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1

Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion," DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion," DOEIG-0642 Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

2

Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion, IG-0751...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion, IG-0751 Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

3

Depleted Uranium De-conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Environmental Report (ER) constitutes one portion of an application being submitted by International Isotopes Fluorine Products (IIFP) to construct and operate a facility that will utilize depleted DUF6 to produce high purity inorganic fluorides, uranium oxides, and anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. The proposed IIFP facility will be located near Hobbs, New Mexico. IIFP has prepared the ER to meet the requirements specified in 10 CFR 51, Subpart A, particularly those requirements set forth in 10 CFR 51.45(b)-(e). The organization of this ER is generally consistent with NUREG-1748, “Environmental Review Guidance for Licensing Actions Associated with NMSS Programs, Final Report.” The Environmental Report for this proposed facility provides information that is specifically required by the NRC to assist it in meeting its obligations under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and the agency’s NEPA-implementing regulations. This ER demonstrates that the environmental protection measures proposed by IIFP are adequate to protect both the environment and the health and safety of the public. This Environmental Report evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and its reasonable alternatives. This ER also describes the environment potentially affected by IIEF’s proposal,

Fluorine Extraction Process

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OFFICE OF DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE MANAGEMENT Issuance Of Final Report On Preconceptual Designs For Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants The Department of Energy...

5

Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Depleted uranium is uranium that has had some of its U-235 content removed. Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce uranium having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the 0.72% that occurs naturally (called "enriched" uranium) for use in U.S. national defense and civilian applications. "Depleted" uranium is also a product of the enrichment process. However, depleted uranium has been stripped of some of its natural uranium-235 content. Most of the Department of Energy's (DOE) depleted uranium inventory contains between 0.2 to 0.4 weight-percent uranium-235, well

6

Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the 60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site Summary This site-specific EIS analyzes the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; transportation of all cylinders (DUF6, enriched, and empty) currently stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Portsmouth; construction of a new cylinder storage yard at Portsmouth (if required) for ETTP cylinders; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride

8

Draft Supplement Analysis for Location(s) to Dispose of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE'S Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED URANIUM OXIDE CONVERSION PRODUCT GENERATED FROM DOE'S INVENTORY OF DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE (DOE/EIS-0359-SA1 AND DOE/EIS-0360-SA1) March 2007 March 2007 i CONTENTS NOTATION........................................................................................................................... iv 1 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ................................................................. 1 1.1 Why DOE Has Prepared This Draft Supplement Analysis .............................. 1 1.2 Background ....................................................................................................... 3 1.3 Proposed Actions Considered in this Draft Supplement Analysis.................... 4

9

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

11

Preconceptual design studies and cost data of depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plants  

SciTech Connect

One of the more important legacies left with the Department of Energy (DOE) after the privatization of the United States Enrichment Corporation is the large inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) is responsible for the long-term management of some 700,000 metric tons of DUF6 stored at the sites of the two gaseous diffusion plants located at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The DUF6 management program resides in NE's Office of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management. The current DUF6 program has largely focused on the ongoing maintenance of the cylinders containing DUF6. However, the long-term management and eventual disposition of DUF6 is the subject of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) and Public Law 105-204. The first step for future use or disposition is to convert the material, which requires construction and long-term operation of one or more conversion plants. To help inform the DUF6 program's planning activities, it was necessary to perform design and cost studies of likely DUF6 conversion plants at the preconceptual level, beyond the PEIS considerations but not as detailed as required for conceptual designs of actual plants. This report contains the final results from such a preconceptual design study project. In this fast track, three month effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Bechtel National Incorporated developed and evaluated seven different preconceptual design cases for a single plant. The preconceptual design, schedules, costs, and issues associated with specific DUF6 conversion approaches, operating periods, and ownership options were evaluated based on criteria established by DOE. The single-plant conversion options studied were similar to the dry-conversion process alternatives from the PEIS. For each of the seven cases considered, this report contains information on the conversion process, preconceptual plant description, rough capital and operating costs, and preliminary project schedule.

Jones, E

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

FAQ 23-How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium hexafluoride -- is stored in the United States? In addition to the depleted uranium stored...

13

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary Report for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities - Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C: SCOPING SUMMARY REPORT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SCOPING PROCESS Scoping Summary Report C-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Scoping Summary Report C-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C This appendix contains the summary report prepared after the initial public scoping period for the depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities environmental impact statement (EIS) project. The scoping period for the EIS began with the September 18, 2001, publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (66 FR 23213) and was extended to January 11, 2002. The report summarizes the different types of public involvement opportunities provided and the content of the comments received.

14

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

15

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

16

Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DU Uses DU Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Research & Development A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore beneficial uses of depleted uranium (DU) and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6. A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore the safe, beneficial use of depleted uranium and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6 (e.g., fluorine and empty carbon steel cylinders) for the purposes of resource conservation and cost savings compared with disposal. This program explored the risks and benefits of several depleted uranium uses, including uses as a radiation shielding material, a catalyst, and a semi-conductor material in electronic devices.

17

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for DUF 6 Conversion Project Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Meetings November/December 2001 Overview Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 2 DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart EM-10 Policy EM-40 Project Completion EM-20 Integration EM-50 Science and Technology EM-31 Ohio DUF6 Management Program EM-32 Oak Ridge EM-33 Rocky Flats EM-34 Small Sites EM-30 Office of Site Closure Office of Environmental Management EM-1 DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 3 DUF 6 Management Program DUF 6 Management Program * Mission: Safely and efficiently manage the DOE inventory of DUF 6 in a way that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, and protects the environment DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 4 DUF 6 Inventory Distribution

18

Depleted uranium valuation  

SciTech Connect

The following uses for depleted uranium were examined to determine its value: a substitute for lead in shielding applications, feed material in gaseous diffusion enrichment facilities, feed material for an advanced enrichment concept, Mixed Oxide (MOx) diluent and blanket material in LMFBRs, and fertile material in LMFBR systems. A range of depleted uranium values was calculated for each of these applications. The sensitivity of these values to analysis assumptions is discussed. 9 tables.

Lewallen, M.A.; White, M.K.; Jenquin, U.P.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). Although not part of the proposed action, an option of shipping all cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF{sub 6} [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Paducah rather than to Portsmouth is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Paducah site. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0360) evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed Portsmouth conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6 [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) to Portsmouth; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). An option of shipping the ETTP cylinders to Paducah is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Portsmouth and ETTP sites. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0359) evaluates potential environmental impacts for the proposed Paducah conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 SUMMARY S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth,

22

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

23

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

24

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process,

25

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

26

Video: The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Story  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Story The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Story An overview of Uranium, its isotopes, the need and history of diffusive separation, the handling of the Depleted Uranium...

27

FAQ 6-What is depleted uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium? What is depleted uranium? Depleted uranium is created during the processing that is done to make natural uranium suitable for use as fuel in nuclear power plants...

28

Health Risks Associated with Disposal of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Disposal of Depleted Uranium A discussion of risks associated with disposal...

29

Environmental Impacts of Options for Disposal of Depleted Uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

study by Oak Ridge National Laboratory evaluated the acceptability of several depleted uranium conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE...

30

What is Depleted Uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is Uranium? What is Uranium? Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects What is Uranium? Physical and chemical properties, origin, and uses of uranium. Properties of Uranium Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in varying but small amounts in soil, rocks, water, plants, animals and all human beings. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes, which are identified by the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus: uranium-238, uranium-235, and uranium-234. (Isotopes of an element have the

31

FAQ 26-Are there any uses for depleted uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uses for depleted uranium? Are there any uses for depleted uranium? Several current and potential uses exist for depleted uranium. Depleted uranium could be mixed with highly...

32

Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poly DU Poly DU Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium Technology Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed preliminary work to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating DU in low density polyethylene to form a stable, dense product. DU loadings as high as 90 wt% were achieved. A maximum product density of 4.2 g/cm3 was achieved using UO3, but increased product density using UO2 is estimated at 6.1 g/cm3. Additional product density improvements up to about 7.2 g/cm3 were projected using DU aggregate in a hybrid technique known as micro/macroencapsulation.[1] A U.S. patent for this process has been received.[2] Figure 1 Figure 1: DU Encapsulated in polyethylene samples produced at BNL containing 80 wt % depleted UO3 A recent DU market study by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. for DOE thoroughly identified and rated potential applications and markets for DU metal and oxide materials.[3] Because of its workability and high DU loading capability, the polyethylene encapsulated DU could readily be fabricated as counterweights/ballast (for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships and missiles), flywheels, armor, and projectiles. Also, polyethylene encapsulated DU is an effective shielding material for both gamma and neutron radiation, with potential application for shielding high activity waste (e.g., ion exchange resins, glass gems), spent fuel dry storage casks, and high energy experimental facilities (e.g., accelerator targets) to reduce radiation exposures to workers and the public.

33

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants, May 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

34

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants, May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

35

Depleted Uranium and Uranium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Naturally occurring uranium makes up 0.0004% of the crust of the Earth; it is 40 times more plentiful than silver, and 800 times more plentiful than gold. Natural uranium contains approximately 0.7% fissionable U 235 and 99.3%

36

Depleted Uranium (DU) Dioxide Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fill Depleted Uranium (DU) Dioxide Fill DU dioxide in the form of sand may be used to fill the void spaces in the waste package after the package is loaded with SNF. This...

37

Environmental Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Conversion A general discussion of the potential environmental impacts associated with depleted UF6 conversion activities. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The potential environmental impacts associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This page discusses in general the types of impacts that might be associated with the conversion process based on the PEIS analysis. The PEIS evaluated the potential environmental impacts for representative conversion facilities. Conversion to uranium oxide and uranium metal were considered. Potential impacts were evaluated for a representative site, and

38

Health Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Conversion A discussion of health risks associated with conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form. General Health Risks of Conversion The potential environmental impacts, including potential health risks, associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This section discusses in general the types of health risks associated with the conversion process. The conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form will be done in an industrial facility dedicated to the conversion process. Conversion will involve the handling of depleted UF6 cylinders. Hazardous chemicals, such

39

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This Technical Brief specifically addresses DU in an environmental contamination setting and specifically does.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other govern ment sources. DU occurs in a number of different compounds airborne releases of uranium at one DOE facility amounted to 310,000 kg between 1951 and 1988, which

40

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Transcript of Public Scoping Meeting for Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, held Nov. 28, 2001, Piketon, Ohio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL 2 IMPACT STATEMENT 3 FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE 4 CONVERSION FACILITIES 5 AT PORTSMOUTH, OHIO AND PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 6 7 SCOPING MEETING 8 9 November 28, 2001. 10 11 6:00 p.m. 12 13 Riffe Beavercreek Vocational School 14 175 Beavercreek Road 15 Piketon, Ohio 45661 16 17 FACILITATORS: Darryl Armstrong 18 Harold Munroe 19 Kevin Shaw 20 Gary Hartman 21 22 23 24 Professional Reporters, Inc. (614) 460-5000 or (800) 229-0675 2 1 -=0=- 2 PROCEEDINGS 3 -=0=- 4 MR. ARMSTRONG: I have 6:00, 5 according to my watch. Good evening, ladies 6 and gentlemen. If you'll please take your 7 seats, we'll get started. This meeting is 8 now officially convened. 9 On behalf of DOE, we thank you for 10 attending the environmental impact 11 statement, or EIS, scoping meeting this 12 evening for the depleted uranium conversion 13 facilities. My name is Darryl Armstrong. I 14

42

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), natural uranium hexafluoride (NUF6), and low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (LEUF6) at the DOE Paducah site in western Kentucky (DOE Paducah) and the DOE Portsmouth site near Piketon in south-central Ohio (DOE Portsmouth)1. This inventory exceeds DOE's current and projected energy and defense program needs. On March 11, 2008, the Secretary of Energy issued a policy statement (the

43

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

44

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

45

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services December 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for engineering and operations technical services to support the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office and the oversight of operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project located in Paducah KY, and Portsmouth OH. The RFQ is for a Time-and-Materials Task Order for three years with two one-year option periods. The estimated contract value is approximately $15 - 20 million.

47

DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services December 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for engineering and operations technical services to support the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office and the oversight of operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project located in Paducah KY, and Portsmouth OH. The RFQ is for a Time-and-Materials Task Order for three years with two one-year option periods. The estimated contract value is approximately $15 - 20 million.

48

Potential Uses of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM Robert R. Price U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20874 M. Jonathan Haire and Allen G. Croff Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 June 2000 For American Nuclear Society 2000 International Winter and Embedded Topical Meetings Washington, D.C. November 12B16, 2000 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________

49

Transcript of Public Scoping Meeting for Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, held Dec. 4, 2001, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSCRIPT TRANSCRIPT OF MEETING ______________________________________________________ FACILITATOR: MR. DARRYL ARMSTRONG SPEAKER: MR. DALE RECTOR SPEAKER: MR. NORMAN MULVENON SPEAKER: MS. SUSAN GAWARECKI SPEAKER: MR. GENE HOFFMAN DECEMBER 4, 2001 ____________________________________________________ JOAN S. ROBERTS COURT REPORTER P.O. BOX 5924 OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE 37831 (865-457-4027) 2 1 MR. ARMSTRONG: TAKE YOUR SEATS AND WE 2 WILL BEGIN THE MEETING. GOOD EVENING, LADIES 3 AND GENTLEMEN. IF YOU WILL, WE WILL START, THE 4 TIME IS NOW 6:02 P.M. THE MEETING IS 5 OFFICIALLY CONVENED. ON BEHALF OF THE 6 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WE THANK YOU FOR 7 ATTENDING THIS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT 8 SCOPING MEETING, ALSO KNOWN AS AN EIS SCOPING 9 MEETING, FOR THE DEPLETED URANIUM CONVERSION 10 FACILITIES. MY NAME IS DARRYL ARMSTRONG. I'M 11 AN INDEPENDENT AND NEUTRAL FACILITATOR HIRED BY 12 AGENCIES

50

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Paducah, Kentucky, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Paducah Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Paducah Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Paducah Summary S-28 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Areas of Potential Impact Evaluated for Each Alternative Alternatives 2-7 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS

51

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Portsmouth Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Portsmouth Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Portsmouth Summary S-25 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Potential Locations for Construction of a New Cylinder Storage Yard at Portsmouth

52

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

News Media Exits for Depleted Uranium and Depleted UF6 Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

line line Archived News and Events News Media Links News Media Exits for Depleted Uranium and Depleted UF6 Articles Online editions of newspapers that cover Depleted Uranium...

54

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

55

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

56

Depleted Uranium Operations at the Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Depleted Uranium Operations at the Y-12 National Security Complex, G-0570 Depleted Uranium Operations...

57

FAQ 14-What does a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look like? What does a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look like? A picture is worth a thousand words The pictures below show typical...

58

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support March 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 Bill.Taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive small business task order to Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The award is a $22 million, time and materials task order with a three-year performance period and two one-year extension options. Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. will provide engineering and operations technical support services to the DOE Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio.

59

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support March 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 Bill.Taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive small business task order to Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The award is a $22 million, time and materials task order with a three-year performance period and two one-year extension options. Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. will provide engineering and operations technical support services to the DOE Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio.

60

Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Package Package Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package The steel components of the waste package could be replaced with a uranium cermet. The cermet contains uranium dioxide particulates, which are embedded in steel. Cermets are made with outer layers of clean steel; thus, there is no radiation-contamination hazard in handling the waste packages. Because cermets are made of the same materials that would normally be found in the YM repository (uranium dioxide and steel), there are no chemical compatibility issues. From half to all of the DU inventory in the United States could be used for this application. Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Cross Section of a Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Follow the link below for more information on Cermets:

62

Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, 59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site Summary This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold. This EIS also considers a no action alternative that assumes continued storage of DUF6 at the Paducah site. A

64

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 2 (ref. 1). The content of 235 U in DU is dependent on economics. If the cost of natural uranium feed is high relative to the cost of enrichment services, then a low 235 U...

66

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio. For several decades DOE was responsible for uranium enrichment, the uranium hexafluoride depleted in the 235U isotope (typically down...

67

FAQ 25-What are the options for managing depleted uranium in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

options for managing depleted uranium in the future? What are the options for managing depleted uranium in the future? The options for managing depleted uranium were evaluated in...

68

Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's DUF DOE's DUF 6 Cylinder Inventory a Location Number of Cylinders DUF 6 (MT) b Paducah, Kentucky 36,910 450,000 Portsmouth, Ohio 16,041 198,000 Oak Ridge (ETTP), Tennessee 4,683 56,000 Total 57,634 704,000 a The DOE inventory includes DUF 6 generated by the government, as well as DUF 6 transferred from U.S. Enrichment Corporation pursuant to two memoranda of agreement. b A metric ton (MT) is equal to 1,000 kilograms, or 2,200 pounds. Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce enriched uranium for U.S. national defense and civilian purposes. The gaseous diffusion process uses uranium in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), primarily because UF 6 can conveniently be used in

69

Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

FAQ 24-Who is responsible for managing depleted uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who is responsible for managing depleted uranium? Who is responsible for managing depleted uranium? In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing...

71

Depleted UF6 Conversion facility EIS Topics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topics Topics Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EIS Topics A listing of topics included in the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs. DOE addressed the following environmental issues when assessing the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives in the two site-specific EISs. DOE solicited comment from the Federal agencies, Native American tribes, state and local governments, and the general public on these and any other issues as part of the public scoping process: Potential impacts on health from DUF6 conversion activities, including potential impacts to workers and the public from exposure to radiation and chemicals during routine and accident conditions for the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of DUF6 conversion facilities.

72

Depleted Uranium Uses: Regulatory Requirements and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Depleted Uranium Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Regulatory Requirements Regulatory Requirements and Issues and Issues Nancy L. Ranek Nancy L. Ranek Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory August 5, 1998 August 5, 1998 Beneficial Reuse '98 Beneficial Reuse '98 Knoxville, TN Knoxville, TN NOTES Work Performed for: Office of Facilities (NE-40) Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed by: Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Phone: 202/488-2417 E-mail: ranekn@smtplink.dis.anl.gov 2 2 2 Programmatic Environmental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Impact Statement (PEIS) Draft PEIS Published 12/97 * Preferred Alternative = 100% Use

73

Uranio impoverito: perché? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of understanding the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

Germano D'Abramo

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility  

SciTech Connect

The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

Zagula, T.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Press Release: DOE Seeks Public Input for Depleted Uranium Hexafluorid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perry, (865) 576-0885 September 24, 2001 www.oakridge.doe.gov DOE SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT Public Meetings Planned in...

77

Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

Regulation of New Depleted Uranium Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-5 2-5 Regulation of New Depleted Uranium Uses Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The University of Chicago, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

79

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal  

SciTech Connect

During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete. Another possibility could be the use of depleted uranium for the blending of High enriched Uranium (HEU) or with Plutonium to MOX-elements. (authors)

Moeller, Kai D. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BFS, Postfach 10 01 49, D-38201 Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CRAD, Safety Basis - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Safety Basis - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to...

82

CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE...

83

CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

84

Depleted Uranium Dioxide as SNF Waste Package Fill: A Disposal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AS SNF WASTE PACKAGE FILL: A DISPOSAL OPTION Charles W. Forsberg Oak Ridge National Laboratory * P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6179 Tel: (865)...

85

Regulation of new depleted uranium uses.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates how the existing U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory structure and pending modifications would affect full deployment into radiologically uncontrolled areas of certain new depleted uranium (DU) uses being studied as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's DU uses research and development program. Such new DU uses include as catalysts (for destroying volatile organic compounds in off-gases from industrial processes and for hydrodesulfurization [HDS] of petroleum fuels), semiconductors (for fabricating integrated circuits, solar cells, or thermoelectric devices, especially if such articles are expected to have service in hostile environments), and electrodes (for service in solid oxide fuel cells, in photoelectrochemical cells used to produce hydrogen, and in batteries). The report describes each new DU use and provides a detailed analysis of whether any existing NRC licensing exemption or general license would be available to users of products and devices manufactured to deploy the new use. Although one existing licensing exemption was found to be possibly available for catalysts used for HDS of petroleum fuels and one general license was found to be possibly available for catalysts, semiconductors, and electrodes used in hydrogen production or batteries, existing regulations would require most users of products and devices deploying new DU uses to obtain specific source material licenses from the NRC or an Agreement State. This situation would not be improved by pending regulatory modifications. Thus, deployment of new DU uses may be limited because persons having no previous experience with NRC or Agreement State regulations may be hesitant to incur the costs and inconvenience of regulatory compliance, unless using a DU-containing product or device offers a substantial economic benefit over nonradioactive alternatives. Accordingly, estimating the risk of deploying new DU-containing products and devices in certain radiologically uncontrolled areas is recommended. If the estimated risks of such deployment are found to be acceptable, then it may be possible to justify adding new exemptions or general licenses to the NRC regulations.

