh K. (W. Corine, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Name: Jack Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do plants have any other way of growing besides photosythesis? Plants do not use photosynthesis to grow!!! They use cellular respiration just like every other organism to process energy into work. Plants use oxygen just like we do. Photosynthesis is principally only a process to change sunlight into a chemical form for storage. Replies: Check out our archives for more information. www.newton.dep.anl.gov/archive.htm Steve Sample Jack, Several kinds of flowering plants survive without the use of chlorophyll which is what makes plants green and able to produce sugar through photosynthesis. Dodder is a parasitic nongreen (without chlorophyll) plant that is commonly found growing on jewelweed and other plants in damp areas. Dodder twines around its host, (A host is an organism that has fallen victim to a parasite.), like a morning glory and attaches itself at certain points along the stem where it absorbs sugar and nutrients from the hosts sap.

326

China urges rapid growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This time last year China's paramount leader, Deng Xiaoping, launched the country on another bout of fast-paced economic growth and restructuring. After three years of riding out political and economic clampdown, foreign chemical companies were jerked awake by major changes in China's chemical industry. As the state becomes less involved with managing the economy, unleashing 12% gross national product growth, closer involvement with domestic factories has become attractive and essential. MCI officials say government funds will now be channeled toward clearing energy and transport bottlenecks, and chemical enterprises will be given more chance to turn a profit. They will be allowed to issue shares, seek foreign investment partners themselves, and bypass trading companies like China National Import-Export Corp. (Sinochem), the former state monopoly. Foreign analysts question whether China's finances and oil resources can support expansion. Even if they can, Cai estimates that ethylene imports will remain around the present level of 1 million tons. To further guarantee chemical supplies, China has invested in urea and polypropylene plants in the US and polystyrene plant in Hong Kong.

Hendry, S.

1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

327

EGR Cooler Fouling- Visualization of Deposition and Removal Mechanis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents experimental data on exhaust gas recirculation(EGR) cooler fouling using new test apparatus that allows for in-situ observation of deposition and removal processes

328

S-shaped magnetic macroparticle filter for cathodic arc deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new magnetic macroparticle filter design consisting of two 90{sup o} filters forming an S-shape is described. Transport properties of this S-filter are investigated using Langmuir and deposition probes. It is shown that filter efficiency is product of the efficiencies of two 90{sup o} filters and the deposition rate is still acceptably high to perform thin film deposition. Films of amorphous hard carbon have been deposited using a 90{sup o} filter and the S-filter, and macroparticle content of the films are compared.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

How to make deposition of images a reality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis is performed of the technical and financial challenges to be overcome if deposition of primary experimental data is to become routine.

Guss, J.M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating apparatus that efficiently heats subterranean geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract hydrocarbons for energy needs. The apparatus provides more efficient...

332

Calculating Deposit Formation in the Pipelining of Waxy Crude Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax deposition from a waxy crude oil is modelled in turbulent flow in a pipeline. Molecular diffusion in a thin boundary layer...

S. Correra; A. Fasano; L. Fusi; D. Merino-Garcia

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques.

Wickboldt, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Jose, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Malahide, IE)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques.

Wickboldt, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Fremont, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

System and Method for Sealing a Vapor Deposition Source - Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

costs and minimizes system downtime for cleaning Applications and Industries Thin film solar Deposition of any thin film Patents and Patent Applications ID Number Title and...

336

Plasma parameters in electrospark deposition of silver coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spectroscopic measurements and mathematical simulations are conducted to study the composition and parameters of spark discharge in depositing coatings with silver electrodes using an Élitron-22 generator. The...

V. D. Kurochkin; L. P. Kravchenko; L. O. Kryachko…

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Loan/deposit links at rural Texas banks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Agricultural Economics LOAN/DEPOSIT LINKS AT RURAL TEXAS RANKS A Thesis by VERA SURTON PODOLECKI Approved as to style and content by: fCha' an of Comm' ee) . '/ (Head' of Dep rtment) (Member ) (Membe May 1977 441'726 ABSTRACT Loan/Deposit Links... in agri- cultural lending on deposit level which in turn influences bank pro- fitability. This paper is directed towards providing the rural banker with tangible evidence of the effect of lending on deposit levels over time, and providing a...

Podolecki, Vera Burton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

CFD Analysis of Particle Deposition During DPF Filtration Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A 3-D DPF model is developed to predict thermo-physical properties during filtration processes and to quantitatively investigate particle deposition regarding its size and number distribution.

339

Hydrogen Absorption Induced Metal Deposition on Palladium and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Absorption Induced Metal Deposition on Palladium and Palladium-Alloy Particles Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology

High resolution...

340

Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Abstract The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Depositional environments of the Kodiak Shelf, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these envfronments are created by the bathymetry of tfii s!iel f affec+ing the flow of the shelf waters. Sediment in the re!ighs is characterized by high asti and forami- rifera content, higi poros Ity and low bu', k densi ty. The fine-i;i a in natiif e i i' 'I... and clay. The f'ine-g; ain nature nf tive sed'me!&t of the surf'icfal deposits suogests that. they al e lovi ene!"gy ivii Gniilents, The negative ". opography shelters t'tie sediment in the d pressions from erosion. Iv ACKi'lOWLEDGMENTS The wr1ter...

Burbach, Stuart Peter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of standard polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

Affinito, J.D.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Argentina: export-biased growth versus import-biased growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARGENTINA. : EXPORT-BIASED GROWTH VERSUS IMPORT-BIASED GROWTH A Thesis by MICHAEL PAGE BRADLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1972... Major Subject: Economics ARGENTINA: EXPORT-BIASED GROWTH VERSUS IMPORT-BIASED GROWTH A Thesis by MICHAEL PAGE BRADLEY Approved as to style and content by: rman o omit ee ea o Depar men em er Mem er May 1&72 ABSTRACT Argentina: Export...

Bradley, Michael Page

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

[ital In] [ital situ] infrared measurements of film and gas properties during the plasma deposition of amorphous hydrogenated silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has performed preliminary [ital in] [ital situ] Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements during the plasma deposition of amorphous silicon ([ital a]-Si:H). Experiments demonstrate both gas phase and film measurements within a simple SiH[sub 4] plasma reactor using a specially modified FTIR spectrometer. Films are deposited on substrates of either gold (mirror finish) or stainless steel (matte finish). In particular, [ital in] [ital situ] emission/reflection FTIR of the film yields information about surface temperature, film thickness, and film composition. We have measured surface temperature to [plus minus]5 K and detected the onset of poor film growth at a thickness of 500--1000 A using the 2080 cm[sup [minus]1] absorption feature. A simple model for the reflectance of a film on a metal is employed to determine the thickness of the films. [ital In] [ital situ] emission/transmission FTIR of the plasma determines the gas composition and average gas temperature. Measurements show that the silane conversion is [similar to]11% within the plasma region for a typical deposition at 250 [degree]C and roughly doubles for a deposition at room temperature. The FTIR spectra show that most of this converted silane reappears as disilane (Si[sub 2]H[sub 6]). Before starting the plasma, the silane gas is [similar to]30 K cooler than the nominal substrate temperature of 250 [degree]C; starting the plasma raises the average temperature another 20 [degree]C.

Morrison, P.W. Jr.; Haigis, J.R. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, Connecticut 06108 (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Kinetic Roughening and Phase Ordering in the Two-Component Growth Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interplay between kinetic roughening and phase ordering is studied in a growth SOS model with two kinds of particles and Ising-like interaction by Monte Carlo simulations. We found that, for a sufficiently large coupling, growth is strongly affected by interaction between species. Surface roughness increases rapidly with coupling. Scaling exponents for kinetic roughening are enhanced with respect to homogeneous situation. Phase ordering which leads to the lamellar structure persisting for a long time is observed. Surface profiles in strong coupling regime have a saw-tooth form, with the correlation between the positions of local minima and the domain boundaries. Key words: Computer simulations; Ising models; Growth; Surface roughening; Surface structure, morphology, roughness and topography. PACS: 81.10.Aj, 68.35.Ct, 75.70Kw 1 Introduction Growth by vapour deposition is a technologically important process for producing high quality materials. During last years much progress has been ma...

unknown authors

347

Growth model for carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence is presented, through high-resolution electron microscopy images, for the open-end growth of carbon nanotubes. Terminations of incomplete layers of carbon, seen on the tube surfaces and cone tips, suggest that the extension and thickening of the tubes occur by the island growth of graphite basal planes on existing tube surfaces. The nucleation of positive (pentagons) and negative (heptagons) disclinations on open tube ends results in changes of growth directions, producing different morphologies. A novel structure that shows complete ‘‘turn around growth,’’ involving pentagon-heptagon pairs, of the tubular assemblies is presented.

Sumio Iijima; P. M. Ajayan; T. Ichihashi

1992-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

Robust Growth-Optimal Portfolios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 24, 2014 ... Adopting standard terminology, we refer to the portfolio managed under the Kelly strategy as the growth-optimal portfolio. This portfolio displays ...

2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

349

Military Expenditure, Threats, and Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a country's external military threat; lgdp is the log ofMilitary Expenditure, Threats, and Growth * September 2003expenditure, external threats, corruption, and other

Aizenman, Joshua; Glick, Reuven

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Big-Data RHEED analysis for understanding epitaxial film growth processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now become a standard tool for in-situ monitoring of film growth by pulsed laser deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Yet despite the widespread adoption and wealth of information in RHEED image, most applications are limited to observing intensity oscillations of the specular spot, and much additional information on growth is discarded. With ease of data acquisition and increased computation speeds, statistical methods to rapidly mine the dataset are now feasible. Here, we develop such an approach to the analysis of the fundamental growth processes through multivariate statistical analysis of RHEED image sequence. This approach is illustrated for growth of LaxCa1-xMnO3 films grown on etched (001) SrTiO3 substrates, but is universal. The multivariate methods including principal component analysis and k-means clustering provide insight into the relevant behaviors, the timing and nature of a disordered to ordered growth change, and highlight statistically significant patterns. Fourier analysis yields the harmonic components of the signal and allows separation of the relevant components and baselines, isolating the assymetric nature of the step density function and the transmission spots from the imperfect layer-by-layer (LBL) growth. These studies show the promise of big data approaches to obtaining more insight into film properties during and after epitaxial film growth. Furthermore, these studies open the pathway to use forward prediction methods to potentially allow significantly more control over growth process and hence final film quality.

