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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production...

2

Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S. Department of EnergyD e s c r iQ1Configuration

4

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulation has been used, as common practice, to estimate the CO2 storage capacity of depleted reservoirs. However, this method is time consuming, expensive and requires detailed input data. This investigation proposes an analytical method...

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir-A Numerical Simulation Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

injection into saline aquifer, CO2-EOR, CO2-ECBM, and so forth, have been studied to minimize the CO22-EOR, CO2-ECBM, and so forth, have been studied to minimize the CO2 release into the atmosphere1 CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir- A Numerical Simulation

Mohaghegh, Shahab

6

Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

Gardner, William Payton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Large releases from CO2 storage reservoirs: Analogs, scenarios, and modeling needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells is a major concern for storage of CO 2 in depleted or near-depleted oil and gas reservoirs [

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Large releases from CO2 storage reservoirs: analogs, scenarios, and modeling needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells is a major concern for storage of CO 2 in depleted or near-depleted oil and gas reservoirs [

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: A Discussion of Natural Analogs, FEPS, and Modeling Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells is a major concern for geological storage of CO 2 in depleted or near-depleted oil and gas reservoirs [

Birkholzer, J.; Pruess, K.; Lewicki, J.L.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.; Karimjee, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

11

Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storage reservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO 2 to the surface, particularly in depleted oil or gas reservoir

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Analytical solution for Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 geo-sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs Simon A.1. Introduction Depleted oil and gas reservoirs (DOGRs)

Mathias, S.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

14

Computer Simulation of Reservoir Depletion and Oil Flow from the Macondo Well Following the Deepwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Simulation of Reservoir Depletion and Oil Flow from the Macondo Well Following, 2010, Computer simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well following. ..................................................................................12 Figures Figure 1. Oblique schematic view of the M56 oil reservoir

15

Impact of carbon dioxide sequestration in depleted gas-condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Depleted gas-condensate reservoirs are becoming important targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Since depleted below the dew point, retrograde condensate has been deposited in the pore… (more)

Ramharack, Richard M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storage reservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned wells at storage sites, particularly at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirsabandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO 2 to the surface, particularly in depleted oil or gas reservoirabandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO 2 to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground...

20

Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside...

Seo, Jeong Gyu

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Prediction of future well performance, including reservoir depletion effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past, the reservoir material balance (voidage) effects occurring between the end of the measured (known) production history and future Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) time levels have been commonly ignored in the computation of the future IPR behavior. Neglecting the reservoir voidage that occurs during the time interval between the end of the known production history and the future IPR time levels results in erroneous estimates of the future IPR behavior. A detailed description is given of the mathematically rigorous technique that has been used in the development of a multilayer well performance simulator that properly accounts for the reservoir voidage effects. Some of the more significant results are also presented of an extensive effort to develop an accurate and computationally efficient well performance simulation model. The reservoir can be considered to be multilayered, with mixed reservoir layer completion types and outer boundary shapes, drainage areas and boundary conditions. The well performance model can be used to simulate performance in three different operating modes: (1) constant wellhead rate, (2) constant bottomhole pressure, and (3) constant wellhead pressure. The transient performance of vertical, vertically fractured and horizontal wells can be simulated with this well performance model. The well performance model uses mathematically rigorous transient solutions and not simply the approximate solutions for each of the well types, as do most of the other commercially available well performance models.

Poe, B.D. Jr.; Elbel, J.L.; Spath, J.B.; Wiggins, M.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Long-timescale interaction of CO2 storage with reservoir and seal: Miller and Brae natural analogue fields North Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power generation by shift of natural methane gas to hydrogen and pre-combustion separation of CO2 Background Depleted oil or gas fields, naturally rich in CO2, provide an immediate opportunity for long1 Long-timescale interaction of CO2 storage with reservoir and seal: Miller and Brae natural

Haszeldine, Stuart

24

Panel 2, Geologic Storage of Hydrogen  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geologic Storage - Types Types of Underground Storage Aquifers Aquifers are similar in geology to depleted reservoirs, but have not been proven to trap gas and must be developed....

25

Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storage reservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs where wells areat sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs where wells areparticularly in depleted oil or gas reservoir systems, where

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Source Term Modeling for Evaluating the Potential Impacts to Groundwater of Fluids Escaping from a Depleted Oil Reservoir Used for Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Modeling is currently being conducted to evaluate potential risks to groundwater associated with leakage of fluids from depleted oil reservoirs used for storage of CO2. Modeling results reported here focused on understanding how toxic organic compounds found in oil will distribute between the various phases within a storage reservoir after introduction of CO2, understanding the migration potential of these compounds, and assessing potential groundwater impacts should leakage occur. Two model scenarios were conducted to evaluate how organic components in oil will distribute among the phases of interest (oil, CO2, and brine). The first case consisted of 50 wt.% oil and 50 wt.% water; the second case was 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil. Several key organic compounds were selected for special attention in this study based upon their occurrence in oil at significant concentrations, relative toxicity, or because they can serve as surrogate compounds for other more highly toxic compounds for which required input data are not available. The organic contaminants of interest (COI) selected for this study were benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Partitioning of organic compounds between crude oil and supercritical CO2 was modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state over temperature and pressure conditions that represent the entire subsurface system (from those relevant to deep geologic carbon storage environments to near surface conditions). Results indicate that for a typical set of oil reservoir conditions (75°C, and 21,520 kPa) negligible amounts of the COI dissolve into the aqueous phase. When CO2 is introduced into the reservoir such that the final composition of the reservoir is 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil, a significant fraction of the oil dissolves into the vapor phase. As the vapor phase moves up through the stratigraphic column, pressures and temperatures decrease, resulting in significant condensation of oil components. The heaviest organic components condense early in this process (at higher pressures and temperatures), while the lighter components tend to remain in the vapor phase until much lower pressures and temperatures are reached. Based on the model assumptions, the final concentrations of COI to reach an aquifer at 1,520 kPa and 25°C were quite significant for benzene and toluene, whereas the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons that reach the aquifer were very small. This work demonstrates a methodology that can provide COI source term concentrations in CO2 leaking from a reservoir and entering an overlying aquifer for use in risk assessments.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

27

On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from a Geologic Storage Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 - 16, 1987. Skinner, L. CO2 Blowouts: An Emerging Problem,Assessment for Underground CO2 Storage, paper 234, presentedReservoir Performance Risk in CO2 Storage Projects, paper

Pruess, Karsten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Wave propagation and thermodynamic losses in packed-bed thermal reservoirs for energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

 .     The  reservoirs  of  interest  here  typically  comprise  a  cylindrical  pressure  vessel  containing  the  solid  storage  medium  in  the  form  of  a  packed  bed  of  pebbles  or  gravel,  or  a  uniform... WAVE  PROPAGATION  AND  THERMODYNAMIC  LOSSES  IN  PACKED-­?BED  THERMAL  RESERVOIRS  FOR  ENERGY  STORAGE       Alexander  White1,  Joshua  McTigue1,  Christos  Markides2   1  Cambridge  University...

White, Alexander; McTigue, Joshua; Markides, Christos

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of Storage Reallocation and Related Strategies for Optimizing Reservoir System Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-145 1988 Evaluation of Storage Reallocation and Related Strategies for Optimizing Reservoir System Operations R.A. Wurbs P.E. Carriere Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Carriere, Patrick E.

30

Modeling Reallocation of Reservoir Storage Capacity Between Flood Control and Conservation Purposes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modifications in reservoir storage allocations and related system operations. The research consisted of the following tasks: ? The Brazos River Basin WRAP input dataset from the Texas WAM System (Brazos WAM) has a 1940-1997 hydrologic period...

Kim, Tae Jin

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

31

DUSCOBS - a depleted-uranium silicate backfill for transport, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Depleted Uranium Silicate COntainer Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside storage, transport, and repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill all void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (1) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (2) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. In addition, the DUSCOBS improves the integrity of the package by acting as a packing material and ensures criticality control for the package during SNF storage and transport. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments.

Forsberg, C.W.; Pope, R.B.; Ashline, R.C.; DeHart, M.D.; Childs, K.W.; Tang, J.S.

1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Deep Saline Aquifer Storage Based on Reservoir and Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and of the Council of 23 April 2009 on the geological storage of carbon dioxide IEA-GHG, 2007. Remediation of Leakage from CO2 Storage Reservoirs. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme, 2007/11, September 2007. Le Guenan T : review and modelling., in CO2NET 2009 Annual Seminar Agenda - Trondheim - Norway - 18-19 June 2009. Xu T

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

35

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

36

Flood control reservoir operations for conditions of limited storage capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Therefore, if the entire flood control capacity of a reservoir is available, only an extremely severe flood event would require the implementation of the EOS for most reservoir projects, and thus the bulk of the research has been focused on how to manage... operations objectives. In other words, the REOS provide a set of rules that reflect the risk of flooding upstream as well as downstream of the dams. The USACE and other reservoir management agencies may use the methodology proposed in this study...

Rivera Ramirez, Hector David

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal–CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations: An Approach to Improve Energy Recovery and Mitigate Risk : FY1 Final Report The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Compositional simulation of primary depletion for near critical reservoirs using the VIP simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

whenever dealing with this kind of reservoir. The methods do not involve the re-tuning of the equation of state because this can be an expensive and time consuming process. The methods approach the problem by artificially modifying two adjustement...

Ordonez, Roberto E

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Impact of reservoir properties on mixing of inert cushion and natural gas in storage reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Underground natural gas storage is a process which effectively balances a variable demand market with a nearly constant supply of energy provided by the pipeline… (more)

Srinivasan, Balaji S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of the Effect of Geological Reservoir Variability on Carbon Dioxide Storage Using'expériences -- Dans le contexte de l'étude du stockage géologique du dioxyde de carbone dans les réservoirs al. (2007) Energy Convers. Manage. 48, 1782-1797; Gunter et al. (1999) Appl. Geochem. 4, 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs Sean T Description Date 0 Original document 1/29/2008 1 Estimate for carbon content of crude oil was incorrect (see p an invaluable summer at the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin working with Sue

43

Use of depleted uranium metal as cask shielding in high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE has amassed over 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium from its uranium enrichment operations. Rather than dispose of this depleted uranium as waste, this study explores a beneficial use of depleted uranium as metal shielding in casks designed to contain canisters of vitrified high-level waste. Two high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal shielded cask systems are analyzed. The first system employs a shielded storage and disposal cask having a separate reusable transportation overpack. The second system employs a shielded combined storage, transport, and disposal cask. Conceptual cask designs that hold 1, 3, 4 and 7 high-level waste canisters are described for both systems. In all cases, cask design feasibility was established and analyses indicate that these casks meet applicable thermal, structural, shielding, and contact-handled requirements. Depleted uranium metal casting, fabrication, environmental, and radiation compatibility considerations are discussed and found to pose no serious implementation problems. About one-fourth of the depleted uranium inventory would be used to produce the casks required to store and dispose of the nearly 15,400 high-level waste canisters that would be produced. This study estimates the total-system cost for the preferred 7-canister storage and disposal configuration having a separate transportation overpack would be $6.3 billion. When credits are taken for depleted uranium disposal cost, a cost that would be avoided if depleted uranium were used as cask shielding material rather than disposed of as waste, total system net costs are between $3.8 billion and $5.5 billion.

Yoshimura, H.R.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; McAllaster, M.E. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increasing number of open hole horizontal well completions in low-pressure and depleted reservoirs requires the use of non-damaging low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) to avoid formation damage and realize optimum well productivity. To address...

Chen, Guoqiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Design and Implementation of a C02 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to utilize reservoir characteristics and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. Also the project seeks to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field.

None

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S. Department of EnergyD e sNetworkConfiguration

47

Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation of a hydraulic barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- up in the storage reservoir. For some man-made leakages (e.g. abandoned well), and more importantlyGHGT-10 Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation emissions. Depleted oil and gas fields or saline aquifers are seen as possible storage reservoirs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Loss analysis of thermal reservoirs for electrical energy storage schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phase. HX1 and HX2 are heat exchangers used to reject heat at near-ambient conditions. The compressor, C, and expander, E, may be turbomachines as in Ref. [5] or reciprocating devices, as in Ref. [4] 33 2 Schematic view of heat transfer within... are heat exchangers used to reject heat at near-ambient conditions. The compressor, C, and expander, E, may be turboma- chines as in Ref. [5] or reciprocating devices, as in Ref. [4] 33 T2 x hot 1 T ? T ? T x gas front storage m edia Tg + Tg sT Q . ? Tg...

White, Alexander

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Assessing Reservoir Depositional Environments to Develop and Quantify Improvements in CO2 Storage Efficiency: A Reservoir Simulation Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storage potential and fluid movement within formations are dependent on the unique hydraulic characteristics of their respective depositional environments. Storage efficiency (E) quantifies the potential for storage in a geologic depositional environment and is used to assess basinal or regional CO2 storage resources. Current estimates of storage resources are calculated using common E ranges by lithology and not by depositional environment. The objectives of this project are to quantify E ranges and identify E enhancement strategies for different depositional environments via reservoir simulation studies. The depositional environments considered include deltaic, shelf clastic, shelf carbonate, fluvial deltaic, strandplain, reef, fluvial and alluvial, and turbidite. Strategies considered for enhancing E include CO2 injection via vertical, horizontal, and deviated wells, selective completions, water production, and multi-well injection. Conceptual geologic and geocellular models of the depositional environments were developed based on data from Illinois Basin oil fields and gas storage sites. The geologic and geocellular models were generalized for use in other US sedimentary basins. An important aspect of this work is the development of conceptual geologic and geocellular models that reflect the uniqueness of each depositional environment. Different injection well completions methods were simulated to investigate methods of enhancing E in the presence of geologic heterogeneity specific to a depositional environment. Modeling scenarios included horizontal wells (length, orientation, and inclination), selective and dynamic completions, water production, and multiwell injection. A Geologic Storage Efficiency Calculator (GSECalc) was developed to calculate E from reservoir simulation output. Estimated E values were normalized to diminish their dependency on fluid relative permeability. Classifying depositional environments according to normalized baseline E ranges ranks fluvial deltaic and turbidite highest and shelf carbonate lowest. The estimated average normalized baseline E of turbidite, and shelf carbonate depositional environments are 42.5% and 13.1%, with corresponding standard deviations of 11.3%, and 3.10%, respectively. Simulations of different plume management techniques suggest that the horizontal well, multi-well injection with brine production from blanket vertical producers are the most efficient E enhancement strategies in seven of eight depositional environments; for the fluvial deltaic depositional environment, vertical well with blanket completions is the most efficient. This study estimates normalized baseline E ranges for eight depositional environments, which can be used to assess the CO2 storage resource of candidate formations. This study also improves the general understanding of depositional environment’s influence on E. The lessons learned and results obtained from this study can be extrapolated to formations in other US basins with formations of similar depositional environments, which should be used to further refine regional and national storage resource estimates in future editions of the Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas of the United States. Further study could consider the economic feasibility of the E enhancement strategies identified here.

Okwen, Roland; Frailey, Scott; Leetaru, Hannes; Moulton, Sandy

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Convective stability analysis of the long-term storage of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formations, such as unmineable coal beds, depleting oil reservoirs, depleting gas reservoirs, and deep saline

Zhang, Dongxiao

52

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

53

Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

D0 Decomissioning : Storage of Depleted Uranium Modules Inside D0 Calorimeters after the Termination of D0 Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dzero liquid Argon calorimeters contain hadronic modules made of depleted uranium plates. After the termination of DO detector's operation, liquid Argon will be transferred back to Argon storage Dewar, and all three calorimeters will be warmed up. At this point, there is no intention to disassemble the calorimeters. The depleted uranium modules will stay inside the cryostats. Depleted uranium is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. It is slightly radioactive, emits alpha, beta and gamma radiation. External radiation hazards are minimal. Alpha radiation has no external exposure hazards, as dead layers of skin stop it; beta radiation might have effects only when there is a direct contact with skin; and gamma rays are negligible - levels are extremely low. Depleted uranium is a pyrophoric material. Small particles (such as shavings, powder etc.) may ignite with presence of Oxygen (air). Also, in presence of air and moisture it can oxidize. Depleted uranium can absorb moisture and keep oxidizing later, even after air and moisture are excluded. Uranium oxide can powder and flake off. This powder is also pyrographic. Uranium oxide may create health problems if inhaled. Since uranium oxide is water soluble, it may enter the bloodstream and cause toxic effects.

Sarychev, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reservoir Engineering Optimization Strategies for Subsurface CO{sub 2} Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to outline a methodology for calculating the optimum number of injection wells for geologic CCS. The methodology is intended primarily for reservoir pressure management, and factors in cost as well. Efficiency may come in many forms depending on project goals; therefore, various results are presented simultaneously. The developed methodology is illustrated via application in a case study of the Rocky Mountain Carbon Capture and Storage (RMCCS) project, including a CCS candidate site near Craig, Colorado, USA. The forecasting method provided reasonable estimates of cost and injection volume when compared to simulated results.