Ranek, N. L.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotonically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

Forsberg, Charles W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Calculating Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Concentrations from Beta Activity Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the depleted uranium (DU) source term for the subsequent human health risk assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Correction factors for the disrupted equilibrium ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Alberth, David P.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

Ivan R. Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

Koller, Darcie D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, Ill, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cermet Waste Packages Using Depleted Uranium Dioxide and Steel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERMET WASTE PACKAGES USING DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AND STEEL CERMET WASTE PACKAGES USING DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AND STEEL Charles W. Forsberg Oak Ridge National Laboratory * P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 Tel: (865) 574-6783 Fax: (865) 574-9512 Email: forsbergcw@ornl.gov Manuscript Number: 078 File Name: DuCermet.HLWcon01.article.final Article Prepared for 2001 International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference American Nuclear Society Las Vegas, Nevada April 29-May 3, 2001 Limits: 1500 words; 3 figures Actual: 1450 words; 3 figures Session: 3.6 Disposal Container Materials and Designs The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution,

94

Uranio impoverito: perch'e? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of the author of understanding the reasons of the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

D'Abramo, G

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

FAQ 32-What are the potential health risks from conversion of depleted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? What are the potential health risks from conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? Accidental release of UF6 during processing activities could result in injuries. The most immediate hazard from a release would be lung injury or death from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when UF6 reacts with moisture in air. Uranyl fluoride is also formed. Uranyl fluoride is a particulate that can be dispersed in air and inhaled. Once inhaled, uranyl fluoride is easily absorbed into the bloodstream because it is soluble. If large quantities are inhaled, kidney toxicity will result. Conversion of uranium hexafluoride to oxide or metal may involve hazardous chemicals in addition to UF6; specifically, ammonia (NH3) may be used in the process, and HF may be produced from the process. In the PEIS, the conversion accidents estimated to have the largest potential consequences were accidents involving the rupture of tanks containing either anhydrous HF or ammonia. Such an accident could be caused by a large earthquake. The probability of large earthquakes depends on the location of the facility, and the probability of damage depends on the structural characteristics of the buildings. In the PEIS, the estimated frequency of this type of accident was less than once in one million years. However, if such an extremely unlikely accident did occur, it was estimated that up to 41,000 members of the general public around the conversion facility might experience adverse effects from chemical exposures (mostly mild and temporary effects, such as respiratory irritation or temporary decrease in kidney function). Of these, up to 1,700 individuals might experience irreversible adverse effects (such as lung damage or kidney damage), with the potential for about 30 fatalities. In addition, irreversible or fatal effects among workers very near the accident scene would be possible. (Note: The actual numbers of injuries among the general public would depend on the size and proximity of the population around the conversion facility).

96

Transpassive electrodissolution of depleted uranium in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

To aid in removal of oralloy from the nuclear weapons stockpile, scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility are decontaminating oralloy parts by electrodissolution in neutral to alkaline electrolytes composed of sodium nitrate and sodium sulfate. To improve the process, electrodissolution experiments were performed with depleted uranium to understand the effects of various operating parameters. Sufficient precipitate was also produced to evaluate the feasibility of using ultrafiltration to separate the uranium oxide precipitates from the electrolyte before it enters the decontamination fixture. In preparation for the experiments, a potential-pH diagram for uranium was constructed from thermodynamic data for fully hydrated species. Electrodissolution in unstirred solutions showed that uranium dissolution forms two layers, an acidic bottom layer rich in uranium and an alkaline upper layer. Under stirred conditions results are consistent with the formation of a yellow precipitate of composition UO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, a six electron process. Amperometric experiments showed that current efficiency remained near 100% over a wide range of electrolytes, electrolyte concentrations, pH, and stirring conditions.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Schake, A.R.; Morgan, A.N.; Purdy, G.M.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

98

Record of Decision for Long-term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record of Decision for Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Record of Decision SUMMARY: The Department of Energy ("DOE" or "the Department") issued the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (Final PEIS) on April 23, 1999. DOE has considered the environmental impacts, benefits, costs, and institutional and programmatic needs associated with the management and use of its approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ). DOE has decided to promptly convert the depleted UF 6 inventory to depleted uranium oxide, depleted uranium metal, or a combination of both. The depleted uranium oxide will be

99

Video: The Inside Story (of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Cylinder)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inside Story Inside Story The Inside Story The Inside Story (of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Cylinder) Probes are used to look at the inside of a Uranium Hexafluoride cylinder. The distribution and structure of the contents are discussed. View this Video in Real Player format Download free RealPlayer SP Highlights of the Video: Video 00:42 10 ton 48Xcylinder of UF6 Video 01:19 Liquid UF6 filling 95% of cylinder volume Video 02:15 Liquid UF6 Video 02:23 Beginning of UF6 phase change from liquid to solid Video 02:32 Solid UF6 Video 03:00 Probe and instrument to investigate inside cylinder Video 04:09 Workers preparing to insert TV camera probe into 48X cylinder containing 10 tons of solid UF6 Video 04:28 Inner surface of head of cylinder showing no corrosion

100

CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Management program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Training Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

102

Engineering Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Engineering Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memorandum is a product of Argonne's Environmental Assessment Division (EAD). For information on the division's scientific and engineering activities, contact: Director, Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois 60439-4832

103

Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Background Fact Sheet Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions At the direction of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, over many months, the Energy Department (DOE) has been working closely with Energy Northwest (ENW), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and USEC Inc. (USEC) to develop a plan to address the challenges at USEC's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) that advances America's national security interests, protects taxpayers, and provides benefits for TVA and the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) electric ratepayers and business operations. BPA is ENW's sole customer, purchasing 100 percent of ENW's Columbia Generating Station's electric power as part of BPA's overall

104

FAQ 16-How much depleted uranium hexafluoride is stored in the United  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How much depleted uranium hexafluoride is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium hexafluoride is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium hexafluoride is stored in the United States? U.S. DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 consists of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6, containing about 470,000 metric tons of uranium, currently stored at the Paducah Site in Kentucky, the Portsmouth Site in Ohio, and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Tennessee (formerly known as the K-25 Site). This inventory of depleted UF6 is stored in about 57,000 steel cylinders. The inventory is listed in the table below. DOE Inventory of Depleted UF6 Location Total Cylinders Total Depleted UF6 (metric tons) Paducah, Kentucky 36,191 436,400 Portsmouth, Ohio 16,109 195,800 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 4,822 54,300

105

Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

Goldberg, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Avci, H.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bradley, C.E. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

Gsponer, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Kr Ion Irradiation Study of the Depleted-Uranium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Fuel development for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor program is tasked with the development of new low-enriched uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing highly enriched uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion-type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel/cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel/cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Si, Al)3, (U, Mo)(Si, Al)3, UMo2Al20, U6Mo4Al43, and UAl4. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200ºC to ion doses up to 2.5 × 1015 ions/cm2 (~ 10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 1012 ions/cm2-sec (~ 4.0 × 10-3 dpa/sec). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

J. Gan; D. Keiser; B. Miller; M. Kirk; J. Rest; T. Allen; D. Wachs

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Kr ion irradiation study of the depleted-uranium alloys.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel development for the reduced enrichment research and test reactor (RERTR) program is tasked with the development of new low enrichment uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing high enrichment uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel-cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted-uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel-cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Al, Si){sub 3}, (U, Mo)(Al, Si){sub 3}, UMo{sub 2}Al{sub 20}, U{sub 6}Mo{sub 4}Al{sub 43} and UAl{sub 4}. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200 C to ion doses up to 2.5 x 10{sup 19} ions/m{sup 2} ({approx}10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}/s ({approx}4.0 x 10{sup -3} dpa/s). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Kirk, M. A.; Rest, J.; Allen, T. R.; Wachs, D. M. (Materials Science Division); (INL); (Univ. of Wisconsin)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Y-12 Site Office's programs for oversight of its contractors at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

110

Repository Applications: Potential Benefits of Using Depleted Uranium (DU)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repository Applications Repository Applications Repository Applications: Potential Benefits of Using Depleted Uranium (DU) in a Geological Repository The United States is investigating the Yucca Mountain (YM) site in Nevada for the disposal of radioactive spent nuclear fuel (SNF)—the primary waste from nuclear power plants. The SNF would be packaged and then emplaced 200 to 300 m underground in parallel disposal tunnels. The repository isolates the SNF from the biosphere until the radionuclides decay to safe levels. DU may improve the performance of geological repositories for disposal of SNF via three mechanisms: Radiation shielding for waste packages to protect workers Lowering the potential for long-term nuclear criticality in the repository Reducing the potential for releases of radionuclides from the SNF

111

Military use of depleted uranium assessment of prolonged population exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is an exposure assessment for a population living in an area contaminated by use of depleted uranium (DU) weapons. RESRAD 5.91 code is used to evaluate the average effective dose delivered from 1, 10, 20 cm depths of contaminated soil, in a residential farmer scenario. Critical pathway and group are identified in soil inhalation or ingestion and children playing with the soil, respectively. From available information on DU released on targeted sites, both critical and average exposure can leave to toxicological hazards; annual dose limit for population can be exceeded on short-term period (years) for soil inhalation. As a consequence, in targeted sites cleaning up must be planned on the basis of measured concentration, when available, while special cautions have to be adopted altogether to reduce unaware exposures, taking into account the amount of the avertable dose.

Giannardi, C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Biokinetics, Concentrations, and Doses  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal goals of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was to quantify and characterize DU aerosols generated inside armored vehicles by perforation with a DU penetrator. This study consequently produced a database in which the DU aerosol source terms were specified both physically and chemically for a variety of penetrator-impact geometries and conditions. These source terms were used to calculate radiation doses and uranium concentrations for various scenarios as part of the Capstone DU Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA). This paper describes the scenario-related biokinetics of uranium, and summarizes intakes, chemical concentrations to the organs, and E(50) and HT(50) for organs and tissues based on exposure scenarios for personnel in vehicles at the time of perforation as well as for first responders. For a given exposure scenario (duration time and breathing rates), the range of DU intakes among the target vehicles and shots was not large, about a factor of 10, with the lowest being from a ventilated operational Abrams tank and the highest being for an unventilated Abrams with DU penetrator perforating DU armor. The ranges of committed effective doses were more scenario-dependent than were intakes. For example, the largest range, a factor of 20, was shown for scenario A, a 1-min exposure, whereas, the range was only a factor of two for the first-responder scenario (E). In general, the committed effective doses were found to be in the tens of mSv. The risks ascribed to these doses are discussed separately.

Guilmette, Raymond A.; Miller, Guthrie; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Depleted Uranium Metal Microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel comes in many forms; oxide fuel is the most commonly used in current reactor systems while metal fuel is a promising fuel type for future reactors due to neutronic performance and increased thermal conductivity. As a key heat transfer parameter, thermal conductivity describes the heat transport properties of a material based upon the density, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity. A material’s ability to transport thermal energy through its structure is a measurable property known as thermal diffusivity; the units for thermal diffusivity are given in area per unit time (e.g., m2/s). Current measurement methods for thermal diffusivity include LASER (or light) Flash Analysis and the hot-wire method. This study examines an approach that combines these previous two methods to characterize the diffusivity of a packed bed of microspheres of depleted uranium (DU) metal, which have a nominal diameter of 250 micrometers. The new apparatus is designated as the Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA), and it induces a radial transient across a packed sample of microspheres then monitors the temperature profile using an array of thermocouples located at different distances from the source of the thermal transient. From the thermocouple data and an accurate time log, the thermal diffusivity of the sample may be calculated. Results indicate that DU microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer. At 500°C, the thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was 0.431 ± 13% W/m-K compared to approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal. Characterization of the developed apparatus revealed a method that may be useful for measuring the thermal diffusivity of powders and liquids.

Humrickhouse, Carissa Joy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Attainable Burnup in a LIFE Engine Loaded with Depleted Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) system uses a laser-based fusion source for electricity production. The (D,T) reaction, beside a pure fusion system, allows the option to drive a sub-critical fission blanket in order to increase the total energy gain. In a typical fusion-fission LIFE engine the fission blanket is a spherical shell around the fusion source, preceded by a beryllium shell for neutron multiplications by means of (n,2n) reactions. The fuel is in the form of TRISO particles dispersed in carbon pebbles, cooled by flibe. The optimal design features 80 cm thick blanket, 16 cm multiplier, and 20% TRISO packing factor. A blanket loaded with depleted uranium and depleted in a single batch with continuous mixing can achieve burnup as high as {approx}85% FIMA while generating 2,000 MW of total thermal power and producing enough tritium to be used for fusion. A multi-segment blanket with a central promotion shuffling scheme enhances burnup to {approx}90% FIMA, whereas a blanket that is operated with continuous refueling achieves only 82% FIMA under the same constraints of thermal power and tritium self-sufficiency. Both, multi-segment and continuous refueling eliminate the need for a fissile breeding phase.

Fratoni, M; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effect of twinning on texture evolution of depleted uranium using a viscoplastic self-consistent model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ductility and fracture toughness is a major stumbling block in using depleted uranium as a structural material. The ability to correctly model deformation of uranium can be used to create process path methods to improve its structural design ability. The textural evolution of depleted uranium was simulated using a visco-plastic self consistent model and analyzed by comparing pole figures of the simulations and experimental samples. Depleted uranium has the same structure as alpha uranium, which is an orthorhombic phase of uranium. Both deformation slip and twin systems were compared. The VPSC model was chosen to simulate this material because the model encompasses both low-symmetry materials as well as twinning in materials. This is of particular interest since depleted uranium has a high propensity for twinning, which dominates deformation and texture evolution. Simulated results were compared to experimental results to measure the validity of the model. One specific twin system, the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin, was of specific notice. The VPSC model was used to simulate the influence of this twin on depleted uranium and was compared with a mechanically shocked depleted uranium sample. Under high strain rate shock deformation conditions, the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin system appears to be a dominant deformation system. By simulating a compression process using the VPSC model with the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin as the dominant deformation mode, a favorable comparison could be made between the experimental and simulated textures. (authors)

Ho, J.; Garmestani, H. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Burrell, R.; Belvin, A. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, D. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); McDowell, D. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Rollett, A. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Proposal concerning the participation of CERN in the procurement of depleted-uranium sheets for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal concerning the participation of CERN in the procurement of depleted-uranium sheets for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management system--a decision tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management System (DMS) is being developed as a decision tool to provide cost and risk data for evaluation of short-and long-term management strategies for depleted uranium. It can be used to assist decision makers on a programmatic or site-specific level. Currently, the DMS allows evaluation of near-term cylinder management strategies such as storage yard improvements, cylinder restocking, and reconditioning. The DMS has been designed to provide the user with maximum flexibility for modifying data and impact factors (e.g., unit costs and risk factors). Sensitivity analysis can be performed on all key parameters such as cylinder corrosion rate, inspection frequency, and impact factors. Analysis may be conducted on a system-wide, site, or yard basis. The costs and risks from different scenarios may be compared in graphic or tabular format. Ongoing development of the DMS will allow similar evaluation of long-term management strategies such as conversion to other chemical forms. The DMS is a Microsoft Windows 3.1 based, stand-alone computer application. It can be operated on a 486 or faster computer with VGA, 4 MB of RAM, and 10 MB of disk space.

Gasper, J.R.; Sutter, R.J.; Avci, H.I. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Dupoly process for treatment of depleted uranium and production of beneficial end products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process of encapsulating depleted uranium by forming a homogenous mixture of depleted uranium and molten virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer into desired shapes. Separate streams of depleted uranium and virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer are simultaneously subjected to heating and mixing conditions. The heating and mixing conditions are provided by a thermokinetic mixer, continuous mixer or an extruder and preferably by a thermokinetic mixer or continuous mixer followed by an extruder. The resulting DUPoly shapes can be molded into radiation shielding material or can be used as counter weights for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships, missiles, armor or projectiles.

Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Adams, Jay W. (Stony Brook, NY); Lageraaen, Paul R. (Seaford, NY); Cooley, Carl R. (Gaithersburg, MD)

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation for the Paducah Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation for the Paducah Site in Support of Site-Specific NEPA Requirements for Continued Cylinder Storage, Cylinder Preparation, Conversion, and Long-Term Storage Activities Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memorandum is a product of Argonne's Environmental Assessment Division (EAD). For information on the division's scientific and engineering

120

Uranium Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enrichment Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Uranium Enrichment A description of the uranium enrichment process, including gaseous...

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121

Public Involvement Opportunities for the DUF6 Conversion Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Comment Form The public comment period for the Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted...

122

Radiological Risk Assessment of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of the health risk from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium (DU) is an important outcome of the Capstone aerosol studies that established exposure ranges to personnel in armored combat vehicles perforated by DU munitions. Although the radiation exposure from DU is low, there is concern that DU deposited in the body may increase cancer rates. Radiation doses to various organs of the body resulting from the inhalation of DU aerosols measured in the Capstone studies were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Organs and tissues with the highest calculated committed equivalent 50-yr doses were lung and extrathoracic tissues (nose and nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, mouth and thoracic lymph nodes). Doses to the bone surface and kidney were about 5 to 10% of the doses to the extrathoracic tissues. The methodologies of the ICRP International Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) were used for determining the whole body cancer risk. Organ-specific risks were estimated using ICRP and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodologies. Risks for crewmembers and first responders were determined for selected scenarios based on the time interval of exposure and for vehicle and armor type. The lung was the organ with the highest cancer mortality risk, accounting for about 97% of the risks summed from all organs. The highest mean lifetime risk for lung cancer for the scenario with the longest exposure time interval (2 h) was 0.42%. This risk is low compared with the natural or background risk of 7.35%. These risks can be significantly reduced by using an existing ventilation system (if operable) and by reducing personnel time in the vehicle immediately after perforation.

Hahn, Fletcher; Roszell, Laurie E.; Daxon, Eric G.; Guilmette, Ray A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package fill materials  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium dioxide fill inside the waste package creates the potential for significant improvements in package performance based on uranium geochemistry, reduces the potential for criticality in a repository, and consumes DU inventory. As a new concept, significant uncertainties exist: fill properties, impacts on package design, post- closure performance.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix D: Environmental Synopsis for the Depleted UF6 Conversion Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX D: ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT Environmental Synopsis D-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT (Solicitation No. DE-RP05-01OR22717) October 2002 Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Prepared for Office of Site Closure - Oak Ridge Office (EM-32) Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. October 2002 iii CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 1 2 BACKGROUND.............................................................................................................

125

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix D: Environmental Synopsis for the Depleted UF6 Conversion Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX D: ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT Environmental Synopsis D-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT (Solicitation No. DE-RP05-01OR22717) October 2002 Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Prepared for Office of Site Closure - Oak Ridge Office (EM-32) Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. October 2002 iii CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 1 2 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................. 3 3

126

Depleted-Uranium Uses R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

curve, indicating that one should be able to use uranium oxides to make very efficient solar cells, semiconductors, or other electronic devices. Figure 3 shows the ideal solar...

127

FAQ 15-What are the dimensions of a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the dimensions of a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder? are the dimensions of a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder? What are the dimensions of a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder? Several different cylinder types are in use, although the vast majority of cylinders are designed to contain 14-tons (12-metric tons) of depleted UF6. The 14-ton-capacity cylinders are 12 ft (3.7 m) long by 4 ft (1.2 m) in diameter, with most having an initial wall thickness of 5/16 in. (0.79 cm) of steel. The cylinders have external stiffening rings that provide support. Lifting lugs for handling are attached to the stiffening rings. A small percentage of the cylinders have skirted ends (extensions of the cylinder walls past the rounded ends of the cylinder). Each cylinder has a single valve for filling and emptying located on one end at the 12 o'clock position. Similar, but slightly smaller, cylinders designed to contain 10 tons (9 metric tons) of depleted UF6 are also in use. Cylinders are manufactured in accordance with an American National Standards Institute standard (ANSI N14.1, American National Standard for Nuclear Materials - Uranium Hexafluoride - Packaging for Transport) as specified in 49 CFR 173.420, the federal regulations governing transport of depleted UF6.

128

Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

HIGH-DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE S.G. Ermichev, V.I. Shapovalov, N.V.Sviridov (RFNC-VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia) V.K. Orlov, V.M. Sergeev, A. G. Semyenov, A.M. Visik, A.A. Maslov, A. V. Demin, D.D. Petrov, V.V. Noskov, V. I. Sorokin, O. I. Uferov (VNIINM, Moscow, Russia) L. Dole (ORNL, Oak Ridge, USA) Abstract - Russia is researching the production and testing of concretes with ceramic aggregate based on depleted uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). These DU concretes are to be used as structural and radiation-shielded material for casks for A-plant spent nuclear fuel transportation and storage. This paper presents the results of studies aimed at selection of ceramics and concrete composition, justification of their production technology, investigation of mechanical properties, and chemical stability.

130

Summary of the engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is reviewing ideas for the long-term management and use of its depleted uranium hexafluoride. DOE owns about 560,000 metric tons (over a billion pounds) of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This material is contained in steel cylinders located in storage yards near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. On November 10, 1994, DOE announced its new Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program by issuing a Request for Recommendations and an Advance Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (59 FR 56324 and 56325). The first part of this program consists of engineering, costs and environmental impact studies. Part one will conclude with the selection of a long-term management plan or strategy. Part two will carry out the selected strategy.

Dubrin, J.W., Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

NEPA Activities for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETTP) to some other stable chemical form acceptable for transportation, beneficial usereuse, andor disposal. Conversion facilities will be constructed at Paducah and...

132

Comparative study of femtosecond and nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

We present spectra of depleted uranium metal from laser plasmas generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and femtosecond Ti:sapphire (800 nm) laser pulses. The latter pulses produce short-lived and relatively cool plasmas in comparison to the longer pulses, and the spectra of neutral uranium atoms appear immediately after excitation. Evidence for nonequilibrium excitation with femtosecond pulses is found in the dependence of spectral line intensities on the pulse chirp.