Vasudevan, Rama K [ORNL; Tselev, Alexander [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

As-deposited low-strain LPCVD (low-pressure, chemical-vapor-deposition) polysilicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As-deposited polysilicon films with very low residual strain (lower than 5 x 10/sup -5/) are obtained by a low-pressure, chemical-vapor-deposition (LPCVD) process. Straight polysilicon bridges 300 ..mu..m long, 1.2 ..mu..m thick, and 2 to 20 ..mu..m wide, made using this process. No buckling has been observed in any of the nearly one thousand bridges of this type made in two separate process runs. In addition, no problems of sticking between the bridges and the substrate were encountered with these structures. The polysilicon films from which the beams were fabricated were deposited by pyrolyzing silane at 605/degree/C on a phosphosilicate-glass (PSG) layer (8 wt % P). The PSG layer serves as a sacrificial layer to be subsequently etched away to free the bridge. Our research is aimed at obtaining an understanding of these relationships through consideration of the role of interfacial stresses and the kinetics of initial crystalline nucleation. The technique for producing these low-strain films is significant, however, because no high-temperature annealing steps are required to produce them. 4 refs., 4 figs.

Fan, L.S.; Muller, R.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-001181: Categorical Exclusion Determination Santiam Substation Renovation CX(s) Applied: B1.16 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Linn County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 12, 2010 CX-001147: Categorical Exclusion Determination Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods for Metal Oxide Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Somerset, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 12, 2010 CX-001182: Categorical Exclusion Determination Access Road Improvement Project for Structure 12/1 of the Snoking Tap to Echo Lake-Monroe Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.13 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Snohomish, Washington

353

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-006104: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-Temecula CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Temecula, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 12, 2010 CX-001181: Categorical Exclusion Determination Santiam Substation Renovation CX(s) Applied: B1.16 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Linn County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 12, 2010 CX-001147: Categorical Exclusion Determination Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods for Metal Oxide Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Somerset, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

354

Energy deposition by weakly interacting massive particles: a comprehensive study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......necessary to study the energy deposition in the surrounding...pair annihilates into muons; and (iii) a 200-GeV...cascade. The fractional energy depositions into the...pair annihilates into muons and gives as a result a hard energy spectrum in agreement......

C. Evoli; M. Valdés; A. Ferrara; N. Yoshida

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) provides a summary of major scientific reports on air pollution and public health. The reports includeAIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Annual Progress Report for FY 2005 through the US Department of Interior #12;PROGRESS REPORT: AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER

District of Columbia, University of the

356

Prediction of ash deposition in pulverized coal combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A predictive scheme based on CCSEM flyash data and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been developed to study the slagging propensity of coals. The model has been applied to predict the deposition potential of three UK coals; Bentinck, Daw Mill and Silverdale, in a pilot scale single burner ash deposition test facility and an utility size multi-burner front wall-fired furnace. The project is part of a collaborative research program sponsored by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and involved various industrial organizations and universities. The objective of the project is to understand the fundamental aspects of slagging in pulverized coal-fired combustion systems. This paper is a sequel to the poster paper entitled: The Prediction of Ash Deposition in a Coal Fired Axi-symmetric Furnace, presented in the last Engineering Foundation Conference. The present model predicts the relative slagging propensity of the three coals correctly. The predicted deposition patterns are also consistent with the observations. The results from the model indicate a preferential deposition of iron during the initial stage of ash deposition. The average compositions of the deposits become closer to that of the bulk ash when the accumulation of ash deposits is taken into account.

Lee, F.C.C.; Riley, G.S. [National Power PLC, Swindon (United Kingdom); Lockwood, F.C. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Ash Deposition Behavior of Upgraded Brown Coal and Bituminous Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ash Deposition Behavior of Upgraded Brown Coal and Bituminous Coal ... Ash with a low melting point causes slagging and fouling problems in pulverized coal combustion boilers. ... The ash composition in coal and operational conditions in boilers such as heat load greatly affect the ash deposition behavior. ...

Katsuya Akiyama; Haeyang Pak; Toshiya Tada; Yasuaki Ueki; Ryo Yoshiie; Ichiro Naruse

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Gas Phase Electrodeposition: A Programmable Multimaterial Deposition Method for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma induced synthesis,11 and arc discharge12,13 can produce nanoparticles and nanow- ires of various-phase deposition process produces charged tungsten, and platinum and uses externally electrodeposition, arc discharge, atmospheric pressure gas phase deposition, nanoparticle nanostructured electrodes

Jacobs, Heiko O.

359

Sputter deposition for multi-component thin films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion beam sputter-induced deposition using a single ion beam and a multicomponent target is capable of reproducibly producing thin films of arbitrary composition, including those which are close to stoichiometry. Using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and a computer controlled, well-focused ion beam, this sputter-deposition approach is capable of producing metal oxide superconductors and semiconductors of the superlattice type such as GaAs-AlGaAs as well as layered metal/oxide/semiconductor/superconductor structures. By programming the dwell time for each target according to the known sputtering yield and desired layer thickness for each material, it is possible to deposit composite films from a well-controlled sub-monolayer up to thicknesses determined only by the available deposition time. In one embodiment, an ion beam is sequentially directed via a set of X-Y electrostatic deflection plates onto three or more different element or compound targets which are constituents of the desired film. In another embodiment, the ion beam is directed through an aperture in the deposition plate and is displaced under computer control to provide a high degree of control over the deposited layer. In yet another embodiment, a single fixed ion beam is directed onto a plurality of sputter targets in a sequential manner where the targets are each moved in alignment with the beam under computer control in forming a multilayer thin film. This controlled sputter-deposition approach may also be used with laser and electron beams.

Krauss, Alan R. (Plainfield, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Cary, NC)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sputter deposition for multi-component thin films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion beam sputter-induced deposition using a single ion beam and a multicomponent target is capable of reproducibly producing thin films of arbitrary composition, including those which are close to stoichiometry. Using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and a computer controlled, well-focused ion beam, this sputter-deposition approach is capable of producing metal oxide superconductors and semiconductors of the superlattice type such as GaAs-AlGaAs as well as layered metal/oxide/semiconductor/superconductor structures. By programming the dwell time for each target according to the known sputtering yield and desired layer thickness for each material, it is possible to deposit composite films from a well-controlled sub-monolayer up to thicknesses determined only by the available deposition time. In one embodiment, an ion beam is sequentially directed via a set of X-Y electrostatic deflection plates onto three or more different element or compound targets which are constituents of the desired film. In another embodiment, the ion beam is directed through an aperture in the deposition plate and is displaced under computer control to provide a high degree of control over the deposited layer. In yet another embodiment, a single fixed ion beam is directed onto a plurality of sputter targets in a sequential manner where the targets are each moved in alignment with the beam under computer control in forming a multilayer thin film. This controlled sputter-deposition approach may also be used with laser and electron beams. 10 figs.

Krauss, A.R.; Auciello, O.

1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

QuestionQuestion How does nitrogen deposition affect roadside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. 2004. Concentrations of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide at roadside verges, and their contributionQuestionQuestion How does nitrogen deposition affect roadside plant community composition? 1. Is there a gradient of nitrogen deposition to freeway verges from traffic exhaust? 2. Are there other sources of N

Hall, Sharon J.

362

Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and absolute contributions of nitric acid (HNO3) and NOx (nitric oxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) to totalTropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest A thesis. Steven C. Wofsy Cassandra Volpe Horii Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition

363

Electroplating method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits for nuclear reactor dosimetry is described, including the steps of holding a radioactive parent until the radioactive parent reaches secular equilibrium with a daughter isotope, chemically separating the daughter from the parent, electroplating the daughter on a suitable substrate, and holding the electroplated daughter until the daughter decays to the fissionable deposit.

Ruddy, Francis H. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Plasma-Therm Workshop: Fundamentals of Plasma Processing (Etching & Deposition)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma-Therm Workshop: Fundamentals of Plasma Processing (Etching & Deposition) Nanofabrication The workshop will focus on the fundamentals of plasma etching and deposition. Lectures will include an introduction to vacuum technology, the basics of plasma and plasma reactors and an overview of mechanisms

Martin, Jan M.L.

365

Hydrothermal Activity and Travertine Deposits in Valles Caldera Paul Withers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrothermal Activity and Travertine Deposits in Valles Caldera Paul Withers Valles Caldera for the Valles Caldera hydrothermal system [fig]. Some fluids escape in acid springs and mud pits (Sulphur mineral deposits as they cool, specifically travertine. Travertine is a freshwater, calcium carbonate

Withers, Paul

366

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

367

A Geostatistical Study of the Uranium Deposit at Kvanefjeld,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the geology. It is also shown that, although anisotropy exists, the uranium variation has a secondRisa-R-468 A Geostatistical Study of the Uranium Deposit at Kvanefjeld, The Ilimaussaq Intrusion A GEOSTATISTICAL STUDY OF THE URANIUM DEPOSIT AT KVANEFJELD, THE ILIMAUSSAQ INTRUSION, SOUTH GREENLAND Flemming

368

Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. To minimize the shadowing effects we used an ionbeam sputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr{sup +} ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the Linear Continuous Model of film growth.

Gawlitza, Peter; Cambie, Rossana; Dhuey, Scott; Gullikson, Eric; Warwick, Tony; Braun, Stefan; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Padmore, Howard

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Size-dependent mobility of gold nano-clusters during growth on chemically modified graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gold nano-clusters were grown on chemically modified graphene by direct sputter deposition. Transmission electron microscopy of the nano-clusters on these electron-transparent substrates reveals an unusual bimodal island size distribution (ISD). A kinetic Monte Carlo model of growth incorporating a size-dependent cluster mobility rule uniquely reproduces the bimodal ISD, providing strong evidence for the mobility of large clusters during surface growth. The cluster mobility exponent of ?5/3 is consistent with cluster motion via one-dimensional diffusion of gold atoms around the edges of the nano-clusters.

Bell, Gavin R., E-mail: gavin.bell@warwick.ac.uk; Dawson, Peter M.; Pandey, Priyanka A.; Wilson, Neil R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Mulheran, Paul A. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose St., Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Barrier performance optimization of atomic layer deposited diffusion barriers for organic light emitting diodes using x-ray reflectivity investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of O{sub 3} pulse duration for encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with ultra thin inorganic atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers is demonstrated for deposition temperatures of 50 °C. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements show that O{sub 3} pulse durations longer than 15?s produce dense and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Correspondingly, black spot growth is not observed in OLEDs encapsulated with such layers during 91 days of aging under ambient conditions. This implies that XRR can be used as a tool for process optimization of OLED encapsulation layers leading to devices with long lifetimes.