Mclntire, Blayde; McPherson, Brian

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Large releases from CO2 storage reservoirs: analogs, scenarios,and modeling needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the purpose of geologic storage in deep salineformations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential existsfor CO2 to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward alongpermeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. In this paper, weevaluate the potential for such CO2 discharges based on the analysis ofnatural analogs, where large releases of gas have been observed. We areparticularly interested in circumstances that could generate sudden,possibly self-enhancing release events. The probability for such eventsmay be low, but the circumstances under which they occur and thepotential consequences need to be evaluated in order to designappropriate site-selection and risk-management strategies. Numericalmodeling of hypothetical test cases is suggested to determine criticalconditions for large CO2 releases, to evaluate whether such conditionsmaybe possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, toevaluate the potential impacts of such events as well as designappropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Rutqvist,Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

Lykins, M.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN DEPLETED AND NEAR- DEPLETED OIL RESERVOIRS V. A. KuuskraaDEPLETED AND NEAR-DEPLETED OIL RESERVOIRS Vello A. Kuuskraaof CO 2 in a depleted oil reservoir: an overview,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formations or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research hasas brine formations or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. The

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Productivity of the aquatic macrophyte community of the Holston River: implications to hypolimnetic oxygen depletions of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated in 1979 to evaluate the extensive aquatic macrophyte beds on the Holston River in upper east Tennessee. The primary aim of these studies was to determine if allochthonous input from drifting aquatic plant debris was a significant factor contributing to low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Cherokee Reservoir located downstream. This report presents the results of studies conducted in 1979-1980 to obtain refined estimate of the impact of allochthonous aquatic macrophyte input on DO levels in Cherokee Reservoir. The report also details phenological aspects of the growth and reproduction of the various species that comprise the submersed aquatic macrophyte community of the Holston River above Cherokee Reservoir and discusses the contribution of each to net primary productivity of the river. 31 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

Young, R.C.; Dennis, W.M.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The effect of flooding velocity and degree of reservoir depletion on the recovery of oil by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allowables and transfer of allowables from injection wells to producing wells. In some states, waterflood allowables are deter- mined solely by the capacity of the reservoir to produce i. e. unres- 1 tricted production As in the case of primary production... the flood water Q injected ~he eil is pro- ducec4- Other considerations of an economic nature leading to in- creased allowables include the high initial cost of a waterflood develop- ment and the recovery of oil from a reservoir which would be un...

Hall, Phillips C

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluating Potential for Large Releases from CO2 StorageReservoirs: Analogs, Scenarios, and Modeling Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the purpose of geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential exists for CO{sub 2} to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward along permeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. Such discharge is not necessarily a serious concern, as CO{sub 2} is a naturally abundant and relatively benign gas in low concentrations. However, there is a potential risk to health, safety and environment (HSE) in the event that large localized fluxes of CO{sub 2} were to occur at the land surface, especially where CO{sub 2} could accumulate. In this paper, we develop possible scenarios for large CO{sub 2} fluxes based on the analysis of natural analogues, where large releases of gas have been observed. We are particularly interested in scenarios which could generate sudden, possibly self-enhancing, or even eruptive release events. The probability for such events may be low, but the circumstances under which they might occur and potential consequences need to be evaluated in order to design appropriate site selection and risk management strategies. Numerical modeling of hypothetical test cases is needed to determine critical conditions for such events, to evaluate whether such conditions may be possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, to evaluate the potential HSE impacts of such events and design appropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Tsang,Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

Impact of Fractures on CO2 Storage Monitoring: Keys for an Integrated Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage in fractured reservoirs (depleted hydrocarbon fields or brine aquifers) requires the study fluids, connected and/or non-connected fractures, the presence of Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev

Boyer, Edmond

64

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a CO{sub 2} project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. This report includes work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and the demonstration project objective.

Chimahusky, J.S.

1996-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

65

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second object is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. The report include work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and demonstration project objective.

Chimahusky, J.S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 injection, depleted oil and gas reservoirs for 20 years,depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs known to have trapped oiloil and gas companies are viewing depleted reservoirs and

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Interaction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal systems 5.Use of CO2 in enhanced coal bed methane recovery 6.Other suggested options (basalts, oilInteraction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation María García formations (after Cook, 1999). Geological Storage Options for CO2 1.Depleted oil and gas reservoirs 2.Use

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

68

MANAGING THE RISKS IN THE VADOSE ZONE ASSOCIATED WITH THE LEAKAGE OF CO2 FROM A DEEP GEOLOGICAL STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term storage (depleted natural gas and oil fields, deep aquifers and unmineable coal seams). CO2 is injected correspond to a storage reservoir depth of about 800 m (Law et al., 1996). Since the 1990's, the CCS" in case of "abnormal behaviour" of the reservoir has been outlined by the European directive on geological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

69

Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF CO2 SEPARATION AND STORAGE PROPERTIES OF COAL GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An attractive alternative of sequestering CO{sub 2} is to inject it into coalbed methane reservoirs, particularly since it has been shown to enhance the production of methane during near depletion stages. The basis for enhanced coalbed methane recovery and simultaneous sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep coals is the preferential sorption property of coal, with its affinity for carbon dioxide being significantly higher than that for methane. Yet, the sorption behavior of coal under competitive sorptive environment is not fully understood. Hence, the original objective of this research study was to carry out a laboratory study to investigate the effect of studying the sorption behavior of coal in the presence of multiple gases, primarily methane, CO{sub 2} and nitrogen, in order to understand the mechanisms involved in displacement of methane and its movement in coal. This had to be modified slightly since the PVT property of gas mixtures is still not well understood, and any laboratory work in the area of sorption of gases requires a definite equation of state to calculate the volumes of different gases in free and adsorbed forms. This research study started with establishing gas adsorption isotherms for pure methane and CO{sub 2}. The standard gas expansion technique based on volumetric analysis was used for the experimental work with the additional feature of incorporating a gas chromatograph for analysis of gas composition. The results were analyzed first using the Langmuir theory. As expected, the Langmuir analysis indicated that CO{sub 2} is more than three times as sorptive as methane. This was followed by carrying out a partial desorption isotherm for methane, and then injecting CO{sub 2} to displace methane. The results indicated that CO{sub 2} injection at low pressure displaced all of the sorbed methane, even when the total pressure continued to be high. However, the displacement appeared to be occurring due to a combination of the preferential sorption property of coal and reduction in the partial pressure of methane. As a final step, the Extended Langmuir (EL) model was used to model the coal-methane-CO{sub 2} binary adsorption system. The EL model was found to be very accurate in predicting adsorption of CO{sub 2}, but not so in predicting desorption of methane. The selectivity of CO{sub 2} over methane was calculated to be 4.3:1. This is, of course, not in very good agreement with the measured values which showed the ratio to be 3.5:1. However, the measured results are in good agreement with the field observation at one of the CO{sub 2} injection sites. Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that low pressure injection of CO{sub 2} can be fairly effective in displacing methane in coalbed reservoirs although this might be difficult to achieve in field conditions. Furthermore, the displacement of methane appears to be not only due to the preferential sorption of methane, but reduction in partial pressure as well. Hence, using a highly adsorbing gas, such as CO{sub 2}, has the advantages of inert gas stripping and non-mixing since the injected gas does not mix with the recovered methane.

John Kemeny; Satya Harpalani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Optimal Commodity Trading with a Capacitated Storage Asset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoir · 4% Salt caverns Wild Goose Storage, Northern California (depleted Wild Goose natural gas field storage facilities as real options on natural gas prices In principle, the idea is simple: Buy low, inject CMU Tepper School 3 Physical Control Commercial Trading ... mainly in the context of natural gas (NG

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

73

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a CO{sub 2} project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. This report includes work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective. In addition the initiation of the demonstration project objective includes work done in November and December, 1995.

NONE

1996-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

Underground gas storage in New York State: A historical perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New York State has a long history of underground gas storage activity that began with conversion of the Zoar gas field into a storage reservoir in 1916, the first in the United States. By 1961 another fourteen storage fields were developed and seven more were added between 1970 and 1991. All twenty-two operating storage reservoirs of New York were converted from depleted gas fields and are of low-deliverability, base-load type. Nineteen of these are in sandstone reservoirs of the Lower Silurian Medina Group and the Lower Devonian Oriskany Formation and three in limestone reservoirs are located in the gas producing areas of southwestern New York and are linked to the major interstate transmission lines. Recent developments in underground gas storage in New York involve mainly carbonate-reef and bedded salt-cavern storage facilities, one in Stuben County and the other in Cayuga County, are expected to begin operation by the 1996-1997 heating season.

Friedman, G.M.; Sarwar, G.; Bass, J.P. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ., Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - ageologic storage reservoir Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JafarGandomi* and Andrew Curtis, School of GeoSciences, The University of Edinburgh, Kings Summary: of a range of 1D subsurface CO2 reservoir models. Each model consists of a...

76

Design and implementation of a CO2 flood utilizing advanced reservoirs characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching water floods depletion: Technical progress report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work this quarter falls within the demonstration project.

Chimahusky, J.S., Casteel, J.F.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

SPE -124703 Process for tracking the evolving perception of risk during CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil and gas reservoirs, and coal seams. While the technology for CCS already exists (e.g. Moritis for presentation at the 2009 SPE Offshore Europe Oil & Gas Conference & Exhibition held in Aberdeen, UK, 8's subsurface and stored in the pore spaces of rock. Potential storage sites include saline reservoirs, depleted

78

CO2 Saline Storage Demonstration in Colorado Sedimentary Basins: Applied Studies in Reservoir Assessment and Dynamic Processes Affecting Industrial Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multitask research project was conducted in anticipation of a possible future increase in industrial efforts at CO2 storage in Colorado sedimentary basins. Colorado is already the home to the oldest Rocky Mountain CO2 storage site, the Rangely Oil Field, where CO2-EOR has been underway since the 1980s. The Colorado Geological Survey has evaluated storage options statewide, and as part of the SW Carbon Sequestration Partnership the Survey, is deeply engaged in and committed to suitable underground CO2 storage. As a more sustainable energy industry is becoming a global priority, it is imperative to explore the range of technical options available to reduce emissions from fossil fuels. One such option is to store at least some emitted CO2 underground. In this NETL-sponsored CO2 sequestration project, the Colorado School of Mines and our partners at the University of Colorado have focused on a set of the major fundamental science and engineering issues surrounding geomechanics, mineralogy, geochemistry and reservoir architecture of possible CO2 storage sites (not limited to Colorado). Those are the central themes of this final report and reported below in Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 6. Closely related to these reservoir geoscience issues are also legal, environmental and public acceptance concerns about pore space accessibility—as a precondition for CO2 storage. These are addressed in Tasks 1, 5 and 7. Some debates about the future course of the energy industry can become acrimonius. It is true that the physics of combustion of hydrocarbons makes it impossible for fossil energy to attain a carbon footprint anywhere nearly as low as that of renewables. However, there are many offsetting benefits, not the least that fossil energy is still plentiful, it has a global and highly advanced distribution system in place, and the footprint that the fossil energy infrastructure occupies is orders of magnitude smaller than renewable energy facilities with equivalent energy capacity. Finally, inexpensive natural gas here in North America is pushing coal for electricity generation off the market, thus reducing US CO2 emissions faster than any other large industrialized nation. These two big factors argue for renewed efforts to find technology solutions to reduce the carbon footprint (carbon dioxide as well as methane and trace gases) of conventional and unconventional oil and gas. One major such technology component is likely to be carbon capture, utilization and storage.

Nummedal, Dag; Sitchler, Alexis; McCray, John; Mouzakis, Katherine; Glossner, Andy; Mandernack, Kevin; Gutierrez, Marte; Doran, Kevin; Pranter, Matthew; Rybowiak, Chris

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Satellite-based measurements of surface deformation reveal fluid flow associated with the geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequestration in abandoned oil reservoirs: The Internationalinto partially depleted oil reservoirs as a means of

Vasco, D.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, corefloods were conducted at 1,500 psig and 70??C, in which flue gas was injected into an Austin chalk core containing initially methane. Two types of flue gases were injected: dehydrated flue gas with 13.574 mole% CO2 (Gas A), and treated flue gas (N2, O2...

Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Prediction of the effects of compositional mixing in a reservoir on conversion to natural gas storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The increased interest in the development of new Gas Storage Fields over the lastseveral decades has created some interesting challenges for the industry. Most existinggas… (more)

Brannon, Alan W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Although models that simulate the fracturing process exist, they can be significantly improved by extending the models to account for nonsymmetric, nonplanar fractures, coupling the models to more realistic reservoir simulators, and implementing advanced multiphase flow models for the transport of proppant. Third, it may be possible to deviate from current hydraulic fracturing technology by using different proppants (possibly waste materials that need to be disposed of, e.g., asbestos) combined with different hydraulic fracturing carrier fluids (possibly supercritical CO2 itself). Because current technology is mainly aimed at enhanced oil recovery, it may not be ideally suited for the injection and storage of CO2. Finally, advanced concepts such as increasing the injectivity of the fractured geologic formations through acidization with carbonated water will be investigated. Saline formations are located through most of the continental United States. Generally, where saline formations are scarce, oil and gas reservoirs and coal beds abound. By developing the technology outlined here, it will be possible to remove CO2 at the source (power plants, industry) and inject it directly into nearby geological formations, without releasing it into the atmosphere. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a technology capable of sequestering CO2 in geologic formations at a cost of US $10 per ton.

L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unminable coaltakes place in depleted oil or gas reservoirs (IAE, 2003).of CO 2 in depleted oil and gas reservoirs. J Can Pet

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

How secure is CO2 storage? Leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology available to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from large point sources such as power plants and the burial of organic rich rocks such as coal seams.2 We have compiled the first global dataset on natural CO ­ but not necessarily leaking. Figure 4: Diagram showing the state of CO2 in the studied reservoirs. Supercritical

86

CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can be used by operators to guide treatment selection in wells with significant non-darcy damage component. In addition, the effectiveness of the remediation treatment designed to reduce damage caused by the inorganic precipitate siderite was measured, and the benefits of this work are extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry. Similarly the potential benefits realized from more effective identification and treatment of wells with significant nondarcy damage component are also presented, and these benefits are also extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry.

J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column that the CO2 is in a dense phase (either liquid or supercritical). Accurate assessment of the storage capacity also requires an estimation of the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored beneath the reservoir seal

88

Genetic Diversity in Microcystis Populations of a French Storage Reservoir Assessed by Sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic Diversity in Microcystis Populations of a French Storage Reservoir Assessed by Sequencing stations with different depths and at two dif- ferent sampling times (winter and summer) in the French allows this microorganism to growth in a broad range of environmental conditions. These papers

Jacquet, Stéphan

89

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) project for the south Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work this quarter falls within Task V field demonstration. Short progress reports are presented for field demonstration involving: drill horizontal injection wells 6C-25H and 7C-11H; and drill two vertical WAG injectors along South Cowden Unit boundary.

NONE

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

91

Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: A Discussion ofNatural Analogs, FEPS, and Modeling Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the purpose of geologic storage in deep saline formations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential exists for CO{sub 2} to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward along permeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. In this paper, we evaluate the potential for such CO{sub 2} discharges based on the analysis of natural analogs, where large releases of gas have been observed. We are particularly interested in circumstances that could generate sudden, possibly self-enhancing release events. The probability for such events may be low, but the circumstances under which they occur and the potential consequences need to be evaluated in order to design appropriate site-selection and risk-management strategies. Numerical modeling of hypothetical test cases is suggested to determine critical conditions for large CO{sub 2} releases, to evaluate whether such conditions may be possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, to evaluate the potential impacts of such events as well as design appropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, J.; Pruess, K.; Lewicki, J.L.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang,C-F.; Karimjee, A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Porous media compressed air energy storage (PM-CAES): Theory and simulation of the coupled wellbore-reservoir system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of selected compressed air energy storage studes, Pacificaspects of compressed-air energy storage in aquifers, J. ofresources and compressed air energy storage (CAES), Energy,

Oldenburg, C.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Modeling wettability alteration in naturally fractured carbonate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The demand for energy and new oil reservoirs around the world has increased rapidly while oil recovery from depleted reservoirs has become more difficult. Oil… (more)

Goudarzi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report serves as the final technical report and users manual for the 'Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II SBIR project. Advanced Resources International has developed a screening tool by which users can technically screen, assess the storage capacity and quantify the costs of CO2 storage in four types of CO2 storage reservoirs. These include CO2-enhanced oil recovery reservoirs, depleted oil and gas fields (non-enhanced oil recovery candidates), deep coal seems that are amenable to CO2-enhanced methane recovery, and saline reservoirs. The screening function assessed whether the reservoir could likely serve as a safe, long-term CO2 storage reservoir. The storage capacity assessment uses rigorous reservoir simulation models to determine the timing, ultimate storage capacity, and potential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Finally, the economic assessment function determines both the field-level and pipeline (transportation) costs for CO2 sequestration in a given reservoir. The screening tool has been peer reviewed at an Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical meeting in March 2009. A number of useful observations and recommendations emerged from the Workshop on the costs of CO2 transport and storage that could be readily incorporated into a commercial version of the Screening Tool in a Phase III SBIR.