Emmert, Luke A.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.; Cremers, David A.; Jones, C. Randy; Rudolph, Wolfgang

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

DOE/EA-1607: Final Environmental Assessment for Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium (June 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

μCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter μCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter MAP mitigation action plan MEI maximally exposed individual mg/kg milligrams per kilogram mrem millirem mSv millisievert MT metric ton MTCA Model Toxics Control Act MTU metric tons of uranium N/A not applicable Final Environmental Assessment: Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium vi NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NEF National Enrichment Facility NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NU natural uranium NUF 6 natural uranium hexafluoride pCi/g picocuries per gram PEIS programmatic environmental impact statement PM 2.5 particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less PM 10 particulate matter with a diameter of 10 microns or less

134

BLENDING LOW ENRICHED URANIUM WITH DEPLETED URANIUM TO CREATE A SOURCE MATERIAL ORE THAT CAN BE PROCESSED FOR THE RECOVERY OF YELLOWCAKE AT A CONVENTIONAL URANIUM MILL  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex, there are a number of streams of low enriched uranium (LEU) that contain various trace contaminants. These surplus nuclear materials require processing in order to meet commercial fuel cycle specifications. To date, they have not been designated as waste for disposal at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, with no commercial outlet available, the DOE is evaluating treatment and disposal as the ultimate disposition path for these materials. This paper will describe an innovative program that will provide a solution to DOE that will allow disposition of these materials at a cost that will be competitive with treatment and disposal at the NTS, while at the same time recycling the material to recover a valuable energy resource (yellowcake) for reintroduction into the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUSA) and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) have entered into a commercial relationship to pursue the development of this program. The program involves the design of a process and construction of a plant at NFS' site in Erwin, Tennessee, for the blending of contaminated LEU with depleted uranium (DU) to produce a uranium source material ore (USM Ore{trademark}). The USM Ore{trademark} will then be further processed at IUC's White Mesa Mill, located near Blanding, Utah, to produce conventional yellowcake, which can be delivered to conversion facilities, in the same manner as yellowcake that is produced from natural ores or other alternate feed materials. The primary source of feed for the business will be the significant sources of trace contaminated materials within the DOE complex. NFS has developed a dry blending process (DRYSM Process) to blend the surplus LEU material with DU at its Part 70 licensed facility, to produce USM Ore{trademark} with a U235 content within the range of U235 concentrations for source material. By reducing the U235 content to source material levels in this manner, the material will be suitable for processing at a conventional uranium mill under its existing Part 40 license to remove contaminants and enable the product to re-enter the commercial fuel cycle. The tailings from processing the USM Ore{trademark} at the mill will be permanently disposed of in the mill's tailings impoundment as 11e.(2) byproduct material. Blending LEU with DU to make a uranium source material ore that can be returned to the nuclear fuel cycle for processing to produce yellowcake, has never been accomplished before. This program will allow DOE to disposition its surplus LEU and DU in a cost effective manner, and at the same time provide for the recovery of valuable energy resources that would be lost through processing and disposal of the materials. This paper will discuss the nature of the surplus LEU and DU materials, the manner in which the LEU will be blended with DU to form a uranium source material ore, and the legal means by which this blending can be accomplished at a facility licensed under 10 CFR Part 70 to produce ore that can be processed at a conventional uranium mill licensed under 10 CFR Part 40.

Schutt, Stephen M.; Hochstein, Ron F.; Frydenlund, David C.; Thompson, Anthony J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size  

SciTech Connect

During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time particularly within the first minute after the shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% 30 min after perforation. In the Bradley vehicle, the initial (and maximum) uranium concentration was lower than those observed in the Abrams tank and decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in the cyclone samplers, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h post perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages from the Abrams tank tests ranged from 38% to 72% and, in most cases, varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Results with the Bradley vehicle ranged from 18% to 29% and were not specifically correlated with particle size.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Traub, Richard J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Metallography of pitted aluminum-clad, depleted uranium fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The storage of aluminum-clad fuel and target materials in the L-Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site for more than 5 years has resulted in extensive pitting corrosion of these materials. In many cases the pitting corrosion of the aluminum clad has penetrated in the uranium metal core, resulting in the release of plutonium, uranium, cesium-137, and other fission product activity to the basin water. In an effort to characterize the extent of corrosion of the Mark 31A target slugs, two unirradiated slug assemblies were removed from basin storage and sent to the Savannah River Technology Center for evaluation. This paper presents the results of the metallography and photographic documentation of this evaluation. The metallography confirmed that pitting depths varied, with the deepest pit found to be about 0.12 inches (3.05 nun). Less than 2% of the aluminum cladding was found to be breached resulting in less than 5% of the uranium surface area being affected by corrosion. The overall integrity of the target slug remained intact.

Nelson, D.Z.; Howell, J.P.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

D0 Decomissioning : Storage of Depleted Uranium Modules Inside D0 Calorimeters after the Termination of D0 Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dzero liquid Argon calorimeters contain hadronic modules made of depleted uranium plates. After the termination of DO detector's operation, liquid Argon will be transferred back to Argon storage Dewar, and all three calorimeters will be warmed up. At this point, there is no intention to disassemble the calorimeters. The depleted uranium modules will stay inside the cryostats. Depleted uranium is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. It is slightly radioactive, emits alpha, beta and gamma radiation. External radiation hazards are minimal. Alpha radiation has no external exposure hazards, as dead layers of skin stop it; beta radiation might have effects only when there is a direct contact with skin; and gamma rays are negligible - levels are extremely low. Depleted uranium is a pyrophoric material. Small particles (such as shavings, powder etc.) may ignite with presence of Oxygen (air). Also, in presence of air and moisture it can oxidize. Depleted uranium can absorb moisture and keep oxidizing later, even after air and moisture are excluded. Uranium oxide can powder and flake off. This powder is also pyrographic. Uranium oxide may create health problems if inhaled. Since uranium oxide is water soluble, it may enter the bloodstream and cause toxic effects.

Sarychev, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assessing the Renal Toxicity of Capstone Depleted Uranium Oxides and Other Uranium Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The primary target for uranium toxicity is the kidney. The most frequently used guideline for uranium kidney burdens is the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) value of 3 µg U/g kidney, a value that is based largely upon chronic studies in animals. In the present effort, we have developed a risk model equation to assess potential outcomes of acute uranium exposure. Twenty-seven previously published case studies in which workers were acutely exposed to soluble compounds of uranium (as a result of workplace accidents) were analyzed. Kidney burdens of uranium for these individuals were determined based on uranium in the urine, and correlated with health effects observed over a period of up to 38 years. Based upon the severity of health effects, each individual was assigned a score (- to +++) and then placed into an Effect Group. A discriminant analysis was used to build a model equation to predict the Effect Group based on the amount of uranium in the kidneys. The model equation was able to predict the Effect Group with 85% accuracy. The risk model was used to predict the Effect Group for Soldiers exposed to DU as a result of friendly fire incidents during the 1991 Gulf War. This model equation can also be used to predict the Effect Group of new cases in which acute exposures to uranium have occurred.

Roszell, Laurie E.; Hahn, Fletcher; Lee, Robyn B.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

Slurry calcination process for conversion of aqueous uranium and plutonium to a mixed oxide powder  

SciTech Connect

Pilot plant studies indicate that a slurry calcination process for conversion of uranium and plutonium solutions to a mixed oxide powder can be operated at a plant scale.

Jones, M K; Jenkins, W J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Design of Transport Casks with Depleted Uranium Gamma Shield and Advanced Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Casks with Depleted Uranium Gamma Shield and Advanced Safety Transport Casks with Depleted Uranium Gamma Shield and Advanced Safety Matveev V.Z., Morenko A.I., Shapovalov V.I. Russian Federal Nuclear Center - All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 37 Mira Prospect, Sarov, Russia, 607190, matveev@vniief.ru Maslov A.A., Orlov V.K., Semenov A.G., Sergeev V.M., Yuferov O.I., Visik A.M. Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 5-A Rogova street, p.b. 369, Moscow, Russia, 123060, majul2000@mail.ru Abstract - The report is dedicated to a problem of creation of a new generation of dual-purpose transport packing complete sets (TPCS) 1 with advanced safety. These sets are intended for transportation and storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies (SNFA) 2 of VVER reactors and spent spark elements (SSE)

142

Methods Used to Calculate Doses Resulting from Inhalation of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methods used to calculate radiological and toxicological doses to hypothetical persons inside either a United States Army Abrams tank or Bradley Fighting Vehicle that has been perforated by depleted uranium munitions is described. Data from time- and particle-size-resolved measurements of depleted uranium aerosol as well as particle-size resolved measurements of aerosol solubility in lung fluids for aerosol produced in the breathing zones of the hypothetical occupants were used. The aerosol was approximated as a mixture of nine monodisperse (single particle size) components corresponding to particle size increments measured by the eight stages plus backup filter of the cascade impactors used. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Bayesian analysis technique was employed, which straightforwardly calculates the uncertainties in doses. Extensive quality control checking of the various computer codes used is described.

Miller, Guthrie; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Traub, Richard J.; Little, Thomas T.; Guilmette, Ray A.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Summary of the Preliminary Analysis of Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a preliminary special analysis of the Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream (SVRSURANIUM03, Revision 2). The analysis is considered preliminary because a final waste profile has not been submitted for review. The special analysis is performed to determine the acceptability of the waste stream for shallow land burial at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream requires a special analysis because the waste stream’s sum of fractions exceeds one. The 99Tc activity concentration is 98 percent of the NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria and the largest single contributor to the sum of fractions.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

144

Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances. The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment. Operation Allied Force (OAF) has been going on for weeks in Yugoslavia with grave environmental consequences in the neighboring countries. Unfortunately, the sophisticated weapons that are being used carry the spectrum of radiological contamination. Over the past decades there has been a tremendous effort in weapons laboratories to use depleted uranium

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vitaly T. Gotovchikov a , Victor A. Seredenko a , Valentin V. Shatalov a , Vladimir N. Kaplenkov a , Alexander S. Shulgin a , Vladimir K. Saranchin a , Michail A. Borik a∗ , Charles W. Forsberg b , All-Russian Research Institute of Chemical Technology (ARRICT) 33, Kashirskoe ave., Moscow, Russia, 115409, E-mail: chem.conv@ru.net Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Bethel Wall Road, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6165, Oak Ridge, TN, USA, 37831 Abstract - Induction cold crucible melters (ICCM) have the potential to be a very-low-cost high-throughput method for the production of DUO 2 for SNF casks. The proposed work would develop these melters for this specific application. If a

146

Development of a Novel Depleted Uranium Treatment Process at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-stage process was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to treat potentially pyrophoric depleted uranium metal wastes. The three-stage process includes waste sorting/rinsing, acid dissolution of the waste metal with a hydrochloric and phosphoric acid solution, and solidification of the neutralized residuals from the second stage with clay. The final product is a solid waste form that can be transported to and disposed of at a permitted low-level radioactive waste disposal site.

Gates-Anderson, D; Bowers, J; Laue, C; Fitch, T

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package invert and backfill materials  

SciTech Connect

A new technology has been proposed in which depleted uranium, in the form of oxides or silicates, is placed around the outside of the spent nuclear fuel waste packages in the geological repository. This concept may (1) reduce the potential for repository nuclear criticality events and (2) reduce long-term release of radionuclides from the repository. As a new concept, there are significant uncertainties.

Forsberg, C.W.; Haire, M.J.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Documents: DUF6 Conversion EIS Supporting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUF6 Conversion EIS DUF6 Conversion EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents NEPA Compliance: DUF6 Conversion EIS Supporting Documents PDF Icon Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project 38 KB details PDF Icon Press Release: DOE Seeks Public Input for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Environmental Impact Statement 90 KB details PDF Icon Advance Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 52 KB details PDF Icon Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 60 KB details PDF Icon Overview: Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Management Program

149

Use of depleted uranium metal as cask shielding in high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal systems  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE has amassed over 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium from its uranium enrichment operations. Rather than dispose of this depleted uranium as waste, this study explores a beneficial use of depleted uranium as metal shielding in casks designed to contain canisters of vitrified high-level waste. Two high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal shielded cask systems are analyzed. The first system employs a shielded storage and disposal cask having a separate reusable transportation overpack. The second system employs a shielded combined storage, transport, and disposal cask. Conceptual cask designs that hold 1, 3, 4 and 7 high-level waste canisters are described for both systems. In all cases, cask design feasibility was established and analyses indicate that these casks meet applicable thermal, structural, shielding, and contact-handled requirements. Depleted uranium metal casting, fabrication, environmental, and radiation compatibility considerations are discussed and found to pose no serious implementation problems. About one-fourth of the depleted uranium inventory would be used to produce the casks required to store and dispose of the nearly 15,400 high-level waste canisters that would be produced. This study estimates the total-system cost for the preferred 7-canister storage and disposal configuration having a separate transportation overpack would be $6.3 billion. When credits are taken for depleted uranium disposal cost, a cost that would be avoided if depleted uranium were used as cask shielding material rather than disposed of as waste, total system net costs are between $3.8 billion and $5.5 billion.

Yoshimura, H.R.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; McAllaster, M.E. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Characterization of options and their analysis requirements for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining alternative strategies for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) currently stored at the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, and on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This paper describes the methodology for the comprehensive and ongoing technical analysis of the options being considered. An overview of these options, along with several of the suboptions being considered, is presented. The long-term management strategy alternatives fall into three broad categories: use, storage, or disposal. Conversion of the depleted UF6 to another form such as oxide or metal is needed to implement most of these alternatives. Likewise, transportation of materials is an integral part of constructing the complete pathway between the current storage condition and ultimate disposition. The analysis of options includes development of pre-conceptual designs; estimates of effluents, wastes, and emissions; specification of resource requirements; and preliminary hazards assessments. The results of this analysis will assist DOE in selecting a strategy by providing the engineering information necessary to evaluate the environmental impacts and costs of implementing the management strategy alternatives.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rosen, R.S.; Zoller, J.N.; Harri, J.W.; Schwertz, N.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Aerosol Sampling System for Collection of Capstone Depleted Uranium Particles in a High-Energy Environment  

SciTech Connect

The Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a kinetic-energy cartridge with a large-caliber depleted uranium (DU) penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post-impact, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the vehicle commander, loader, gunner, and driver. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for depleted uranium concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol.

Holmes, Thomas D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Hoover, Mark D.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols II: Particle Size Distributions as a Function of Time  

SciTech Connect

The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing depleted uranium from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluated particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using beta spectrometry, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements was quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 um and a large size mode between 2 and 15 um. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 um shortly after perforation to around 1 um at the end of the 2-hr sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles.

Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances . The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment.

Liolios, T E

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols III: Morphologic and Chemical Oxide Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against an armored target causes erosion and fragmentation of the penetrators, the extent of which is dependent on the thickness and material composition of the target. Vigorous oxidation of the DU particles and fragments creates an aerosol of DU oxide particles and DU particle agglomerations combined with target materials. Aerosols from the Capstone DU aerosol study, in which vehicles were perforated by DU penetrators, were evaluated for their oxidation states using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and particle morphologies using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS). The oxidation state of a DU aerosol is important as it offers a clue to its solubility in lung fluids. The XRD analysis showed that the aerosols evaluated were a combination primarily of U3O8 (insoluble) and UO3 (relatively more soluble) phases, though intermediate phases resembling U4O9 and other oxides were prominent in some samples. Analysis of particle residues in the micrometer-size range by SEM/EDS provided microstructural information such as phase composition and distribution, fracture morphology, size distribution, and material homogeneity. Observations from SEM analysis show a wide variability in the shapes of the DU particles. Some of the larger particles appear to have been fractured (perhaps as a result of abrasion and comminution); others were spherical, occasionally with dendritic or lobed surface structures. Amorphous conglomerates containing metals other than uranium were also common, especially with the smallest particle sizes. A few samples seemed to contain small chunks of nearly pure uranium metal, which were verified by EDS to have a higher uranium content exceeding that expected for uranium oxides. Results of the XRD and SEM/EDS analyses were used in other studies described in this issue of The Journal of Health Physics to interpret the results of lung solubility studies and in selecting input parameters for dose assessments.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Gold, Kenneth; Arey, Bruce W.; Jenson, Evan D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 calorimeter upgrading

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of 5 mm depleted-uranium plates for the UA1 experiment

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Summary of the cost analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the Cost Analysis Report which provides comparative cost data for the management strategy alternatives. The PEIS and the Cost Analysis Report will help DOE select a management strategy. The Record of Decision, expected in 1998, will complete the first part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The second part of the Program will look at specific sites and technologies for carrying out the selected strategy. The Cost Analysis Report estimates the primary capital and operating costs for the different alternatives. It reflects the costs of technology development construction of facilities, operation, and decontamination and decommissioning. It also includes potential revenues from the sale of by-products such as anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (ABF). These estimates are based on early designs. They are intended to help in comparing alternatives, rather than to indicate absolute costs for project budgets or bidding purposes. More detailed estimates and specific funding sources will be considered in part two of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Conclusions of the Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rationale for the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Program and its results and applications have been examined in the previous 13 articles of this special issue. This paper summarizes the results and discusses its successes and lessons learned. The robust data from the Capstone DU Aerosol Study have provided a sound basis for assessing the inhalation exposure to DU aerosols and the dose and risk to personnel in combat vehicles at the time of perforation and to those entering immediately after perforation. The Human Health Risk Assessment provided a technically sound process for evaluating chemical and radiological doses and risks from DU aerosol exposure using well-accepted biokinetic and dosimetric models innovatively applied. An independent review of the study process and results is summarized, and recommendations for possible avenues of future study by the authors and by other major reviews of DU health hazards are provided.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

Assessing the risk from the depleted Uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern due to the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study some worst-case scenaria are assumed in order to assess the risk for Yugoslavia and its neighboring countries. The risk is proved to be negligible for the neighboring countries while for Yugoslavia itself evidence is given that any increase in total long-term cancer mortality will be so low that it will remain undetected. Local radioactive hotspots such as DU weapons fragments and abandoned battle tanks, fortified or contaminated with DU, constitute a post-war hazard which is not studied in this article.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Oxidation of depleted uranium penetrators and aerosol dispersal at high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Aerosols dispersed from depleted uranium penetrators exposed to air and air-CO/sub 2/ mixtures at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000/sup 0/C for 2- or 4-h periods were characterized. These experiments indicated dispersal of low concentrations of aerosols in the respirable size range (typically <10/sup -3/% of penetrator mass at 223 cm/s (5 mph) windspeed). Oxidation was maximum at 700/sup 0/C in air and 800/sup 0/C in 50% air-50% CO/sub 2/, indicating some self-protection developed at higher temperatures. No evidence of self-sustained burning was observed, although complete oxidation can be expected in fires significantly exceeding 4 h, the longest exposure of this series. An outdoor burning experiment using 10 batches of pine wood and paper packing material as fuel caused the highest oxidation rate, probably accelerated by disruption of the oxide layer accompanying broad temperature fluctuation as each fuel batch was added.

Elder, J.C.; Tinkle, M.C.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Process for Reducing the Licensing Burden for New Products Containing Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-01 3-01 A Process for Reducing the Licensing Burden for New Products Containing Depleted Uranium Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The University of Chicago, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

162

Delayed neutron measurements for Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron emission rates from five very pure actinide samples (Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium) were measured following equilibrium irradiation in fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The relative abundances (alphas) for the first four groups were calculated from the delayed neutron emission (counts vs. time) data using Keepin's 6-group decay constants (lambdas) for Th-232, Pu-239 and depleted uranium (both fast and thermal neutron induced fissions). The relative abundances (alphas) for the first five groups were calculated for the fast neutron induced fission of Np-237 using the 7-group lambdas obtained by Charlton (1997). The relative abundances for the first five groups were also calculated using the 7-group lambdas proposed by Loaiza and Haskin (2000), the 8-group lambdas proposed by Campbell and Spriggs (1998) and the 8-group lambdas proposed by Piksaikin (2000) for all of the samples (fast neutron induced fission only for Th-232 and Np-237, fast and thermal neutron induced fission for the remainder). Fission product yield and delayed neutron emission probability data from the ENDF-349 and JEF 2.2 nuclear data libraries were also used to simulate neutron emission data from the samples. The calculated neutron yield curves were used to obtain group relative abundances for each of the five actinide samples (fast neutron induced fission only for Th-232 and Np-237, fast and thermal neutron induced fission for the remainder) based on each set of proposed lambdas. The relative abundances obtained from the experiments and calculations are compared and the differences are noted and discussed.