Singh, Aarti, E-mail: aarti.singh@namlab.com; Schröder, Uwe [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany)] [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Klumbies, Hannes; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Leo, Karl [Dresden Innovation Center Energy Efficiency, Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Dresden Innovation Center Energy Efficiency, Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Geidel, Marion; Knaut, Martin; Hoßbach, Christoph; Albert, Matthias [Institute of Semiconductor and Microsystems Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01187 Dresden (Germany)] [Institute of Semiconductor and Microsystems Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Mikolajick, Thomas [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany) [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Semiconductor and Microsystems Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 Radiography Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 Radiography Abstract Iridium-192 radiography has been successfully tested as a technique for externally monitoring geothermal scale deposits in piping at the Brawley, CA geothermal field. This technique is applied to piping that handles flowing brine to provide in situ scale deposition observations without the disadvantage of dismantling piping for visual scale inspection. Exposure times and film orientations have been optimized to yield excellent agreement between radiographically detected scale thicknesses and actual

372

Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information Data Set: Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe Effective Date of Revision: May 2, 2005 Data Set Citation: Holland, E. A., B. H. Braswell, J. M. Sulzman, and J. -F. Lamarque. 2005. Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Revision Summary: The investigator advised us that data in two of the deposition files were a factor of 100 too large and the order of the records was reversed from the description in the documentation. NADP_wet_deposition_no3_0.5x0.5_grid_annual.txt NADP_wet_deposition_nh4_0.5x0.5_grid_annual.txt Data File Changes:

373

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated.

Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM); Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated. 5 figs.

Mansure, A.J.; Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deposition conditions and film properties for a variety of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and silicon-carbon films produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are discussed. Deposition gases include monosilane, disilane, trisilane, and acetylene. Two types of optically wide band-gap p layers are obtained. One of these window p layers (without carbon) has been extensively tested in photovoltaic devices. Remarkably, this p layer can be deposited between about 200 to 300 /sup 0/C. A typical open circuit voltage in an all CVD p-i-n device is 0.70--0.72 V, and in a hybrid device where the i and n layers are deposited by glow discharge, 0.8--0.83 V.

Ellis F.B. Jr.; Delahoy, A.E.

1985-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

A macroscopic model for focused?ion?beam?induced deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A time?dependent model for focused?ion?beam?induced deposition is presented which explicitly takes the scanning strategy of the beam during deposition into account. The model differentiates between the contribution of the beam center and that of the beam wings and contains all major experimental variables such as current density focus size scan speed and frame time. The deposition rate has been measured for tungsten as a function of the major experimental variables. The model has been fitted to these data and is found to describe the various dependences very well. By use of the model inclusive of the parameters obtained from the fit we can predict optimum deposition conditions. Furthermore the model clarifies effects observed during deposition on the structuredsurface of an integrated circuit such as redeposition of sputtered material and poor step coverage due to an impeded gas flow.

M. H. F. Overwijk; F. C. van den Heuvel

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Studies of wax deposition in the Trans Alaska pipeline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crude oil being pumped into the Trans Alaska pipeline experiences considerable cooling during its 800-mile (1,287 km) journey from Prudhoe Bay to Valdez. The conditions during the initial flow period were favorable especially for the deposition of the waxy constituents of the crude on the pipeline wall. As time passed and the crude oil flow rate increased, segments of the pipeline warmed up to temperatures greater than that at which wax deposition occurs. This study investigated mechanisms of wax deposition and determined the expected nature and thickness of deposits in the pipeline as a function of time and distance. Results indicate that deposition during start-up is a consequence of 3 separate mechanisms which transport both dissolved and precipitated waxy residue laterally. 31 references.

Burger, E.D.; Perkins, T.K.; Striegler, J.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Influences of deposition and crystallization kinetics on the properties of silicon films deposited by low-pressure chemical vapour deposition from silane and disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with the properties of silicon films obtained by low-pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD). Two gaseous sources characterized by different deposition temperatures, i.e. disilane Si2H6 (420–520 °C) and silane SiH4 (520–750 °C), was studied in order to understand the influences of deposition and crystallization kinetics on silicon film properties. Thus, the deposition of amorphous, semi-crystallized and polycrystalline silicon films was related to “volume random” and “surface columnar” crystallization phenomena, highlighting a linear relationship between the refractive index and the polysilicon volume fraction and, showing complex residual stress dependency with process conditions. Finally, by introducing the ratio Vd/Vc between the deposition and crystallization rates as a major parameter, different deposition behaviours and related semi-empirical relationships were defined in order to characterize fully the various properties of LPCVD silicon films (microstructure, polysilicon volume fraction, refractive index and residual stress) according to the chosen gaseous source, silane or disilane.

Pierre Temple-Boyer; B. Rousset; E. Scheid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Controlled growth of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Terrones Controlled growth of carbon nanotubes R. Vajtai 1 B. Q. Wei 2 P. M. Ajayan...Rouge, LA 70803-5901, USA Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical and electronic...state-of-the-art account of tailored nanotube growth. To provide these properties...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

CALIFORNIA SMART GROWTH ENERGY SAVINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(particularly autos) comprises a large share of total energy consumption, its reduction through more compact in transportation energy consumption resulting from Smart Growth planning. Since energy consumed by transportationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA SMART GROWTH ENERGY SAVINGS MPO SURVEY FINDINGS SEPTEMBER

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alluvial-fan deposits of Eldorado and Piute Valleys Alluvial-fan deposits are mapped as allostratigraphic units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that may be subject to intermittent flooding from active channels. Young alluvial-fan depositsMFan-piedmont and interfluvial wash terrace remnants; pebble-cobble to boulder gravel; small pebble sand where dominated by grus-cobble to boulder gravel. Deposits are poorly sorted; generally matrix supported; poorly to moderately stratified

Tingley, Joseph V.

382

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

383

Ga-assisted catalyst-free growth mechanism of GaAs nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanisms of Ga-assisted GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy are addressed. The axial and radial growth rates as a function of the Ga rate and As pressure indicate that on the opposite of what is observed in thin film epitaxy, the growth rate of the nanowires is arsenic limited. As a consequence, the axial growth rate of the wires can be controlled by the As4 pressure. Additionally, due to the small As4 pressure leading to nanowire growth, the deposition on the facets is very slow, leading to a much lower radial growth rate. Finally, we present a model that is able to accurately describe the presented observations and predicts a maximum length of nontapered nanowires of 40?m.

C. Colombo; D. Spirkoska; M. Frimmer; G. Abstreiter; A. Fontcuberta i Morral

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

In Situ Reaction Mechanism Studies on Atomic Layer Deposition of AlxSiyOz from Trimethylaluminium, Hexakis(ethylamino)disilane, and Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Reaction Mechanism Studies on Atomic Layer Deposition of AlxSiyOz from Trimethylaluminium, Hexakis(ethylamino)disilane, and Water ... The hexakis(ethylamino)disilane Si2(NHEt)6 precursor, also known as AHEAD, exhibits a high ALD growth rate (1 Å/cycle) with ozone as the oxygen source at temperatures ranging from 150 to 300 °C,(28) thus appearing as a serious candidate for ALD of silicon oxide. ...

Yoann Tomczak; Kjell Knapas; Suvi Haukka; Marianna Kemell; Mikko Heikkilä; Marcel Ceccato; Markku Leskelä; Mikko Ritala

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

385

A photoemission study of Au, Ge, and O{sub 2} deposition on NH{sub 4}F etched Si(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the interaction of a metal, Au, a semiconductor, Ge, and a non-metal, O{sub 2}, with the NH{sub 4}F etched Si(111) surface with photoemission spectroscopy. Two components were present in Si 2p core level spectra from the H-terminated surface. We observed the flat band condition from the as-etched, n-type, Si(111) surface. We performed stepwise depositions of Au and measured the band bending with photoemission spectroscopy. The Fermi level pinned near mid-gap as Au was deposited onto the as-etched surface. After the deposition of 1 ML of Au, a Au-silicide layer formed. This interfacial component indicated that the passivating H layer was compromised. As the Au coverage was increased, layers of pure Au formed between the bulk silicon and the Au-silicide layer. The observed behavior was nearly identical to that of Au deposition on the Si(111) 7 {times} 7 surface. Next, we tested the ability of the monohydride layer to sustain surfactant assisted growth of Ge. Ge islanding was observed at 400{degree}C indicating that good surfactant growth was not obtained. Although the monohydride layer was not a good surfactant for the Si(111) surface at this temperature, further study at different temperatures is needed to determine the ability of the ideal monohydride layer to act as a surfactant. Finally, we observed no oxidation of the as-etched surface at room temperature upon exposure to molecular oxygen.

Terry, J.; Cao, R.; Wigren, C.; Pianetta, P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

Maxwell, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Craig A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Miguel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Black, Marcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maskaly, Karlene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boman, Mats [UPPSALA UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100?°C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.11–0.13?nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of ±2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76?ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1?m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5?mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD.

Yersak, Alexander S.; Lee, Yung C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1045 Regent Drive, 422 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0422 (United States); Spencer, Joseph A.; Groner, Markus D., E-mail: mgroner@aldnanosolutions.com [ALD NanoSolutions, Inc., 580 Burbank Street, Unit 100, Broomfield, Colorado 80020 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Diameter and wall number control of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the relationship between the average wall number (N) and the diameter (d) for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by chemical vapour deposition. It is found that N depends linearly on d for diameters in the range of 2.5–10?nm, while single wall nanotubes predominate for diameters under about 2.1?nm. The linear relationship is found to depend somewhat on the growth conditions. It is also verified that the mean diameter depends on the diameter of the originating catalyst nanoparticle, and thus on the initial catalyst thickness where a thin film catalyst is used. This simplifies the characterisation of CNTs by electron microscopy. We also find a linear relationship between nanotube diameter and initial catalyst film thickness.

Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang, E-mail: gz222@cam.ac.uk; Zhang, Can; Chen, Bingan; Santiago Esconjauregui, C.; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Structure control of carbon nanotubes using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon nanotube structures such as tube diameter, growth site, and formation density are controlled using radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) method. We have produced uniformly well-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown over the large scale area and linearly arrayed \\{MWNTs\\} grown in a selected area without any highly-sophisticated patterning process. In our RF-PECVD experiment, furthermore, individually grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) or their thin bundles are synthesized for the first time within the scope of the PECVD methods. These results indicate that PECVD method provides the high potential for the further development of nano-technology.