George J. Koperna Jr.; Vello A. Kuuskraa; David E. Riestenberg; Aiysha Sultana; Tyler Van Leeuwen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A CO2 FLOOD UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL INJECTION WELLS IN A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE APPROACHING WATERFLOOD DEPLETION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO{sub 2} horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields. The Unit was a mature waterflood with water cut exceeding 95%. Oil must be mobilized through the use of a miscible or near-miscible fluid to recover significant additional reserves. Also, because the unit was relatively small, it did not have the benefit of economies of scale inherent in normal larger scale projects. Thus, new and innovative methods were required to reduce investment and operating costs. Two primary methods used to accomplish improved economics were use of reservoir characterization to restrict the flood to the higher quality rock in the unit and use of horizontal injection wells to cut investment and operating costs. The project consisted of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. In this phase Reservoir Analysis, Characterization Tasks and Advanced Technology Definition Tasks were completed. Completion enabled the project to be designed, evaluated, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation submitted to working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consisted of the implementation and execution of the project in the field. Phase II was completed in July 2001. Performance monitoring, during Phase II, by mid 1998 identified the majority of producing wells which under performed their anticipated withdrawal rates. Newly drilled and re-activated wells had lower offtake rates than originally forecasted. As a result of poor offtake, higher reservoir pressure was a concern for the project as it limited CO{sub 2} injectivity. To reduce voidage balance, and reservoir pressure, a disposal well was therefore drilled. Several injection surveys indicated the CO{sub 2} injection wells had severe conformance issues. After close monitoring of the project to the end of 1999, it was evident the project would not recover the anticipated tertiary reserves. The main reasons for under-performance were poor in zone CO{sub 2} injection into the upper San Andres layers, poorer offtake rates from newly drilled replacement wells and a higher than required reservoir pressure. After discussion internally within Phillips, externally with the Department of Energy (DOE) and SCU partners, a redevelopment of South Cowden was agreed upon to commence in year 2000. The redevelopment essentially abandoned the original development for Budget Phase II in favor of a revised approach. This involved conformance techniques to resolve out of zone CO{sub 2} injection and use of horizontal wells to improve in zone injectivity and productivity. A phased approach was used to ensure short radius lateral drilling could be implemented effectively at South Cowden. This involved monitoring drilling operations and then production response to determine if larger investments during the second phase were justified. Redevelopment Phase 1 was completed in May 2000. It was deemed a success in regard to finding suitable/cost-effective technology for drilling horizontal laterals and finding a technique that could sustain long-term productivity from the upper layers of the San Andres reservoir. Four existing vertical producing wells were isolated from their existing completions and sidetracked with horizontal laterals into the upper layers of the San Andres. Overall average offtake rates for the four wells increased by a factor of 12 during the first four months after completion of Phase 1. Phase 2 of the redevelopment focused on current CO{sub 2} vertical injection wells. Techniques were applied to resolve near well conformance concerns and then either single or dual laterals were dril

K.J. Harpole; Ed G. Durrett; Susan Snow; J.S. Bles; Carlon Robertson; C.D. Caldwell; D.J. Harms; R.L. King; B.A. Baldwin; D. Wegener; M. Navarrette

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consist of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. During this phase the Reservoir Analysis and Characterization Task and the Advanced Technology Definition Task were completed. Completion of these tasks enabled the project to be designed, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation to be generated and submitted to the working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consists of the implementation and execution of the project in the field.

Czirr, K.L.; Owen, R.; Robertson, C.R.; Harpole, K.J.; Durrett, E.G.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

Design and Implementation of a CO(2) Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported herein covers select tasks in Budget Phase 11. The principle Task in Budget Phase 11 included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of many of the Field Demonstration tasks during the last report period enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual C0{sub 2} injection commencing in mid-July, 1996. This report summarizes activities incurred following initial project start-up, towards the goal of optimizing project performance. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative C0{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, C0{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreement (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive chaotic texture. The chaotic modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non- reservoir rock. The chaotic reservoir rock extends from Zone C (4780`-4800`) to the lower part of Zone F (4640`-4680`). Zones D (4755`-4780`) and E (4680`-4755`) are considered the main floodable zones, though Zone F is also productive and Zone C is productive above the oil- water contact. During Budget Phase 1, the Stratamodel computer program was utilized as the primary tool to integrate the diverse geologic, petrophysical, and seismic data into a coherent three dimensional (3-D) model. The basic porosity model having been constructed, critiqued and modified based on field production and detailed cross-section displays, permeability data was imported into the model, and a 3-D interpolation of the permeability was completed.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and include the upper (PM), middle (QH), and lower (RD) sands. The reservoir models address the stratigraphy of the upper (PM) sand and help delineate the lower (RD) reservoir. In addition, this research addresses the partially depleted QH-2 reservoir...

Casey, Michael Chase

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Area of Interest 1, CO2 at the Interface: Nature and Dynamics of the Reservoir/Caprock Contact and Implications for Carbon Storage Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined the influence of geologic features present at the reservoir/caprock interface on the transmission of supercritical CO2 into and through caprock. We focused on the case of deformation-band faults in reservoir lithologies that intersect the interface and transition to opening-mode fractures in caprock lithologies. Deformation-band faults are exceeding common in potential CO2 injection units and our fieldwork in Utah indicates that this sort of transition is common. To quantify the impact of these interface features on flow and transport we first described the sedimentology and permeability characteristics of selected sites along the Navajo Sandstone (reservoir lithology) and Carmel Formation (caprock lithology) interface, and along the Slickrock Member (reservoir lithology) and Earthy Member (caprock lithology) of the Entrada Sandstone interface, and used this information to construct conceptual permeability models for numerical analysis. We then examined the impact of these structures on flow using single-phase and multiphase numerical flow models for these study sites. Key findings include: (1) Deformation-band faults strongly compartmentalize the reservoir and largely block cross-fault flow of supercritical CO2. (2) Significant flow of CO2 through the fractures is possible, however, the magnitude is dependent on the small-scale geometry of the contact between the opening-mode fracture and the deformation band fault. (3) Due to the presence of permeable units in the caprock, caprock units are capable of storing significant volumes of CO2, particularly when the fracture network does not extend all the way through the caprock. The large-scale distribution of these deformation-bandfault- to-opening-mode-fractures is related to the curvature of the beds, with greater densities of fractures in high curvature regions. We also examined core and outcrops from the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation reservoir/caprock interface in order to extend our work to a reservoir/caprock pair this is currently being assessed for long-term carbon storage. These analyses indicate that interface features similar to those observed at the Utah sites 3 were not observed. Although not directly related to our main study topic, one byproduct of our investigation is documentation of exceptionally high degrees of heterogeneity in the pore-size distribution of the Mount Simon Sandstone. This suggests that the unit has a greater-than-normal potential for residual trapping of supercritical CO2.

Mozley, Peter; Evans, James; Dewers, Thomas

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Underground storage of hydrocarbons in Ontario  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground storage of natural gas and liquified petroleum products in geological formations is a provincially significant industry in Ontario with economic, environmental, and safety benefits for the companies and residents of Ontario. There are 21 active natural gas storage pools in Ontario, with a total working storage capacity of approximately 203 bcf (5.76 billion cubic metres). Most of these pools utilize former natural gas-producing Guelph Formation pinnacle reefs. In addition there are seventy-one solution-mined salt caverns utilized for storage capacity of 24 million barrels (3.9 million cubic metres). These caverns are constructed within salt strata of the Salina A-2 Unit and the B Unit. The steadily increasing demand for natural gas in Ontario creates a continuing need for additional storage capacity. Most of the known gas-producing pinnacle reefs in Ontario have already been converted to storage. The potential value of storage rights is a major incentive for continued exploration for undiscovered reefs in this mature play. There are numerous depleted or nearly depleted natural gas reservoirs of other types with potential for use as storage pools. There is also potential for use of solution-mined caverns for natural gas storage in Ontario.

Carter, T.R.; Manocha, J. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Ontario (Canada)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A geochemical assessment of petroleum from underground oil storage caverns in relation to petroleum from natural reservoirs offshore Norway.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this study is to compare oils from known biodegraded fields offshore Norway to waxes and oils from an artificial cavern storage facility,… (more)

Østensen, Marie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of theTransport in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs, Geothermics,Depletion of Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, Lawrence

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Assessing the Effect of Timing of Availability for Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Largest Oil and Gas Pools in the Alberta Basin: Description of Data and Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from large stationary sources and storage in geological media is a technologically-feasible mitigation measure for the reduction of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere in response to climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO2) can be sequestered underground in oil and gas reservoirs, in deep saline aquifers, in uneconomic coal beds and in salt caverns. The Alberta Basin provides a very large capacity for CO2 storage in oil and gas reservoirs, along with significant capacity in deep saline formations and possible unmineable coal beds. Regional assessments of potential geological CO2 storage capacity have largely focused so far on estimating the total capacity that might be available within each type of reservoir. While deep saline formations are effectively able to accept CO2 immediately, the storage potential of other classes of candidate storage reservoirs, primarily oil and gas fields, is not fully available at present time. Capacity estimates to date have largely overlooked rates of depletion in these types of storage reservoirs and typically report the total estimated storage capacity that will be available upon depletion. However, CO2 storage will not (and cannot economically) begin until the recoverable oil and gas have been produced via traditional means. This report describes a reevaluation of the CO2 storage capacity and an assessment of the timing of availability of the oil and gas pools in the Alberta Basin with very large storage capacity (>5 MtCO2 each) that are being looked at as likely targets for early implementation of CO2 storage in the region. Over 36,000 non-commingled (i.e., single) oil and gas pools were examined with effective CO2 storage capacities being individually estimated. For each pool, the life expectancy was estimated based on a combination of production decline analysis constrained by the remaining recoverable reserves and an assessment of economic viability, yielding an estimated depletion date, or year that it will be available for CO2 storage. The modeling framework and assumptions used to assess the impact of the timing of CO2 storage resource availability on the region’s deployment of CCS technologies is also described. The purpose of this report is to describe the data and methodology for examining the carbon dioxide (CO2) storage capacity resource of a major hydrocarbon province incorporating estimated depletion dates for its oil and gas fields with the largest CO2 storage capacity. This allows the development of a projected timeline for CO2 storage availability across the basin and enables a more realistic examination of potential oil and gas field CO2 storage utilization by the region’s large CO2 point sources. The Alberta Basin of western Canada was selected for this initial examination as a representative mature basin, and the development of capacity and depletion date estimates for the 227 largest oil and gas pools (with a total storage capacity of 4.7 GtCO2) is described, along with the impact on source-reservoir pairing and resulting CO2 transport and storage economics. The analysis indicates that timing of storage resource availability has a significant impact on the mix of storage reservoirs selected for utilization at a given time, and further confirms the value that all available reservoir types offer, providing important insights regarding CO2 storage implementation to this and other major oil and gas basins throughout North America and the rest of the world. For CCS technologies to deploy successfully and offer a meaningful contribution to climate change mitigation, CO2 storage reservoirs must be available not only where needed (preferably co-located with or near large concentrations of CO2 sources or emissions centers) but also when needed. The timing of CO2 storage resource availability is therefore an important factor to consider when assessing the real opportunities for CCS deployment in a given region.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Bachu, Stefan

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

110

The feasibility of reservoir monitoring using time-lapse marine CSEM Arnold Orange1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The objective of reservoir-depletion monitoring is to determine the efficacy of the extraction and enhanced oil- hibit small but measureable changes that are characteristic of reservoir-depletion geometry as a means of monitoring the geometry and porosity of reservoirs as they are depleted.This paper presents

Key, Kerry

111

Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To achieve this recovery, the reservoir should return to natural depletion after four years of water injection, before water invades the producing wells. Factors that affect the effectiveness of water injection in this reservoir include aquifer strength...

Ajayi, Arashi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Development of high through-put Sr isotope analysis for monitoring reservoir integrity for CO{sub 2} storage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent innovations in multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have allowed for rapid and precise measurements of isotope ratios in geological samples. Naturally occurring Sr isotopes has the potential for use in Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) associated with geologic CO2 storage. Sr isotopes can be useful for: Sensitive tracking of brine migration; Determining seal rock leakage; Studying fluid/rock reactions. We have optimized separation chemistry procedures that will allow operators to prepare samples for Sr isotope analysis off site using rapid, low cost methods.

Wall, Andy; Jain, Jinesh; Stewart, Brian; Capo, Rosemary; Hakala, Alexandra J.; Hammack, Richard; Guthrie, George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Overview of geologic storage of natural gas with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of storing hydrogen.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many regions across the nation geologic formations are currently being used to store natural gas underground. Storage options are dictated by the regional geology and the operational need. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in understanding theses various geologic storage options, the advantages and disadvantages, in the hopes of developing an underground facility for the storage of hydrogen as a low cost storage option, as part of the hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Currently, depleted gas/oil reservoirs, aquifers, and salt caverns are the three main types of underground natural gas storage in use today. The other storage options available currently and in the near future, such as abandoned coal mines, lined hard rock caverns, and refrigerated mined caverns, will become more popular as the demand for natural gas storage grows, especially in regions were depleted reservoirs, aquifers, and salt deposits are not available. The storage of hydrogen within the same type of facilities, currently used for natural gas, may add new operational challenges to the existing cavern storage industry, such as the loss of hydrogen through chemical reactions and the occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement. Currently there are only three locations worldwide, two of which are in the United States, which store hydrogen. All three sites store hydrogen within salt caverns.

Lord, Anna Snider

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from themodel included the oil reservoir and the well with a toppressures of the deep oil reservoir, to a two-phase oil-gas

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual report, June 3, 1994--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported here covers Budget Phase I of the project. The principal tasks in Budget Phase I are the Reservoir Analysis and Characterization Task and the Advanced Technology Definition Task. Completion of these tasks have enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed and evaluated from an economic and risk analysis standpoint. Field implementation of the project has been recommended to the working interest owner of the South Cowden Unit (SCU) and approval has been obtained. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take or pay requirements, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing cost as opposed to large capital investments for compression) were negotiated to further improve project economics. A detailed reservoir characterization study was completed by an integrated team of geoscientists and engineers. The study consisted of detailed core description, integration of log response to core descriptions, mapping of the major flow units, evaluation of porosity and permeability relationships, geostatistical analysis of permeability trends, and direct integration of reservoir performance with the geological interpretation. The study methodology fostered iterative bidirectional feedback between the reservoir characterization team and the reservoir engineering/simulation team to allow simultaneous refinement and convergence of the geological interpretation with the reservoir model. The fundamental conclusion from the study is that South Cowden exhibits favorable enhanced oil recovery characteristics, particularly reservoir quality and continuity.

Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Gerard, M.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Mathematical models as tools for probing long-term safety of CO2 storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs, with large capacity for CO 2 storage (Bradshaw and Dance, 2004; Bachu, 2008). Improperly abandoned

Pruess, Karsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Petro-electric modeling for CSEM reservoir characterization and monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of two or more repeat surveys recorded at different calendar times over a depleting reservoir. The main a feasibility study of time-lapse CSEM data to monitor the water flooding of an oil reservoir. Utilizing 3DPetro-electric modeling for CSEM reservoir characterization and monitoring Alireza Shahin1 , Kerry

Key, Kerry

119

Operation of water supply reservoirs for flood mitigation : hydrologic and institutional considerations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additional demands are being placed upon reservoirs to meet a variety of diverse needs. These demands require efficient management of the limited storage through reservoir operations. This efficiency is most critical with water supply reservoirs...

Craney, Patrick Wayne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual Report, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported herein covers select tasks remaining in Budget Phase I and many of the tasks of Budget Phase II. The principal Tasks in Budget Phase I included in this report are Reservoir Analysis and Characterization; Advanced Technical Studies; and Technology Transfer, Reporting and Project Management Activities for Budget Phase I. The principle Task in Budget Phase II included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of these tasks has enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection scheduled for start-up in mid-July, 1996. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} texture. The {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non-reservoir rock.

Chimahusky, J.S.; Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation Washington, DC 20460 EPA-402-R-06-011 December 2006 #12;#12;Depleted Uranium Technical Brief EPA of Radiation and Indoor Air Radiation Protection Division ii #12;iii #12;FOREWARD The Depleted Uranium

123

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in depleted or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs; how- ever,abandoned wells represent a potentially direct route from reservoirabandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO 2 reservoir

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in depleted or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs; how- ever,oil well abandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO 2 reservoir

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough 1996) inthroughthrough 1996)

126

Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) detection of water storage changes in the Three Gorges Reservoir of China and comparison with in situ measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRACE and a land-atmosphere water balance, Geophys. Res.2008), Analysis of terrestrial water storage changes fromGRACE and GLDAS, Water Resour. Res. , 44, W02433, doi:

Wang, Xianwei; de Linage, Caroline; Famiglietti, James; Zender, Charles S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Depleted uranium hexafluoride: Waste or resource?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the US Department of Energy is evaluating technologies for the storage, disposal, or re-use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). This paper discusses the following options, and provides a technology assessment for each one: (1) conversion to UO{sub 2} for use as mixed oxide duel, (2) conversion to UO{sub 2} to make DUCRETE for a multi-purpose storage container, (3) conversion to depleted uranium metal for use as shielding, (4) conversion to uranium carbide for use as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel. In addition, conversion to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} as an option for long-term storage is discussed.

Schwertz, N.; Zoller, J.; Rosen, R.; Patton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bradley, C. [USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, Technology, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, A. [SAIC (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Next-Generation Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Code PFLOTRAN: Application to CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers P. Lichtner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to investigate sequestration of CO2 in vari- ous geologic media including depleted oil reservoirs and saline

Mills, Richard

130

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Defending Resource Depletion Attacks on Implantable Medical Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and storage. In this research, we identify a new kind of attacks on IMDs - Resource Depletion (RD) attacks information. IMD attacks may also be launched by insurance companies. IMD readers may be installed near, and storage. An IMD is implanted in patient's body and expected to run for several years. Typical IMDs

Wu, Jie

132

General inflow performance relationship for solution-gas reservoir wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two equations are developed to describe the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of wells producing from solution-gas drive reservoirs. These are general equations (extensions of the currently available IPR's) that apply to wells with any drainage-area shape at any state of completion flow efficiency and any stage of reservoir depletion. 7 refs.

Dias-Couto, L.E.; Golan, M.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Variable Cell Model for Simulating Gas Condensate Reservoir Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, SPE-~~~ SPE 21428 A Variable Cell Model for Simulating Gas Condensate Reservoir Performance A of depletion performance of gas condensate reservoirs report the existence of a A variable cell model for simulating gas relatively high, near-constant, oil saturation in condensate reeervoir performance has been

Al-Majed, Abdulaziz Abdullah

134

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the ``health`` or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir (``Vital Signs``) and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Type curve analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs (infinite-acting reservoir case): a new approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis methods are sometimes inconclusive for pressure transient analysis of wells completed in naturally fractured reservoirs. This is due to wellbore storage effects which mask the early time "straight-line" that is expected on the semilog plot...