Stone, Joseph C.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Environmental acceptability of high-performance alternatives for depleted uranium penetrators  

SciTech Connect

The Army`s environmental strategy for investigating material substitution and management is to measure system environmental gains/losses in all phases of the material management life cycle from cradle to grave. This study is the first in a series of new investigations, applying material life cycle concepts, to evaluate whether there are environmental benefits from increasing the use of tungsten as an alternative to depleted uranium (DU) in Kinetic Energy Penetrators (KEPs). Current military armor penetrators use DU and tungsten as base materials. Although DU alloys have provided the highest performance of any high-density alloy deployed against enemy heavy armor, its low-level radioactivity poses a number of environmental risks. These risks include exposures to the military and civilian population from inhalation, ingestion, and injection of particles. Depleted uranium is well known to be chemically toxic (kidney toxicity), and workplace exposure levels are based on its renal toxicity. Waste materials containing DU fragments are classified as low-level radioactive waste and are regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These characteristics of DU do not preclude its use in KEPs. However, long-term management challenges associated with KEP deployment and improved public perceptions about environmental risks from military activities might be well served by a serious effort to identify, develop, and substitute alternative materials that meet performance objectives and involve fewer environmental risks. Tungsten, a leading candidate base material for KEPS, is potentially such a material because it is not radioactive. Tungsten is less well studied, however, with respect to health impacts and other environmental risks. The present study is designed to contribute to the understanding of the environmental behavior of tungsten by synthesizing available information that is relevant to its potential use as a penetrator.

Kerley, C.R.; Easterly, C.E.; Eckerman, K.F. [and others] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Thermal hydraulic limits analysis for the MIT Research Reactor low enrichment uranium core conversion using statistical propagation of parametric uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is evaluating the conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. In addition to the fuel element re-design from 15 to 18 plates per element, a reactor ...

Chiang, Keng-Yen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ZPR-3 Assembly 11 : A cylindrical sssembly of highly enriched uranium and depleted uranium with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 12 atom % and a depleted uranium reflector.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 11 (ZPR-3/11) was designed as a fast reactor physics benchmark experiment with an average core {sup 235}U enrichment of approximately 12 at.% and a depleted uranium reflector. Approximately 79.7% of the total fissions in this assembly occur above 100 keV, approximately 20.3% occur below 100 keV, and essentially none below 0.625 eV - thus the classification as a 'fast' assembly. This assembly is Fast Reactor Benchmark No. 8 in the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) Benchmark Specificationsa and has historically been used as a data validation benchmark assembly. Loading of ZPR-3 Assembly 11 began in early January 1958, and the Assembly 11 program ended in late January 1958. The core consisted of highly enriched uranium (HEU) plates and depleted uranium plates loaded into stainless steel drawers, which were inserted into the central square stainless steel tubes of a 31 x 31 matrix on a split table machine. The core unit cell consisted of two columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) HEU plates, six columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) depleted uranium plates and one column of 1.0 in.-wide (25.4 mm) depleted uranium plates. The length of each column was 10 in. (254.0 mm) in each half of the core. The axial blanket consisted of 12 in. (304.8 mm) of depleted uranium behind the core. The thickness of the depleted uranium radial blanket was approximately 14 in. (355.6 mm), and the length of the radial blanket in each half of the matrix was 22 in. (558.8 mm). The assembly geometry approximated a right circular cylinder as closely as the square matrix tubes allowed. According to the logbook and loading records for ZPR-3/11, the reference critical configuration was loading 10 which was critical on January 21, 1958. Subsequent loadings were very similar but less clean for criticality because there were modifications made to accommodate reactor physics measurements other than criticality. Accordingly, ZPR-3/11 loading 10 was selected as the only configuration for this benchmark. As documented below, it was determined to be acceptable as a criticality safety benchmark experiment. A very accurate transformation to a simplified model is needed to make any ZPR assembly a practical criticality-safety benchmark. There is simply too much geometric detail in an exact (as-built) model of a ZPR assembly, even a clean core such as ZPR-3/11 loading 10. The transformation must reduce the detail to a practical level without masking any of the important features of the critical experiment. And it must do this without increasing the total uncertain

Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; National Security; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Public Involvement Opportunities for the DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities Opportunities Public Involvement Opportunities The public comment period for the Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride is closed. Sorry! The public comment period for the Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride is closed. The public comment form is no longer available. For information on other public involvement opportunities, please visit Public Involvement Opportunities. Ways to Provide Comments Comments may be submitted via the Public Comment Form on this Web site. Comments can also be mailed to: DU Disposal Supplement Analysis Comment Argonne National Laboratory

167

Barriers and Issues Related to Achieving Final Disposition of Depleted Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 750,000 metric tons (MT) of surplus depleted uranium (DU) in various chemical forms are stored at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites throughout the United States. Most of the DU is in the form of DU hexafluoride (DUF6) that resulted from uranium enrichment operations over the last several decades. DOE plans to convert the DUF6 to ''a more stable form'' that could be any one or combination of DU tetrafluoride (DUF4 or green salt), DU oxide (DUO3, DUO2, or DU3O8), or metal depending on the final disposition chosen for any given quantity. Barriers to final disposition of this material have existed historically and some continue today. Currently, the barriers are more related to finding uses for this material versus disposing as waste. Even though actions are beginning to convert the DUF6, ''final'' disposition of the converted material has yet to be decided. Unless beneficial uses can be implemented, DOE plans to dispose of this material as waste. This expresses the main barrier to DU disposition; DOE's strategy is to dispose unless uses can be found while the strategy should be only dispose as a last resort and make every effort to find uses. To date, only minimal research programs are underway to attempt to develop non-fuel uses for this material. Other issues requiring resolution before these inventories can reach final disposition (uses or disposal) include characterization, disposal of large quantities, storage (current and future), and treatment options. Until final disposition is accomplished, these inventories must be managed in a safe and environmentally sound manner; however, this is becoming more difficult as materials and facilities age. The most noteworthy final disposition technical issues include the development of reuse and treatment options.

Gillas, D. L.; Chambers, B. K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Melting characteristics of the stainless steel generated from the uranium conversion plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partition ratio of cerium (Ce) and uranium (U) in the ingot, slag and dust phases has been investigated for the effect of the slag type, slag concentration and basicity in an electric arc melting process. An electric arc furnace (EAF) was used to melt the stainless steel wastes, simulated by uranium oxide and the real wastes from the uranium conversion plant in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The composition of the slag former used to capture the contaminants such as uranium, cerium, and cesium during the melt decontamination process generally consisted of silica (SiO{sub 2}), calcium oxide (CaO) and aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Also, Calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2} ), nickel oxide (NiO), and ferric oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added to provide an increase in the slag fluidity and oxidative potential. Cerium was used as a surrogate for the uranium because the thermochemical and physical properties of cerium are very similar to those of uranium. Cerium was removed from the ingot phase to slag phase by up to 99% in this study. The absorption ratio of cerium was increased with an increase of the amount of the slag former. And the maximum removal of cerium occurred when the basicity index of the slag former was 0.82. The natural uranium (UO{sub 2}) was partitioned from the ingot phase to the slag phase by up to 95%. The absorption of the natural uranium was considerably dependent on the basicity index of the slag former and the composition of the slag former. The optimum condition for the removal of the uranium was about 1.5 for the basicity index and 15 wt% of the slag former. According to the increase of the amount of slag former, the absorption of uranium oxide in the slag phase was linearly increased due to an increase of its capacity to capture uranium oxide within the slag phase. Through experiments with various slag formers, we verified that the slag formers containing calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and a high amount of silica were more effective for a melt decontamination of stainless steel wastes contaminated with uranium. During the melting tests with stainless steel wastes from the uranium conversion plant(UCP ) in KAERI, we found that the results of the uranium decontamination were very similar to those of the uranium oxide from the melting of stimulated metal wastes. (authors)

Choi, W.K.; Song, P.S.; Oh, W.Z.; Jung, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Min, B.Y. [Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-Dong, Yusung-Gu Taejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities  

SciTech Connect

A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Conversion of mixed plutonium-uranium oxides. [COPRECAL  

SciTech Connect

Coprocessing is among the several reprocessing schemes being considered to improve the proliferation resistance of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Coconversion of mixed oxides has been developed but not demonstrated on a production scale. AGNS developed a preliminary conceptual design for a production scale facility to convert mixed plutonium-uranium nitrate to the mixed oxide.

Thomas, L.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Determination of Depleted Uranium in Environmental Bio-monitor Samples and Soil from Target sites in Western Balkan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lichen and Moss are widely used to assess the atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and radionuclides. In this paper, we report results of uranium and its isotope ratios using mass spectrometric measurements (followed by chemical separation procedure) for mosses, lichens and soil samples from a depleted uranium (DU) target site in western Balkan region. Samples were collected in 2003 from Han Pijesak (Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Hercegovina). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show the presence of high concentration of uranium in some samples. Concentration of uranium in moss samples ranged from 5.2-755.43 Bq/Kg. We have determined {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratio using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) from the samples with high uranium content and the ratios are in the range of 0.002097-0.002380. TIMS measurement confirms presence of DU in some samples. However, we have not noticed any traces of DU in samples containing lesser amount of uranium or from any samples from the living environment of same area.

Sahoo, Sarata K.; Enomoto, Hiroko; Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ujic, Predrag; Celikovic, Igor; Zunic, Zora S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) PYRolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) is a shielding material consisting of depleted uranium UO2 or UC in either pellet...

173

CONVERSION RATIOS IN SLIGHTLY ENRICHED URANIUM, WATER MODERATED LATTICES  

SciTech Connect

An experiment is described in which the conversion ratios were measured using highly enriched U-Al foils as catchers. Data are included on the ratios of epi-cadmium to sub-cadmium fission rates of U/sup 235/ in l% enriched U light water moderated lattices, and on conversion ratios of 1% enriched U light water moderated lattices. (J.R.D.)

Tassan, S.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

low-enriched uranium related to NNSA's programs for down-blending surplus U.S. highly enriched uranium. Based on this analysis, Secretary Chu made a determination that the above...

175

CRAD, Radiological Controls- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

176

Conversion of the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to convert the UMR Reactor fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and to ship the HEU fuel back to the Department of Energy Savannah River Site. The actual core conversion was completed in the summer of 1992. The HEU fuel was offloaded to an onsite storage pit where it remained until July, 1996. In July, 1996, the HEU fuel was shipped to the DOE Savannah River Site. The objectives of the project have been achieved. DOE provided the following funding for the project. Several papers were published regarding the conversion project and are listed in the Attachment. In retrospect, the conversion project required much more time and effort than originally thought. Several difficulties were encountered including the unavailability of a shipping cask for several years. The authors are grateful for the generous funding provided by DOE for this project but wish to point out that much of their efforts on the conversion project went unfunded.

Bolon, A.E.; Straka, M.; Freeman, D.W.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Isotopic dilution of {sup 233}U with depleted uranium for criticality safety in processing and disposal  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of excess {sup 233}U as waste is being considered. Because {sup 233}U is a fissile material, a key requirement for processing {sup 233}U to a final waste form and disposing of it is the avoidance of nuclear criticality. For many processing and disposal options, isotopic dilution is the most feasible and preferred option to avoid nuclear criticality. Isotopic dilution is dilution of fissile {sup 233}U with nonfissile {sup 238}U. The use of isotopic dilution removes any need to control nuclear criticality in process or disposal facilities through geometry or chemical composition. Isotopic dilution allows the use of existing waste management facilities that are not designed for significant quantities of fissile materials to be used for processing and disposing of {sup 233}U. The amount of isotopic dilution required to reduce criticality concerns to reasonable levels was determined in this study to be approximately 0.53 wt % {sup 233}U. The numerical calculations used to define this limit consisted of a homogeneous system of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), water (H{sub 2}O), {sup 233}U and depleted uranium (DU) in which the ratio of each component was varied to learn the conditions of maximum nuclear reactivity. About 188 parts of DU (0.2 wt % {sup 235}U) are required to dilute 1 part of {sup 233}U to this limit in a water-moderated system with no SiO{sub 2} present. Thus for the U.S. inventory of {sup 233}U, several hundred metric tons of DU would be required for isotopic dilution.

Hopper, C.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Elam, K.R.; Forsberg, C.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

CRITICALITY CONTROL DURING THE DISMANTLING OF A URANIUM CONVERSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Within the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, in the Cadarache Research Center in southern France, the production at the Enriched Uranium Treatment Workshops started in 1965 and ended in 1995. The dismantling is in progress and will last until 2006. The decommissioning is planned in 2007. Since the authorized enrichment in 235U was 10% in some parts of the plant, and unlimited in others, the equipment and procedures were designed for criticality control during the operating period. Despite the best previous removing of the uranium in the inner parts of the equipment, evaluation of the mass of remaining fissile material by in site gamma spectrometry measurement shows that the safety of the ''clean up'' operations requires specific criticality control procedures, this mass being higher than the safe mass. The chosen method is therefore based on the mapping of fissile material in the contaminated parts of the equipment and on the respect of particular rules set for meeting the criticality control standards through mass control. The process equipment is partitioned in separated campaign, and for each campaign the equipment dismantling is conducted with a precise traceability of the pieces, from the equipment to the drum of waste, and the best final evaluation of the mass of fissile material in the drum. The first results show that the mass of uranium found in the dismantled equipment is less than the previous evaluation, and they enable us to confirm that the criticality was safely controlled during the operations. The mass of fissile material remaining in the equipment can be then carefully calculated, when it is lower than the minimal critical mass, and on the basis of a safety analysis, we will be free of any constraints regarding criticality control, this allowing to make procedures easier, and to speed up the operations.

LADURELLE, Laurent; LISBONNE, Pierre

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

180

Surface Decontamination of System Components in Uranium Conversion Plant at KAERI  

SciTech Connect

A chemical decontamination process using nitric acid solution was selected as in-situ technology for recycle or release with authorization of a large amount of metallic waste including process system components such as tanks, piping, etc., which is generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The applicability of nitric acid solution for surface decontamination of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds was evaluated through the basic research on the dissolution of UO2 and ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) powder. Decontamination performance was verified by using the specimens contaminated with such uranium compounds as UO2 and AUC taken from the uranium conversion plant. Dissolution rate of UO2 powder is notably enhanced by the addition of H2O2 as an oxidant even in the condition of a low concentration of nitric acid and low temperature compared with those in a nitric acid solution without H2O2. AUC powders dissolve easily in nitric acid solutions until the solution pH attains about 2.5 {approx} 3. Above that solution pH, however, the uranium concentration in the solution is lowered drastically by precipitation as a form of U3(NH3)4O9 . 5H2O. Decontamination performance tests for the specimens contaminated with UO2 and AUC were quite successful with the application of decontamination conditions obtained through the basic studies on the dissolution of UO2 and AUC powders.

Choi, W. K.; Kim, K. N.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys.

Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.H.; Myers, O.B.; Bestgen, H.T.; Jenkins, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Long-term criticality control in radioactive waste disposal facilities using depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

Plant photosynthesis has created a unique planetary-wide geochemistry - an oxidizing atmosphere with oxidizing surface waters on a planetary body with chemically reducing conditions near or at some distance below the surface. Uranium is four orders of magnitude more soluble under chemically oxidizing conditions than it is under chemically reducing conditions. Thus, uranium tends to leach from surface rock and disposal sites, move with groundwater, and concentrate where chemically reducing conditions appear. Earth`s geochemistry concentrates uranium and can separate uranium from all other elements except oxygen, hydrogen (in water), and silicon (silicates, etc). Fissile isotopes include {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and many higher actinides that eventually decay to one of these two uranium isotopes. The potential for nuclear criticality exists if the precipitated uranium from disposal sites has a significant fissile enrichment, mass, and volume. The earth`s geochemistry suggests that isotopic dilution of fissile materials in waste with {sup 238}U is a preferred strategy to prevent long-term nuclear criticality in and beyond the boundaries of waste disposal facilities because the {sup 238}U does not separate from the fissile uranium isotopes. Geological, laboratory, and theoretical data indicate that the potential for nuclear criticality can be minimized by diluting fissile materials with-{sup 238}U to 1 wt % {sup 235}U equivalent.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

Development of Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversion at Natural Uranium Conversion Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has focused on some source term modeling of uranyl nitrate (UN) as part of a comprehensive validation effort employing gamma-ray detector instrumentation for the detection of diversion from declared conversion activities. Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is purified and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexafluoride gas (UF6), has historically been excluded from the nuclear safeguards requirements of the 235U-based nuclear fuel cycle. The undeclared diversion of this product material could potentially provide feedstock for a clandestine weapons program for state or non-state entities. Given the changing global political environment and the increased availability of dual-use nuclear technology, the International Atomic Energy Agency has evolved its policies to emphasize safeguarding this potential feedstock material in response to dynamic and evolving potential diversion pathways. To meet the demand for instrumentation testing at conversion facilities, ORNL developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions of a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant. This work investigates gamma-ray signatures of UN circulating in the UNCLE facility and evaluates detector instrumentation sensitivity to UN for safeguards applications. These detector validation activities include assessing detector responses to the UN gamma-ray signatures for spectrometers based on sodium iodide, lanthanum bromide, and germanium detectors. The results of measurements under static and dynamic operating conditions at concentrations ranging from 10-90g U/L of naturally enriched UN will be presented. A range of gamma-ray lines was examined and self-attenuation factors were calculated, in addition to attenuation for transmission measurement of density, concentration and enrichment. A detailed uncertainty analysis will be presented providing insights into instrumentation limitations to spoofing.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Croft, Stephen [ORNL; McElroy, Robert Dennis [ORNL; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Cleveland, Steven L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Model of a Generic Natural Uranium Conversion Plant ? Suggested Measures to Strengthen International Safeguards  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report that closed a joint collaboration effort between DOE and the National Nuclear Energy Commission of Brazil (CNEN). In 2005, DOE and CNEN started a collaborative effort to evaluate measures that can strengthen the effectiveness of international safeguards at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP). The work was performed by DOE s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and CNEN. A generic model of a NUCP was developed and typical processing steps were defined. Advanced instrumentation and techniques for verification purposes were identified and investigated. The scope of the work was triggered by the International Atomic Energy Agency s 2003 revised policy concerning the starting point of safeguards at uranium conversion facilities. Prior to this policy only the final products of the uranium conversion plant were considered to be of composition and purity suitable for use in the nuclear fuel cycle and therefore, subject to the IAEA safeguards control. DOE and CNEN have explored options for implementing the IAEA policy, although Brazil understands that the new policy established by the IAEA is beyond the framework of the Quadripartite Agreement of which it is one of the parties, together with Argentina, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) and the IAEA. Two technical papers on this subject were published at the 2005 and 2008 INMM Annual Meetings.

Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia [ORNL; Begovich, John M [ORNL; Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ZPR-3 Assembly 6F : A spherical assembly of highly enriched uranium, depleted uranium, aluminum and steel with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 47 atom %.  

SciTech Connect

Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 6 consisted of six phases, A through F. In each phase a critical configuration was constructed to simulate a very simple shape such as a slab, cylinder or sphere that could be analyzed with the limited analytical tools available in the 1950s. In each case the configuration consisted of a core region of metal plates surrounded by a thick depleted uranium metal reflector. The average compositions of the core configurations were essentially identical in phases A - F. ZPR-3 Assembly 6F (ZPR-3/6F), the final phase of the Assembly 6 program, simulated a spherical core with a thick depleted uranium reflector. ZPR-3/6F was designed as a fast reactor physics benchmark experiment with an average core {sup 235}U enrichment of approximately 47 at.%. Approximately 81.4% of the total fissions in this assembly occur above 100 keV, approximately 18.6% occur below 100 keV, and essentially none below 0.625 eV - thus the classification as a 'fast' assembly. This assembly is Fast Reactor Benchmark No. 7 in the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) Benchmark Specifications and has historically been used as a data validation benchmark assembly. Loading of ZPR-3/6F began in late December 1956, and the experimental measurements were performed in January 1957. The core consisted of highly enriched uranium (HEU) plates, depleted uranium plates, perforated aluminum plates and stainless steel plates loaded into aluminum drawers, which were inserted into the central square stainless steel tubes of a 31 x 31 matrix on a split table machine. The core unit cell consisted of three columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) HEU plates, three columns of 0.125 in.-wide depleted uranium plates, nine columns of 0.125 in.-wide perforated aluminum plates and one column of stainless steel plates. The maximum length of each column of core material in a drawer was 9 in. (228.6 mm). Because of the goal to produce an approximately spherical core, core fuel and diluent column lengths generally varied between adjacent drawers and frequently within an individual drawer. The axial reflector consisted of depleted uranium plates and blocks loaded in the available space in the front (core) drawers, with the remainder loaded into back drawers behind the front drawers. The radial reflector consisted of blocks of depleted uranium loaded directly into the matrix tubes. The assembly geometry approximated a reflected sphere as closely as the square matrix tubes, the drawers and the shapes of fuel and diluent plates allowed. According to the logbook and loading records for ZPR-3/6F

Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D; Schaefer, R. W.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Overview: A Legacy of Uranium Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Legacy of Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium is a Legacy of Uranium Enrichment Cylinders Photo Next Screen Management Responsibilities...

188

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab.

Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

123 123 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 181 / Tuesday, September 18, 2001 / Notices Section 615-Procedural Safeguards Topic Addressed: Due Process Hearings * Letter dated April 19, 2001 to Virginia Department of Education Director Judith A. Douglas, regarding whether a State educational agency is required to convene a due process hearing initiated by someone other than the parent of a child with a disability or a public agency. Topic Addressed: Surrogate Parents * Letter dated April 16, 2001 to Pinal County, Arizona Deputy County Attorney Linda L. Harant, regarding the appointment of surrogate parents for children who are wards of a tribal court. Topic Addressed: Student Discipline * Letter dated April 16, 2001 to Professor Perry A. Zirkel, regarding the calculation of disciplinary removals of

191

A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Depleted UF6 Management Program Overview Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Management Program Overview Presentation Cylinders Photo Next Screen A Legacy of Uranium Enrichment...