T. Kato; G.-H. Jeong; T. Hirata; R. Hatakeyama

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Waterless TiO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition using titanium tetrachloride and titanium tetraisopropoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface chemistry for TiO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD) typically utilizes water or other oxidants that can oxidize underlying substrates such as magnetic disks or semiconductors. To avoid this oxidation, waterless or oxidant-free surface chemistry can be used that involves titanium halides and titanium alkoxides. In this study, waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD was accomplished using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl{sub 4}) and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). In situ transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were employed to study the surface species and the reactions during waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD. At low temperatures between 125 and 225??°C, the FTIR absorbance spectra revealed that the isopropoxide species remained on the surface after TTIP exposures. The TiCl{sub 4} exposures then removed the isopropoxide species and deposited additional titanium species. At high temperatures between 250 and 300??°C, the isopropoxide species were converted to hydroxyl species by ?-hydride elimination. The observation of propene gaseous reaction product by quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) confirmed the ?-hydride elimination reaction pathway. The TiCl{sub 4} exposures then easily reacted with the hydroxyl species. QMS studies also observed the 2-chloropropane and HCl gaseous reaction products and monitored the self-limiting nature of the TTIP reaction. Additional studies examined the waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD growth at low and high temperature. Quartz crystal microbalance measurements observed growth rates of ?3?ng/cm{sup 2} at a low temperature of 150??°C. Much higher growth rates of ?15?ng/cm{sup 2} were measured at a higher temperature of 250??°C under similar reaction conditions. X-ray reflectivity analysis measured a growth rate of 0.55 ± 0.05?Å/cycle at 250??°C. X-ray photoelectron depth-profile studies showed that the TiO{sub 2} films contained low Cl concentrations <1 at. %. This waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD process using TiCl{sub 4} and TTIP should be valuable to prevent substrate oxidation during TiO{sub 2} ALD on oxygen-sensitive substrates.

Anderson, Virginia R.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Abdulagatov, Aziz I. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Gibbs, Zachary M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States); George, Steven M., E-mail: Steven.George@Colorado.Edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427. (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tsunami deposits related to flank collapse in oceanic volcanoes: The Agaete Valley evidence, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enigmatic marine conglomerates are attached at 41–188 m asl to the walls of the valley of Agaete, on the northwest coast of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands). They are formed by heterogeneous, angular to rounded heterometric volcanic clasts (roundness and maximal size decreasing with altitude), and fossils (rhodolites and marine shells), never found in growth position and often broken. The deposits are internally stratified into several layers, most of them showing very poor sorting, matrix-supported and reverse grading. They present lenticular morphologies with poor lateral continuity in transversal and longitudinal sections. Slopes show values and orientations similar to those of the relief of the substratum to which they seem to adapt. Although they show clear evidence of erosive contact with the substratum (rip up clasts), they do not tend to form horizontal terraces. Soft materials (soils and colluviums) are preserved in the contact with the substratum in outcrops with deposit slopes of up to 15°. The age of the deposits is constrained between 1.75 Ma and 32 ka. Their altitude and slope distributions are not related to Pleistocene interglacial sea level changes, storm deposits or isostatic movements. All the above suggests that the Agaete marine deposits were generated by tsunami waves, the most probable source being a flank failure, at least nine major such events having occurred in the Canary Islands during the Pleistocene. The Güímar sector collapse (east coast of Tenerife, 30 km3) is the closest possible source for the tsunami and the sole flank failure that is directed towards another island in the Canaries.

Francisco J. Pérez-Torrado; Raphaël Paris; María C. Cabrera; Jean-Luc Schneider; Patrick Wassmer; Juan-Carlos Carracedo; Ángel Rodríguez-Santana; Francisco Santana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Simple method for preparing hydrogenated amorphous silicon films by chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An inexpensive one-step method is presented for fabricating hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films with good photovoltaic properties using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a mixture of silane, disilane, trisilane, and higher polysilanes in hydrogen at one atmosphere total pressure. The gas mixture is generated by the action of dilute acid on magnesium silicide and used immediately in the CVD process. Thus, elaborate techniques for handling, transporting or storing the pyrophoric polysilanes are avoided. In addition, the method requires no expensive vacuum or electrical equipment. The conditions necessary for high (approx. =10%) hydrogen incorporation and very high deposition rates (50-100 A/sec) are explained. Experimental parameters are explained and properties as a function of these parameters are shown. The measurements include hydrogen content, optical, electrical and photovoltaic properties of the a-Si:H films. A chemical kinetic model is presented for this and other silane and polysilane CVD systems between about 400 and 600/sup 0/C. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions are considered. The model is derived from homogeneous gas-phase silane and polysilane chemistry and predicts, in agreement with our experiments, that the homogeneous gas-phase chemistry determines the a-Si:H film growth rate under a variety of conditions. The model is sufficiently predictive to be useful in determining appropriate experimental conditions. Stable solar cells are proposed for a-Si:H and fluorine doped tin oxide which can be produced by CVD at very high deposition rates. The unstable a-Si:H/tin oxide interface is eliminated by a very thin layer of titanium nitride and oxide between the a-Si:H and tin oxide.

Ellis, F.B. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method for depositing high-quality microcrystalline semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the plasma deposition of a layer of a microcrystalline semiconductor material is carried out by energizing a process gas which includes a precursor of the semiconductor material and a diluent with electromagnetic energy so as to create a plasma therefrom. The plasma deposits a layer of the microcrystalline semiconductor material onto the substrate. The concentration of the diluent in the process gas is varied as a function of the thickness of the layer of microcrystalline semiconductor material which has been deposited. Also disclosed is the use of the process for the preparation of an N-I-P type photovoltaic device.

Guha, Subhendu (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Yang, Chi C. (Troy, MI); Yan, Baojie (Rochester Hills, MI)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Nopal I uranium deposit: A study of radionuclide migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary reports on activities of naturally-occurring radionuclides for the Nopal I uranium deposit located in the Pena Blanca Uranium District, Chihuahua, Mexico. Activities were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. In addition, data reduction procedures and sample preparation (for Rn retention) will be discussed here. Nopal I uranium deposit has been identified as one of the most promising sites for analogue studies to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of this research is to study the potential for radionuclide migration by testing whether any portion of the deposit is in secular equilibrium.

Wong, V.; Anthony, E.; Goodell, P. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymeric thin films : mechanism and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a novel technique for depositing polymeric thin films. It is able to deposit thin films of application-specific polymers in one step without using any solvents. Its uniqueness ...

Chan, Kelvin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

STRUCTURAL CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRUCTURAL CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION WITHIN THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT CONTROL AND ANISOTROPY OF MINERALIZATION WITHIN THE CHUQUICAMATA PORPHYRY COPPER DEPOSIT, NORTHERN CHILE the Chuquicamata Porphyry Copper Deposit, northern Chile DEPARTMENT OR SCHOOL: Department of Earth Sciences DEGREE

Beaumont, Christopher

397

Vacuum deposited polycrystalline silicon films for solar cell applications. Quarterly report, September 15-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycrystalline silicon films 14-22 ..mu..m thick and with average grain diameters of 20-40 ..mu..m were deposited by vacuum deposition onto both ceramic and sapphire substrates which were previously coated with a thin (1-2 ..mu..m) TiB/sub 2/ conducting layer. The large grains are the result of an interaction in the initial growth stages between silicon and TiB/sub 2/. SIMS studies of B/Ti/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Ti/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, interactions are reported as part of a continuing investigation of TiB/sub 2/ formation and silicon interactions on the TiB/sub 2/ surface. The increase in grain size has led to an improvement in the open-circuit voltage V/sub oc/, but not to an increase in the short-circuit current J/sub sc/. Capacitance-voltage measurements give results characteristic of an abrupt junction and a build-in voltage V/sub D/ consistent with the measured doping levels. A simple method for measuring the minority carrier diffusion length in the base region L/sub n/ is described. The measurements indicate that there is little change in L/sub n/ between large (20-40 ..mu..m) and small (approx. 5 ..mu..m) grained samples.

Feldman, C.; Arrington, C. H.; Blum, N. A.; Satkiewicz, F. G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The augmented saddle field discharge characteristics and its applications for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high ion flux parallel electrode plasma is proposed and studied in its DC configuration. By cascading a diode source region which supplies electrons and a saddle field region where these seed electrons are energized and amplified, the energy of ion bombardment on the substrate can be decoupled from the plasma density. The sufficiently large density of electrons and holes in the vicinity of the substrate raises the possibility to perform plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition on insulating materials, at low sheath voltages (around 40 V in the configuration studied), at low temperatures in which the surface mobility of film growth species may be provided by the bombardment of moderate energy ions. As a benchmarking exercise, experiments are carried out on silane discharge characteristics and deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on both silicon wafer and glass. The films grown at low anode voltages have excellent microstructures with predominantly monohydride bonds, sharp band tails, but relatively high integrated defect density in the mid 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3} range for the particular substrate temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C, indicating that further optimizations are necessary if the electrode configuration is to be used to create a-Si:H devices.

Wong, Johnson; Yeghikyan, Davit; Kherani, Nazir P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's college Rd., M5S 3G4 Toronto (Canada)

2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fatigue crack growth testing of sub-clad defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on four-point bend specimens with cracklike defects intentionally placed in A302B low-alloy pressure vessel steel clad with 308/309L weld-deposited stainless steel. The defects were placed in the base metal under the cladding by machining a cavity from the side opposite the cladding, electric-discharge machining a very sharp flaw, fatigue precracking the flaw, and then filling up the cavity by a weld repair process. The specimens were stress relieved before fatigue testing. The specimens were fatigue cycled at positive load ratios until the defects broke through to the surface. The specimens were then fractured at liquid nitrogen temperatures to reveal the fracture surfaces. Seven different sub-clad flaw specimens were tested in room temperature air and each test provides a record of cycles to defect breakthrough. Changes in defect size and shape as a function of applied load cycles were obtained by beach-marking the crack at various stages of the load history. The results provide a set of embedded defect data which can be used for qualifying fatigue crack growth analysis procedures such as those in Section XI of the ASME boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A comparison between calculated and measured values shows that the ASME B and PV Section XI fatigue crack growth procedures conservatively predict cycles to defect breakthrough for small sub-clad defects.

Jones, D.P.; Leax, T.R. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith 1 Simple Models Bacteria are the dominant form of life on the planet the concentration of the nutrient in the media (grams/liter) and N(t) de

Smith, Hal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Parameterized Beyond-Einstein Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single parameter, the gravitational growth index gamma, succeeds in characterizing the growth of density perturbations in the linear regime separately from the effects of the cosmic expansion. The parameter is restricted to a very narrow range for models of dark energy obeying the laws of general relativity but can take on distinctly different values in models of beyond-Einstein gravity. Motivated by the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism for testing gravity, we analytically derive and extend the gravitational growth index, or Minimal Modified Gravity, approach to parameterizing beyond-Einstein cosmology. The analytic formalism demonstrates how to apply the growth index parameter to early dark energy, time-varying gravity, DGP braneworld gravity, and some scalar-tensor gravity.