Angel Restrepo, Juan Alejandro

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dynamic Reservoir Characterization for High Resolution Connectivity Mapping and Conformance Control, Morrow Sandstone Reservoir, Postle Field, Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The purpose is to conduct dynamic reservoir characterization of the Postle Field, Morrow Reservoir, under CO2 depletion, followed by water flooding in 1965, and later onset of CO2-enhanced oil recovery in 1995 within valley fill complexes (Fig. 3). Whiting Petroleum Company, the operator, is preparing to initiate a CO2

138

A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control...

Yan, Bicheng

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Potential for future development of salt cavern storage in the upper Silurian Syracuse Formation of south-central New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although depleted reservoirs remain the dominant structures used for storage fulfilling the demand for base load gas supply during the heating season, the current general surge in storage projects, nationwide, takes advantage of opportunities in Order 636, and makes greater use of salt caverns for gas storage. This reflects the increasing need by gas users, local distribution companies in particular, to quickly cycle a storage facility`s gas supply for services such as peak shaving, emergency supply, and system balancing to meet hourly swings. Occurrence of thick deposits of bedded salt deposits provides New York the capability to develop high deliverability salt cavern storage facilities. Furthermore, New York is uniquely positioned at the gateway to major northeastern markets to provide peak load storage services of natural gas supply. The thickest units of bedded salt in New York occur in the {open_quotes}F{close_quotes} horizon of the Upper Silurian Syracuse Formation. Three bedded salt cavern storage facilities have been recently proposed in New York. Two of these projects is much larger (with 5 Bcfg ultimate capacity), is under construction, and will provide valuable storage service to the Ellisburg-Leidy market center hub in Pennsylvania. Identification of possible sites for future salt cavern storage projects has been achieved chiefly by defining areas of thick beds of salt at sufficient depths close to gas transmission lines, with access to a freshwater supply for leaching, and possessing an acceptable method of brine disposal.

Bass, J.P.; Sarwar, G.; Guo, B. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ. of New York, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling (TDIRM) Y.Gomez, Y. Khazaeni, S.D. Mohaghegh, SPE, West Virginia University, R. Gaskari, Intelligent Solutions, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspects of an oil reservoir. The models include different reservoir saturation conditions (saturated depletion and achieving high recovery factor has always been a challenge for reservoir engineersSPE 124204 Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling (TDIRM) Y.Gomez, Y. Khazaeni, S.D. Mohaghegh

Mohaghegh, Shahab

142

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT Biomass Facility JumpvolcanicPhase 1 JumpExplorationinfracture

143

1 Cyclotron Rd, 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postdoctoral Research Fellow Geologic CO2 storage in the deep subsurface such as depleted oil reservoirs

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

144

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Application of reservoir models to Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Cherokee Reservoir Project hydrodynamic-temperature models and water quality models hav

Kim, B.R.; Bruggink, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoir storage project in Sesta, Italy [1]; as well as two pilot tests in rock caverns associated with abandoned

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Seismic modeling to monitor CO2 geological storage: The Atzbach ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 8, 2012 ... greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide in depleted hydrocarbon ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Flood Operation Rules for a Single Reservoir Licheng Dong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of California - Davis 2012-12-12 Abstract This paper examines the theoretical behavior ecosystems. 2. Simple Inflow Hydrographs Three main factors affect the reservoir's inflow flood volume and peak outflow (Ergish, 2010): 1) inflow hydrograph volume and shape; 2) controllable reservoir storage

Lund, Jay R.

151

Analysis of condensate banking dynamics in a gas condensate reservoir under different injection schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condensate reservoir under natural depletion, and injection of methane, injection of carbon dioxide, produced gas recycling and water injection. To monitor the condensate banking dynamics near the wellbore area, such as oil saturation and compositional...

Sandoval Rodriguez, Angelica Patricia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Application of Fast Marching Method in Shale Gas Reservoir Model Calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unconventional reservoirs are typically characterized by very low permeabilities, and thus, the pressure depletion from a producing well may not propagate far from the well during the life of a development. Currently, two approaches are widely...

Yang, Changdong

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

Reservoir characterization and development opportunities in Jacob Field, South-Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the study, determine the oil potential, and make recommendations to improve production. Since no previous reservoir study was performed in this field, the original oil in place and the current status of depletion was unknown. Therefore a complete integrated...

Hernandez Depaz, Mirko Joshoe

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Recovery Act: 'Carbonsheds' as a Framework for Optimizing United States Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonsheds are regions in which the estimated cost of transporting CO{sub 2} from any (plant) location in the region to the storage site it encompasses is cheaper than piping the CO{sub 2} to a storage site outside the region. We use carbonsheds to analyze the cost of transport and storage of CO{sub 2} in deploying CCS on land and offshore of the continental U.S. We find that onshore the average cost of transport and storage within carbonsheds is roughly $10/t when sources cooperate to reduce transport costs, with the costs increasing as storage options are depleted over time. Offshore transport and storage costs by comparison are found to be roughly twice as expensive but t may still be attractive because of easier access to property rights for sub-seafloor storage as well as a simpler regulatory system, and possibly lower MMV requirements, at least in the deep-ocean where pressures and temperatures would keep the CO{sub 2} negatively buoyant. Agent-based modeling of CCS deployment within carbonsheds under various policy scenarios suggests that the most cost-effective strategy at this point in time is to focus detailed geology characterization of storage potential on only the largest onshore reservoirs where the potential for mitigating emissions is greatest and the cost of storage appears that it will be among the cheapest.

Pratson, Lincoln

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Understanding the use of natural gas storage for generators of electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground natural gas storage is aggressively used by a handful of utility electric generators in the United States. While storage facilities are often utilized by the natural gas pipeline industry and the local distribution companies (LDCs), regional electric generators have taken advantgage of abundant storage and pipeline capacity to develop very cost efficient gas fired electric generating capacity, especially for peaking demand. Most types of natural gas storage facilities are located underground, with a few based above-ground. These facilities have served two basic types of natural gas storage service requirements: seasonal baseload and needle peakshaving. Baseload services are typically developed in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and aquifers while mined caverns and LNG facilities (also Propane-air facilities) typically provide needle peakshaving services. Reengineering of the natural gas infrastructure will alter the historical use patterns, and will provide the electric industry with new gas supply management tools. Electric generators, as consumers of natural gas, were among the first open access shippers and, as a result of FERC Order 636, are now attempting to reposition themselves in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} gas industry. Stated in terms of historical consumption, the five largest gas burning utilities consume 40% of all the gas burned for electric generation, and the top twenty accounted for approximately 70%. Slightly more than 100 utilities, including municipals, have any gas fired generating capacity, a rather limited number. These five are all active consumers of storage services.

Beckman, K.L. [International Gas Consulting, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lays out guidelines for the conditions under which coal mining operations must notify state authorities of intentions to mine where underground gas is stored as well as map and data requirements,...

157

Using Big Data and Smart Field Technology for Detecting Leakage in a CO2 Storage Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Storage), captures the CO2 from production sources like the power plants (coal or gas fired) and transfers leaking from the reservoir using the real-time data streams demonstrates the power of pattern recognition it to sink or storage site (geologic unit). Hydrocarbon reservoirs, deep saline reservoirs and coal bed

Mohaghegh, Shahab

158

Identification and quantification of fracture behavior through reservoir simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrated the use of reservoir simulation as a tool for quantifying and describing the relative significance of fracture and matrix flow units to overall reservoir storage capacity and transmissibility in a field development example. A high matrix porosity Pennsylvanian age sandstone oil reservoir, that is currently undergoing the early stages of secondary recovery by waterflood, was studied. Unexpected early water breakthrough indicated the presence of a high directional permeability fracture system superimposed on the high porosity matrix system. To further understand the reservoir behavior, improve field performance and to quantify the relative contributions of fracture and matrix units to permeability and storage capacity, a reservoir simulation and characterization project was initiated. Well test, well log, tracer and geologic data were integrated into the simulation project. The integrated study indicated that the fractures exhibited high directional permeability but low storage capacity relative to the matrix portion of the reservoir. Although fractures heavily influenced overall fluid flow behavior, they did not contain large storage capacity. The system had a low calculated fracture intensity index. Reservoir simulation enabled the quantification of the relative importance of the two flow systems which in turn had a large impact on total reserves estimates and production forecasting. Simulation results indicated a need to realign injector and producer patterns which improved production rates and ultimate recovery.

Cline, S. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)]|[Hefner Corporation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and 76 Field, Clinton Co., KY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enhanced recovery, production operations in fracture- dominated oil and gas reservoirs. Borehole geophonesSPE 36651 Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated

160

A Simple Model for Estimating Water Balance and Salinity of Reservoirs and Outflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on flow and salinity of the stream and the floodplains. The first part deals with water and salt balance in reservoirs. The primary purpose of the model is to predict outflow salinity from the reservoir storage and inflow information in advance... management strategy, yet the method to predict outflow salinity has not been adequately examined. The study reported here examined the water and salt balance in a reservoir using a two-layer model. This model assumes that inflow blends with the storage...

Miyamoto, S; Yuan, F; Anand, Shilpa

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Field Demonstration of Horizontal Infill Drilling Using Cost-effective Integrated Reservoir Modeling--Mississippian Carbonates, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mississippian carbonate reservoirs have produced in excess of 1 billion barrels of oil in Kansas accounting for over 16% of the state's production. With declining production from other age reservoirs, the contribution of Mississippian reservoirs to Kansas's oil production has risen to 43% as of 2004. However, solution-enhanced features such as vertical shale intervals extending from the karst erosional surface at the top introduce complexities/compartmentalizations in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs. Coupled with this, strong water drives charge many of these reservoirs resulting in limited drainage from vertical wells due to high water cuts after an initial period of low water production. Moreover, most of these fields are operated by small independent operators without access to the knowledge bank of modern research in field characterization and exploitation/development practices. Thus, despite increasing importance of Mississippian fields to Kansas production, these fields are beset with low recovery factors and high abandonment rates leaving significant resources in the ground. Worldwide, horizontal infill wells have been successful in draining compartmentalized reservoirs with limited pressure depletion. The intent of this project was to demonstrate the application of horizontal wells to successfully exploit the remaining potential in mature Mississippian fields of the mid-continent. However, it is of critical importance that for horizontal wells to be economically successful, they must be selectively targeted. This project demonstrated the application of initial and secondary screening methods, based on publicly available data, to quickly shortlist fields in a target area for detailed studies to evaluate their potential to infill horizontal well applications. Advanced decline curve analyses were used to estimate missing well-level production data and to verify if the well produced under unchanging bottom-hole conditions--two commonly occurring data constraints afflicting mature Mississippian fields. A publicly accessible databank of representative petrophysical properties and relationships was developed to overcome the paucity of such data that is critical to modeling the storage and flow in these reservoirs. Studies in 3 Mississippian fields demonstrated that traditional reservoir models built by integrating log, core, DST, and production data from existing wells on 40-acre spacings are unable to delineate karst-induced compartments, thus making 3D-seismic data critical to characterize these fields. Special attribute analyses on 3D data were shown to delineate reservoir compartments and predict those with pay porosities. Further testing of these techniques is required to validate their applicability in other Mississippian reservoirs. This study shows that detailed reservoir characterization and simulation on geomodels developed by integrating wireline log, core, petrophysical, production and pressure, and 3D-seismic data enables better evaluation of a candidate field for horizontal infill applications. In addition to reservoir compartmentalization, two factors were found to control the economic viability of a horizontal infill well in a mature Mississippian field: (a) adequate reservoir pressure support, and (b) an average well spacing greater than 40-acres.

Saibal Bhattacharya

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

CO{sub 2} Injectivity, Storage Capacity, Plume Size, and Reservoir and Seal Integrity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone and the Cambrian Potosi Formation in the Illnois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins underlie most of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan. This interval also extends through much of the Midwest of the United States and, for some areas, may be the only available target for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We evaluated the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the basal Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir for sequestration potential. The two targets were the Cambrian carbonate intervals in the Knox and the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of these two formations was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the USDOE-funded Illinois Basin â?? Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. Interpretations were completed using log analysis software, a reservoir flow simulator, and a finite element solver that determines rock stress and strain changes resulting from the pressure increase associated with CO{sub 2} injection. Results of this research suggest that both the St. Peter Sandstone and the Potosi Dolomite (a formation of the Knox) reservoirs may be capable of storing up to 2 million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for a 20-year period. Reservoir simulation results for the St. Peter indicate good injectivity and a relatively small CO{sub 2} plume. While a single St. Peter well is not likely to achieve the targeted injection rate of 2 million tonnes/year, results of this study indicate that development with three or four appropriately spaced wells may be sufficient. Reservoir simulation of the Potosi suggest that much of the CO{sub 2} flows into and through relatively thin, high permeability intervals, resulting in a large plume diameter compared with the St. Peter.

Hannes Leetaru; Alan Brown; Donald Lee; Ozgur Senel; Marcia Coueslan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Underground-Energy-Storage Program, 1982 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two principal underground energy storage technologies are discussed--Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). The Underground Energy Storage Program objectives, approach, structure, and milestones are described, and technical activities and progress in the STES and CAES areas are summarized. STES activities include aquifer thermal energy storage technology studies and STES technology assessment and development. CAES activities include reservoir stability studies and second-generation concepts studies. (LEW)

Kannberg, L.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fully depleted back illuminated CCD  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

Holland, Stephen Edward (Hercules, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Rotational Mixing and Lithium Depletion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review basic observational features in Population I stars which strongly implicate rotation as a mixing agent; these include dispersion at fixed temperature in coeval populations and main sequence lithium depletion for a range of masses at a rate which decays with time. New developments related to the possible suppression of mixing at late ages, close binary mergers and their lithium signature, and an alternate origin for dispersion in young cool stars tied to radius anomalies observed in active young stars are discussed. I highlight uncertainties in models of Population II lithium depletion and dispersion related to the treatment of angular momentum loss. Finally, the origins of rotation are tied to conditions in the pre-main sequence, and there is thus some evidence that enviroment and planet formation could impact stellar rotational properties. This may be related to recent observational evidence for cluster to cluster variations in lithium depletion and a connection between the presence of planets and s...

Pinsonneault, M H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of TVA's Reservoir Vital signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made on fourteen TVA reservoirs (the nine mainstem Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and five tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, Norris, Melton Hill and Tellico). In addition in 1991, limited water quality monitoring was initiated on ten tributary storage impoundments. The objective of the Vital Signs monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. Physical/chemical data collected in 1991 showed the water quality of the majority of TVA's reservoirs to be very good, but pointed out areas for improvement and further investigation.

Meinert, D.L.; Fehring, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Number of Existing Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year JanProduction 4 12 7311,925 177,995811. Capacity43 43

171

Reservoir management using streamline simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions...

Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual Report, August 1990-December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was designed to investigate production management strategies through a field study approach. The initial task was to prepare a summary of industry experience with water-drive gas and water-drive gas storage reservoirs. This activity was necessary to define the variety of reservoir situations in which water influx occurs, to identify those cases where alternative production practices will increase ultimate recovery, and to develop techniques to better characterize these reservoirs for further analysis. Four fields were selected for study: 1 onshore Gulf Coast gas reservoir, 2 offshore Gulf Coast reservoirs, and 1 mid-continent aquifier gas storage field. A modified material balance technique was developed and validated which predicts the pressure and production performance of water-drive gas reservoirs. This method yields more accurate results than conventional water influx techniques.

Hower, T.L.; Abbott, W.A.; Arsenault, J.W.; Jones, R.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Method and apparatus for storage battery electrolyte circulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrolyte reservoir in fluid communication with the cell of a storage battery is intermittently pressurized with a pulse of compressed gas to cause a flow of electrolyte from the reservoir to the upper region of less dense electrolyte in the cell. Upon termination of the pressure pulse, more dense electrolyte is forced into the reservoir from the lower region of the cell by the differential pressure head between the cell and reservoir electrolyte levels. The compressed gas pulse is controlled to prevent the entry of gas from the reservoir into the cell.

Inkmann, Mark S. (Milwaukee, WI)

1980-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

174

Underground pumped storage scheme in the Bukit Timah granite of Singapore  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pumped storage is an energy storage method that involves the pumping of water from a lower reservoir to an upper reservoir during off-peak period using low cost power and releasing of the water from the upper reservoir to produce electricity during peak load period. Because of the very small and relatively flat land area of Singapore, a conventional surface pumped storage plant is not feasible. A pumped storage plant can be constructed here by siting the upper reservoir in one of the many abandoned granite quarries and by placing the lower reservoir and the powerhouse underground in the Bukit Timah granite, which is sound, massive and impervious. The capital costs for a pumped storage plant could be the same as those of an oil-fired plant of a comparable size. When the very high cost of land in Singapore is taken into account, an underground pumped storage scheme for peaking purposes becomes attractive. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Wong, I.H. [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore)] [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Comparative evaluation of network flow programming and conventional reservoir system simulation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS MODELS Operating river/reservoir systems in an optimal manner is an important and com- plex area of water resources planning and management. Reservoir system operation involves: allocating storage capacity and water resources between multiple... broad array of analysis capabilities, have been developed over the past several decades to support planning studies and management decisions. Reservoir system analysis models can be categorized as (I) simulation models, (2) optimization models...