193

ZPR-3 Assembly 12 : A cylindrical assembly of highly enriched uranium, depleted uranium and graphite with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 21 atom %.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 12 (ZPR-3/12) was designed as a fast reactor physics benchmark experiment with an average core {sup 235}U enrichment of approximately 21 at.%. Approximately 68.9% of the total fissions in this assembly occur above 100 keV, approximately 31.1% occur below 100 keV, and essentially none below 0.625 eV - thus the classification as a 'fast' assembly. This assembly is Fast Reactor Benchmark No. 9 in the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) Benchmark Specifications and has historically been used as a data validation benchmark assembly. Loading of ZPR-3 Assembly 12 began in late Jan. 1958, and the Assembly 12 program ended in Feb. 1958. The core consisted of highly enriched uranium (HEU) plates, depleted uranium plates and graphite plates loaded into stainless steel drawers which were inserted into the central square stainless steel tubes of a 31 x 31 matrix on a split table machine. The core unit cell consisted of two columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) HEU plates, seven columns of 0.125 in.-wide depleted uranium plates and seven columns of 0.125 in.-wide graphite plates. The length of each column was 9 in. (228.6 mm) in each half of the core. The graphite plates were included to produce a softer neutron spectrum that would be more characteristic of a large power reactor. The axial blanket consisted of 12 in. (304.8 mm) of depleted uranium behind the core. The thickness of the radial blanket was approximately 12 in. and the length of the radial blanket in each half of the matrix was 21 in. (533.4 mm). The assembly geometry approximated a right circular cylinder as closely as the square matrix tubes allowed. According to the logbook and loading records for ZPR-3/12, the reference critical configuration was loading 10 which was critical on Feb. 5, 1958. The subsequent loadings were very similar but less clean for criticality because there were modifications made to accommodate reactor physics measurements other than criticality. Accordingly, ZPR-3/12 loading 10 was selected as the only configuration for this benchmark. As documented below, it was determined to be acceptable as a criticality safety benchmark experiment. An accurate transformation to a simplified model is needed to make any ZPR assembly a practical criticality-safety benchmark. There is simply too much geometric detail in an exact (as-built) model of a ZPR assembly, even a clean core such as ZPR-3/12 loading 10. The transformation must reduce the detail to a practical level without masking any of the important features of the critical experiment. And it must d

Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Perel, R. L.; Wagschal, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Racah Inst. of Physics

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements have been performed on high-enriched uranium (HEU) oxide fuel pins and depleted uranium metal

196

Notice of Availability of a Draft Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Produce Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69 Federal Register 69 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 63 / Tuesday, April 3, 2007 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Advisory Board AGENCY: The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Board, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the schedule and proposed agenda of an upcoming open meeting of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Advisory Board. The notice also describes the functions of the Board. Notice of this meeting is required by Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act and is intended to notify the public of their opportunity to attend. DATES: Friday, April 20, 2007. Time: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

197

Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problem, and the use of depleted uranium and other heavyenvironmental hazard. Depleted uranium is weakly radioactiveMB. (2004). Depleted and natural uranium: chemistry and

Hwang, Chiachi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Standard guide for establishing a quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide provides guidance and recommended practices for establishing a comprehensive quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate health and safety practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 The basic elements of a quality assurance program appear in the following order: FUNCTION SECTION Organization 5 Quality Assurance Program 6 Design Control 7 Instructions, Procedures & Drawings 8 Document Control 9 Procurement 10 Identification and Traceability 11 Processes 12 Inspection 13 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment 14 Handling, Storage and Shipping 15 Inspection, Test and Operating Status 16 Control of Nonconforming Items 17 Corrective Actions 18 Quality Assurance Records 19 Audits 20 TABLE 1 NQA-1 Basic Requirements Relat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Spook Site, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon, Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Spook site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings 48 mi northeast of Casper, in Converse County, Wyoming. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 187,000 tons of tailings at the Spook site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Depleted uranium risk assessment for Jefferson Proving Ground using data from environmental monitoring and site characterization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third risk assessment completed for the depleted uranium (DU) munitions testing range at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG), Indiana, for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation command. Jefferson Proving Ground was closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act and the testing mission was moved to Yuma Proving Ground. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This report integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. Prior studies have shown that the MITR will be able to ...

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Uranium Oxide Semiconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of semiconductors, it would consume the annual production rate of depleted uranium from uranium enrichment facilities. For more information: PDF Semiconductive Properties of...

203

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Spook site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings 48 mi northeast of Casper, in Converse County, Wyoming. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 187,000 tons of tailings at the Spook site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover makes and gamma densitometers for measuring cross-sectionally averaged mass velocity in steady steam-water flow are presented. The results are interpreted ntation.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Management and Uses Conversion Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion Depleted UF6 Conversion DOE is planning to build two depleted UF6 conversion facilities, and site-specific environmental impact statements (EISs) to evaluate project alternatives. The Final Plan for Conversion and the Programmatic EIS The eventual disposition of depleted UF6 remains the subject of considerable interest within the U.S. Congress, and among concerned citizens and other stakeholders. Congress stated its intentions in Public Law (P. L.) 105-204, signed by the President in July 1998. P. L. 105-204 required DOE to develop a plan to build two depleted UF6 conversion facilities, one each at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. DOE submitted the required plan, Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, to Congress in July 1999. This document provided a discussion of DOE's technical approach and schedule to implement this project. Although much of the information provided in this report is still valid, a few aspects of this plan have changed since its publication.

205

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Depleted UF6 Overview Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information network Web Site. The presentation covers the following topics: The uranium mining and enrichment processes - how depleted UF6 is created, How and where...

207

INFORMATION: Management Alert on Environmental Management's Select Strategy for Disposition of Savannah River Site Depleted Uranium Oxides  

SciTech Connect

The Administration and the Congress, through policy statements and passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), have signaled that they hope that proactive actions by agency Inspectors General will help ensure that Federal Recovery Act activities are transparent, effective and efficient. In that context, the purpose of this management alert is to share with you concerns that have been raised to the Office of Inspector General regarding the planned disposition of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) inventory of Depleted Uranium (DU) oxides. This inventory, generated as a by-product of the nuclear weapons production process and amounting to approximately 15,600 drums of DU oxides, has been stored at SRS for decades. A Department source we deem reliable and credible recently came to the Office of Inspector General expressing concern that imminent actions are planned that may not provide for the most cost effective disposition of these materials. During April 2009, the Department chose to use funds provided under the Recovery Act to accelerate final disposition of the SRS inventory of DU oxides. After coordination with State of Utah regulators, elected officials and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Department initiated a campaign to ship the material to a facility operated by EnergySolutions in Clive, Utah. Although one shipment of a portion of the material has already been sent to the EnergySolutions facility, the majority of the product remains at SRS. As had been planned, both for the shipment already made and those planned in the near term, the EnergySolutions facility was to have been the final disposal location for the material. Recently, a member of Congress and various Utah State officials raised questions regarding the radioactive and other constituents present in the DU oxides to be disposed of at the Clive, Utah, facility. These concerns revolved around the characterization of the material and its acceptability under existing licensing criteria. As a consequence, the Governor of Utah met with Department officials to voice concerns regarding further shipments of the material and to seek return of the initial shipment of DU oxides to SRS. Utah's objections and the Department's agreement to accede to the State's demands effectively prohibit the transfer of the remaining material from South Carolina to Utah. In response, the Department evaluated its options and issued a draft decision paper on March 1, 2010, which outlined an alternative for temporary storage until the final disposition issue could be resolved. Under the terms of the proposed option, the remaining shipments from SRS are to be sent on an interim basis to a facility owned by Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews, Texas. Clearly, this choice carries with it a number of significant logistical burdens, including substantial additional costs for, among several items, repackaging at SRS, transportation to Texas, storage at the interim site, and, repackaging and transportation to the yet-to-be-determined final disposition point. The Department source expressed the concern that the proposal to store the material on an interim basis in Texas was inefficient and unnecessary, asserting: (1) that the materials could remain at SRS until a final disposition path is identified, and that this could be done safely, securely and cost effectively; and, (2) that the nature of the material was not subject to existing compliance agreements with the State of South Carolina, suggesting the viability of keeping the material in storage at SRS until a permanent disposal site is definitively established. We noted that, while the Department's decision paper referred to 'numerous project and programmatic factors that make it impractical to retain the remaining inventory at Savannah River,' it did not outline the specific issues involved nor did it provide any substantive economic or environmental analysis supporting the need for the planned interim storage action. The only apparent driver in this case was a Recovery Act-related goal esta

None

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Control of structure and reactivity by ligand design : applications to small molecule activation by low-valent uranium complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coordination chemistry is depleted uranium, a by-product innuclear reactors. Depleted uranium Figure 1-1. The periodic

Lam, Oanh Phi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Rauch, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix E: Impacts Associated with HF and CaF2 Conversion Product Sale and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE E.1 INTRODUCTION During the conversion of the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) inventory to depleted uranium oxide, products having some potential for sale to commercial users would be produced. These products would include aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and calcium fluoride (CaF 2 , commonly referred to as fluorspar). These products are routinely used as commercial materials, and an investigation into their potential reuse was done; results are included as part of

211

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix E: Impacts Associated with HF and CaF2 Conversion Product Sale and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE E.1 INTRODUCTION During the conversion of the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) inventory to depleted uranium oxide, products having some potential for sale to commercial users would be produced. These products would include aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and calcium fluoride (CaF 2 , commonly referred to as fluorspar). These products are routinely used as commercial materials, and an investigation into their potential reuse was done; results are included as part of

212

DUF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternatives Alternatives Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives Alternatives included in the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs. Proposed Action The proposed action evaluated in each EIS is to construct and operate a conversion facility at each site for conversion of the DOE DUF6 inventory. The time period considered is a construction period of approximately 2 years, an operational period of 25 years at Paducah and 18 years at Portsmouth, and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facility of about 3 years. The EISs assess the potential environmental impacts from the following proposed activities: Construction, operation, maintenance, and D&D of the proposed DUF6 conversion facility at each site; Transportation of uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility;

213

Remediation and Recovery of Uranium from Contaminated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium containing the mixture of isotopes occurring in nature; uranium depleted in the isotope 235; Depleted uranium 1000 kilograms; and Thorium 1000 kilograms. #12;INFCIRC/254/Rev.9/Part.1 November 2007 Annex B, section 4.); 2.5. Plants for the separation of isotopes of natural uranium, depleted uranium

Lovley, Derek

214

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

216

Feasibility study on AFR-100 fuel conversion from uranium-based fuel to thorium-based fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although thorium has long been considered as an alternative to uranium-based fuels, most of the reactors built to-date have been fueled with uranium-based fuel with the exception of a few reactors. The decision to use uranium-based fuels was initially made based on the technology maturity compared to thorium-based fuels. As a result of this experience, lot of knowledge and data have been accumulated for uranium-based fuels that made it the predominant nuclear fuel type for extant nuclear power. However, following the recent concerns about the extent and availability of uranium resources, thorium-based fuels have regained significant interest worldwide. Thorium is more abundant than uranium and can be readily exploited in many countries and thus is now seen as a possible alternative. As thorium-based fuel technologies mature, fuel conversion from uranium to thorium is expected to become a major interest in both thermal and fast reactors. In this study the feasibility of fuel conversion in a fast reactor is assessed and several possible approaches are proposed. The analyses are performed using the Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR-100) design, a fast reactor core concept recently developed by ANL. The AFR-100 is a small 100 MW{sub e} reactor developed under the US-DOE program relying on innovative fast reactor technologies and advanced structural and cladding materials. It was designed to be inherently safe and offers sufficient margins with respect to the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature when using U-10Zr binary metal fuel. Thorium-based metal fuel was preferred to other thorium fuel forms because of its higher heavy metal density and it does not need to be alloyed with zirconium to reduce its radiation swelling. The various approaches explored cover the use of pure thorium fuel as well as the use of thorium mixed with transuranics (TRU). Sensitivity studies were performed for the different scenarios envisioned in order to determine the best core performance characteristics for each of them. With the exception of the fuel type and enrichment, the reference AFR-100 core design characteristics were kept unchanged, including the general core layout and dimensions, assembly dimensions, materials and power rating. In addition, the mass of {sup 235}U required was kept within a reasonable range from that of the reference AFR-100 design. The core performance characteristics, kinetics parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated using the ANL suite of fast reactor analysis code systems. Orifice design calculations and the steady-state thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed using the SE2-ANL code. The thermal margins were evaluated by comparing the peak temperatures to the design limits for parameters such as the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature. The inherent safety features of AFR-100 cores proposed were assessed using the integral reactivity parameters of the quasi-static reactivity balance analysis. The design objectives and requirements, the computation methods used as well as a description of the core concept are provided in Section 2. The three major approaches considered are introduced in Section 3 and the neutronics performances of those approaches are discussed in the same section. The orifice zoning strategies used and the steady-state thermal-hydraulic performance are provided in Section 4. The kinetics and reactivity coefficients, including the inherent safety characteristics, are provided in Section 5, and the Conclusions in Section 6. Other scenarios studied and sensitivity studies are provided in the Appendix section.

Heidet, F.; Kim, T.; Grandy, C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Electron Beam Welding of a Depleted Uranium Alloy to Niobium Using a Calibrated Electron Beam Power Density Distribution  

SciTech Connect

Electron beam test welds were made joining flat plates of commercially pure niobium to a uranium-6wt%Nb (binary) alloy. The welding parameters and joint design were specifically developed to minimize mixing of the niobium with the U-6%Nb alloy. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the precise power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines and/or to other facilities.

Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; Terrill, P.E.

2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

218

Depleted UF6 Management Information Network - A resource for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an online repository of information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), a product of the uranium enrichment...

219

Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Disposal A discussion of the environmental impacts...

220

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.

Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Depleted UF6 Production and Handling Slide Presentation  

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Production and Handling Depleted UF6 Production and Handling Slide Presentation An online slide presentation about production and handling of depleted UF6, from mining of uranium...

222

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density… (more)

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Derived enriched uranium market  

SciTech Connect

The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market.

Rutkowski, E.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

PREPARING THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR FOR CONVERSION TO LOW ENRICHED URANIUM FUEL ? EXTENDING CYCLE BURNUP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor performance studies have been completed for conceptual plate designs and show that maintaining reactor performance while converting HFIR from high enriched to low enriched uranium (20 wt % 235U) fuel requires extending the end-of-life burnup value for HFIR fuel from the current nominal value of 2200 MWD to 2600 MWD. The current fuel fabrication procedure is discussed and changes that would be required to this procedure are identified. Design and safety related analyses that are required for the certification of a new fuel are identified. Qualification tests and comments regarding the regulatory approval process are provided along with a conceptual schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Overview of the Capstone Depleted Uranium Study of Aerosols from Impact with Armored Vehicles: Test Setup and Aerosol Generation, Characterization, and Application in Assessing Dose and Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Study was conducted to generate data about DU aerosols generated during the perforation of armored combat vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, and to apply the data in assessments of human health risks to personnel exposed to these aerosols, primarily through inhalation, during the 1991 Gulf War or in future military operations. The Capstone study consisted of two components: 1) generating, sampling and characterizing DU aerosols by firing at and perforating combat vehicles and 2) applying the source-term quantities and characteristics of the aerosols to the evaluation of doses and risks. This paper reviews the background of the study including the bases for the study, previous reviews of DU particles and health assessments from DU used by the U.S. military, the objectives of the study components, the participants and oversight teams, and the types of exposures it was intended to evaluate. It then discusses exposure scenarios used in the dose and risk assessment and provides an overview of how the field tests and dose and risk assessments were conducted.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Depleted UF6 Health Risks  

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(depleted UF6) is released to the atmosphere, the uranium compounds and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gas that are formed by reaction with moisture in the air can be chemically...

228

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at the Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey performed at the Spook site in Converse County, Wyoming, in June 1976, are presented. The mill at this site was located a short distance from the open-pit mine where the ore was obtained and where part of the tailings was dumped into the mine. Several piles of overburden or low-grade ore in the vicinity were included in the measurements of above-ground gamma exposure rate. The average exposure rate over these piles varied from 14 ..mu..R/hr, the average background exposure rate for the area, to 140 ..mu..R/hr. The average exposure rate for the tailings and former mill area was 220 ..mu..R/hr. Movement of tailings particles down dry washes was evident. The calculated concentration of /sup 226/Ra in ten holes as a function of depth is presented graphically.

Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density monolithic UMo fuel. The design of an optimum LEU core for the ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Magnetic Exchange Coupling and Single-Molecule Magnetism in Uranium Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greater than 99% U-238 (depleted uranium), which has no neturanium, since this actinide element offers minimal radioactivity (in depleted

Rinehart, Jeffrey Dennis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Documents: Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF6 Final EIS Paducah DUF6 Final EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and Record of Decision Full text of the Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site. The full text of the Record of Decision and Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD is available for downloading or browsing in Adobe Acrobat PDF format through the links below. You may also order a CD-ROM or paper copy of the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs by submitting a Final EIS Document Request Form. Record of Decision PDF Icon Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision 3.6 MB details

232

Disposition of Depleted Uranium Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes environmental information which has been collected up to June 1983 at Savannah River Plant. Of particular interest is an updating of dose estimates from changes in methodology of calculation, lower cesium transport estimates from Steel Creek, and new sports fish consumption data for the Savannah River. The status of various permitting requirements are also discussed.

Crandall, J.L.

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cross section generation and physics modeling in a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study has been initiated at ORNL to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The current study is limited to steady-state, nominal operation and are focused on the determination of the fuel requirements, primarily density, that are required to maintain the performance of the reactor. Reactor physics analyses are reported for a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. An LEU core design has been obtained and requires an increase in {sup 235}U loading of a factor of 1.9 over the current HEU fuel. These initial results indicate that the conversion from HEU to LEU results in a reduction of the thermal fluxes in the central flux trap region of approximately 9 % and in the outer beryllium reflector region of approximately 15%. Ongoing work is being performed to improve upon this initial design to further minimize the impact of conversion to LEU fuel. (authors)

Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C.; Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Production and Handling Slide 18: Conversion of Yellow Cake to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

last step of the conversion process involves the chemical conversion of uranium tetrafluoride UF4 to uranium hexafluoride UF6 using fluorine F2. Slide 1...

235

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix...

236

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

237

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

238

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to...

239

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

240

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Radiological Controls - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January...

242

Description of the Canadian Particulate-Fill WastePackage (WP) System for Spent-Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and its Applicability to Ligh-Water Reactor SNF WPS with Depleted Uranium-Dioxide Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3502 3502 Chemical Technology Division DESCRIPTION OF THE CANADIAN PARTICULATE-FILL WASTE-PACKAGE (WP) SYSTEM FOR SPENT-NUCLEAR FUEL(SNF) AND ITS APPLICABILITY TO LIGHT- WATER REACTOR SNF WPS WITH DEPLETED URANIUM-DIOXIDE FILL Charles W. Forsberg Oak Ridge National Laboratory * P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 Tel: (423) 574-6783 Fax: (423) 574-9512 Email: forsbergcw@ornl.gov October 20, 1997 _________________________ Managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 for the * U.S. Department of Energy. iii CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

243

Production and Handling Slide 38: 48G Depleted UF6 Storage Cylinder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

48G Depleted UF6 Storage Cylinder Refer to caption below for image description After enrichment, depleted uranium hexafluoride is placed in large steel cylinders for storage....

244

FAQ 35-What are the potential health risks from disposal of depleted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health risks from disposal of depleted uranium as an oxide? Once depleted uranium has been converted from UF6 to the oxide form, the risk associated with handling at a disposal...

245

FAQ 33-What are the potential health risks from storage of depleted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health risks from storage of depleted uranium as an oxide? Once depleted uranium has been converted from UF6 to the oxide form, the risk associated with storage and handling is...

246

Transcript of Public Hearing on DUF6 Conversion Facility Draft EISs, Held Jan. 7, 2004, Waverly, Ohio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- - - - - - Draft Environmental Impact Statements For the Construction and Operation of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at the Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio Sites - - - PUBLIC HEARING JANUARY 7, 2004 - - - LOCATION: Pike County YMCA 400 Pride Drive Waverly, Ohio TIME: 6:00

247

Depleted UF6 Internet Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUF6 Guide DU Uses DUF6 Management and Uses DUF6 Conversion EIS Documents News FAQs Internet Resources Glossary Home Internet Resources Depleted UF6 Internet Resources Links...

248

Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6-related Manufacturing Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and operation of a facility to fabricate representative products containing depleted uranium. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS evaluated the general environmental impacts...

250

Power distributions in fresh and depleted LEU and HEU cores of the MITR reactor.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Toward this goal, core geometry and power distributions are presented. Distributions of power are calculated for LEU cores depleted with MCODE using an MCNP5 Monte Carlo model. The MCNP5 HEU and LEU MITR models were previously compared to experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. This same model was used with a finer spatial depletion in order to generate power distributions for the LEU cores. The objective of this work is to generate and characterize a series of fresh and depleted core peak power distributions, and provide a thermal hydraulic evaluation of the geometry which should be considered for subsequent thermal hydraulic safety analyses.