Linder, Eric; Linder, Eric V.; Cahn, Robert N.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjusted deposit insurance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

such as checking, savings, trust and money market deposit accounts, as well... as certificates of deposit (CDs) and IRAs. Bank accounts generally are insured by the FDIC up...

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-mediated callose deposition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-associated molecular patterns (flg22 and elf18), including callose deposition, lignin deposition, pigment accumulation... ., 1998; Soylu et al., 2005). Some bacterial and...

404

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis atmospheric deposition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals 2.1 Main Sources of Atmospheric Pollution...7 Summary: and dry deposition analysis...

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic vapor deposited Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Articles Surfactant-Catalyzed Chemical Vapor Deposition of Copper Thin Films Eui Seong Hwang... and demonstrated for deposition of copper thin films from ... Source:...

406

On-line inspection and thermal properties comparison for laser deposition process .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??"This thesis is focused on comparing the laser deposition cladding with intended design model and comparing the effect of laser deposition process on thermal properties… (more)

Yang, Yu, 1973-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Time of Sands: Quartz-rich Sand Deposits as a Renewable Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sand production is from unconsolidated units, but the St.and Midwestern U.S. , unconsolidated sand deposits aresand is produced from unconsolidated deposits or hard,

Shaffer, Nelson R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Characterisation of a Pleistocene debris-avalanche deposit in the Tenteniguada Basin, Gran Canaria Island, Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied a large debris-avalanche deposit of Pleistocene age in the Tenteniguada Basin, Gran Canaria Island, Spain. This deposit, which is...

Alejandro Lomoschitz; Javier Hervás; Jorge Yepes; Joaquín Meco

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and the Airborne Visible/IR Image Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were used to characterize hot spring deposits in the Lower, Midway, and Upper Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field observations of these basins provided the critical ground-truth for comparison with the

410

Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Experience with Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues Douglas Clark Analyst B&W Technical Services Y-12 May 9, 2012 Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues Y-12 Specific Issues Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues Windspeed - Calm Wind Conditions at Y-12 Site Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues Windspeed - Stability Class Determinations * NRC RG 1.23 ΔT-only method * EPA-454/R-99-005 solar- radiation-delta-temperature (SRDT) method * Hybrid SR - DT method * wind direction standard deviation [sigma-theta (σ θ )] * elevation angle standard deviation [sigma-phi (σ φ )] * vertical wind speed standard deviation [sigma-omega (σ ω )], * wind-speed ratio method (u R ) * All evaluated using data from west

411

Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Remote_Detection_Of_Quaternary_Borate_Deposits_With_Aster_Satellite_Imagery_As_A_Geothermal_Exploration_Tool&oldid=389959

412

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

413

Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada, in: Gold and Silver Deposits of Western Nevada Authors Hastings, J.S., Burkhart, T.H., and Richardson and R.E. Published Geological Society of Nevada 1993 fall field trip...

414

Laser-Based Deposition Technique: Patterning Nanoparticles into Microstructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-Based Deposition Technique: Patterning Nanoparticles into Microstructures Edward M. Nadgorny Jaroslaw Drelich Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION The laser- tions of unlike materials, and unconventional substrates. The technique makes use of laser

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

415

Modeling of Particle Deposition in Cleanroom Environments: Current Status  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently many models have been presented to describe particle deposition in cleanroom environments. The models can be classified according to the scale of flow — cleanroom scale, equipment scale, or product scale...

Jay R. Turner

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Atmospheric Mercury Deposition during the Last 270 Years: A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Mercury Deposition during the Last 270 Years: A Glacial Ice Core Record of Natural, and U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin District Mercury Research Laboratory, Middleton, Wisconsin 53562 Mercury (Hg) contamination of aquatic ecosystems and subsequent methylmercury bioaccumulation

417

Glow discharge deposition at high rates using disilane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research program reported makes use of the fact that amorphous silicon films can be grown faster from disilane in a glow discharge than from the traditional silane. The goal is to find a method to grow films at a high rate and with sufficiently high quality to be used in an efficient solar cell. It must also be demonstrated that the appropriate device structure can be successfully fabricated under conditions which give high deposition rates. High quality intrinsic films have been deposited at 20 A/s. Efficiency of 5.6% on steel substrates and 5.3% on glass substrates were achieved using disilane i-layers deposited at 15 A/s in a basic structure, without wide-gap doped layers or light trapping. Wide gap p-layers were deposited using disilane. Results were compared with those obtained at Vactronic using high power discharges of silane-hydrogen mixtures. (LEW)

Rajeswaran, G.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.; Vanier, P.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Quantifying channelized submarine depositional systems from bed to basin scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The challenges of directly observing active turbidity currents necessitates the consideration of preserved deposits for deciphering the behavior of these systems. In this thesis, I take advantage 3-D subsurface seismic ...

Lyons, William J., 1965-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 2. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 of these proceedings contains papers on dry deposition and resuspension of airborne pollutants. Items within the scope of EDB have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Initiated chemical vapor deposition of functional polyacrylic thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was explored as a novel method for synthesis of functional polyacrylic thin films. The process introduces a peroxide initiator, which can be decomposed at low temperatures (<200?C) ...

Mao, Yu, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Critical loads of acid deposition on Scottish soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of acid deposition, attributable to sulphur and nitrogen pollutants, on the soils of Scotland has been analysed using a critical loads approach. The critical load of a soil (as an indicator of ecolo...

Simon J. Langan; M. J. Wilson

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Wet and Dry Pollutant Deposition to the Mixed Conifer Forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mediterranean climate in southern California regulates wet and dry deposition characteristics in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). Long dry periods in combination with the large air pollution emissions f...

A. Bytnerowicz; M. E. Fenn; P. R. Miller…

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Asphaltene Deposition in Carbonate Rocks: Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphaltene Deposition in Carbonate Rocks: Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation ... Interfacial tension (IFT) as one of the main properties for efficient CO2 flooding planning in oil reservoirs depends strongly on pressure, temperature, and composition of the reservoir fluids. ...

Shahin Kord; Rohaldin Miri; Shahab Ayatollahi; Mehdi Escrochi

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mass-Selected Ion Deposition System - Electrospray Source | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

molecules originating in the ion source from impacting the surface, an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for ion deposition by soft landing, and a vacuum-lock system for introducing...

427

Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records of Atmospherically Deposited Contaminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

73 Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records of Atmospherically Deposited Contaminants 8.1. Catchment the Water Column...............................................79 8.3 Water Column to Bottom Sediment Transfer......................................80 #12;Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records... 74 8

Short, Daniel

428

High density Ru nanocrystal deposition for nonvolatile memory applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High density Ru nanocrystal deposition for nonvolatile memory applications Damon B. Farmer School density optimizes the charge storing capability of the floating layer, while a high degree of size

429

Enabling integration of vapor-deposited polymer thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) is a versatile, one-step process for synthesizing conformal and functional polymer thin films on a variety of substrates. This thesis emphasizes the development of tools to further ...

Petruczok, Christy D. (Christy Danielle)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Aerosol Transport and Deposition Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, various aerosol particle transport and deposition mechanisms were studied through the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, including inertial impaction, gravitational effect, lift force, interception, and turbophoresis, within...

Tang, Yingjie

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY The Impact of Simulated Sulfate Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY The Impact of Simulated Sulfate Deposition on Peatland Testate Amoebae of microbial biomass in Sphagnum peatlands (Gilbert et al. [14] estimate 14% and Mitchell et al. [27] estimate

Gauci, Vincent

432

Direct Deposit When Message Passing meets Shared Thomas M. Stricker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Deposit ­ When Message Passing meets Shared Memory Thomas M. Stricker May 19, 2000 CMU-CS-96 Copyright c by Thomas M. Stricker Supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

433

Direct Deposit --When Message Passing meets Shared Thomas M. Stricker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Deposit -- When Message Passing meets Shared Memory Thomas M. Stricker May 19, 2000 CMU Copyright c flby Thomas M. Stricker Supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

434

Spatial distribution of deposition within a patch of vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This laboratory study describes the spatial pattern of deposition observed in a patch of vegetation located at the wall of a channel. There are two sources of sediment flux to the patch: the advection of particles across ...

Zong, Lijun

435

Cathodic Arc Deposition of Copper Oxide Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the range 1-1.25 GHz, UHV compatible, and very adhesivefulfill the requirements for UHV compatibility. A cathodic85 MPa) and fulfill all UHV requirements. The deposition

MacGill, R.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hygienic rating of hydrocarbons in bottom deposits of water ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors of this article draw the reader’s attention to the topical problem of the contamination of bottom deposits of water ecosystems by hydrocarbons, such as oil and gas condensate,...

Rauf Valievich Galiulin…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

438

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts: Connectors, bends anddeveloping flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ventilation duct flow the turbulent flow profile is commonly disturbed or not fully developed and these conditions are likely to influence particle deposition to duct surfaces. Particle deposition rates at eight S-connectors, in two 90{sup o} duct bends and in two ducts where the turbulent flow profile was not fully developed were measured in a laboratory duct system with both galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle diameters of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition of particles with nominal diameters of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m was measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces. Deposition at S-connectors, in bends and in straight ducts with developing turbulence was often greater than deposition in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence for equal particle sizes, air speeds and duct surface orientations. Deposition rates at all locations were found to increase with an increase in particle size or air speed. High deposition rates at S-connectors resulted from impaction and these rates were nearly independent of the orientation of the S-connector. Deposition rates in the two 90{sup o} bends differed by more than an order of magnitude in some cases, probably because of the difference in turbulence conditions at the bend inlets. In straight steel ducts where the turbulent flow profile was developing, the deposition enhancement relative to fully developed turbulence generally increased with air speed and decreased with downstream distance from the duct inlet. This enhancement was greater at the duct ceiling and wall than at the duct floor. In insulated ducts, deposition enhancement was less pronounced overall than in steel ducts. Trends that were observed in steel ducts were present, but weaker, in insulated ducts.

Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Current and future effects of ozone and atmospheric nitrogen deposition on California’s mixed conifer forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixed conifer forests in southern California are exposed to elevated levels of ozone (O3) and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition. Growing season 12-h daily average O3 levels are 0.06–0.09 ppm, and N deposition rates are 5–45 kg N/ha per year. However, N deposition rates have high spatial variability due to the heterogeneous and open-patchy characteristics of these stands. Annual deposition fluxes are greatest to canopy-covered areas with high pollution exposure. The harmful effects of O3 on sensitive pines are well documented, and selected areas in the San Bernardino and San Gabriel mountains have reached N-saturation as demonstrated by high nitrate (NO3?) export in streams, and a suite of plant and edaphic indicators. The adverse effects of O3 culminate at the community level as a result of chronic effects on pine needle structure, retention, and physiology. Alterations in whole-tree biomass occur after several years due to higher carbon retention in the shoot for O3 detoxification, and lower carbon allocation to roots, as a result of O3 and N deposition. As a consequence, tree susceptibility to drought, windthrow, and root diseases could be exacerbated. Changes in forest community structure may occur due to the death of O3-sensitive pines and fire suppression, and pine replacement by faster-growing, O3-tolerant cedar and fir species. The negative impact of atmospheric N deposition occurs at the ecosystem-level as an alteration of biogeochemical nutrient cycling. For trees growing on N-deficient soils, increased supplies of N could moderate harmful O3 effects on growth for several decades. Over time, levels of soil N rise due to sustained inputs from the atmosphere, and the accelerated production and senescence of N-rich foliage by O3. The increase in soil N is expected to favor the proliferation of nitrophilous overstory and understory species relative to pines. At this stage, N-limitation of forest productivity would be partially alleviated, and N emissions from soil and NO3? leaching losses elevated as a result of high soil N availability. In the western San Bernardino Mountains and in low-elevation chaparral watersheds in the San Gabriel Mountains, NO3? levels in streams are as high or higher than in any other undisturbed montane watersheds in North America, and NO3? contamination of domestic water supplies is of near-term concern. The effects of chronic O3 exposure and N deposition are expected to become more prevalent in the southern Sierra Nevada as human populations and influences in adjacent areas increase in the coming years.

Brent K. Takemoto; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Mark E. Fenn

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cosmic Growth History and Expansion History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the expansion history dark energy equation of state,and growth history constraints on the dark energy equationand growth history constraints on the dark energy equation

Linder, Eric V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Camptothecine, a selective plant growth regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Camptothecine, a selective plant growth regulator ... The literature documents several hundred plant products that appear to exhibit growth-regulating activity. ...

J. George Buta; Joseph F. Worley

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

Lowden, R.A.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

443

Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

Muruska, H. Paul (East Windsor, NJ); Sansregret, Joseph L. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Young, Archie R. (Montclair, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Epitaxial growth in dislocation-free strained alloy films: Morphological and compositional instabilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanisms of stability or instability in the strained alloy film growth are of intense current interest to both theorists and experimentalists. We consider dislocation-free, coherent, growing alloy films which could exhibit a morphological instability without nucleation. We investigate such strained films by developing a nonequilibrium continuum model and by performing a linear stability analysis. The couplings of film-substrate misfit strain, compositional stress, deposition rate, and growth temperature determine the stability of film morphology as well as the surface spinodal decomposition. We consider some realistic factors of epitaxial growth, in particular the composition dependence of elastic moduli and the coupling between the top surface and underlying bulk of the film. The interplay of these factors leads to new stability results. In addition to the stability diagrams both above and below the coherent spinodal temperature, we also calculate the kinetic critical thickness for the onset of instability as well as its scaling behavior with respect to misfit strain and deposition rate. We apply our results to some real growth systems and discuss the implications related to some recent experimental observations.

Zhi-Feng Huang and Rashmi C. Desai

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Study of ash deposition during coal combustion under oxyfuel conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparative study on ash deposition of two selected coals, Russian coal and lignite, under oxyfuel (O2/CO2) and air combustion conditions. The comparison is based on experimental results and subsequent evaluation of the data and observed trends. Deposited as well as remaining filter ash (fine ash) samples were subjected to XRD and ICP analyses in order to study the chemical composition and mineral transformations undergone in the ash under the combustion conditions. The experimental results show higher deposition propensities under oxyfuel conditions; the possible reasons for this are investigated by analyzing the parameters affecting the ash deposition phenomena. Particle size seems to be larger for the Russian coal oxy-fired ash, leading to increased impaction on the deposition surfaces. The chemical and mineralogical compositions do not seem to differ significantly between air and oxyfuel conditions. The differences in the physical properties of the flue gas between air combustion and oxyfuel combustion, e.g. density, viscosity, molar heat capacity, lead to changes in the flow field (velocities, particle trajectory and temperature) that together with the ash particle size shift seem to play a role in the observed ash deposition phenomena.

L. Fryda; C. Sobrino; M. Glazer; C. Bertrand; M. Cieplik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release.

Buckley, R.L.

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Solid particle deposition during turbulent flow production operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production and transportation of petroleum fluids could be severely affected by deposition of suspended particles (i.e., asphaltene, paraffin/wax, sand, and/or diamondoid) in the production wells and/or transfer pipelines. In many instances the amount of precipitation is rather large causing complete plugging of these conduits. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of suspended particles during flow conditions. In this paper the authors present an analysis of the diffusional effects on the rate of solid particle deposition during turbulent flow conditions (crude oil production generally falls within this regime). The turbulent boundary layer theory and the concepts of mass transfer have been utilized to calculate the particle deposition rates on the walls of the flowing conduit. The developed model accounts for the eddy and Brownian diffusivities as well as for inertial effects. The analysis presented in this paper shows that rates of solid-particle deposition (during crude oil production) on the walls of the flowing channel due solely to diffusional effects are small. It is also shown that deposition rates decrease with increasing particle size. However, when the process is momentum controlled (large particle sizes) higher deposition rates are expected.

Escobedo, J.; Mansoori, G.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

In situ mass spectrometric study of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) thin film deposition with metallorganic chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrite, FeS{sub 2}, thin films have been prepared by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition using tert-butyl disulfide (TBDS) and iron(III) acetylacetonate [Fe(acac){sub 3}] as the precursors and H{sub 2} as co-reactant. The reaction mechanism is studied with in situ mass spectrometry. The thermal decomposition of TBDS and Fe(acac){sub 3} has been investigated, as well as the synthesis of FeS{sub 2}. A complicated gas-phase reaction chain occurs in the deposition reaction. In the first 1--2 cm of the deposition zone, thick rough films are formed, but further downstream in the reactor a smooth FeS{sub 2} film is deposited. This remarkable change in morphology is accounted for in the proposed reaction mechanism.

Reijnen, L.; Meester, B.; Goossens, A.; Schoonman, J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Properties of nitrogen doped silicon films deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition from disilane and ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen doped silicon films have been deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition from disilane Si2H6 and ammonia NH3. Deposition kinetics is investigated, pointing out the influences of the deposition temperature, the total pressure and the gas flow rates. According to the Bruggeman theory, variations of the NH3/Si2H6 gaseous ratio allow for a wide range of the SiNx stoichiometry as well as a good control of the film nitrogen doping. The different behaviours of the nitrogen atom in silicon films are discussed and an overview of the nitrogen doped silicon physical properties (optical, mechanical and electrical) is proposed for the development of boron-doped polysilicon gates.

P Temple-Boyer; L Jalabert; E Couderc; E Scheid; P Fadel; B Rousset

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Method and apparatus for removing and preventing window deposition during photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Unwanted build-up of the film deposited on the transparent light-transmitting window of a photochemical vacuum deposition (photo-CVD) chamber is eliminated by flowing an etchant into the part of the photolysis region in the chamber immediately adjacent the window and remote from the substrate and from the process gas inlet. The respective flows of the etchant and the process gas are balanced to confine the etchant reaction to the part of the photolysis region proximate to the window and remote from the substrate. The etchant is preferably one that etches film deposit on the window, does not etch or affect the window itself, and does not produce reaction by-products that are deleterious to either the desired film deposited on the substrate or to the photolysis reaction adjacent the substrate. 3 figs.

Tsuo, S.; Langford, A.A.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

Method and apparatus for removing and preventing window deposition during photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Unwanted build-up of the film deposited on the transparent light-transmitting window of a photochemical vacuum deposition (photo-CVD) chamber is eliminated by flowing an etchant into the part of the photolysis region in the chamber immediately adjacent the window and remote from the substrate and from the process gas inlet. The respective flows of the etchant and the process gas are balanced to confine the etchant reaction to the part of the photolysis region proximate to the window and remote from the substrate. The etchant is preferably one that etches film deposit on the window, does not etch or affect the window itself, and does not produce reaction by-products that are deleterious to either the desired film deposited on the substrate or to the photolysis reaction adjacent the substrate.

Tsuo, Simon (Lakewood, CO); Langford, Alison A. (Boulder, CO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

In-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductor in MOCVD system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ deposition of high-k materials to passivate the GaAs in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system was well demonstrated. Both atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods ...

Cheng, Cheng-Wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A Forward Look into Rare Earth Supply and Demand: A Role for Sedimentary Phosphate Deposits?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rare earth elements, key to many high-technology applications, are regularly making headlines, even in general public newspapers. Will the word run short of rare earth elements and of the many applications that rest on their use? In support to French and European Union policy making, as well as in support to industrial clients, BRGM is monitoring rare earth markets from the supply and the demand sides, as well as for technological shifts that drive them. Not every rare earth element is effectively rare and there are well over 400 ongoing rare earth exploration projects worldwide. Nevertheless, some rare earth elements such as dysprosium, europium and terbium are rare, in high and fast growing demand; as they either are indispensable to the production of Fe-B-Nd (Dy) permanent magnets, the highest performance magnetic material currently being available at industrial scale, or to the production of phosphors essential to the production of fluorescent compact, energy saving, light bulbs and video displays. At the current 10% compound annual growth rate of the demand for these elements, the question arises of their the future availability. Among the many rare-earth bearing minerals apatite is of particular interest as a potential source of rare earth elements, as it is a widespread mineral, forming huge deposits such as the sedimentary and magmatic phosphate deposits. An overview of the potential of sedimentary phosphate deposits as an important source for future rare earth production is presented and discussed. In addition to knowledge about the distribution and concentration of individual rare earth elements in sedimentary phosphate deposits, it is also necessary to understand the partitioning of the individual elements between phosphogypsum and phosphoric acid in the fertilizer production process, as well as available technologies to recover and separate individual rare earth elements from these materials. This could pave the way to the generation of extra added-value for phosphate producers, and to the broadening of the international production base of rare earth elements in high demand by the global economy.