Yerramreddy, Anilkumar

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 9 (2012) 1023 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strata other than depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs (e.g. in saline aquifers), relatively little indefinitely in the pore space of the rock. Potential storage sites include saline brine reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, and coal seams. The technology

177

Interdisciplinary Investigation of CO2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project investigates the feasibility of geologic sequestration of CO2 in depleted shale gas reservoirs from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. It is anticipated that over the next two decades, tens of thousands of wells will be drilled in the 23 states in which organic-rich shale gas deposits are found. This research investigates the feasibility of using these formations for sequestration. If feasible, the number of sites where CO2 can be sequestered increases dramatically. The research embraces a broad array of length scales ranging from the ~10 nanometer scale of the pores in the shale formations to reservoir scale through a series of integrated laboratory and theoretical studies.

Zoback, Mark; Kovscek, Anthony; Wilcox, Jennifer

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Carbon sequestration in leaky reservoirs Alain Jean-Marie, INRIA and UMR LIRMM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration in leaky reservoirs Alain Jean-Marie, INRIA and UMR LIRMM Michel Moreaux, February 2, 2011 Abstract We propose in this paper a model of optimal Carbon Capture and Storage in which the reservoir of sequestered carbon is leaky, and pollution eventually is released into the atmosphere. We

Boyer, Edmond

179

Analysis of the dynamics of saturation and pressure close to the wellbore for condensate reservoirs as a tool to optimize liquid production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas condensate reservoirs often exhibit a rapid decline in production with depletion. During early production, liquid dropout accumulates in the near wellbore area and this liquid dropout reduces the effective permeability to gas and thereby...

Guerra Camargo, Andrea M

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A study to assess the value of post-stack seismic amplitude data in forecasting fluid production from a Gulf-of-Mexico reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a Gulf-of-Mexico reservoir Maika Gambús-Ordaz, Carlos Torres-Verdín The University of Texas in the Gulf of Mexico. The availability of measured time records of fluid production and pressure depletion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Reservoir Operation in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of the surface water resources of the various river basins of the state. The operation of these essential water control facilities is examined in this report. Reservoir operation is viewed here from the perspective of deciding how much water...

Wurbs, Ralph A.

182

Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

183

Session: Reservoir Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Monitoring aquifer storage and recovery using multiple geophysical methods , Kristofer Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gravity methods to monitor an aquifer storage recovery (ASR) project. An abandoned coal mine has been developed into an underground water reservoir in Leyden, Colorado. Excess water from surface sources is injected into the reservoir during winter and then retrieved for use in the summer. Understanding the storage-recovery process

185

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The practice of underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in the USA in 1916, provides useful insight into the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide--the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. In many ways, UNGS is directly relevant to geologic CO{sub 2} storage because, like CO{sub 2}, natural gas (essentially methane) is less dense than water. Consequently, it will tend to rise to the top of any subsurface storage structure located below the groundwater table. By the end of 2001 in the USA, about 142 million metric tons of natural gas were stored underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine aquifers. Based on their performance, UNGS projects have shown that there is a safe and effective way of storing large volumes of gases in the subsurface. In the small number of cases where failures did occur (i.e., leakage of the stored gas into neighboring permeable layers), they were mainly related to improper well design, construction, maintenance, and/or incorrect project operation. In spite of differences in the chemical and physical properties of the gases, the risk-assessment, risk-management, and risk-mitigation issues relevant to UNGS projects are also pertinent to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 125, No. 3, pp. 143-153, May/June 1999 Some Derived Operating Rules for Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for reservoirs in series and in parallel for water supply, flood control, hydropower, water quality-time, seasonal, and long- term operations, and for understanding the workings of multi-reservoir systems-term operation for hydropower production and energy storage. For reservoirs in parallel, additional new special

Pasternack, Gregory B.

188

Overspill avalanching in a dense reservoir network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of communities, agriculture, and industry is strongly dependent on an effective storage and supply of water resources. In some regions the economic growth has led to a level of water demand which can only be accomplished through efficient reservoir networks. Such infrastructures are not always planned at larger scale but rather made by farmers according to their local needs of irrigation during droughts. Based on extensive data from the upper Jaguaribe basin, one of the world's largest system of reservoirs, located in the Brazilian semiarid northeast, we reveal that surprisingly it self-organizes into a scale-free network exhibiting also a power-law in the distribution of the lakes and avalanches of discharges. With a new self-organized-criticality-type model we manage to explain the novel critical exponents. Implementing a flow model we are able to reproduce the measured overspill evolution providing a tool for catastrophe mitigation and future planning.

Mamede, G L; Schneider, C M; de Araújo, J C; Herrmann, H J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials to the timescale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model

190

Prediction of pressure depletion from wireline and mud logs, Golden Trend field, Garvin County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Golden Trend, a giant oil field encompassing several overlapping Pennsylvanian stratigraphic traps on the eastern flank of the Anadarko basin, has undergone a resurgence in the 1980s with deeper drilling for pre-Pennsylvanian targets. Approximately 200 new wells in and near the Antioch Southwest, Panther Creek, and Elmore Northeast waterflood units (T2, 3N, R2, 3W) have encountered evidence of undrained reserves in both established and new pay intervals of Pennsylvanian Hart and Gibson sandstones. Although all porous Hart and Gibson sandstones in the study area were originally oil bearing, evaluation of the state of depletion is necessary for planning future recompletions to these reservoirs. In general, wireline and mud logs over intervals with known production histories exhibit characteristics suggestive of pressure depletion, even in areas of old waterfloods. The most consistent parameters correlating to low reservoir pressure are lost circulation, lack of an increase in penetration rate when drilling porous sandstone, excessive gas effect on neutron-density logs, and low methane and total gas levels on the mud logs. The resistivity invasion profile also reflects lower pressure, but is subtle. The SP curve and gas composition on the mud log do not vary substantially as a function of pressure. Visual sample shows are slightly weaker in depleted sandstones, but are less reliable, owing to dependence on reservoir quality and variations between geologists on oral descriptions of show quality.

Sorenson, R.P.; White, F.W.; Struckel, J.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

Pruess, Karsten

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

OXYGEN DEPLETION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: IMPLICATIONS FOR GRAIN MODELS AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELEMENTAL OXYGEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper assesses the implications of a recent discovery that atomic oxygen is being depleted from diffuse interstellar gas at a rate that cannot be accounted for by its presence in silicate and metallic oxide particles. To place this discovery in context, the uptake of elemental O into dust is considered over a wide range of environments, from the tenuous intercloud gas and diffuse clouds sampled by the depletion observations to dense clouds where ice mantles and gaseous CO become important reservoirs of O. The distribution of O in these contrasting regions is quantified in terms of a common parameter, the mean number density of hydrogen (n{sub H}). At the interface between diffuse and dense phases (just before the onset of ice-mantle growth) as much as {approx}160 ppm of the O abundance is unaccounted for. If this reservoir of depleted oxygen persists to higher densities it has implications for the oxygen budget in molecular clouds, where a shortfall of the same order is observed. Of various potential carriers, the most plausible appears to be a form of O-bearing carbonaceous matter similar to the organics found in cometary particles returned by the Stardust mission. The 'organic refractory' model for interstellar dust is re-examined in the light of these findings, and it is concluded that further observations and laboratory work are needed to determine whether this class of material is present in quantities sufficient to account for a significant fraction of the unidentified depleted oxygen.

Whittet, D. C. B. [New York Center for Astrobiology, and Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

194

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data...

Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an opto-electronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations.

Yvan Paquot; François Duport; Anteo Smerieri; Joni Dambre; Benjamin Schrauwen; Marc Haelterman; Serge Massar

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

Robert W. Watson

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

A dual-porosity reservoir model with a nonlinear coupling term  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since their introduction by Barenblatt et al. (1960), double-porosity models have been widely used for simulating flow in fractured reservoirs, such as geothermal reservoirs. In a dual-porosity system, the matrix blocks provide most of the storage of the reservoir, whereas the fractures provide the global transmissivity. Initially, most work on dual-porosity models emphasized the development of analytical solutions to idealized reservoir problems. Increasingly, the dual-porosity approach is being implemented by numerical reservoir simulators. Accurate numerical simulation of a dual-porosity problem often requires a prohibitively large number of computational cells in order to resolve the transient pressure gradients in the matrix blocks. We discuss a new dual-porosity model that utilizes a nonlinear differential equation to approximate the fracture/matrix interactions, When implemented into a numerical simulator, it eliminates the need to discretize the matrix blocks, and thereby allows more efficient simulation of reservoir problems.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Chen, G.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Time-lapse gravity monitoring: A systematic 4D approach with application to aquifer storage and recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. An abandoned underground coal mine has been developed into a subsurface water reservoir. Water from surface reservoirs use valuable land needed for develop- ment or the preservation of open space and can have of such reservoirs can reach tens of millions of dollars. The aquifer storage recovery ASR process Pyne, 1995 pro

203

The subsurface fluid mechanics of geologic carbon dioxide storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO? is captured at power plants and then injected into deep geologic reservoirs for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued use of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained ...

Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure

205

Identification of Parameters Influencing the Response of Gas Storage Wells to Hydraulic Fracturing with the Aid of a Neural Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

75083-3836, U.S.A. Telex, 163245 SPEUT. Abstract Performing hydraulic fractures on gas storage wells necessary for most reservoir studies and hydraulic fracture design and evaluation are scarce for these old storage wells to hydraulic fracturing may be identified in the absence of sufficient reservoir data

Mohaghegh, Shahab

206

Review The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.

Wayne Briner

207

Energy Storage  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

Paranthaman, Parans

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

Paranthaman, Parans

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

CERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selected Plan provides approximately 170,000 acre-feet of above-ground storage volume in a twoCERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida 23 August 2007 Abstract: The purpose of the Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Reservoir project

US Army Corps of Engineers

210

Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. An investigation team was immediately formed to determine the cause of the failures and their impact on future storage procedures and to recommend corrective actions. Subsequent investigation showed that the failures most probably resulted from mechanical damage that occurred at the time that the cylinders had been placed in the storage yard. In both cylinders evidence pointed to the impact of a lifting lug of an adjacent cylinder near the front stiffening ring, where deflection of the cylinder could occur only by tearing the cylinder. The impacts appear to have punctured the cylinders and thereby set up corrosion processes that greatly extended the openings in the wall and obliterated the original crack. Fortunately, the reaction products formed by this process were relatively protective and prevented any large-scale loss of uranium. The main factors that precipitated the failures were inadequate spacing between cylinders and deviations in the orientations of lifting lugs from their intended horizontal position. After reviewing the causes and effects of the failures, the team`s principal recommendation for remedial action concerned improved cylinder handling and inspection procedures. Design modifications and supplementary mechanical tests were also recommended to improve the cylinder containment integrity during the stacking operation.

DeVan, J.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Summary of the engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is reviewing ideas for the long-term management and use of its depleted uranium hexafluoride. DOE owns about 560,000 metric tons (over a billion pounds) of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This material is contained in steel cylinders located in storage yards near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. On November 10, 1994, DOE announced its new Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program by issuing a Request for Recommendations and an Advance Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (59 FR 56324 and 56325). The first part of this program consists of engineering, costs and environmental impact studies. Part one will conclude with the selection of a long-term management plan or strategy. Part two will carry out the selected strategy.

Dubrin, J.W., Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Depleted uranium disposition study -- Supplement, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Weapons and Materials Planning has requested a supplemental study to update the recent Depleted Uranium Disposition report. This supplemental study addresses new disposition alternatives and changes in status.

Becker, G.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of TVA`s Reservoir Vital signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made on fourteen TVA reservoirs (the nine mainstem Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and five tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, Norris, Melton Hill and Tellico). In addition in 1991, limited water quality monitoring was initiated on ten tributary storage impoundments. The objective of the Vital Signs monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. Physical/chemical data collected in 1991 showed the water quality of the majority of TVA`s reservoirs to be very good, but pointed out areas for improvement and further investigation.

Meinert, D.L.; Fehring, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Status of COThe Status of CO22 CaptureCapture and Storage Technologyand Storage Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and hydrogen from fossil fuels · Energy models show that without CCS, the cost of mitigating climate change (Electricity, Fuels, Chemicals, Hydrogen) CO2 CO2 Capture & Compress CO2 Transport CO2 Storage (Sequestration) - Post-combustion - Pre-combustion - Oxyfuel combustion - Pipeline - Tanker - Depleted oil/gas fields

217

Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

Goldberg, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Avci, H.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bradley, C.E. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

acute tryptophan depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Psychopharmacology ISSN 0269-8811 SAGE Publications Ltd 12 Review The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging...

219

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Sites Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the...

220

Fluid Flow Simulation in Fractured Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to analyze fluid flow in fractured reservoirs. In most petroleum reservoirs, particularly carbonate reservoirs and some tight sands, natural fractures play a critical role in controlling fluid ...

Sarkar, Sudipta

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

222

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality regulates the underground storage of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Prior to the use of any underground reservoir for the...

223

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondary accumulation at shallow depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: Analogs,S.T. Nelson. Natural Leaking CO2-charged Systems as AnalogsY. Sano, and H.U. Schmincke. CO2-rich Gases from Lakes Nyos

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using...

227

Time-lapse gravity monitoring of an aquifer storage recovery project in Leyden, Colorado Kristofer Davis*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on using time-lapse micro-gravity surveying to monitor an aquifer storage recovery project. An abandoned coal mine is being developed into an underground water reservoir in Leyden, Colorado. Excess water from surface sources is poured into the reservoir during winter and then retrieved for use in the summer

228

Thermionic reactor module with thermal-storage reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermionic energy conversion system assembly is described, which comprises a fissionable nuclear fuel that surrounds a cylindrical arrangement of thermionic-emitter electrodes that surround corresponding collector electrodes, which in turn surround a cylindrical container of a heat-sink material such as lithium hydride, which can absorb large amounts of waste heat energy through a phase change. The heat-sink material may also act as a nuclear moderator to reduce the amount of required nuclear fuel. A heat pipe is enclosed within the container of heat-sink material to remove waste heat stored in the material. A thermionic energy-conversion module is described which comprises 100 stacked-in-series thermionic-converter assemblies. A complete space-based thermionic nuclear reactor is described which comprises an array of 91 thermionic-converter modules wherein the heat pipes connect to a lithium hydride radiation shield which acts as a further heat sink. The radiation shield connects to radiators to remove the waste heat to space.

Kennel, E.B.

1987-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Legal Aspects of Water Storage in Federal Reservoirs in Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 785 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 786 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 787 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 788 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 789 1983-1984 Hein...Online -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 790 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 791 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 792 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 793 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L. Rev. 794 1983-1984 HeinOnline -- 32 U. Kan. L...

Peck, John C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data03. U.S.

231

FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

Abbas Firoozabadi

1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

234

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on surfactant injection in near well bore region. We demonstrate that by injecting the surfactant, the relative permeability of water could be decreased, and that of gas could be increased. This should result in improved gas recovery from the reservoir. Our geological analysis of the reservoir develops the detailed stratigraphic description of the reservoir. Two new stratigraphic units, previously unrecognized, are identified. Additional lithofacies are recognized in new core descriptions. Our engineering analysis has determined that well density is an important parameter in optimally producing Hunton reservoirs. It appears that 160 acre is an optimal spacing. The reservoir pressure appears to decline over time; however, recovery per well is only weakly influenced by the pressure. This indicates that additional opportunity to drill wells exists in relatively depleted fields. A simple material balance technique is developed to validate the recovery of gas, oil and water. This technique can be used to further extrapolate recoveries from other fields with similar field characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results demonstrate how these reactors can possess and realize extraordinary excellent characteristics, no prompt critical, long-term safe and stable operation with negative feedback, closed uranium-plutonium cycle chain within the vessel, normal operation only with depleted-uranium, and depleted-uranium high burnup in reality, to realize with fission nuclear energy sufficiently satisfying humanity long-term energy resource needs, as well as thoroughly solve the challenges of nuclear criticality safety, uranium resource insuffic...

Dong, Bao-Guo; Gu, Ji-Yuan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup ?3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 ?s. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 Jason J. Heinrich, Howard J. Herzog, David M. Reiner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analogs: acid gas injection (AGI), enhanced oil recovery (EOR), natural gas storage, and CO2 transportENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 * Jason J. Heinrich, Howard J. Herzog, David M of reducing CO2 emissions. The storage of CO2 in underground geologic reservoirs is one such idea that employs

238

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Compressed air energy storage technology program. Annual report for 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) program are to establish stability criteria for large underground reservoirs in salt domes, hard rock, and porous rock used for air storage in utility applications, and to develop second-generation CAES technologies that have minimal or no dependence on petroleum fuels. During the year reported reports have been issued on field studies on CAES on aquifers and in salt, stability, and design criteria for CAES and for pumped hydro-storage caverns, laboratory studies of CAES in porous rock reservoris have continued. Research has continued on combined CAES/Thermal Energy Storage, CAES/Solar systems, coal-fired fluidized bed combustors for CAES, and two-reservoir advanced CAES concepts. (LCL)

Loscutoff, W.V.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

THE RIMINI PROTOCOL Oil Depletion Protocol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soaring oil prices have drawn attention to the issue of the relative supply and demand for crude oil1 THE RIMINI PROTOCOL an Oil Depletion Protocol ~ Heading Off Economic Chaos and Political Conflict During the Second Half of the Age of Oil As proposed at the 2003 Pio Manzu Conference

Keeling, Stephen L.

244

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary o Regional nuclear war could cause global which traps pollutants o Nuclear weapons cause explosions, which then causes things around the vicinity to start burning, which in turn releases black carbon; it is not the nuclear material or fallout causing

Toohey, Darin W.