Wilson, E.H.; Horelik, N.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Newton, T.H., Jr.; Hu, L.; Stevens, J.G. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (2MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department)

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Final environmental statement related to the United Nuclear Corporation, Morton Ranch, Wyoming Uranium Mill (Converse County, Wyoming)  

SciTech Connect

Impacts from Morton Ranch Uranium Mill will result in: alterations of up to 270 acres occupied by the mill facilities; increase in the existing background radiation levels; socioeconomic effects on Glenrock and Douglas, Wyoming. Solid waste material (tailings solids) from the mill will be deposited onsite in exhausted surface mine pits. Any license issued for the Morton Ranch mill will be subject to conditions for the protection of the environment.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Sustained Removal of Uranium From Contaminated Groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approximately 5 mm in diameter by 5 mm tal/. Compositions measured ranged from depleted uranium oxide to mixtures of plutonium and depleted uranium oxide (MOX) and mixed oxides with small percentages of minor.1943 - - - Title: Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Measurements of the Elastic Properties of Uranium

Lovley, Derek

253

In-Situ Evidence for Uranium Immobilization and Remobilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, together with depleted uranium, for fabrication of mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for reuse in a light water with depleted uranium to produce a metallic fuel for a fast reactor. The fast reactor can be designed to produce of depleted uranium and the cost of fabricating the MOX fuel: ( ) ( ) 2,22,22,22,2 bpzupf ++= . (11) The back

Istok, Jonathan "Jack"

254

Documents: Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF6 Final EIS Portsmouth DUF6 Final EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and Record of Decision Full text of the Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site. The full text of the Record of Decision and Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD is available for downloading or browsing in Adobe Acrobat PDF format through the links below. Record of Decision PDF Icon Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision 3.8 MB details PDF Icon Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision: As Published in the Federal Register 82 KB details

255

Journal of the Less-Common Metals, I62 (1990) 117-127 117 COMPARISON OF URANIUM AND ZIRCONIUM COBALT FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface wastes resulting from uranium solution extraction processes. Underground ore bodies depleted Washington, DC 20460 Uranium Location Database Compilation #12;Table of Contents Abstract............................................................................................................................3 Uranium

Kherani, Nazir P.

256

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS SUMMARY 1 S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in

257

Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

EPA Review of Standards for Uranium and Thorium Milling Facilities @ 40 CFR Parts 61 and 192.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diversity in industrial effluent and sewage contaminated soils. 2008, in prep. New test for depleted uranium A new test to detect depleted uranium in Gulf War veterans has unexpectedly uncovered high levels uranium. But depleted uranium showed up in a related study by the team near a former munitions plant

259

Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities (DOE/EIS-0329) (9/18/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23 23 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 181 / Tuesday, September 18, 2001 / Notices Section 615-Procedural Safeguards Topic Addressed: Due Process Hearings * Letter dated April 19, 2001 to Virginia Department of Education Director Judith A. Douglas, regarding whether a State educational agency is required to convene a due process hearing initiated by someone other than the parent of a child with a disability or a public agency. Topic Addressed: Surrogate Parents * Letter dated April 16, 2001 to Pinal County, Arizona Deputy County Attorney Linda L. Harant, regarding the appointment of surrogate parents for children who are wards of a tribal court. Topic Addressed: Student Discipline * Letter dated April 16, 2001 to Professor Perry A. Zirkel, regarding the calculation of disciplinary removals of

260

Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project (4/28/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

68 68 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 81 / Monday, April 28, 2003 / Notices ''Browse Pending Collections'' link and by clicking on link number 2270. When you access the information collection, click on ''Download Attachments'' to view. Written requests for information should be addressed to Vivian Reese, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4050, Regional Office Building 3, Washington, DC 20202-4651 or to the e-mail address vivan.reese@ed.gov. Requests may also be electronically mailed to the internet address OCIO_RIMG@ed.gov or faxed to 202-708-9346. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be directed to Joseph Schubart at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Record of Decision for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) (07/20/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49 49 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 143 / Tuesday, July 27, 2004 / Notices halseypj@oro.doe.gov or check the Web site at www.oakridge.doe.gov/em/ssab. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Board: The purpose of the Board is to make recommendations to DOE in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Tentative Agenda 8 a.m.-Introductions, overview of meeting agenda and logistics (Dave Mosby) 8:15 a.m.-Past year evaluation-Board and stakeholder survey results, what worked, what can be improved (Facilitator) 9:50 a.m.-Break 10:05 a.m.-Past year evaluation continued 10:45 a.m.-Summaries and Q&A on the most important issues to DOE, TN Department of Environment & Conservation, and EPA (Facilitator) 11:30 a.m.-Lunch

262

Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

68 68 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 81 / Monday, April 28, 2003 / Notices ''Browse Pending Collections'' link and by clicking on link number 2270. When you access the information collection, click on ''Download Attachments'' to view. Written requests for information should be addressed to Vivian Reese, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4050, Regional Office Building 3, Washington, DC 20202-4651 or to the e-mail address vivan.reese@ed.gov. Requests may also be electronically mailed to the internet address OCIO_RIMG@ed.gov or faxed to 202-708-9346. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be directed to Joseph Schubart at

263

Advance Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities (DOE/EIS-0329) (5/7/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

010 010 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 88 / Monday, May 7, 2001 / Notices centers. The commenter believes that by working independently of schools, the centers can better assist families who do not feel connected with the schools and provide families with the tools needed to create change in the schools. Discussion: The Secretary is not requiring non-profit organizations to apply in consortium with one or more LEAs. However, the Secretary believes that strengthening school-community- family partnerships will help children in low-performing schools succeed in school. Under the priority, the parent centers still will have considerable autonomy in designing proposals that best meet local needs and in coordinating with low-performing schools in implementing comprehensive strategies to assist children in these

264

Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blanding highly enriched uranium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gasses into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gasses from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gasses into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell.

McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Miller, Philip E. (Livermore, CA); Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blending highly enriched uranium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gases into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gases from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gases into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell. 4 figs.

McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.; Horton, J.A.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electron Emission from Slightly Oxidized Depleted Uranium Generated by its Own Radioactivity Measured by Electron Spectroscopy, and Electron-Induced Dissociation and Ionization of Hydrogen Near its Surface.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy dependent electron emission (counts per second) between zero and 1.4 keV generated by the natural reactivity of uranium was measured by an electrostatic spectrometer with known acceptance angle and acceptance area. The electron intensity decreases continuously with energy, but at different rates in different energy regimes, suggesting that a variety of processes may be involved in producing the observed electron emission. The spectrum was converted to energy dependent electron flux (e-/cm{sup 2} s) using the assumption that the emission has a cosine angular distribution. The flux decreased rapidly from {approx}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s in the energy range from zero to 200 eV, and then more slowly from {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}3*10{sup 4}/cm{sup 2} s in the range from 200 to 1400 eV. The energy dependent electron mean free path in gases together with literature cross sections for electron induced reactions were used to determine the number of ionization and dissociation reactions per cm{sup 2}s within the inelastic mean free path of electrons, and found to be about 1.3*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.5*10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively, for hydrogen. An estimate of the number of ionization and dissociation reactions occurring within the total range, rather than the mean free path of electrons in gases resulted in 6.2*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.3*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively. The total energy flux carried by electrons from the surface is suspiciously close to the total possible energy generated by one gram of uranium. A likely source of error is the assumption that the electron emission has a cosine distribution. Angular distribution measurements of the electron emission would check that assumption, and actual measurement of the total current emanating from the surface are needed to confirm the value of the current calculated in section II. These results must therefore be used with caution - until they are confirmed by other measurements.

Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Production and Handling Slide 5: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refer to caption below for image description The third step in the uranium fuel cycle involves the conversion of "yellowcake" to uranium hexafluoride (UF6), the chemical form...

269

Summary of the Special Analysis of Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide Demonstrating the Before and After Impacts on the DOE Order 435.1 Performance Objective and the Peak Dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the special analysis (SA) of the Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream (SVRSURANIUM03, Revision 1) demonstrating the before and after impacts of the waste stream to the DOE Order 435.1 performance objective at the disposal facility, and the peak dose. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) requested this SA and asked the Nevada Site Office (NSO) to run the SA deterministically and assume that all the model conditions remain the same regardless of the length of time to the peak dose. Although the NDEP accepts that DOE Order 435.1 requires a compliance period of 1,000 years, it also requested to know what year, if any, the specific DOE performance objectives will be exceeded. Given the NDEP’s requested model conditions, the SA demonstrates the Rn-222 peak dose will occur in about 2 million years and will exceed the performance objective in about 6,000 years. The 0.25 mSv y-1 all-pathway performance objective was not exceeded for the resident scenario after reaching the 4 million year peak dose.

Shott, G.J.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS SUMMARY 1 S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF 6 from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and

271

Charge Depleting:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.5 seconds 0.5 seconds Acceleration 1/4 Mile Time: 18.6 seconds Maximum Speed: 83.2 MPH Acceleration 1 Mile Maximum Speed: 100.6 MPH Charge Sustaining: Acceleration 0-60 MPH Time: 10.6 seconds Acceleration 1/4 Mile Time: 18.6 seconds Maximum Speed: 82.8 MPH Acceleration 1 Mile Maximum Speed: 101.9 MPH Brake Test @ 60 MPH Distance Required: 145.1 ft UDDS Fuel Economy 6 HWFET Fuel Economy 6,10 Distance (miles) Fuel Economy (mpg) AC Energy Consumed (kWh) 7 Distance (miles) Fuel Economy (mpg) AC Energy Consumed (kWh) 7 10 118.5 2.85 10 53.0 1.80 20 116.8 5.49 20 56.6 3.37 40 116.0 10.50 40 58.0 6.38 60 90.7 11.34 60 55.3 9.48 80 76.6 11.34 80 51.4 11.11 100 68.0 11.34 100 47.2 11.13 200 50.9 11.34 200 38.7 11.13 Fuel Economy with A/C Off 1 Cold Start Charge Depleting 2 : Fuel Economy: 119.7 MPG AC kWh Consumed 7 : 0.282 kWh/mi Charge Depleting

272

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NUCLEAR CONVERSION APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear conversion apparatus is described which comprises a body of neutron moderator, tubes extending therethrough, uranium in the tubes, a fluid- circulating system associated with the tubes, a thorium-containing fluid coolant in the system and tubes, and means for withdrawing the fluid from the system and replacing it in the system whereby thorium conversion products may be recovered.

Seaborg, G.T.

1960-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

Safe Operating Procedure SAFETY PROTOCOL: URANIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bodies depleted by uranium solution extraction and which remain underground do not constitute byproductEPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities Reid J. Rosnick Environmental Protection Agency Radiation Protection Division (6608J) Washington, DC 20460 NMA/NRC Uranium Recovery Workshop July 2, 2009 #12

Farritor, Shane

275

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Redistribution of depleted uranium (DU soils and water at two US Army proving grounds. Ann. M Health Phys. SocRemediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction ElizabethJ.P.Phillips, Edward R. Landa and DerekR. Lovley Key words: Bioremediation; Uranium; Mill tailings

Meyer, Karsten

276

The Uranium Institute 24th Annual Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:same as iron. 3.2 Preparation A standard analysis of the depleted uranium,provided by COGEMA, is given-sur-Tille, France Abstract : After reviewing briefly the influence of the incorporationof vanadium in the uranium,nickel and iron, on the properties of the uranium-0.2%vanadium alloys. Tensile tests at both ambient and elevated

Laughlin, Robert B.

277

Radiochemical Analysis Methodology for uranium Depletion Measurements  

SciTech Connect

This report provides sufficient material for a test sponsor with little or no radiochemistry background to understand and follow physics irradiation test program execution. Most irradiation test programs employ similar techniques and the general details provided here can be applied to the analysis of other irradiated sample types. Aspects of program management directly affecting analysis quality are also provided. This report is not an in-depth treatise on the vast field of radiochemical analysis techniques and related topics such as quality control. Instrumental technology is a very fast growing field and dramatic improvements are made each year, thus the instrumentation described in this report is no longer cutting edge technology. Much of the background material is still applicable and useful for the analysis of older experiments and also for subcontractors who still retain the older instrumentation.

Scatena-Wachel DE

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . 7 3.2 PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DU DISPOSAL AT OTHER SITES . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.3 COSTS OF PRODUCTION, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSAL OF DU WASTE FORMS . . . . . . . . . . ....

279

Tritium Transport Vessel Using Depleted Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Storage, Distribution, and Transportation / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology In Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

L. K. Heung

280

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts Associated with Continued Storage of the Entire Portsmouth Site Cylinder Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51 3.5.1 Approach Used to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code USEC United States Enrichment Corporation Chemicals AlF 3 aluminum trifluoride CaF 2 calcium fluoride CO carbon monoxide Fe iron HF hydrogen fluoride HNO 3 nitric acid Mg...

282

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy DUF 6 MATERIALS USE ROADMAP Edited by: M. Jonathan Haire Allen G. Croff August 27, 2001 DUF 6 Materials Use Workshop Participants August 24-25, 1999 Name Organization Halil Avci ANL Bob Bernero Consultant Lavelle Clark PNNL Carl Cooley DOE/EM-50 Allen Croff ORNL Juan Ferrada ORNL Charles Forsberg ORNL John Gasper ANL Bob Hightower ORNL Julian Hill PNNL Ed Jones LLNL Asim Khawaja PNNL George Larson Consultant Paul Lessing INEEL Dan O'Connor ORNL Robert Price DOE/NE-30 Nancy Ranek ANL Mark Senderling DOE/RW-46 Roger Spence ORNL John Tseng DOE/EM-21 John Warren DOE/NE-30 Ken Young LLNL iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

283

FAQ 19-Is storage of uranium hexafluoride safe?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

storage of uranium hexafluoride safe? Is storage of uranium hexafluoride safe? The advanced age of some of the steel cylinders in which the depleted UF6 is contained, and the way...

284

Final Plan for the Conversion of DUF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (Draft PEIS) 1 . The Draft PEIS and...

285

W-98: Synergistic Extraction and Solvent Extraction of Uranium from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

W-42: Evolution of Internal Strain and Microstructure in Depleted Uranium in the Presence of Hydrides · W-43: Existence of Niobium in Ductile Iron and Its Effect ...

286

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 1: Introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 1 INTRODUCTION Over the last five decades, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has enriched large quantities of uranium for nuclear applications by means of gaseous diffusion. This enrichment has taken place at three DOE sites located at Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP, formerly known as the K-25 site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1-1). "Depleted" uranium hexafluoride (commonly referred to as DUF 6 ) is a product of this process. It is being stored at the three sites. The total DUF 6 inventory at the three sites weighs approximately 700,000 metric tons (t) (770,000 short tons [tons]) 1 and is stored in about 60,000 steel cylinders. This document is a site-specific

287

Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The operating room at a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant. The operating room at a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant. Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride.

288

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

289

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2001 Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the given paper consists in obtaining such data for depleted uranium and for four uranium alloys at strain comparison e.g. with depleted uranium. I f we use these materials for design of s t r u c t u r a l p a r Z o Fig. 3 : The effect of the strain rate on the Hugoniot stress -0- ,k A Depleted Uranium A/ o

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

290

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Use of Savannah River Site facilities for blend down of highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was asked to assess the use of existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities for the conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). The purpose was to eliminate the weapons potential for such material. Blending HEU with existing supplies of depleted uranium (DU) would produce material with less than 5% U-235 content for use in commercial nuclear reactors. The request indicated that as much as 500 to 1,000 MT of HEU would be available for conversion over a 20-year period. Existing facilities at the SRS are capable of producing LEU in the form of uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}) powder, uranyl nitrate [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] solution, or metal. Additional processing, and additional facilities, would be required to convert the LEU to uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) or uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 3}), the normal inputs for commercial fuel fabrication. This study`s scope does not include the cost for new conversion facilities. However, the low estimated cost per kilogram of blending HEU to LEU in SRS facilities indicates that even with fees for any additional conversion to UO{sub 2} or UF{sub 6}, blend-down would still provide a product significantly below the spot market price for LEU from traditional enrichment services. The body of the report develops a number of possible facility/process combinations for SRS. The primary conclusion of this study is that SRS has facilities available that are capable of satisfying the goals of a national program to blend HEU to below 5% U-235. This preliminary assessment concludes that several facility/process options appear cost-effective. Finally, SRS is a secure DOE site with all requisite security and safeguard programs, personnel skills, nuclear criticality safety controls, accountability programs, and supporting infrastructure to handle large quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM).

Bickford, W.E.; McKibben, J.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace several obsolete components of the current analytical tool set used for ATR neutronics support. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). It will also greatly facilitate the LEU conversion effort, since the upgraded computational capabilities are now at a stage where they can be, and in fact have been, used for the required physics analysis from the beginning. In this context, extensive scoping neutronics analyses were completed for six preconceptual candidate LEU fuel element designs for the ATR (and for its companion critical facility, ATRC). Of these, four exhibited neutronics performance in what is believed to be an acceptable range. However, there are currently some concerns with regard to fabricability and mechanical performance that have emerged for one of the four latter concepts. Thus three concepts have been selected for more comprehensive conceptual design analysis during the upcoming fiscal year.

David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Assumptions and criteria for performing a feasibility study of the conversion of the high flux isotope reactor core to use low-enriched uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the operating power for the High Flux Isotope Reactor when fuelled with low enriched uranium (LEU). Uncertainties in the fuel fabrication and inspection processes are reviewed for the current fuel cycle [highly enriched uranium (HEU)] and the impact of these uncertainties on the proposed LEU fuel cycle operating power is discussed. These studies indicate that for the power distribution presented in a companion paper in these proceedings, the operating power for an LEU cycle would be close to the current operating power. (authors)

Primm Iii, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6399 (United States); Ellis, R. J.; Gehin, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Moses, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6050 (United States); Binder, J. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6162 (United States); Xoubi, N. [Univ. of Cincinnati, Rhodes Hall, ML 72, PO Box 210072, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

DUF6 Conversion Facility EIS Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs Schedule The final EISs for the DUF6 Conversion Facilities have been completed, and are available through this web site. The RODs are...

295

Draft Supplement Analysis for Location(s) to Dispose of Depleted...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site, issued by Jessie Hill Roberson, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, July 20. DOE,...

296

Uranium mill monitoring for natural fission reactors  

SciTech Connect

Isotopic monitoring of the product stream from operating uranium mills is proposed for discovering other possible natural fission reactors; aspects of their occurrence and discovery are considered. Uranium mill operating characteristics are formulated in terms of the total uranium capacity, the uranium throughput, and the dilution half-time of the mill. The requirements for detection of milled reactor-zone uranium are expressed in terms of the dilution half-time and the sampling frequency. Detection of different amounts of reactor ore with varying degrees of /sup 235/U depletion is considered.

Apt, K.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Photovoltaic Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photovoltaic Energy Conversion Frank Zimmermann #12;Solar Electricity Generation Consumes no fuel Buy Solar Energy Stocks? Make Photovoltaics your Profession! #12;Challenges Make solar cells more and fossil fuel depletion problems! #12;Photovoltaics: Explosive Growth #12;Take Advantage of Solar Megatrend

Glashausser, Charles

298

Uranium Metal: Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Metal Uranium Metal Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses Steven M. Baker, Ph.D. Knoxville Tn 5 August 1998 Summary Uranium Metal is a Valuable Resource 3 Large Inventory of "Depleted Uranium" 3 Need Commercial Uses for Inventory  Avoid Disposal Cost  Real Added Value to Society 3 Uranium Metal Has Valuable Properties  Density  Strength 3 Market will Come if Story is Told Background The Nature of Uranium Background 3 Natural Uranium: 99.3% U238; 0.7% U 235 3 U235 Fissile  Nuclear Weapons  Nuclear Reactors 3 U238 Fertile  Neutron Irradiation of U238 Produces Pu239  Neutrons Come From U235 Fission  Pu239 is Fissile (Weapons, Reactors, etc.) Post World War II Legacy Background 3 "Enriched" Uranium Product  Weapons Program 

299

Effect of Shim Arm Depletion in the NBSR  

SciTech Connect

The cadmium shim arms in the NBSR undergo burnup during reactor operation and hence, require periodic replacement. Presently, the shim arms are replaced after every 25 cycles to guarantee they can maintain sufficient shutdown margin. Two prior reports document the expected change in the 113Cd distribution because of the shim arm depletion. One set of calculations was for the present high-enriched uranium fuel and the other for the low-enriched uranium fuel when it was in the COMP7 configuration (7 inch fuel length vs. the present 11 inch length). The depleted 113Cd distributions calculated for these cores were applied to the current design for an equilibrium low-enriched uranium core. This report details the predicted effects, if any, of shim arm depletion on the shim arm worth, the shutdown margin, power distributions and kinetics parameters.

Hanson A. H.; Brown N.; Diamond, D.J.

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

Uranium and Its Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Its Compounds Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

LEU conversion status of US research reactors, September 1996  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States from the use of fuels containing highly- enriched uranium (HEU, greater than or equal to 20%) to the use of fuels containing low-enriched uranium (LEU, < 20%). Estimates of the uranium densities required for conversion are made for reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW that are not currently involved in the LEU conversion process.

Matos, J.E.

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

FAQ 17-Where is uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Where is uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States? Where is uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States? Most of the depleted UF6 accumulated since the 1940s is stored...

303

Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

P1-04: 3D Microstructural Characterization of Uranium Oxide as a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, P1-04: 3D Microstructural Characterization of Uranium ... to obtain Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) data for depleted UO2 pellets that  ...