Patrice Christmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Automation, Control and Modeling of Compound Semiconductor Thin-Film Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project on control and agile manufacturing in the critical metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) materials growth processes essential to high-speed microelectronics and optoelectronic components. This effort is founded on a modular and configurable process automation system that serves as a backbone allowing integration of process-specific models and sensors. We have developed and integrated MOCVD- and MBE-specific models in this system, and demonstrated the effectiveness of sensor-based feedback control in improving the accuracy and reproducibility of semiconductor heterostructures. In addition, within this framework we have constructed ''virtual reactor'' models for growth processes, with the goal of greatly shortening the epitaxial growth process development cycle.

Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.; Drummond, T.J.; Horn, K.M.; Hou, H.Q.; Klem, J.F.; Tsao, J.Y.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Rate-dependent morphology of Li2O2 growth in Li-O2 batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compact solid discharge products enable energy storage devices with high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities, but solid deposits on active surfaces can disturb charge transport and induce mechanical stress. In this Letter we develop a nanoscale continuum model for the growth of Li2O2 crystals in lithium-oxygen batteries with organic electrolytes, based on a theory of electrochemical non-equilibrium thermodynamics originally applied to Li-ion batteries. As in the case of lithium insertion in phase-separating LiFePO4 nanoparticles, the theory predicts a transition from complex to uniform morphologies of Li2O2 with increasing current. Discrete particle growth at low discharge rates becomes suppressed at high rates, resulting in a film of electronically insulating Li2O2 that limits cell performance. We predict that the transition between these surface growth modes occurs at current densities close to the exchange current density of the cathode reaction, consistent with experimental observations.

Horstmann, B; Mitchell, R; Bessler, W G; Shao-Horn, Y; Bazant, M Z

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Ash Deposit Formation and Deposit Properties. A Comprehensive Summary of Research Conducted at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work performed at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility over the past eight years on the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion. This work has been done under four broad categories: coal characterization, fly ash formation, ash deposition, and deposit property development. The objective was to provide sufficient understanding of these four areas to be able to predict coal behavior in current and advanced conversion systems. This work has led to new characterization techniques for fuels that provide, for the first time, systematic and species specific information regarding the inorganic material. The transformations of inorganic material during combustion can be described in terms of the net effects of the transformations of these individual species. Deposit formation mechanisms provide a framework for predicting deposition rates for abroad range of particle sizes. Predictions based on these rates many times are quite accurate although there are important exceptions. A rigorous framework for evaluating deposit has been established. Substantial data have been obtained with which to exercise this framework, but this portion of the work is less mature than is any other. Accurate prediction of deposit properties as functions of fuel properties, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions represents the single most critical area where additional research is needed.

Larry L. Baxter

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Model for deposition of bedded halite in a shallow shelf setting, San Andres Formation, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing depositional models for evaporites do not adequately describe facies relationships, halite fabrics, and trace element geochemistry of halite from the Permian San Andres Formation. Interbedding of anhydritic halite and mudstone with disrupted bedding records alternation between marine-dominated brine pool and subaerial environments. Chevron structures and hopper crystal cumulates in the halite indicate subaqueous deposition. Abundant anhydrite partings within halite, which thicken and become interbedded with marine shelf carbonates to the south, demonstrate the facies equivalence and physical connection of evaporite and marine environments. Maintenance of marine character in trace element profiles through halite sequences documents the episodic influx of marine water. Haloturbated structure in mudstone interbeds within the halite is produced by displacive growth of halite within mudstone and dissolution and collapse of this halite as ground-water chemistry fluctuates in response to conditions of alternating desiccation and wetting. Karst features cutting the halite also imply subaerial exposure. Mapping of the fine-scale sedimentary structures, geochemical signature, and insoluble component mineralogy of halite sequences indicates that the brine pool environment extended over areas in excess of 100 km/sup 2/. Sabkha, salina, playa, and deep water basin models of halite-precipitating environments do not satisfactorily describe the shallow marine shelf depositional environment of the San Andres halite.

Hovorka, S.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Epitaxial growth of VO{sub 2} by periodic annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the growth of ultrathin VO{sub 2} films on rutile TiO{sub 2} (001) substrates via reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. The films were formed by the cyclical deposition of amorphous vanadium and its subsequent oxidation and transformation to VO{sub 2} via solid-phase epitaxy. Significant metal-insulator transitions were observed in films as thin as 2.3?nm, where a resistance change ?R/R of 25 was measured. Low angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy to study the film/substrate interface and revealed the vanadium to be tetravalent and the titanium interdiffusion to be limited to 1.6?nm.

Tashman, J. W.; Paik, H.; Merz, T. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1501 (United States); Lee, J. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1501 (United States); Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Moyer, J. A.; Schiffer, P. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Misra, R. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mundy, J. A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Spila, T. [Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Schubert, J. [Peter Grünberg Institute, PGI 9-IT, JARA-FIT, Research Centre Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Muller, D. A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Schlom, D. G., E-mail: schlom@cornell.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1501 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

459

Theory of carbon nanotube growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of carbon nanotube growth under arc discharge conditions were investigated over different length and time scales using complementary numerical techniques. Relaxation by ab initio molecular dynamics (Car-Parrinello method) shows that large electric fields present at the tube tips are not the critical factor responsible for the open-ended growth observed experimentally. Classical molecular-dynamics simulations using realistic many-body carbon-carbon potentials show that wide tubes that are initially open can continue to grow straight and maintain an all-hexagonal structure. However, tubes narrower than a critical diameter, estimated to be about ?3 nm, readily nucleate curved, pentagonal structures that lead to tube closure with further addition of atoms. Very narrow tubes can be grown, however, if a small metal particle prevents tube closure. This effect was simulated explicitly by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Monte Carlo simulations were also used to study nanotube growth over longer time scales. The resulting structures are in agreement with the above growth scenario, and provide an estimate for the lowest tube tip temperature necessary for the growth of nanotubes.

A. Maiti; C. J. Brabec; C. Roland; J. Bernholc

1995-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

A benchmarking of silane, disilane and dichlorosilane for the low temperature growth of group IV layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a 300 mm industrial Reduced Pressure–Chemical Vapour Deposition tool we have assessed the advantages and drawbacks of disilane for the low temperature growth of Si and SiGe. Four distinct regions can be noticed on the Arrhenius plot of the Si growth rate at 2660 Pa (i.e. 20 Torr) from Si2H6 as a function of the reverse growth temperature. For T > 850 °C, we are in the high temperature, Si precursor supply-limited regime (as with SiH4). For T ? 850 °C, the situation is more complicated, with the presence of a growth rate “plateau” between 575 °C and 675 °C (not present for SiH4 or SiH2Cl2), surrounded by domains where the Si growth rate increases with the temperature at different rates (Ea = 1.39 eV (T > 675 °C) ? Ea = 2.30 eV (T disilane are generally of high crystalline quality, however moderate Si2H6 mass-flows should be used in the growth rate plateau, in order to avoid the formation of defective Si.

J.M. Hartmann; V. Benevent; J.F. Damlencourt; T. Billon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Economic Growth and Development Economics 777  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Growth and Development Economics 777 July 18, 2008 Fall Semester 2008 Professor J. H. Mc of economic growth and development. We will analyze several different growth models and look at some recent empirical research. Text The text for this course is: Economic Growth (2nd Edition) by Robert J. Barro

Almor, Amit

462

Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Uranium deposition study on aluminum: results of early tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments to quantify uranium compound deposition on Aluminum 3003 test coupons have been initiated. These experiments consist of exposing the coupons to normal assay UF/sub 6/ (0.7% /sup 235/U) in nickel reaction vessels under various conditions of UF/sub 6/ pressure, temperature, and time. To-date, runs from 5 minutes to 2000 hr have been completed at a UF/sub 6/ pressure of 100 torr and at a temperature of 60/sup 0/C. Longer exposure times are in progress. Initial results indicated that a surface film of uranium, primarily as uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/), is deposited very soon after exposure to UF/sub 6/. In a five minute UF/sub 6/ exposure at a temperature of 60/sup 0/C, an average of 2.9 ..mu..g U/cm/sup 2/ was deposited; after 24 hr the deposit typically increased to 5.0 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ and then increased to 10.4 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ after 2000 hr. This amount of deposit (at 2000 hr exposure) would contribute roughly 10 to 20% to the total 186 keV gamma signal obtained from a GCEP product header pipe being operated at UF/sub 6/ pressures of 2 to 5 torr. The amount of isotopic exchange which would occur in the deposit in the event that HEU and LEU productions were alternated is considered. It is felt that isotopic exchange would not occur to any significant amount within the fixed deposit during relatively short HEU production periods since the HEU would be present primarily as adsorbed UF/sub 6/ molecules on the surface of the deposit. The adsorbed HEU molecules would be removed by evacuation and diluted by LEU production. Major increases in the deposit count would be observed if a leak occurred or moisture was introduced into the system while HEU was being produced.

Hughes, M.R.; Nolan, T.A.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

464

Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition via Self-Healing Electrostatic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrostatic Shield Mechanism . Abstract: Lithium metal batteries are called the “holy grail” of energy storage systems. However, lithium dendrite growth in these...

465

Criticality safety concerns of uranium deposits in cascade equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants enrich uranium in the {sup 235}U isotope by diffusing gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) through a porous barrier. The UF{sub 6} gaseous diffusion cascade utilized several thousand {open_quotes}stages{close_quotes} of barrier to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU). Historically, Portsmouth has enriched the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant`s product (typically 1.8 wt% {sup 235}U) as well as natural enrichment feed stock up to 97 wt%. Due to the chemical reactivity of UF{sub 6}, particularly with water, the formation of solid uranium deposits occur at a gaseous diffusion plant. Much of the equipment operates below atmospheric pressure, and deposits are formed when atmospheric air enters the cascade. Deposits may also be formed from UF{sub 6} reactions with oil, UF{sub 6} reactions with the metallic surfaces of equipment, and desublimation of UF{sub 6}. The major deposits form as a result of moist air in leakage due to failure of compressor casing flanges, blow-off plates, seals, expansion joint convolutions, and instrument lines. This report describes criticality concerns and deposit disposition.

Plaster, M.J. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

Welch, Donald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Holdaway, Ray F. (Clinton, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Room-temperature high radio-frequency source power effects on silicon nitride films deposited by using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicon nitride films were deposited at room temperature using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In this study, the effects of radio frequency (RF) source power ranging from 200 W to ... charact...