245

Commonness, population depletion and conservation biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and alleviate significant depletion events. Priority species Judgements about extinction risk are key drivers to be targets for conservation invest- ment. Indeed, high extinction risk typifies the most iconic species, flagship or indicator species [2­4]), the use of extinction risk to set conservation priorities has

Queensland, University of

246

Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Berkeley, California Abstract Proof-of-principle gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have and therefore has limitations in controlling the energy flux associated with solar illumination. The issue storage capacity with the amount of hydrogen needed for maximum switching range. For this reason, as well

249

Sediment accumulation and carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus deposition in the large tropical reservoir Lake Kariba  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kariba, the largest hydropower reservoir in the Zambezi River Basin (ZRB). Sediment characteristics large dams are constructed to provide socio- economic benefits in the form of hydropower, water storage regions of the world have considerable untapped hydropower potential [Bartle, 2002; Hydropower and Dams

Gilli, Adrian

250

SCHEDULING TVA'S RESERVOIRS WITH RIVERWARE Timothy M. Magee, Operations Research Analyst, Center for Advanced Decision Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ware's capabilities with TVA's daily operations scheduling models which optimize hydropower value while meeting non and operates 29 conventional hydropower plants and one pumped storage hydropower plant in the Tennessee Valley to hydropower generation, the reservoir system provides other beneficial services throughout the Tennessee

251

PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION AND DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE REHABILITATION OF TRASH SCREEN AT JOR RESERVOIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was found to be of 27% clay, 26% silt, 43% sand and 4% gravel. The rehabilitation works on structure of the reservoir outlet structure is maintained in accordance to the International Dam Safety Standards. 1.0 million m3 as live storage for hydropower power generation. During the preliminary stage of construction

Julien, Pierre Y.

252

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

P. K. Pande

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage climate system sim- ulated by earth system models (ESMs). The continental freshwater reservoirs represent

Ribes, Aurélien

256

Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Finck, P.J.; Hill, R.N.; Sakamoto, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A STOCHASTIC METHOD FOR MODELING FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andFLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andachieve optimal recovery of petroleum from a reservoir, it

Anderson, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Uranio impoverito: perché? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of understanding the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

Germano D'Abramo

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fracture Dissolution of Carbonate Rock: An Innovative Process for Gas Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project is to develop and assess the feasibility and economic viability of an innovative concept that may lead to commercialization of new gas-storage capacity near major markets. The investigation involves a new approach to developing underground gas storage in carbonate rock, which is present near major markets in many areas of the United States. Because of the lack of conventional gas storage and the projected growth in demand for storage capacity, many of these areas are likely to experience shortfalls in gas deliverability. Since depleted gas reservoirs and salt formations are nearly non-existent in many areas, alternatives to conventional methods of gas storage are required. The need for improved methods of gas storage, particularly for ways to meet peak demand, is increasing. Gas-market conditions are driving the need for higher deliverability and more flexibility in injection/withdrawal cycling. In order to meet these needs, the project involves an innovative approach to developing underground storage capacity by creating caverns in carbonate rock formations by acid dissolution. The basic concept of the acid-dissolution method is to drill to depth, fracture the carbonate rock layer as needed, and then create a cavern using an aqueous acid to dissolve the carbonate rock. Assessing feasibility of the acid-dissolution method included a regional geologic investigation. Data were compiled and analyzed from carbonate formations in six states: Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New York. To analyze the requirements for creating storage volume, the following aspects of the dissolution process were examined: weight and volume of rock to be dissolved; gas storage pressure, temperature, and volume at depth; rock solubility; and acid costs. Hydrochloric acid was determined to be the best acid to use because of low cost, high acid solubility, fast reaction rates with carbonate rock, and highly soluble products (calcium chloride) that allow for the easy removal of calcium waste from the well. Physical and chemical analysis of core samples taken from prospective geologic formations for the acid dissolution process confirmed that many of the limestone samples readily dissolved in concentrated hydrochloric acid. Further, some samples contained oily residues that may help to seal the walls of the final cavern structure. These results suggest that there exist carbonate rock formations well suited for the dissolution technology and that the presence of inert impurities had no noticeable effect on the dissolution rate for the carbonate rock. A sensitivity analysis was performed for characteristics of hydraulic fractures induced in carbonate formations to enhance the dissolution process. Multiple fracture simulations were conducted using modeling software that has a fully 3-D fracture geometry package. The simulations, which predict the distribution of fracture geometry and fracture conductivity, show that the stress difference between adjacent beds is the physical property of the formations that has the greatest influence on fracture characteristics by restricting vertical growth. The results indicate that by modifying the fracturing fluid, proppant type, or pumping rate, a fracture can be created with characteristics within a predictable range, which contributes to predicting the geometry of storage caverns created by acid dissolution of carbonate formations. A series of three-dimensional simulations of cavern formation were used to investigate three different configurations of the acid-dissolution process: (a) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole and no fracture; (b) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole, with an open fracture; and (c) injection into an open borehole connected by a fracture to an adjacent borehole from which the fluids are produced. The two-well configuration maximizes the overall mass transfer from the rock to the fluid, but it results in a complex cavern shape. Numerical simulations were performed to evalua

James W. Castle; Ronald W. Falta; David Bruce; Larry Murdoch; Scott E. Brame; Donald Brooks

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Slug test data analysis in reservoirs with double porosity behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure analysis for a slug test which corresponds to the flow period of a Drill Stem test is extended to wells in reservoirs with double porosity behavior. The modelling of fluid flow within the reservoir is achieved by considering reservoirs having homogeneously distributed regions of primary (matrix) and secondary (fissure) porosity. The matrix acts as a source and fissures connect with the well. The well conditions include wellbore storage and skin effect. Solutions were obtained for either pseudostate, or transient interporosity flow. The distinctive features of both solutions are identified. Results presented are applicable to both naturally fractured and layered reservoirs as long as only the high permeability layer conducts to the wellbore. An interpretation method based on type-curve matching is proposed. Type curves based on pseudosteady or transient interporosity flow are presented. These type curves are similar to existing single layer type curves with the addition of interporosity flow lines indicating double porosity behavior. Application of the type-curve matching technique can provide the interporosity flow parameter lambda, the storativity ratio, ..omega.., in addition to transmissivity kh/..mu.., and skin effect S. Ramey et al. presented type curves for a single homogeneous layer which required empirical correlation in terms of C /SUB D/ e /SUP 2s/ and t /SUB D/ /C /SUB D/. A formal solution showing wellbore pressure as a function of C /SUB D/ e /SUP 2s/ and t /SUB D/ /C /SUB D/ for a homogeneous reservoir is presented. This permits discussion of the approximation involved in Ramey et al. study.

Mateen, K.; Ramey, H.J.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

acute catecholamine depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

about NM biosynthesis, and it is not known where Sulzer, David 9 Review The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging...

266

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This site-specific EIS analyzes the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; transportation of all cylinders (DUF6, enriched, and empty) currently stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Portsmouth; construction of a new cylinder storage yard at Portsmouth (if required) for ETTP cylinders; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion coproduct; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold.

267

Depleted Uranium in Kosovo Post-Conflict Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.1 UNEP’s role in post-conflict environmental assessment................................................9 2.2 Depleted uranium............................................................10

Unep Scientific; Mission Kosovo

268

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Susceptibility to ATP depletion of primary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Susceptibility to ATP depletion of primary proximal tubular cell subjected to ATP depletion using antimycin A. Results: Surprisingly, there was no difference in the amount, Viability, Survival, Apoptosis knockout mice, shRNA, ATP depletion, Metabolic stress, Antimycin Background

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

271

Partitioning Behavior of Organic Contaminants in Carbon Storage Environments: A Critical Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon capture and storage is a promising strategy for mitigating the CO{sub 2} contribution to global climate change. The large scale implementation of the technology mandates better understanding of the risks associated with CO{sub 2} injection into geologic formations and the subsequent interactions with groundwater resources. The injected supercritical CO{sub 2} (sc-CO{sub 2}) is a nonpolar solvent that can potentially mobilize organic compounds that exist at residual saturation in the formation. Here, we review the partitioning behavior of selected organic compounds typically found in depleted oil reservoirs in the residual oil–brine–sc-CO{sub 2} system under carbon storage conditions. The solubility of pure phase organic compounds in sc-CO{sub 2} and partitioning of organic compounds between water and sc-CO{sub 2} follow trends predicted based on thermodynamics. Compounds with high volatility and low aqueous solubility have the highest potential to partition to sc-CO{sub 2}. The partitioning of low volatility compounds to sc-CO{sub 2} can be enhanced by co-solvency due to the presence of higher volatility compounds in the sc-CO{sub 2}. The effect of temperature, pressure, salinity, pH, and dissolution of water molecules into sc-CO{sub 2} on the partitioning behavior of organic compounds in the residual oil-brine-sc-CO{sub 2} system is discussed. Data gaps and research needs for models to predict the partitioning of organic compounds in brines and from complex mixtures of oils are presented. Models need to be able to better incorporate the effect of salinity and co-solvency, which will require more experimental data from key classes of organic compounds.

Burant, Aniela; Lowry, Gregory V.; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Carpenteria reservoir redevelopment project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop a simulation-based reservoir management system that could be used to guide the redevelopment of the Carpenteria Offshore Field, which is located just seven miles from Santa Barbara. The system supports geostatistical and geological modeling and reservoir forecasting. Moreover, it is also a shared resource between the field operator, Pacific Operators Offshore, and the mineral owners, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the State of California.

Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.; Krogh, K.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coombs, S. [Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., Carpinteria, CA (United States); Paul, R.G. [Dept. of the Interior (United States); Voskanian, M.M. [California State Lands Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ershaghi, I. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Regulatory, technical pressures prompt more U. S. salt-cavern gas storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas storage in US salt caverns is meeting the need for flexible, high delivery and injection storage following implementation Nov. 1, 1993, of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636. This ruling has opened the US underground natural-gas storage market to more participants and created a demand for a variety of storage previously provided by pipelines as part of their bundled sales services. Many of these new services such as no-notice and supply balancing center on use of high-delivery natural gas storage from salt caverns. Unlike reservoir storage, nothing restricts flow in a cavern. The paper discusses the unique properties of salt that make it ideal for gas storage, choosing a location for the storage facility, cavern depth and shape, cavern size, spacing, pressures, construction, conversion or brine or LPG storage caverns to natural gas, and operation.

Barron, T.F. (PB-KBB Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

274

Optimizing injected solvent fraction in stratified reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waterflooding has become standard practice for extending the productive life of many solution gas drive reservoirs, but has the disadvantage of leaving a substantial residual oil volume in the reservoir. Solvent flooding has been offered as a...

Moon, Gary Michael

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

Wurbs, Ralph A.

276

Abstract--Electrical energy storage is a central element to any electric-drivetrain technology whether hybrid-electric, fuel-cell,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACC `04 1 Abstract-- Electrical energy storage is a central element to any electric with energy storage is the high replacement cost of depleted battery banks. One possibility to ease the power-capacitors are used in conjunction with batteries as an energy storage system for mass-transit vehicles [1]. As part

Brennan, Sean

277

Fractured gas reservoirs in the Devonian shale of the Illinois and Appalachian basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Devonian and Lower Mississippian black shale sequence of Kentucky includes the New Albany Shale of Illinois basin and the Ohio Shale of the Appalachian basin. Fractured reservoirs in the Ohio Shale contain a major gas resource, but have not been so prolific in the New Albany Shale. The authors propose two models of fractured shale reservoirs in both the Illinois and the Appalachian basins, to be tested with gas production data. (1) Where reactivated basement faults have propagated to the surface, the lack of an effective seal has prevented the development of overpressure. The resulting fracture system is entirely tectonic is origin, and served mainly as a conduit for gas migration from the basin to the surface. Gas accumulations in such reservoirs typically are small and underpressured. (2) Where basement faults have been reactivated but have not reached the surface, a seal on the fractured reservoir is preserved. In areas where thermal maturity has been adequate, overpressuring due to gas generation resulted in a major extension of the fracture system, as well as enhanced gas compression and adsorption. Such gas accumulations are relatively large. Original overpressuring has been largely lost, due both to natural depletion and to uncontrolled production. The relative thermal immaturity of the Illinois basin accounts for the scarcity of the second type of fractured reservoir and the small magnitude of the New Albany Shale gas resource.

Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, D.; Nuttall, B. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Abstract: Solid-state reversible...

279

Optimization Online - Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 7, 2013 ... Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an Extended Planning Horizon using a Benders Decomposition Algorithm Exploiting a Memory Loss ...

Pierre-Luc Carpentier

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

280

Identification of parameters influencing the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing with the aid of a neural network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performing hydraulic fractures on gas storage wells to improve their deliverability is a common practice in the eastern part of the United States. Most of the fields in this part of the country being used for storage are old. Reservoir characteristic data necessary for most reservoir studies and hydraulic fracture design and evaluation are scarce for these old fields. This paper introduces a new methodology by which parameters that influence the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing may be identified in the absence of sufficient reservoir data. Control and manipulation of these parameters, once identified correctly, could enhance the outcome of frac jobs in gas storage fields. The study was conducted on a gas storage field in the Clinton formation of Northeastern Ohio. It was found that well performance indicators prior to a hydraulic fracture play an important role in how good the well will respond to a new frac job. Several other important factors were also identified.

McVey, D.S.; Mohaghegh, S.; Aminian, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

Fischlin, Andreas

283

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 THE GEOTHERMAL CHIMNEY MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Current Design of t h e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

Stanford University

285

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geologic characterization of tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of US Geological Survey (USGS) work during FY 89 were to conduct geologic research characterizing tight gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs and their resources in the western United States. Our research has been regional in scope but, in some basins, our investigations have focused on single wells or small areas containing several wells where a large amount of data is available. The investigations, include structure, stratigraphy, petrography, x-ray mineralogy, source-rock evaluation, formation pressure and temperature, borehole geophysics, thermal maturity mapping, fission-track age dating, fluid-inclusion thermometry, and isotopic geochemistry. The objectives of these investigations are to provide geologic models that can be compared and utilized in tight gas-bearing sequences elsewhere. Nearly all of our work during FY 89 was devoted to developing a computer-based system for the Uinta basin and collecting, analyzing, and storage of data. The data base, when completed will contain various types of stratigraphic, organic chemistry, petrographic, production, engineering, and other information that relate to the petroleum geology of the Uinta basin, and in particular, to the tight gas-bearing strata. 16 refs., 3 figs.

Law, B.E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

Fowler, M.L. [BDM-Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Gas storage plays critical role in deregulated U. S. marketplace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil Gas Journal for the first time has compiled a county-by-county list of underground natural-gas storage operating in the US on Sept. 1. Nearly 3.1 tcf of working gas in storage is currently operated. As will be discussed, several projects to add capacity are under way or planned before 2000. To collect the data, OGJ contacted every company reported by the American Gas Association, U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or the US Department of Energy to have operated storage in the past 2 years. The results were combined with other published information to form Table 1 which provides base, working, and total gas capacities for storage fields, types of reservoirs used, and daily design injection and withdrawal rates. The paper also discusses deregulation, what's ahead, and salt cavern storage.

True, W.R.

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

4. International reservoir characterization technical conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of the proposed study are as follows: (1) To understand and evaluate an unusual primary oil production mechanism which results in decreasing (retrograde) oil cut (ROC) behavior as reservoir pressure declines. (2) To improve calculations of initial oil in place so as to determine the economic feasibility of completing and producing a well. (3) To optimize the location of new wells based on understanding of geological and petrophysical properties heterogeneities. (4) To evaluate various secondary recovery techniques for oil reservoirs producing from fractured formations. (5) To enhance the productivity of producing wells by using new completion techniques. These objectives are important for optimizing field performance from West Carney Field located in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. The field, which was discovered in 1980, produces from Hunton Formation in a shallow-shelf carbonate reservoir. The early development in the field was sporadic. Many of the initial wells were abandoned due to high water production and constraints in surface facilities for disposing excess produced water. The field development began in earnest in 1995 by Altex Resources. They had recognized that production from this field was only possible if large volumes of water can be disposed. Being able to dispose large amounts of water, Altex aggressively drilled several producers. With few exceptions, all these wells exhibited similar characteristics. The initial production indicated trace amount of oil and gas with mostly water as dominant phase. As the reservoir was depleted, the oil cut eventually improved, making the overall production feasible. The decreasing oil cut (ROC) behavior has not been well understood. However, the field has been subjected to intense drilling activity because of prior success of Altex Resources. In this work, we will investigate the primary production mechanism by conducting several core flood experiments. After collecting cores from representative wells, we will study the wettability of the rock and simulate the depletion behavior by mimicking such behavior under controlled lab conditions. The overall project goal would be to validate our hypothesis and to determine the best method to exploit reservoirs exhibiting ROC behavior. To that end, we have completed the Budget Period I and have fulfilled many of the objectives. We have developed a viable model to explain the reservoir mechanism and have been able to develop a correlation between core and log data so that we can extend our analysis to other, yet unexploited, regions. In Budget Period II, we will continue to drill several additional, geologically targeted wells. Depending on the depositional system, these wells can be either vertical or horizontal wells. We will closely examine the secondary recovery techniques to improve the ultimate recovery from this field. In the mean time, we will continue to refine our geological and petrophysical model so that we can extend our approach to other adjacent fields. In the Budget Period III, we will monitor the field performance and revise and refine our models to further optimize the performance.

Mohan Kelkar

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to MW/40 MWI-IR Battery Energy Storage Facility", proc. 23rdcompressed air, and battery energy storage are all only 65

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage are allenergy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro and compressed air.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories' petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Compressed air energy storage technology program. Annual report for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All of the major research funded under the Compressed Air Energy Storage Technology Program during the period March 1980 to March 1981 is described. This annual report is divided into two segments: Reservoir Stability Studies and Second-Generation Concepts Studies. The first represents research performed to establish stability criteria for CAES reservoirs while the second reports progress on research performed on second-generation CAES concepts. The report consists of project reports authored by research engineers and scientists from PNL and numerous subcontractors including universities, architect-engineering, and other private firms.