305

L'URANIUM ET LES ARMES L'URANIUM APPAUVRI. Pierre Roussel*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(depleted uranium) · 4 oxidation states (+4, +6 most common) · U(VI) water-soluble, U(IV) in-soluble Metals Uranium ­ heaviest natural element - 17 isotopes · Natural form % = U-238 (99.27), U-235 (0.72), U-234 (0 in nuclear fuel ­ U-235 (readily fissionable) · Used in nuclear and conventional weapons · Uranium enrichment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

Depleted Uraniuim Dioxide as a Spent-Nuclear-Fuel-Waste Package...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15 DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AS A SPENT-NUCLEAR-FUEL WASTE-PACKAGE PARTICULATE FILL: FILL BEHAVIOR Charles W. Forsberg Oak Ridge National Laboratory * P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge,...

307

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January, 2005 assessment of Conduct of Operations program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

308

URANIUM ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uranium alloy is reported containing from 0.1 to 5 per cent by weight of molybdenum and from 0.1 to 5 per cent by weight of silicon, the balance being uranium.

Colbeck, E.W.

1959-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

FAQ 37-What are the potential health risks from transportation of depleted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium metal or oxide? depleted uranium metal or oxide? What are the potential health risks from transportation of depleted uranium metal or oxide? In the PEIS, risks associated with transportation of depleted uranium oxide and metal were estimated for transport by either rail or truck. Normal transport of oxide or metal would result in low-level external exposure to radiation for persons in the vicinity of a shipment. Based on estimates in the PEIS, the levels of exposure would result in negligible increased cancer risks. Risks from material released in an accident were also estimated. For a hypothetical railcar accident involving powder U3O8 that was assumed to occur in a highly-populated urban area under stable (nighttime) weather conditions, it was estimated that up to 20 people might experience irreversible adverse effects from chemical toxicity, with no fatalities expected. Approximately 2 potential latent cancer fatalities from radiological hazards are estimated for an accident under the same conditions. The probability of such an accident occurring is very low. The consequences from a truck accident would be lower, because trucks have a smaller shipment capacity. The consequences of transportation accidents involving depleted uranium metal would be much smaller than those involving uranium oxide because uranium metal would be in the form of solid blocks and would not be easily dispersed in an accident.

310

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document, Part 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process,

311

Battery depletion monitor  

SciTech Connect

A cmos inverter is used to compare pacemaker battery voltage to a referenced voltage. When the reference voltage exceeds the measured battery voltage, the inverter changes state to indicate battery depletion.

Lee, Y.S.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

312

Validation of a Monte Carlo Based Depletion Methodology Using HFIR Post-Irradiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-irradiation uranium isotopic atomic densities within the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) were calculated and compared to uranium mass spectrographic data measured in the late 1960s and early 70s [1]. This study was performed in order to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology for calculating the burn-up dependent nuclide inventory, specifically the post-irradiation uranium

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method, the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ converted to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent, such as CoF/sub 3/. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reac tion chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. After nitrogen gas is used to sweep out the hydrogen and the water vapor formed, and while continuing to inaintain the temperature between 400 deg C and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion of UO/sub 2/ to UF/sub 4/ the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to about 400 deg C or less, the UF/sub 4/ is mixed with the requisite quantity of CoF/sub 3/, and after evacuating the chamber, the mixture is heated to 300 to 400 deg C, and the resulting UF/sub 6/ is led off and delivered to a condenser.

Fowler, R.D.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Unit Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unit Conversion. ... Unit Conversion Example. "If you have an amount of unit of A, how much is that in unit B?"; Dimensional Analysis; ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

315

CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Emergency Management program at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

316

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

317

Microstructural Evolution of a Uranium-Zirconium Alloy at Low ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) alloys represent one of the types of fuels that are under ... Depleted U-10wt%Zr was irradiated to doses of 0.007 and 0.07 dpa.

318

Bugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. updated at midnight GMTtoday is friday, november 14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7% (no enrichment) and around 20% · Large amount of depleted uranium results from enrichment Energy an integrated facility (Integral Fast Reactor), where only small amounts of natural uranium or waste depleted nuclear fuel cycles Ore · All fuel cycles begin with uranium and/or thorium which are the only naturally

Lovley, Derek

319

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ convented to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reaction chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. The oven is then swept clean of hydrogen and the water vapor formed by means of nitrogen and then while continuing to maintain the temperature between 400 and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion to uranium tetrafluoride, the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to ahout 400 deg C, and elemental fluorine is used as the fluorinating agent for the conversion of UF/sub 4/ into UF/sub 6/. The fluorine gas is passed into the chamber, and the UF/sub 6/ formed passes out and is delivered to a condenser.

Fowler, R.D.

1957-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

EIS-0360: Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIS-0359: Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

322

EIS-0360: Record of Decision  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site

323

EIS-0359: Record of Decision  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

324

DOE Announces Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory DOE Announces Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory March 12, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released a Policy Statement on the management of the Department of Energy's (DOE) excess uranium inventory, providing the framework within which DOE will make decisions concerning future use and disposition of its inventory. During the coming year, DOE will continue its ongoing program for downblending excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) into low enriched uranium (LEU), evaluate the benefits of enriching a portion of its excess natural uranium into LEU, and complete an analysis on enriching and/or selling some of its depleted uranium. Specific transactions are expected to occur in

325

Rescuing a Treasure Uranium-233  

SciTech Connect

Uranium-233 (233U) is a synthetic isotope of uranium formed under reactor conditions during neutron capture by natural thorium (232Th). At high purities, this synthetic isotope serves as a crucial reference for accurately quantifying and characterizing natural uranium isotopes for domestic and international safeguards. Separated 233U is stored in vaults at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These materials represent a broad spectrum of 233U from the standpoint isotopic purity the purest being crucial for precise analyses in safeguarding uranium. All 233U at ORNL currently is scheduled to be down blended with depleted uranium beginning in 2015. Such down blending will permanently destroy the potential value of pure 233U samples as certified reference material for use in uranium analyses. Furthermore, no replacement 233U stocks are expected to be produced in the future due to a lack of operating production capability and the high cost of returning to operation this currently shut down capability. This paper will describe the efforts to rescue the purest of the 233U materials arguably national treasures from their destruction by down blending.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Goldberg, Dr. Steven A. [DOE SC - Chicago Office; Hutcheon, Dr. Ian D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bodies depleted by uranium solution extraction and which remain underground do not constitute byproductEPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities Reid J. Rosnick Environmental Protection Agency Radiation Protection Division (6608J) Washington, DC 20460 NMA/NRC Uranium Recovery Workshop July 2, 2009 #12

Lovley, Derek

327

Enrichment and Location of Uranium Precipitates from Uranyl Carbonate Addition to Tank 43  

SciTech Connect

In order to safety restart the 2H evaporator, plans are to add depleted uranium (DU) as uranyl carbonate to Tank 43 to lower the 235U enrichment in the supernate. This memo examines the enrichment and location of uranium precipitates formed in Tank 43. An assessment of the risks associated with precipitating uranium shows that there is no criticality concern during this operation.

d' Entremont, P.D.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

328

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

URANIUM COMPOSITIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to high purity uranium alloys characterized by improved stability to thermal cycling and low thermal neutron absorption. The high purity uranium alloy contains less than 0.1 per cent by weight in total amount of any ore or more of the elements such as aluminum, silicon, phosphorous, tin, lead, bismuth, niobium, and zinc.

Allen, N.P.; Grogan, J.D.

1959-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

330

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

331

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Documents: Program Planning and Decision Making  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

documents Program Planning and Decision Making PDF Icon Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride 345 KB details PDF Icon Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

333

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 21. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2008-2012

334

Production, depletion trends are keys to predicting ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... ...

335

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an important source of supply in meeting requirements for U.S. utility uranium, conversion, and

336

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an important source of supply in meeting requirements for U.S. utility uranium, conversion, and

337

Conversion Factor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed... 1,110 1,106 1,105 1,106 1,109 Extraction Loss ......

338

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combine to indicate uranium enrichment of an alkaline magma.uranium, the Ilfmaussaq intrusion contains an unusually high enrichment

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Session 9.3: Advances in Depleted Uranium Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes.

Robert R. Price; M. Jonathan Haire; Allen G. Croff; Robert R. Price; M. Jonathan Haire; Allen G. Croff

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Process Control Improvements for Production of Depleted Uranium Hohlraums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from 20th Target Fabrication Meeting, May 20-24, 2012, Santa Fe, NM, Guest Editor: Robert C. Cook

H. Streckert; K. Blobaum; B. Chen; J. E. Fair; N. Hein; A. Nikroo; K. Quan; M. Stadermann

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Characterization of Blistering and Delamination in Depleted Uranium Hohlraums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from 20th Target Fabrication Meeting, May 20-24, 2012, Santa Fe, NM, Guest Editor: Robert C. Cook

K. J. M. Blobaum; M. Stadermann; J. E. Fair; N. E. Teslich; M. A. Wall; R. J. Foreman; N. Hein; H. Streckert; A. Nikroo

342

Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the specific radioactive material and its physical form (e.g., solid, liquid, or gas). The regulations also specify many requirements for labeling, marking, training, and...

343

Depleted-Uranium Dioxide as SNF Waste Package Particulate Fill...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Shunt (Replace Convection) Fill Lowers Temperature (Conductivity > Convective Gas Currents) Limited Convective Currents (Tight Geometry) Heat Transfer (Fuel Basket...

344

Uranium Mining and Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in the earth's surface. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors. Uranium-bearing ores are mined, and the uranium is processed to make reactor fuel. In nature, uranium atoms exist in several forms called isotopes - primarily uranium-238, or U-238, and uranium-235, or U-235. In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.3%) would consist of atoms of U-238, and a very small portion of the total mass (0.7%) would consist of atoms of U-235. Uranium Isotopes Isotopes of Uranium Using uranium as a fuel in the types of nuclear reactors common in the United States requires that the uranium be enriched so that the percentage of U-235 is increased, typically to 3 to 5%.

345

Introduction Uranium is a common element in nature, and has been used for centuries as a coloring agent in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Redistribution of depleted uranium (DU soils and water at two US Army proving grounds. Ann. M Health Phys. SocRemediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction ElizabethJ.P.Phillips, Edward R. Landa and DerekR. Lovley Key words: Bioremediation; Uranium; Mill tailings

346

Environmental Microbiology (2002) 4(9), 510-516 Multip,le influences of nitrate on uranium solubility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sulfate was depleted, U(VI) was reduced but there was no cell growth. Addition of as much as S mM uranium(VI) to U(IV) precipitates uranium from solution,D. desulfuricansmight be a usefulorganismfor recovering uranium from contaminatedwaters and wastestreams. Microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U

Lovley, Derek

347

Estimate of radiation release from MIT reactor with low enriched uranium (LEU) core during maximum hypothetical accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In accordance with a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. A component of the conversion analysis ...

Plumer, Kevin E. (Kevin Edward)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Uranium (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 63   Properties of unstable uranium isotopes with α-particle emission...Table 63 Properties of unstable uranium isotopes with α-particle emission Isotope Abundance, % Half-life ( t 1/2 ), years Energy, MeV 234 U 0.0055 2.47 � 10 5 4.77, 4.72, 4.58, 4.47, 235 U 0.720 7.1 � 10 6 4.40, 4.2 238 U 99.274 4.51 � 10 9 4.18...

349

Uranium-234  

SciTech Connect

Translation of Uran-234 by J. Sehmorak. The following subjects are discussed: /sup 234/U and other natural radioactive isotopes, fractionation of heavy radioactive elements in nature, fractionation of radioactive isotopes, /sup 234/U in nuclear geochemistry, /sup 234/U in uranium minerals, /sup 234/U in continental waters and in quaternary deposits, and /sup 234/U in the ocean. (LK)

Cherdyntsev, V.V.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Conversion Tables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Contents taken from Glossary: Carbon Dioxide and Climate, 1990. ORNL/CDIAC-39, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Third Edition. Edited by: Fred O'Hara Jr. 1 - International System of Units (SI) Prefixes 2 - Useful Quantities in CO2 3 - Common Conversion Factors 4 - Common Energy Unit Conversion Factors 5 - Geologic Time Scales 6 - Factors and Units for Calculating Annual CO2 Emissions Using Global Fuel Production Data Table 1. International System of Units (SI) Prefixes Prefix SI Symbol Multiplication Factor exa E 1018 peta P 1015 tera T 1012 giga G 109 mega M 106 kilo k 103 hecto h 102 deka da 10 deci d 10-1 centi c 10-2

351

The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.

Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, Carlos D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwamoto, Tomonori [JNFL; Tamura, Takayuki [JNFL; Aiuchi, Syun [JNFL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix F: Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Conversion EIS a Material Origin Destination Depleted U 3 O 8 Portsmouth Envirocare, NTS LLW, empty cylinders Portsmouth Envirocare, NTS CaF 2 Portsmouth Envirocare, NTS HF...

353

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Properties of Uranium Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Triuranium Octaoxide (U3O8) Uranium Dioxide (UO2) Uranium Tetrafluoride (U4) Uranyl Fluoride (UO2F2) The physical properties of the pertinent chemical forms of uranium are...

355

Uranium Quick Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Quick Facts Uranium Quick Facts A collection of facts about uranium, DUF6, and DOEs DUF6 inventory. Over the years, the Department of Energy has received numerous...

356

PREPARATION OF URANIUM MONOSULFIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for preparing uranium monosulfide from uranium tetrafluoride dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride. A hydrogen-hydrogen sulfide gas mixture passed through the solution precipitates uranium monosulfide. (AEC)

Yoshioka, K.

1964-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium Occurrences,"A tantalo-niobate of uranium, near pyrochlore. Isometric,niobate and tantalate of uranium, with ferrous iron and rare

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF SHOCK LOADED THIN URANIUM FOILS  

SciTech Connect

A series of spall experiments has been completed with thin depleted uranium targets, nominally 0.1 mm thick. The first set of uranium spall targets was cut and ground to final thickness from electro-refined, high-purity, cast uranium. The second set was rolled to final thickness from low purity uranium. The impactors for these experiments were laser-launched 0.05-mm thick copper flyers, 3 mm in diameter. Laser energies were varied to yield a range of flyer impact velocities. This resulted in varying degrees of damage to the uranium spall targets, from deformation to complete spall or separation at the higher velocities. Dynamic measurements of the uranium target free surface velocities were obtained with dual velocity interferometers. Uranium targets were recovered and sectioned after testing. Free surface velocity profiles were similar for the two types of uranium, but spall strengths (estimated from the magnitude of the pull-back signal) are higher for the high-purity cast uranium. Velocity profiles and microstructural evidence of spall from the sectioned uranium targets are presented.

Robbins, D. L. (David L.); Kelly, A. M. (Anna Marie); Alexander, D. J. (David J.); Hanrahan, R. J. (Robert J.); Snow, R. C. (Ronny C.); Gehr, R. J. (Russell J.); Rupp, Ted Dean,; Sheffield, S. A. (Stephen A.); Stahl, D. B. (David B.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

NUCLEAR BOMBS FROM LOW- ENRICHED URANIUM OR “SPENT ” FUEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom says that low-enriched uranium is not suitable for making nuclear weapons. However, an article in USA Today claims that “rogue ” states and terrorists have discovered that this is untrue. Not only that, but terrorists could separate plutonium from irradiated fuel (often called “spent fuel”) more easily than previously thought. (584.5495) WISE Amsterdam – Lowenriched uranium (LEU) is uranium containing up to 20 % uranium-235. Uranium with higher enrichment levels is classified as high-enriched, and is subject to international safeguards because it can be used to make nuclear weapons. However, a USA Today article claims that “rogue countries and terrorists” have discovered that it is possible to make nuclear weapons with uranium of lower enrichment, according to classified nuclear threat reports (1). The information is not entirely new. Back in 1996, a standard book on nuclear weapons material stated, “a self-sustaining chain reaction in a nuclear weapon cannot occur in depleted or natural or low-enriched uranium and is only theoretically IN THIS ISSUE: possible in LEU of roughly 10 percent or greater ” (2). Fuel for nuclear power reactors would not be suitable – this is typically enriched to 3-5 % uranium-235. However, for a “rogue state” wanting to make high-enriched uranium, it would take less work to start with nuclear fuel than with natural uranium. It could be done in a “small and easy to hide ” uranium enrichment plant – perhaps similar to the plant which has recently been discovered in Iran (3). Nevertheless, it would still require a substantial operation, since the fuel would need to be converted to uranium hexafluoride, enriched and then reconverted to uranium metal. More significantly, many research reactors use uranium of just under

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The LEU conversion status of U.S. Research Reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the conversion status of US research and test reactors and estimates uranium densities needed to convert reactors with power levels 21 MW from HEU ({ge} 20% U-235) to LEU (<20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each reactor need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.

Matos, J. E.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Precious Metals Conversion Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precious Metals Conversion Information. The Office of Weights and Measures (OWM) has prepared a Conversion Factors ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

Gray, A.G.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report Data for: 2005 Release Date: May 15, 2006 Next Release: May 15, 2007

364

Manhattan Project: Uranium cubes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cubes of uranium metal, Los Alamos, 1945 Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 > More Uranium Research, 1942 Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 > Basic Research at Los Alamos,...

365

Expanding and optimizing fuel management and data analysis capabilities of MCODE-FM in support of MIT research reactor (MITR-II) LEU conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies are underway in support of the MIT research reactor (MITR-II) conversion from high enriched Uranium (HEU) to low enriched Uranium (LEU), as required by recent non-proliferation policy. With the same core configuration ...

Horelik, Nicholas E. (Nicholas Edward)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part of a global effort to minimize the availability of ...

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Chapter 1. Introduction Uranium is a common element in nature that has for centuries been used as a coloring agent in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 · Fungus catches radioactive fallout 8 May 2002 · Depleted uranium soils battlefields 12 MarchBugs boost Cold War clean-up: Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago boost Cold War clean-up Bacteria could scrub uranium from sites contaminated decades ago. 13 October

368

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

372

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

Calkins, V.P.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM MONOCARBIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making essentially stoichiometric uranium monocarbide by pelletizing a mixture of uranium tetrafluoride, silicon, and carbon and reacting the mixture at a temperature of approximately 1500 to 1700 deg C until the reaction goes to completion, forming uranium monocarbide powder and volatile silicon tetrafluoride, is described. The powder is then melted to produce uranium monocarbide in massive form. (AEC)

Powers, R.M.

1962-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

375

The utilization of uranium industry technology and relevant chemistry to leach uranium from mixed-waste solids  

SciTech Connect

Methods for the chemical extraction of uranium from a number of refractory uranium-containing minerals found in nature have been in place and employed by the uranium mining and milling industry for nearly half a century. These same methods, in conjunction with the principles of relevant uranium chemistry, have been employed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to chemically leach depleted uranium from mixed-waste sludge and soil. The removal of uranium from what is now classified as mixed waste may result in the reclassification of the waste as hazardous, which may then be delisted. The delisted waste might eventually be disposed of in commercial landfill sites. This paper generally discusses the application of chemical extractive methods to remove depleted uranium from a biodenitrification sludge and a storm sewer soil sediment from the Y-12 weapons plant in Oak Ridge. Some select data obtained from scoping leach tests on these materials are presented along with associated limitations and observations which might be useful to others performing such test work. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Putting Depleted Uranium to Use: A New Class of Uranium-Based...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of ways, but all suffer major problems: (a) no control of the 6 Fig. 4. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of SiO 2 -ordered nanopores (25 D D). (1) location of...

377

DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent deals with the separation of rare earth and other fission products from neutron bombarded uranium. This is accomplished by melting the uranium in contact with either thorium oxide, maguesium oxide, alumnum oxide, beryllium oxide, or uranium dioxide. The melting is preferably carried out at from 1150 deg to 1400 deg C in an inert atmosphere, such as argon or helium. During this treatment a scale of uranium dioxide forms on the uranium whtch contains most of the fission products.

Feder, H.M.; Chellew, N.R.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Physical and chemical properties of UF6, and its use in uranium processing. Uranium Hexafluoride and Its Properties Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. UF6 crystals in a glass vial image UF6 crystals in a glass vial. Uranium hexafluoride does not react with oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or dry air, but it does react with water or water vapor. For this reason,

379

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

380

Context: Destruction/Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Context: Destruction/Conversion. ... Process for Conversion of Halon 1211.. Tran, R.; Kennedy, EM; Dlugogorski, BZ; 2000. ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Video: Part of the 'Hole' Story (of Uranium Hexafluoride Cylinders)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hole Story Hole Story Part of the "Hole" Story (of Uranium Hexafluoride Cylinders) Holes in the depleted Uranium Hexafluoride storage cylinders are investigated. It is shown that corrosion products cause the openings to be self-healing. View this Video in Real Player format Download free RealPlayer SP Highlights of the Video: Video 00:00 Part of the 'Hole' Story Video 00:05 One of the depleted UF6 cylinder storage lots at Portsmouth Video 00:28 48G cylinders, each containing 14 tons of depleted UF6, in storage Video 00:52 Stacked 48G cylinders Video 01:35 UF6 sealed in glass tube Video 02:01 A lifting lug of one cylinder damaging a neighboring cylinder Video 02:37 Damage to small hole cylinder from impact with a lifting lub of an adjoining cylinder

382

Process for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys wherein molten uranium and uranium alloys are melted in a molten layer of a fluoride slag containing up to about 8 weight percent calcium metal. The calcium metal reduces oxides in the uranium and uranium alloys to provide them with an oxygen content of less than 100 parts per million. (auth)

Lewis, P.S. Jr.; Agee, W.A.; Bullock, J.S. IV; Condon, J.B.