Byungwhan Kim; Suyeon Kim

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Effect of the Chemical Composition of Electrode Materials and deposition Parameters on the Properties of Electrospark-Deposited Coatings. I. Mass Transfer Rate and Coating Composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cermet coatings based on Ni–Al alloys and titanium–chromium diboride are electrospark-deposited onto 40Kh steel. It is analyzed ... phase ratio in the electrode material and the deposition parameters influence th...

V. P. Konoval; O. P. Umanskii; A. D. Panasyuk…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Effect of the Chemical Composition of Electrode Materials and Deposition Conditions on the Properties of Spark-Deposited Coatings. II. Coating Hardness and Wear Resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cermet coatings based on Ni–Al alloys and titanium–chromium diboride are electrospark-deposited onto 40Kh steel. It is analyzed ... phase ratio in the electrode material and the deposition conditions influence th...

V. P. Konoval; O. P. Umanskii; O. D. Kostenko…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Effect of substrate temperature on the electrospark deposition, structure, and mechanical properties of coatings. I. Kinetics of substrate heating during electrospark deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is developed for determining the temperature of the substrate in the area of electrospark deposition. The method is employed during experiments on deposition of two types of electrodes onto steel ... est...

V. D. Belik; R. V. Litvin; M. S. Kovalchenko

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Effect of growth temperature on the CVD grown Fe filled multi-walled carbon nanotubes using a modified photoresist  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe filled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition using a simple mixture of iron(III) acetylacetonate (Fe(acac){sub 3}) with a conventional photoresist and the effect of growth temperature (550-950 {sup o}C) on Fe filled nanotubes has been studied. Scanning electron microscopy results show that, as the growth temperature increases from 550 to 950 {sup o}C, the average diameter of the nanotubes increases while their number density decreases. High resolution transmission electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray investigation shows that the nanotubes have a multi-walled structure with partial Fe filling for all growth temperatures. The graphitic nature of the nanotubes was observed via X-ray diffraction pattern. Raman analysis demonstrates that the degree of graphitization of the carbon nanotubes depends upon the growth temperature.

Sengupta, Joydip [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)] [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Jana, Avijit; Pradeep Singh, N.D. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Jacob, Chacko, E-mail: cxj14_holiday@yahoo.com [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)] [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Growth and energy budgets of green and red type sea cucumbers Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) under different light colors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Under white, red, yellow, green and blue light the growth performances and energy budgets of the red type and the green type sea cucumbers Apostichopus japonicus were studied in order to understand their adaptability to different light spectra. The results showed that the growth rates of both types of A. japonicus were influenced significantly by light spectra. The growth rate of the red type in yellow light treatment was significantly greater than those in other light color treatments; however, for the green type similar growth rates were detected in yellow, white and blue light treatments. Resulting from wasting less energy in feces under yellow light deposited more energy to growth, however, for the green type in yellow light more energy to growth was gained by spending less energy in respiration and ammonia excretion as well. The minimum growth rates for both types of sea cucumbers occurred in green light treatment. The difference in food conversion efficiencies between the red type and the green type resulted in the difference in growth rates between both types of sea cucumbers in green light treatment.

Jie Bao; Hongbo Jiang; Xiangli Tian; Shuanglin Dong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Poverty and income growth: measuring pro-poor growth in the case of Romania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper attempts to examine the extent to which income growth was beneficial to poverty reduction in Romania between the years 2000 and 2007. We build income growth incidence curves, both in absolute and relative terms, on the basis of mean individual ... Keywords: economic growth, growth incidence curve, income, inequality, poverty, pro-poor growth

Eva Militaru; Cristina Stroe

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop The Department of Energy's Chief of Nuclear Safety hosted a MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop on June 5-6, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. Approximately 70 participants attended. The purpose of the workshop was to: Discuss MACCS2 and atmospheric dispersion models as applied to DOE consequence analysis. Discuss implementation of HSS Safety Bulletin 2011-2, Accident Analysis Parameter Update, at field sites. Develop a consistent Department-wide approach for responding to the HSS Safety Bulletin. Identify areas for improved DOE guidance for ensuring defensible consequence analyses. June Workshop Agenda- Final.docx Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII

476

Why sequence freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium (Siderocapsaceae)? Stream biofilms are key component of stream food webs and contain bacteria that contribute to the carbon and nitrogen cycles. A slow-growing bacterium isolated from a freshwater stream biofilm has potential bioenergy and bioremediation applications. JOSHI_001 is part of a class of bacteria that deposit iron and manganese precipitates externally to the colony early in its life cycle and could be used for fuel cells and to help clean up manganese contaminated water. Members of the Siderocapsaceae family to which JOSHI_001 belongs have been observed in biofilms for the past century, but have never before been isolated and cultivated in a laboratory environment. As a result, researchers have not been able to learn about the

477

Chrome Deposit Corporation and the University of Delaware IAC: Another  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chrome Deposit Corporation and the University of Delaware IAC: Chrome Deposit Corporation and the University of Delaware IAC: Another Energy Efficiency Success Story Chrome Deposit Corporation and the University of Delaware IAC: Another Energy Efficiency Success Story November 2, 2011 - 2:11pm Addthis Pictured left to right: University of Delaware students Joseph Camp and Nicole Suto; Keith Goossen, director of the Industrial Assessment Center; and Cesar Duarte, University of Delaware grad student. | Image courtesy of UD. Pictured left to right: University of Delaware students Joseph Camp and Nicole Suto; Keith Goossen, director of the Industrial Assessment Center; and Cesar Duarte, University of Delaware grad student. | Image courtesy of UD. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs

478

Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery as a Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery as a Geothermal Exploration Tool Abstract In the Great Basin of the western United States, geothermal fluids are sometimes associated with surface crusts of borate evaporite minerals. These borates can therefore potentially serve as a geothermal exploration tool if they can be efficiently identified and mapped in the field. We demonstrate the effectiveness of using a field-portable ASD Fieldspec® spectroradiometer, and satellite-based Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and Emitted Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) imagery for mapping borate minerals

479

Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

480

Metal-to-Insulator Transition in Anatase TiO2 Thin Films Induced by Growth Rate Modulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate control of the carrier density of single phase anatase TiO{sub 2} thin films by nearly two orders of magnitude by modulating the growth kinetics during pulsed laser deposition, under fixed thermodynamic conditions. The resistivity and the intensity of the photoluminescence spectra of these TiO{sub 2} samples, both of which correlate with the number of oxygen vacancies, are shown to depend strongly on the growth rate. A quantitative model is used to explain the carrier density changes.

Tachikawa, T; Minohara, M.; Nakanishi, Y.; Hikita, Y.; Yoshita, M.; Akiyama, H.; Bell, C.; Hwang, H.Y.

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deposition growth cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Blue-Green Algae: Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IT is well known that many species of algae fail to thrive in simple inorganic media and may be cultured with greater ease in ... organic materials such as soil extract1 2. These observations have promoted the suggestion that such algae may have requirements for growth factors, especially since many species are now known to ...

J. S. BUNT

1961-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

Public Capital, Growth and Welfare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sanitation--increase in enrolment rates (especially for girls, rural areas). 2. Electricity reason: improved access benefits the poor more than proportionally; if inequality is bad for growth (e be internalized. #12;18 Policy Implications #12; 1. Investment spending is a poor proxy for the accumulation

483

Measurement of adherent cell mass and growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...layer was grown by a thermal oxidation, to electrically...deposition (PECVD) for insulation. The PECVD oxide on the bonding pads was...directs stem cell lineage specification . Cell 126 : 677 – 689 . 21...layer was grown by a thermal oxi-dation...deposition (PECVD) for insulation (Fig. S1J). Step...

Kidong Park; Larry J. Millet; Namjung Kim; Huan Li; Xiaozhong Jin; Gabriel Popescu; N. R. Aluru; K. Jimmy Hsia; Rashid Bashir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

8 - Innovations in laser cladding and direct laser metal deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laser-based material deposition to form coatings or 3D structures has gained substantial interest in industry for applications in aerospace, energy conversion, the oil and gas industry, medicine and mechanical engineering. Using light as a tool offers major advantages such as high precision as well as high productivity, utilizing basically the same process principle. However, systems hardware such as nozzle design and additional energy sources must be adjusted to the specific process needs. Moreover, process control and an in-depth understanding of the key processing variables, the resulting material microstructure of the claddings and their resulting properties are essential for successful 2D and 3D material deposition.

C. Leyens; E. Beyer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Dry deposition of gaseous elemental iodine on water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRy DEPOSITION OF GASEOUS ELEMENTAL IODINE ON WATER A Thesis by MICHAEL DANA ALLEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19/4 Ma...Jor SubJect: Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics) DRY DEPOSITION OF GASEOUS ELEMENTAL IODINE ON WATER A Thesis MICHAEL DANA ALLEN Approved as to style and content by: irman of C ttee) ( a of Department) (Member) (Member) August 1974 3. 1. 595') 6...

Allen, Michael Dana

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

487

Particle Velocity and Deposition Efficiency in the Cold Spray Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper powder was sprayed by the cold-gas dynamic method. In-flight particle velocities were measured with a laser-two-focus system as a function of process parameters such as gas temperature, gas pressure, and powder feed rate. Particle velocities were uniform in a relatively large volume within the plume and agreed with theoretical predictions. The presence of the substrate was found to have no significant effect on particle velocities. Cold-spray deposition efficiencies were measured on aluminum substrates as a function of particle velocity and incident angle of the plume. Deposition efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved. The critical velocity for deposition was determined to be about 640 meters per second. This work investigates both the in-flight characteristics of copper particles in a supersonic cold-spray plume and the build-up of the subsequent coating on aluminum substrates. Velocities were found to be relatively constant within a large volume of the plume. Particle counts dropped off sharply away from the central axis. The presence of a substrate was found to have no effect on the velocity of the particles. A substantial mass-loading effect on the particle velocity was observed; particle velocities begin to drop as the mass ratio of powder to gas flow rates exceeds 3%. The measured variation of velocity with gas pressure and pre-heat temperature was in fairly good agreement with theoretical predictions. Helium may be used as the driving gas instead of air in order to achieve higher particle velocities for a given temperature and pressure. Coating deposition efficiencies were found to increase with particle velocity and decrease with gun- substrate angle. There did not appear to be any dependence of the deposition efficiency on coating thickness. A critical velocity for deposition of about 640 mk appears to fit the data well. The cold-spray technique shows promise as a method for the deposition of materials which are thermally sensitive or may experience rapid oxidation under typical thermal spray conditions. High deposition efficiencies are achievable for certain coating-substrate conditions. Work remains to determine the material and microstructural properties which govern the coating process.

Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.; Smith, M.F.

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z