Kannberg, L.D.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Processing depleted uranium quad alloy penetrator rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two depleted uranium (DU) quad alloys were cast, extruded and rolled to produce penetrator rods. The two alloy combinations were (1) 1 wt % molybdenum (Mo), 1 wt % niobium (Nb), and 0.75 wt % titanium (Ti); and (2) 1 wt % tantalum (Ta), 1 wt % Nb, and 0.75 wt % Ti. This report covers the processing and results with limited metallographic information available. The two alloys were each vacuum induction melted (VIM) into an 8-in. log, extruded into a 3-in. log, then cut into 4 logs and extruded at 4 different temperatures into 0.8-in. bars. From the 8 conditions (2 alloys, 4 extrusion temperatures each), 10 to 13 16-in. rods were cut for rolling and swaging. Due to cracking problems, the final processing changed from rolling and swaging to limited rolling and heat treating. The contracted work was completed with the delivery of 88 rods to Dr. Zabielski. 28 figs.

Bokan, S.L.

1987-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

Depletion of bovine pituitary prolactin by cysteamine involves a thiol:disulfide mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cysteamine (2-aminoethanethiol (CySH)) reduces measurable PRL concentrations in vivo and in vitro. Since secretion is also inhibited, CySH may block conversion from a poorly assayable hormone storage form(s) to readily assayable, releasable PRL. This would represent a previously unrecognized mechanism for secretory regulation. We undertook the present study to identify the sites involved in the loss of measurable PRL (depletion) induced by cysteamine. The disulfide cystamine was ineffective on secretory granules unless combined with reduced glutathione, indicating the generation of the active CySH-thiol form. Pretreatment of granules with thiol-blocking agents resulted in dose-dependent enhancement of CySH inhibition, achieving nearly complete inhibition with 5 mM iodoacetamide. In contrast, pretreatment with reduced glutathione or dithiothreitol, respectively, impaired or abolished the CySH effect. These data suggest that the mechanism by which CySH causes PRL depletion is mediated by granule disulfides and the -SH of CySH. The regulation of thiol:disulfide equilibria appears to be an important determinant of the detectability of PRL storage forms and of their secretion.

Lorenson, M.Y.; Jacobs, L.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Lithium Depletion of Nearby Young Stellar Associations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We estimate cluster ages from lithium depletion in five pre-main-sequence groups found within 100 pc of the Sun: TW Hydrae Association, Eta Chamaeleontis Cluster, Beta Pictoris Moving Group, Tucanae-Horologium Association and AB Doradus Moving Group. We determine surface gravities, effective temperatures and lithium abundances for over 900 spectra through least squares fitting to model-atmosphere spectra. For each group, we compare the dependence of lithium abundance on temperature with isochrones from pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks to obtain model dependent ages. We find that the Eta Chamaelontis Cluster and the TW Hydrae Association are the youngest, with ages of 12+/-6 Myr and 12+/-8 Myr, respectively, followed by the Beta Pictoris Moving Group at 21+/-9 Myr, the Tucanae-Horologium Association at 27+/-11 Myr, and the AB Doradus Moving Group at an age of at least 45 Myr (where we can only set a lower limit since the models -- unlike real stars -- do not show much lithium depletion beyond this age). Here, the ordering is robust, but the precise ages depend on our choice of both atmospheric and evolutionary models. As a result, while our ages are consistent with estimates based on Hertzsprung-Russell isochrone fitting and dynamical expansion, they are not yet more precise. Our observations do show that with improved models, much stronger constraints should be feasible: the intrinsic uncertainties, as measured from the scatter between measurements from different spectra of the same star, are very low: around 10 K in effective temperature, 0.05 dex in surface gravity, and 0.03 dex in lithium abundance.

Erin Mentuch; Alexis Brandeker; Marten H. van Kerkwijk; Ray Jayawardhana; Peter H. Hauschildt

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi of the geothermal system. In this way, synergy is established between geothermal energy production and subsurface CO) with geothermal energy. A further reduction could be achieved by capturing the remaining emitted CO2

Stanford University

302

Deuterium depletion and magnesium enhancement in the local disc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The local disc deuter is known to be depleted in comparison to the local bubble. We show, that the same lines of sight that are depleted in deuter, are enhanced in magnesium. Heavier elements - Si and Fe do not show any difference in the abundance between the local disc and the local bubble. This observation implicates that astration is responsible for both deuter depletion and magnesium enhancement.

Piotr Gnacinski

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion Coupled to SRM: Correlation with Clinical Immunoassay Tests. Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity...

304

Microscale Depletion of High Abundance Proteins in Human Biofluids...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by nonspecific binding to the column matrix. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides...

305

atp depletion precedes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

evolves, because new precedents are generated by the form... Smolin, Lee 2012-01-01 15 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

306

analogues deplete androgen: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with androgens has been shown to increase growth rate in fishes (Ron et al., 1995 13 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

307

antioxidant defence depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and defence reactions. Priya Roy; Ramamurthy Dhandapani Department Of Microbiology 15 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

308

administration depletes mitochondrial: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recombination is widespread in plant mtDNA. Recombinant molecules have Nicolas Galtier 6 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

309

approaching waterflood depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are shown in Table 5 of the Appendix. Figure... Pettitt, Bobby Eugene 1963-01-01 19 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

310

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to the DOE Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project in Paducah, Kentucky and...

311

aerosol depletion test: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage and realize optimum well productivity. To address... Chen, Guoqiang 2002-01-01 10 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

312

Evaluation of the Nordland Group overburden as an effective seal for the Sleipner CO2 storage site (offshore Norway) using analytical and stochastic modelling techniques   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saline aquifers and depleted hydrocarbon fields situated beneath the North Sea are currently being proposed as storage repositories for anthropogenic CO2 captured from point source emitters in the UK and mainland Europe. ...

Nicoll, Grant Douglas

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 182-F Reservoir Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-025  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 182-F Reservoir was a rectangular-shaped concrete basin consisting of two sections divided by a concrete wall. The reservoir provided reserve water from the Columbia River for reactor cooling water and raw water for the 100 Area and had a storage capacity of 94.6 million liters (25 million gallons). The 182-F Reservoir was later used as a landfill for decontaminated rubble from buildings that were decommissioned in the 100-F Area. The results of the 182-F Reservoir evaluation showed that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Copyright 1998, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. Electronic reproduction, distribution, or storage of any part of this paper for commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated a drained volume or with the mass exchange of brine replacing produced oil. Introduction Microearthquakes often accompany reservoir stimulation and production. By collecting high-quality seismic data

315

Control of water coning in gas reservoirs by injecting gas into the aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the injected gas bubble to not have the expected effect, because the cone established may have a greater radius at the original WGC than the maximum radius of the gas bubble. In other words, the cone tends to avoid the low permeability zone by going around... the warm seasons of the year. The best storage sites found up to now are deleted or partly aeleted gas fields close to large consumption areas. In this study, gas storage reservoirs with gas originally left by a water drive are studied. The production/injection...

Haugen, Sigurd Arild

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Hydraulic fracturing in a naturally fractured reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of wells in naturally fractured reservoirs can differ dramatically from fracturing wells in conventional isotropic reservoirs. Fluid leakoff is the primary difference. In conventional reservoirs, fluid leakoff is controlled by reservoir matrix and fracture fluid parameters. The fluid leakoff rate in naturally fractured reservoirs is typically excessive and completely dominated by the natural fractures. This paper presents several field examples of a fracture stimulation program performed on the naturally fractured Devonia carbonate of West Texas. Qualitative pressure decline analysis and net treating pressure interpretation techniques were utilized to evaluate the existence of natural fractures in the Devonian Formation. Quantitative techniques were utilized to assess the importance of the natural fractures to the fracturing process. This paper demonstrates that bottomhole pressure monitoring of fracture stimulations has benefits over conducting minifrac treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs. Finally, the results of this evaluation were used to redesign fracture treatments to ensure maximum productivity and minimize costs.

Britt, L.K.; Hager, C.J.; Thompson, J.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Two-dimensional water quality modeling of Town Creek embayment on Guntersville Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA investigated water quality of Town Creek embayment using a branched two-dimensional model of Guntersville Reservoir. Simulation results were compared in terms of algal biomass, nutrient concentrations, and volume of embayment with depleted dissolved oxygen. Stratification and flushing play a significant role in the embayment water quality. Storms introduce large loadings of organics, nutrients, and suspended solids. Dissolved oxygen depletion is most severe after storms followed by low flow that fails to flush the embayment. Embayment water quality responses to potential animal waste and erosion controls were explored. Modeling indicated animal waste controls were much more cost-effective than erosion controls. Erosion controls will decrease embayment suspended solids and thereby increase algal biomass due to greater light penetration. 29 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Bender, M.D.; Shiao, Ming C.; Hauser, G.E. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (USA). Engineering Lab.); Butkus, S.R. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (USA). Water Quality Dept.)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

1112 The Leading Edge October 2011 P e t r o p h y s i c sP e t r o p h y s i c s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) are the storage reservoir's size and safety. The storage size can be addressed by focusing on large saline aquifer reservoirs. The safety concern may be lower if CO2 is injected into depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs because by poorly cemented abandoned wells, and compared to saline aquifers, their storage size is small. Therefore

319

A virtual company concept for reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how reservoir management problems were pursued with a virtual company concept via the Internet and World Wide Web. The focus of the paper is on the implementation of virtual asset management teams that were assembled with small independent oil companies. The paper highlights the mechanics of how the virtual team transferred data and interpretations, evaluated geological models of complex reservoirs, and used results of simulation studies to analyze various reservoir management strategies.

Martin, F.D. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc. (United States); Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Quantum discord dynamics in structured reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-Markovian master equations are derived to study quantum discord dynamics of two qubits coupled to a common reservoir and two independent reservoirs, respectively. We compare the dynamics under different parameters, such as reservoir spectra and resonant parameters, at high temperature and at zero temperature. The results indicate that the dynamics at these two extreme temperatures share similar characters, as well as differences.

Z. -K. Su; S. -J. Jiang

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in response to production from different horizons is studied using numerical simulation methods. The Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya is used as an example where a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlies the main liquid-dominated reservoir. The possibility of improving energy recovery from vapor-dominated reservoirs by tapping deeper horizons is considered.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Integrated reservoir study of the 8 reservoir of the Green Canyon 18 field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The move into deeper waters in the Gulf of Mexico has produced new opportunities for petroleum production, but it also has produced new challenges as different reservoir problems are encountered. This integrated reservoir characterization effort has...

Aniekwena, Anthony Udegbunam

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

A beta-type fully implicit reservoir simulator with variable bubble point and dew point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the following equation. V P 5. 617 m g 2 QT 1000 (56) And the R curve can be obtained from the same constant volume Sg depletion by summing up the GPM content of the propane through hep- tanes plus fractions. The B and the R can then be calculated 0 so...A BETA-TYPE FULLY IMPLICIT RESERVOIR SIMULATOR WITH VARIABLE BUBBLE POINT AND DEW POINT A Thesis by JARLE BOE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

Boe, Jarle

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Reservoir Pressure Management  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reservoir Pressure Management Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot...

326

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i s maintain reservoir pressu found t o be f a i r l yPrieto. , Correlation of pressu temperature trends w i t h

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Templeton David B. Harris Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

328

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of...

329

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Geothermal Resource Assessment and Reservoir EngineeriWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment and ReserooirWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment an ervoi r Engi

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

331

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

332

International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

333

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Principal Investigator: Ahmad Ghassmi Texas A&M University EGS...

334

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties - keep it cool with thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cool thermal energy storage (TES) is described as a means for electric utilities to provide electricity from off-peak times, particularly in the summer when air-conditioning accounts for 50% or more of electricity consumption. Cool TES uses off-peak power to provide cooling capacity by extracting heat from a storage medium such as ice or other phase change material. A refrigeration system may may be utilized at night to provide a reservoir of cold material. During the day, the reservoir is tapped to provide cooling capacity. The advantages of TES are discussed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Stream depletion by groundwater pumping from leaky Vitaly A. Zlotnik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream depletion by groundwater pumping from leaky aquifers Vitaly A. Zlotnik Department Maximum Stream Depletion Rate, which is defined as a maximum fraction of the pumping rate supplied focused on hy- draulic connection between a stream and an aquifer for pumping wells in alluvial valleys

Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

336

Pumping induced depletion from two streams Dongmin Sun a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Pumping induced depletion from two streams Dongmin Sun a , Hongbin Zhan b-domain and becomes identical to that of Hunt [Hunt B. Unsteady stream depletion from ground water pumping. Ground of the shortest distance from the pumping well to the other stream over the shortest distance between the two

Zhan, Hongbin

337

The Hazard Posed by Depleted Uranium Munitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper assesses the radiological and chemical hazards resulting from the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. Due to the low radioactivity of DU, radiological hazards to individuals would become significant in comparison to natural background radiation doses only in cases of prolonged contact---for example, when shards of a DU penetrator remain embedded in a soldier's body. Although the radiation doses to virtually all civilians would be very low, the cumulative "population dose" resulting from the dispersal of hundreds of tons of DU, as occurred during the Gulf War, could result in up to ten cancer deaths. It is highly unlikely that exposures of persons downwind from the use of DU munitions or consuming food or water contaminated by DU dust would reach the estimated threshold for chemical heavy-metal effects. The exposures of soldiers in vehicles struck by DU munitions could be much higher, however, and persons who subsequently enter such vehicles without adequate respiratory protection could potentially be at risk. Soldiers should be trained to avoid unnecessary exposure to DU, and vehicles struck by DU munitions should be made inaccessible to curious civilians. INTRODUCTION

Steve Fetter And; Steve Fetter A

338

Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 ± 9 and 40 ± 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 ± 50 and 430 ± 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 ± 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

339

INTELLIGENT COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR RESERVOIR ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE RED RIVER FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated software has been written that comprises the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). Luff Exploration Company is applying these tools for analysis of carbonate reservoirs in the southern Williston Basin. The integrated software programs are designed to be used by small team consisting of an engineer, geologist and geophysicist. The software tools are flexible and robust, allowing application in many environments for hydrocarbon reservoirs. Keystone elements of the software tools include clustering and neural-network techniques. The tools are used to transform seismic attribute data to reservoir characteristics such as storage (phi-h), probable oil-water contacts, structural depths and structural growth history. When these reservoir characteristics are combined with neural network or fuzzy logic solvers, they can provide a more complete description of the reservoir. This leads to better estimates of hydrocarbons in place, areal limits and potential for infill or step-out drilling. These tools were developed and tested using seismic, geologic and well data from the Red River Play in Bowman County, North Dakota and Harding County, South Dakota. The geologic setting for the Red River Formation is shallow-shelf carbonate at a depth from 8000 to 10,000 ft.

Kenneth D. Luff

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

INTELLIGENT COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR RESERVOIR ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE RED RIVER FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated software has been written that comprises the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). Luff Exploration Company is applying these tools for analysis of carbonate reservoirs in the southern Williston Basin. The integrated software programs are designed to be used by small team consisting of an engineer, geologist and geophysicist. The software tools are flexible and robust, allowing application in many environments for hydrocarbon reservoirs. Keystone elements of the software tools include clustering and neural-network techniques. The tools are used to transform seismic attribute data to reservoir characteristics such as storage (phi-h), probable oil-water contacts, structural depths and structural growth history. When these reservoir characteristics are combined with neural network or fuzzy logic solvers, they can provide a more complete description of the reservoir. This leads to better estimates of hydrocarbons in place, areal limits and potential for infill or step-out drilling. These tools were developed and tested using seismic, geologic and well data from the Red River Play in Bowman County, North Dakota and Harding County, South Dakota. The geologic setting for the Red River Formation is shallow-shelf carbonate at a depth from 8000 to 10,000 ft.

Kenneth D. Luff

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear Jan Feb2009 2010

343

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14Deliveries (Number ofof

344

U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinterYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugYearCubic

345

Fail-safe storage rack for irradiated fuel rod assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fail-safe storage rack is provided for interim storage of spent but radioactive nuclear fuel rod assemblies. The rack consists of a checkerboard array of substantially square, elongate receiving tubes fully enclosed by a double walled container, the outer wall of which is imperforate for liquid containment and the inner wall of which is provided with perforations for admitting moderator liquid flow to the elongate receiving tubes, the liquid serving to take up waste heat from the stored nuclear assemblies and dissipate same to the ambient liquid reservoir. A perforated cover sealing the rack facilitates cooling liquid entry and dissipation.

Lewis, Donald R. (Pocatello, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Mountaineer Commerical Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Technical documents all work performed during the award period on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. This report presents the findings and conclusions produced as a consequence of this work. As identified in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0002673, AEP's objective of the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (MT CCS II) project is to design, build and operate a commercial scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) system capable of treating a nominal 235 MWe slip stream of flue gas from the outlet duct of the Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system at AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant (Mountaineer Plant), a 1300 MWe coal-fired generating station in New Haven, WV. The CCS system is designed to capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the incoming flue gas using the Alstom Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) and compress, transport, inject and store 1.5 million tonnes per year of the captured CO{sub 2} in deep saline reservoirs. Specific Project Objectives include: (1) Achieve a minimum of 90% carbon capture efficiency during steady-state operations; (2) Demonstrate progress toward capture and storage at less than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE); (3) Store CO{sub 2} at a rate of 1.5 million tonnes per year in deep saline reservoirs; and (4) Demonstrate commercial technology readiness of the integrated CO{sub 2} capture and storage system.