1975-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

383

SOLDERING OF URANIUM  

SciTech Connect

One of Its Monograph Series, The Industrial Atom.'' The joining of uranium to uranium has been done successfully using a number of commercial soft solders and fusible alloys. Soldering by using an ultrasonic soldering iron has proved the best method for making sound soldered joints of uranium to uranium and of uranium to other metals, such as stainless steel. Other method of soldering have shown some promise but did not give reliable joints all the time. The soldering characteristics of uranium may best be compared to those of aluminum. (auth)

Hanks, G.S.; Doll, D.T.; Taub, J.M.; Brundige, E.L.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

PRODUCTION OF PURIFIED URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrometallurgical method for processing nuclear reactor fuel elements containing uranium and fission products and for reducing uranium compound; to metallic uranium is reported. If the material proccssed is essentially metallic uranium, it is dissolved in zinc, the sulution is cooled to crystallize UZn/sub 9/ , and the UZn/sub 9/ is distilled to obtain uranium free of fission products. If the material processed is a uranium compound, the sollvent is an alloy of zinc and magnesium and the remaining steps are the same.

Burris, L. Jr.; Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

1960-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

CO depletion --- An evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of Planck satellite with the molecular data of $^{12}$CO/$^{13}$CO (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) 14 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion and CO-to-H$_{2}$ conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores (ECC) sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 6.2$\\times10^{-5}$ and 9.1$\\times10^{-5}$, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 2.8 and 1.4, respectively. The median value of $X_{CO-to-H_{2}}$ for the whole sample is $3.3\\times10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$K$^{-1}$km$^{-1}$ s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor and CO-to-H$_{2}$ conversion factor seems to be strongly correlated to other physical parameters (e.g. dust temperature, dust emissivity spectra index and column density). CO gas severely freeze out in colde...

Liu, Tie; Zhang, Huawei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Method of recovering uranium hexafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures which comprises adsorbing said uranium hexafluoride on activated carbon is described.

Schuman, S.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Atomic Data for Uranium (U )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Uranium (U) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Uranium (U). ...

389

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

390

Independent Oversight Assessment, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office- May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants

391

Performance Assessment Transport Modeling of Uranium at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

Following is a brief summary of the assumptions that are pertinent to the radioactive isotope transport in the GoldSim Performance Assessment model of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, with special emphasis on the water-phase reactive transport of uranium, which includes depleted uranium products.

NSTec Radioactive Waste

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Predicting 232U Content in Uranium  

SciTech Connect

The minor isotope 232U may ultimately be used for detection or confirmation of uranium in a variety of applications. The primary advantage of 232 U as an indicator of the presence of enriched uranium is the plentiful and penetrating nature of the radiation emitted by its daughter radionuclide 208Tl. A possible drawback to measuring uranium via 232U is the relatively high uncertainty in 232U abundance both within and between material populations. An important step in assessing this problem is to ascertain what determines the 232U concentration within any particular sample of uranium. To this end, we here analyze the production and eventual enrichment of 232 U during fuel-cycle operations. The goal of this analysis is to allow approximate prediction of 232 U quantities, or at least some interpretation of the results of 232U measurements. We have found that 232U is produced via a number of pathways during reactor irradiation of uranium and is subsequently concentrated during the later enrichment of the uranium' s 235U Content. While exact calculations are nearly impossible for both the reactor-production and cascade-enrichment parts of the prediction problem, estimates and physical bounds can be provided as listed below and detailed within the body of the report. Even if precise calculations for the irradiation and enrichment were possible, the ultimate 212U concentration would still depend upon the detailed fuel-cycle history. Assuming that a thennal-diffusion cascade is used to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU), dilution of reactor-processed fuel at the cascade input and the long-term holdup of 232U within the cascade both affect the 232U concentration in the product. Similar issues could be expected to apply for the other isotope-separation technologies that are used in other countries. Results of this analysis are listed below: 0 The 232U concentration depends strongly on the uranium enrichment, with depleted uranium (DU) containing between 1600 and 8000 times less 232U than HEU does. * The 236U/232U concentration ratio in HEU is likely to be between 10{sup 6} and 2 x 10{sup 7}. 0 Plutonium-production reactors yield uranium with between I and 10 ppt of 232u. 0 Much higher 132U concentrations can be obtained in some situations. * Significant variation in the 232U concentration is inevitable. * Cascade enrichment increases the 232U concentration by a factor of at least 200, and possibly as much as 1000. 0 The actual 232U concentration depends upon the dilution at the cascade input.

AJ Peurrung

1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Predicting 232U Content in Uranium  

SciTech Connect

The minor isotope 232U may ultimately be used for detection or confirmation of uranium in a variety of applications. The primary advantage of 232 U as an indicator of the presence of enriched uranium is the plentiful and penetrating nature of the radiation emitted by its daughter radionuclide 208Tl. A possible drawback to measuring uranium via 232U is the relatively high uncertainty in 232U abundance both within and between material populations. An important step in assessing this problem is to ascertain what determines the 232U concentration within any particular sample of uranium. To this end, we here analyze the production and eventual enrichment of 232 U during fuel-cycle operations. The goal of this analysis is to allow approximate prediction of 232 U quantities, or at least some interpretation of the results of 232U measurements. We have found that 232U is produced via a number of pathways during reactor irradiation of uranium and is subsequently concentrated during the later enrichment of the uranium' s 235U Content. While exact calculations are nearly impossible for both the reactor-production and cascade-enrichment parts of the prediction problem, estimates and physical bounds can be provided as listed below and detailed within the body of the report. Even if precise calculations for the irradiation and enrichment were possible, the ultimate 212U concentration would still depend upon the detailed fuel-cycle history. Assuming that a thennal-diffusion cascade is used to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU), dilution of reactor-processed fuel at the cascade input and the long-term holdup of 232U within the cascade both affect the 232U concentration in the product. Similar issues could be expected to apply for the other isotope-separation technologies that are used in other countries. Results of this analysis are listed below: 0 The 232U concentration depends strongly on the uranium enrichment, with depleted uranium (DU) containing between 1600 and 8000 times less 232U than HEU does. * The 236U/232U concentration ratio in HEU is likely to be between 10{sup 6} and 2 x 10{sup 7}. 0 Plutonium-production reactors yield uranium with between I and 10 ppt of 232u. 0 Much higher 132U concentrations can be obtained in some situations. * Significant variation in the 232U concentration is inevitable. * Cascade enrichment increases the 232U concentration by a factor of at least 200, and possibly as much as 1000. 0 The actual 232U concentration depends upon the dilution at the cascade input.

AJ Peurrung

1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Uranium from phosphate ores  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant.

Hurst, F.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For inhalation or ingestion of soluble or moderately soluble compounds such as uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) or uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the uranium enters the bloodstream and...

396

METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for purifying a uranium-base nuclear material. The nuclear material is dissolved in zinc or a zinc-magnesium alloy and the concentration of magnesium is increased until uranium precipitates.

Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

1960-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Uranium Quick Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Quick Facts A collection of facts about uranium, DUF6, and DOEs DUF6 inventory. Over the years, the Department of Energy has received numerous inquiries from the...

398

Cathodoluminescence of uranium oxides  

SciTech Connect

The cathodoluminescence of uranium oxide surfaces prepared in-situ from clean uranium exposed to dry oxygen was studied. The broad asymmetric peak observed at 470 nm is attributed to F-center excitation.

Winer, K.; Colmenares, C.; Wooten, F.

1984-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

Bicarbonate leaching of uranium  

SciTech Connect

The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented.

Mason, C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

PREPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for preparing uranium hexafluoride from carbonate- leach uranium ore concentrate. The briquetted, crushed, and screened concentrate is reacted with hydrogen fluoride in a fluidized bed, and the uranium tetrafluoride formed is mixed with a solid diluent, such as calcium fluoride. This mixture is fluorinated with fluorine and an inert diluent gas, also in a fluidized bed, and the uranium hexafluoride obtained is finally purified by fractional distillation.

Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Steunenberg, R.K.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SYSTEM FOR CONVERSION OF UF$sub 4$ TO UF$sub 6$  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are presented for rapid and complete conversion of solid, powdered uranium tetrafiuorlde to uranlum hexafluorlde by treating the UF/ sub 4/ with fluorine gas at a temperature of about 800 icient laborato C.

Brater, D.G.; Pike, J.W.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for producing uranium tetrafluoride from the gaseous hexafluoride by feeding the hexafluoride into a high temperature zone obtained by the recombination of molecularly dissociated hydrogen. The molal ratio of hydrogen to uranium hexnfluoride is preferably about 3 to 1. Uranium tetrafluoride is obtained in a finely divided, anhydrous state.

Shaw, W.E.; Spenceley, R.M.; Teetzel, F.M.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

FAQ 10-Why is uranium hexafluoride used?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uranium hexafluoride used? Why is uranium hexafluoride used? Uranium hexafluoride is used in uranium processing because its unique properties make it very convenient. It can...

404

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

Yeager, J.H.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The production of uranium metal by the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride is described. Massive uranium metal of high purily is produced by reacting uranium tetrafluoride with 2 to 20% stoichiometric excess of magnesium at a temperature sufficient to promote the reaction and then mantaining the reaction mass in a sealed vessel at temperature in the range of 1150 to 2000 d C, under a superatomospheric pressure of magnesium for a period of time sufficient 10 allow separation of liquid uranium and liquid magnesium fluoride into separate layers.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Measurement and Analysis of Fission Rates in a Spherical Mockup of Uranium and Polyethylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the reaction rate distribution were carried out using two kinds of Plate Micro Fission Chamber(PMFC). The first is a depleted uranium chamber and the second an enriched uranium chamber. The material in the depleted uranium chamber is strictly the same as the material in the uranium assembly. With the equation solution to conduct the isotope contribution correction, the fission rate of 238U and 235U were obtained from the fission rate of depleted uranium and enriched uranium. And then, the fission count of 238U and 235U in an individual uranium shell was obtained. In this work, MCNP5 and continuous energy cross sections ENDF/BV.0 were used for the analysis of fission rate distribution and fission count. The calculated results were compared with the experimental ones. The calculation of fission rate of DU and EU were found to agree with the measured ones within 10% except at the positions in polyethylene region and the two positions near the outer surface. Beacause the fission chamber was not co...

Tong-Hua, Zhu; Xin-Xin, Lu; Rong, Liu; Zi-Jie, Han; Li, Jiang; Mei, Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Documents: Engineering Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Depleted UF6 99 KB details HTML Icon Preconceptual Design Studies and Cost Data of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants 4 KB details Engineering Analysis Report...

409

Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2007 EIS-0359: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplement Analysis Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Produce Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted...

410

Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

Duerksen, Walter K. (Norris, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixtures is then cooled to a temperature less than -100/sup 0/C in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

Duerksen, W.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W _7405-eng- 4B QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvint r UCRL-9 533 QUANrUM CONVERSION IN PHWOSYNTHESIS * Melvinitself. The primary quantum conversion act is an ionization

Calvin, Melvin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

414

Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

415

Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

Willit, James L. (Ratavia, IL)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Produced Conversion Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical conversion coatings are commonly applied to Mg alloys as paint bases and in some cases as stand-alone protection. Traditional conversion coatings ...

417

Library Conversion Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Library Conversion Tool. ... The LIB2NIST mass spectral data conversion program consists of the following files (which are contained in a ZIP archive): ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Conversion of Legacy Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Conversion of Legacy Data. Conversion of legacy data can be one of the most difficult and challenging components in an SGML environment. ...

419

Biofuel Conversion Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The conversion of biomass solids into liquid or gaseous biofuels is a complex process. Today, the most common conversion processes are biochemical- and thermochemical-based. However, researchers...

420

Uranium series disequilibrium in the Bargmann property area of Karnes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Historical evidence is presented for natural uranium series radioactive disequilibrium in uranium bearing soils in the Bargmann property area of karnes County on the Gulf Coastal Plain of south Texas. The early history of uranium exploration in the area is recounted and records of disequilibrium before milling and mining operations began are given. The property contains an open pit uranium mine associated with a larger ore body. In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the Bargmann tract for the presence of uranium mill tailings (ORNL 1996). There was a possibility that mill tailings had washed onto or blown onto the property from the former tailings piles in quantities that would warrant remediation under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project. Activity ratios illustrating disequilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U in background soils during 1986 are listed and discussed. Derivations of uranium mass-to-activity conversion factors are covered in detail.

Davidson, J.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

FAQ 1-What is uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is uranium? What is uranium? What is uranium? Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in low concentrations (a few parts per million) in soil, rock, and surface and groundwater. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. Uranium in its pure form is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes: primarily uranium-238, uranium-235, and a very small amount of uranium-234. (Isotopes are different forms of an element that have the same number of protons in the nucleus, but a different number of neutrons.) In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.27%) consists of atoms of uranium-238. About 0.72% of the mass consists of atoms of uranium-235, and a very small amount (0.0055% by mass) is uranium-234.

422

Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Conversion Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conversion Plan Conversion Plan This template is used to document the conversion plan that clearly defines the system or project's conversion procedures; outlines the installation...

425

Uranium hexafluoride public risk  

SciTech Connect

The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Leu conversion status of U.S. research reactors: September 1996  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Department of Energy, the RERTR Program has summarized the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States and has made estimates of the uranium densities that would be needed to convert the reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) (greater than or equal to 20% U-235) to Lightly Enriched Uranium (LEU) (less than 20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each of the reactors need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.

Matos, J.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) AREVA NC, Inc. (was COGEMA, Inc.) American Fuel Resources, LLC American Fuel Resources, LLC BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ConverDyn CAMECO CAMECO Denison Mines Corp. ConverDyn ConverDyn Energy Resources of Australia Ltd. Denison Mines Corp. Energy Fuels Resources Energy USA, Inc. Effective Energy N.V. Energy Resources of Australia Ltd.

428

Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sintering behavior of uranium and uranium-zirconium alloys in the alpha phase were characterized in this research. Metal uranium powder was produced from pieces of depleted uranium metal acquired from the Y-12 plant via hydriding/dehydriding process. The size distribution and morphology of the uranium powder produced by this method were determined by digital optical microscopy. Once the characteristics of the source uranium powder were known, uranium and uranium-zirconium pellets were pressed using a dual-action punch and die. The majority of these pellets were sintered isothermally, first in the alpha phase near 650°C, then in the gamma phase near 800°C. In addition, a few pellets were sintered using more exotic temperature profiles. Pellet shrinkage was continuously measured in situ during sintering. The isothermal shrinkage rates and sintering temperatures for each pellet were fit to a simple model for the initial phase of sintering of spherical powders. The material specific constants required by this model, including the activation energy of the process, were determined for both uranium and uranium-zirconium. Following sintering, pellets were sectioned, mounted, and polished for imaging by electron microscopy. Based on these results, the porosity and microstructure of the sintered pellets were analyzed. The porosity of the uranium-zirconium pellets was consistently lower than that of the pure uranium pellets. In addition, some formation of an alloyed phase of uranium and zirconium was observed. The research presented within this thesis is a continuation of a previous project; however, this research has produced many new results not previously seen. In addition, a number of issues left unresolved by the previous project have been addressed and solved. Most notably, the low original output of the hydride/dehydride powder production system has been increased by an order of magnitude, the actual characteristics of the powder have been measured and determined, shrinkage data was successfully converted into a sintering model, an alloyed phase of uranium and zirconium was produced, and pellet cracking due to delamination has been eliminated.

Helmreich, Grant

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Preparation of uranium compounds  

SciTech Connect

UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

430

First Principles Calculations of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, First Principles Calculations of Uranium and Uranium- Zirconium Alloys. Author(s), Benjamin Good, Benjamin Beeler, Chaitanya Deo, Sergey ...

431

Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

432

Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN); Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Depleted Argon from Underground Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Jadwin Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H. [Augustana College, Physics Department, 2001 South Summit Ave., Sioux Fall, SD 57197 (United States); Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

434

DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONTINUOUS METHOD FOR THE REDUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH HYDROGEN-PROCESS DEVELOPMENT. HOT WALL REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

>A continuous process for the reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride was developed and proved on a pilot-plant scale. Complete conversion to uranium tetrafluoride was realized by contacting gaseous uranium hexafluoride with hydrogen in a heated, vertical, open-tube reactor. The purity and density of the solid product met metal grade uranium tetrafluoride specifications. Some difficulty with the accumulation of fused uranium fluorides in the tower was encountered, however, and it was necessary to stop and desing the unit about every 8 to 24 hours. The reaction of uranium hexafluoride with gaseous trichloroethylene was stadied before the tests with hydrogen were made. Although the reduction to uranium tetrafluoride was complete, the solid product was highly contaminated with the organic by-products of the reaction and was quite low in density. Tests of this method were discontinued when promising results were obtained with hydrogen as the reductant. (auth)

Smiley, S H; Brater, D C

1958-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

435

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"...

436

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. U.S. uranium drilling activities, 2003-2012 Exploration Drilling Development Drilling Exploration and Development Drilling Year Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes...

437

Uranium 'pearls' before slime  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

harm to themselves, scientists have wondered how on Earth these microbes do it. For Shewanella oneidensis, a microbe that modifies uranium chemistry, the pieces are coming...

438

Uranium Purchases Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue. This report details natural and enriched uranium purchases as reported by owners and operators of commercial nuclear power plants. 1996 represents the most recent publication year.

Douglas Bonnar

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is described for the magnesium reduction of UF/sub 4/ to produce uranium metal. In the past, there have been undesirable premature reactions between the Mg and the bomb liner or the UF/sub 4/ before the actual ignition of the bomb reaction. Since these premature reactions impair the yield of uranium metal, they have been inhibited by forming a protective film upon the particles of Mg by reacting it with hydrated uranium tetrafluoride, sodium bifluoride, uranyl fluoride, or uranium trioxide. This may be accomplished by adding about 0.5 to 2% of the additive to the bomb charge.

Ruehle, A.E.; Stevenson, J.W.

1957-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

440

Uranium Purchases Report 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA–0570(95) Distribution Category UC–950 Uranium Purchases Report 1995 June 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted uranium conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High-voltage-compatible, fully depleted CCDs  

SciTech Connect

We describe charge-coupled device (CCD) developmentactivities at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).Back-illuminated CCDs fabricated on 200-300 mu m thick, fully depleted,high-resistivity silicon substrates are produced in partnership with acommercial CCD foundry.The CCDs are fully depleted by the application ofa substrate bias voltage. Spatial resolution considerations requireoperation of thick, fully depleted CCDs at high substrate bias voltages.We have developed CCDs that are compatible with substrate bias voltagesof at least 200V. This improves spatial resolution for a given thickness,and allows for full depletion of thicker CCDs than previously considered.We have demonstrated full depletion of 650-675 mu m thick CCDs, withpotential applications in direct x-ray detection. In this work we discussthe issues related to high-voltage operation of fully depleted CCDs, aswell as experimental results on high-voltage-compatible CCDs.

Holland, Stephen E.; Bebek, Chris J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Emes, JohnE.; Fabricius, Max H.; Fairfield, Jessaym A.; Groom, Don E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, William F.; Palaio, Nick P.; Roe, Natalie A.; Wang, Guobin

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Quantification of uranium transport away from firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory: A mass balance approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory to quantify the extent of migration of depleted uranium away from firing sites. Extensive sampling of air particles, soil, sediment, and water was conducted to establish the magnitude of uranium contamination throughout one watershed. The uranium source term was estimated, and mass balance calculations were performed to compare the percentage of migrated uranium with original expenditures. Mass balance calculations can be powerful in identification of the extent of waste migration and used as an aid in planning future waste investigations.

Becker, N.M.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Quantification of uranium transport away from firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory: A mass balance approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory to quantify the extent of migration of depleted uranium away from firing sites. Extensive sampling of air particles, soil, sediment, and water was conducted to establish the magnitude of uranium contamination throughout one watershed. The uranium source term was estimated, and mass balance calculations were performed to compare the percentage of migrated uranium with original expenditures. Mass balance calculations can be powerful in identification of the extent of waste migration and used as an aid in planning future waste investigations.

Becker, N.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

udrilling 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Next Release Date: May 2014 Table 1. U.S. uranium drilling activities, 2003-2012 Year Exploration Drilling

445

URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

McClaine, L.A.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

446

PROCESS FOR MAKING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for producing uranium hexafluoride by reacting uranium hexachloride with hydrogen fluoride at a temperature below about 150 deg C, under anhydrous conditions.

Rosen, R.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

447

Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 March 26, 2010 Consent Order issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to Construction Deficiencies at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement has completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with construction deficiencies at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings located at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants. The investigation reports, dated January 22, 2009, and April 23, 2009, were provided to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (DDS), and addressed specific areas of potential noncompliance with DOE nuclear safety requirements established in

448

,"Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural...

449

Uranium industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radioactive. uranium, depleted Uranium consisting primarilyoccurring in nature, depleted uranium is man-made. uranium,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z