Deanna Gilliland; Matthew Usher

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Inducinga CO2 leak into ashallow aquifer (CO2FieldLab EUROGIA+ project): Monitoring the CO2 plume in groundwaters.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(saline aquifer, depleted oil/gas reservoir), aquifers are ubiquitousin the overlying sedimentary pile in case of unwanted CO2leakages from a storage site. Independently from the nature of the reservoir

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

348

Reservoir characterization using experimental design and response surface methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research combines a statistical tool called experimental design/response surface methodology with reservoir modeling and flow simulation for the purpose of reservoir characterization. Very often, it requires large number of reservoir simulation...

Parikh, Harshal

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir...

350

Integrated reservoir characterization for the Mazari oil field, Pakistan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evaluated reservoir performance potential using the production history, well tests and cased-hole well log surveys. Suggestions for reservoir management activities in conjunction with the evaluation of the reservoir performance are discussed in detail...

Ashraf, Ejaz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

Water quality management plan for Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management plan provides an assessment of Cherokee Reservoir's current water quality, identifies those factors which affect reservoir water quality, and develops recommendations aimed at restoring or maintaining water quality at levels sufficient to support diverse beneficial uses. 20 references, 8 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stratigraphic geothermal reservoirs at 3 – 4 km depth in high heat-flow basins are capable of sustaining 100 MW-scale power plants at about 10 c/kWh. This paper examines the impacts on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of reservoir depth and temperature, reservoir productivity, and drillhole/casing options. For a reservoir at 3 km depth with a moderate productivity index by hydrothermal reservoir standards (about 50 L/s/MPa, 5.6 gpm/psi), an LCOE of 10c/kWh requires the reservoir to be at about 200°C. This is the upper temperature limit for pumps. The calculations assume standard hydrothermal drilling costs, with the production interval completed with a 7 inch liner in an 8.5 inch hole. If a reservoir at 4 km depth has excellent permeability characteristics with a productivity index of 100 L/s/MPa (11.3 gpm/psi), then the LCOE is about 11 c/kWh assuming the temperature decline rate with development is not excessive (< 1%/y, with first thermal breakthrough delayed by about 10 years). Completing wells with modest horizontal legs (e.g. several hundred meters) may be important for improving well productivity because of the naturally high, sub-horizontal permeability in this type of reservoir. Reducing the injector/producer well ratio may also be cost-effective if the injectors are drilled as larger holes.

Greg Mines; Hillary Hanson; Rick Allis; Joseph Moore

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Multimedia Gallery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

StorageEnergy Storage Multimedia Gallery Energy Storage Multimedia Gallery Images Videos Energy Storage Image Gallery Energy Storage B-Roll Videos Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory...

355

Cool Storage Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilities have promoted the use of electric heat and thermal storage to increase off peak usage of power. High daytime demand charges and enticing discounts for off peak power have been used as economic incentives to promote thermal storage systems...

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Underground Storage Tank Regulations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects that will require the use and building of pipelines, underground storage of any sorts, and/or electrical equipment. The...

357

Safe Home Food Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

Van Laanen, Peggy

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Energy Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

Conover, David R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Numerical reservoir simulation has been used to describe mechanism of methane gas desorption process, diffusion process, and fluid flow in a coalbed methane reservoir. The… (more)

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

362

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

363

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

364

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Abstract Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

365

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from reservoir rock formation. - Task 2: Carbonation study of minerals. - Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock...

366

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Abstract An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed...

367

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Abstract The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of...

368

Application of horizontal wells in steeply dipping reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A three-dimensional reservoir simulation study is performed to evaluate the impact of horizontal well applications on oil recovery from steeply dipping reservoirs. The Provincia field,… (more)

Lopez Navarro, Jose David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Some practical aspects of reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The practical essence of reservoir management is the optimal application of available resources-people, equipment, technology, and money to maximize profitability and recovery. Success must include knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system, (2) the technologies available, and (3) the reservoir management business environment. Two Reservoir Management Demonstration projects (one in a small, newly-discovered field and one in a large, mature water-flood) implemented by the Department of Energy through BDM-Oklahoma illustrate the diversity of situations suited for reservoir management efforts. Project teams made up of experienced engineers, geoscientists, and other professionals arrived at an overall reservoir management strategy for each field. in 1993, Belden & Blake Corporation discovered a regionally significant oil reservoir (East Randolph Field) in the Cambrian Rose Run formation in Portage County, Ohio. Project objectives are to improve field operational economics and optimize oil recovery. The team focused on characterizing the reservoir geology and analyzing primary production and reservoir data to develop simulation models. Historical performance was simulated and predictions were made to assess infill drilling, water flooding, and gas repressurization. The Citronelle Field, discovered in 1955 in Mobile County, Alabama, has produced 160 million barrels from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Rodessa formation. Project objectives are to address improving recovery through waterflood optimization and problems related to drilling, recompletions, production operations, and regulatory and environmental issues. Initial efforts focused on defining specific problems and on defining a geographic area within the field where solutions might best be pursued. Geologic and reservoir models were used to evaluate past performance and to investigate improved recovery operations.

Fowler, M.L.; Young, M.A.; Cole, E.L.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

deYoung, Brad

371

Induced Microearthquake Patterns in Hydrocarbon and Geothermal Reservoirs W. Scott Phillips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improved resource management in fractured reservoirs. Running Head: Microearthquake Patterns in Reservoirs

372

Blood oxygen transport and depletion : the key of consummate divers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Dill, D. B. (1935). Oxygen dissociation curves of birdE. (1964). A venous blood oxygen reservoir in the divingand Torrance, J. D. (1977). Oxygen-Affinity of Avian Blood.

Meir, Jessica Ulrika

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Global microRNA depletion suppresses tumor angiogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MicroRNAs delicately regulate the balance of angiogenesis. Here we show that depletion of all microRNAs suppresses tumor angiogenesis. We generated microRNA-deficient tumors by knocking out Dicer1. These tumors are highly ...

Chen, Sidi

374

The economics of fuel depletion in fast breeder reactor blankets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fast breeder reactor fuel depletion-economics model was developed and applied to a number of 1000 MWe UMBR case studies, involving radial blanket-radial reflector design, radial blanket fuel management, and sensitivity ...

Brewer, Shelby Templeton

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

alarming oxygen depletion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T. Doan; Q. Cao; L. Selavo; Y. Wu; L. Fang; Z. He; S. Lin; J. Stankovic 2006-01-01 37 Depleted Uranium Technical Brief Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and...

377

Storage Ring Revised March 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5.4.3. Ground Plane Epoxy #12; 136 Storage Ring #12; Storage Ring 137 8.5.5. Coil Winding Process #12; 138Chapter 8. Storage Ring Revised March 1994 8.1. Introduction -- 107 -- #12; 108 Storage Ring 8.2. Magnetic Design and Field Calculations 8.2.1. Conceptual Approach #12; Storage Ring 109 #12; 110 Storage

Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

378

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management system--a decision tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management System (DMS) is being developed as a decision tool to provide cost and risk data for evaluation of short-and long-term management strategies for depleted uranium. It can be used to assist decision makers on a programmatic or site-specific level. Currently, the DMS allows evaluation of near-term cylinder management strategies such as storage yard improvements, cylinder restocking, and reconditioning. The DMS has been designed to provide the user with maximum flexibility for modifying data and impact factors (e.g., unit costs and risk factors). Sensitivity analysis can be performed on all key parameters such as cylinder corrosion rate, inspection frequency, and impact factors. Analysis may be conducted on a system-wide, site, or yard basis. The costs and risks from different scenarios may be compared in graphic or tabular format. Ongoing development of the DMS will allow similar evaluation of long-term management strategies such as conversion to other chemical forms. The DMS is a Microsoft Windows 3.1 based, stand-alone computer application. It can be operated on a 486 or faster computer with VGA, 4 MB of RAM, and 10 MB of disk space.

Gasper, J.R.; Sutter, R.J.; Avci, H.I. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Packaging and Disposal of a Radium-beryllium Source using Depleted Uranium Polyethylene Composite Shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two, 111-GBq (3 Curie) radium-beryllium (RaBe) sources were in underground storage at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) since 1988. These sources originated from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) where they were used to calibrate neutron detection diagnostics. In 1999, PPPL and BNL began a collaborative effort to expand the use of an innovative pilot-scale technology and bring it to full-scale deployment to shield these sources for eventual transport and burial at the Hanford Burial site. The transport/disposal container was constructed of depleted uranium oxide encapsulated in polyethylene to provide suitable shielding for both gamma and neutron radiation. This new material can be produced from recycled waste products (depleted uranium and polyethylene), is inexpensive, and can be disposed with the waste, unlike conventional lead containers, thus reducing exposure time for workers. This paper will provide calculations and information that led to the initial design of the shielding. We will also describe the production-scale processing of the container, cost, schedule, logistics, and many unforeseen challenges that eventually resulted in the successful fabrication and deployment of this shield. We will conclude with a description of the final configuration of the shielding container and shipping package along with recommendations for future shielding designs.

Keith Rule; Paul Kalb; Pete Kwaschyn

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S. National Security Interests, Extend Operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to...

382

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Volume 4: Characterization of representative reservoirs -- Gulf of Mexico field, U-8 reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reservoir study was performed using a publicly available black oil simulator to history match and predict the performance of a Gulf of Mexico reservoir. The first objective of this simulation study was to validate the Black Oil Applied Simulation Tool version three for personal computers (BOAST3-PC) model to ensure the integrity of the simulation runs. Once validation was completed, a field history match for the Gulf of Mexico U-8 oil reservoir was attempted. A verbal agreement was reached with the operator of this reservoir to blindcode the name and location of the reservoir. In return, the operator supplied data and assistance in regards to the technical aspects of the research. On the basis of the best history match, different secondary recovery techniques were simulated as a predictive study for enhancing the reservoir productivity.

Koperna, G.J. Jr.; Johnson, H.R. [BDM Federal, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Sawyer, W.K. [Mathematical and Computer Services, Inc., Danville, VA (United States); Kimbrell, W.C.; Schenewerk, P.A. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Facies Analysis, Reservoir Characterization, and LIDAR Modeling of an Eocene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Dean, 1982; Westcott, 1992; Giosan and Bhattacharya, 2005). Reservoir complexity in marginal lacustrine

Johnson, Cari

385

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The verification of a semi-analytical reservoir simulator using a finite difference reservoir simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction in CPU time and computer memory, when compared to using finite difference reservoir simulators and mainframe computers, to solve the same problem. Development of Computers The advances that have been made in computing power and the improved...THE VERIFICATION OF A SEMI-ANALYTICAL RESERVOIR SIMULATOR USING A FINITE DIFFERENCE RESERVOIR SIMULATOR A Thesis by HANS GERHARDT DUBE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Dube, Hans Gerhardt

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling f o r Geothermal Reservoirs and Power- plants. I'Fumaroles Hunt, 1970 Geothermal power James, 1978 FusionGood a lated perfo : Geothermal Power Systems Compared. 'I

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP-"R- 68 Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption and Composition Michael J. Economides September, 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program Contract No Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford

Stanford University

390

Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Salinity routing in reservoir system modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in several major river basins in Texas and neighboring states. WRAP is the river/reservoir system simulation model incorporated in the Water Availability Modeling (WAM) System applied by agencies and consulting firms in Texas in planning and water right...

Ha, Mi Ae

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The performance of new multilateral well in heterogeneous reservoirs is studied, and that is compared with vertical well architecture also. In order to study the productivity of new multilateral wells, we use a numerical simulation method to set up heterogeneous...

Jia, Hongqiao

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Estimating uncertainties in integrated reservoir studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To make sound investment decisions, decision makers need accurate estimates of the uncertainties present in forecasts of reservoir performance. In this work I propose a method, the integrated mismatch method, that incorporates the misfit...

Zhang, Guohong

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reservoir characterization using nonparametric regression techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs, but a simple and computationally efficient correlation is developed using only commonly available well log responses. Accurate permeability correlations are essential to understand, forecast, manage, and control production operations...

Mathisen, Trond

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

Fang, Xinding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control....

397

Continuous variable entanglement dynamics in structured reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the evolution of entanglement in bimodal continuous variable quantum systems interacting with two independent structured reservoirs. We derive an analytic expression for the entanglement of formation without performing the Markov and the secular approximations and study in details the entanglement dynamics for various types of structured reservoirs and for different reservoir temperatures, assuming the two modes initially excited in a twin-beam state. Our analytic solution allows us to identify three dynamical regimes characterized by different behaviors of the entanglement: the entanglement sudden death, the non-Markovian revival and the non-secular revival regimes. Remarkably, we find that, contrarily to the Markovian case, the short-time system-reservoir correlations in some cases destroy quickly the initial entanglement even at zero temperature.

R. Vasile; S. Olivares; M. G. A. Paris; S. Maniscalco

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

398

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities were identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program currently being implemented is a result of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Pressure maintenance in a volatile oil reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESSURE MAINTENANCE IN A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR A Thesis BRUCE ALAN SCHUSTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1989 Major... Subject: Petroleum Engineering PRESSURE MAINTENANCE IN A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR A Thesis BRUCE ALAN SCHUSTER Approved as to style and content by: S. A. Holditch (Chair of Committee) W. J. Lee (Member) R. R, Berg (Member) , Jz W. D. Von Gonten...

Schuster, Bruce Alan

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Oil reservoir properties estimation using neural networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the applicability as well as the accuracy of artificial neural networks for estimating specific parameters that describe reservoir properties based on seismic data. This approach relies on JPL`s adjoint operators general purpose neural network code to determine the best suited architecture. The authors believe that results presented in this work demonstrate that artificial neural networks produce surprisingly accurate estimates of the reservoir parameters.

Toomarian, N.B. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research; Aminzadeh, F. [UNOCAL Corp., Sugarland, TX (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Numerical simulation of sandstone reservoir models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Case 3 - Alternatin h1 h and low ermeabilities Waterflood performance of the Case 3 reservoir is shown in Figures 19 and 20. The process 1s practically rate insensitive for both the high and low viscosity ratio cases because of the ex istence... The results of the water flood study indicate that lower rates result i n higher waterflood oil recoveries from heterogeneous reservoirs, particularly where high oil-water viscosity ratios exist. These results support the conclusions of Jordan et. al...

Gross, Stephen Joseph

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Reservoir analysis model for battlefield operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESERVOIR ANALYSIS MODEL FOR BATTLEFIELD OPERATIONS A Thesis by GARRETT JAMES SULLIVAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988... Major Subject: Civil Engineering RESERVOIR ANALYSIS MODEL FOR BATTLEFIELD OPERATIONS A Thesis by GARRETT JAMES SULLIVAN Approved as to style and content by: Ralp A. Wurbs (Chair of Committee) mes (N er) neth tr ek Nem e Charles . a es...

Sullivan, Garrett James

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Reservoir cross-over in entanglement dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effects of spontaneous emission on the entanglement dynamics of two qubits interacting with a common Lorentzian structured reservoir. We assume that the qubits are initially prepared in a Bell-like state. We focus on the strong coupling regime and study the entanglement dynamics for different regions of the spontaneous emission decay parameter. This investigation allows us to explore the cross-over between common and independent reservoirs in entanglement dynamics.

L. Mazzola; S. Maniscalco; K. -A. Suominen; B. M. Garraway

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number of these reservoirs contain several  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number of these reservoirs contain several billion barrels of oil. Accurate and efficient reservoir this implementation has led to a unique and powerful reservoir simulator that can be used by small and large oil

Arbogast, Todd

407

Heat storage duration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher Yongdae Kim players. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many companies are hesitating to outsource their storage due to security concerns. The success of storage outsourcing is highly dependent on how well

Minnesota, University of

409

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and R. W . BOOIll, "Superconductive Energy Storage Inducand H. A. Peterson, "Superconductive E nergy S torage forMeeting, Janua ry N. Mohan, "Superconductive Energy S torage

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy Storage and Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage and Transportation INL Logo Search Skip Navigation Links Home Newsroom About INL Careers Research Programs Energy and Environment National and Homeland Security New Energy...

411

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of the BPA Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storagefor a Utility Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storagefor a Lnrge Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

1 BASEMENT STORAGE 3 MICROSCOPE LAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANICAL ROOM 13 SHOWER ROOMSAIR COMPRESSOR 14 NITROGEN STORAGE 15 DIESEL FUEL STORAGE 16 ACID NEUT. TANK 17a ACID STORAGE 17b INERT GAS STORAGE 17c BASE STORAGE 17d SHELVES STORAGE * KNOCK-OUT PANEL

Boonstra, Rudy

414

Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Formation and thermal evolution of insoluble reservoir bitumen in Angolan carbonate reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation and thermal evolution of insoluble reservoir bitumen in Angolan carbonate reservoirs from 98% insoluble bitumen to 45% insoluble, indicating a substantial spread of maturity. However, the discordance shown by these parameters (e.g. bitumen reflectance and bitumen solubility in DCM) indicates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

416

HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

Julien, Pierre Y.

417

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effect of Shim Arm Depletion in the NBSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cadmium shim arms in the NBSR undergo burnup during reactor operation and hence, require periodic replacement. Presently, the shim arms are replaced after every 25 cycles to guarantee they can maintain sufficient shutdown margin. Two prior reports document the expected change in the 113Cd distribution because of the shim arm depletion. One set of calculations was for the present high-enriched uranium fuel and the other for the low-enriched uranium fuel when it was in the COMP7 configuration (7 inch fuel length vs. the present 11 inch length). The depleted 113Cd distributions calculated for these cores were applied to the current design for an equilibrium low-enriched uranium core. This report details the predicted effects, if any, of shim arm depletion on the shim arm worth, the shutdown margin, power distributions and kinetics parameters.

Hanson A. H.; Brown N.; Diamond, D.J.

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

420

Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs, and depleted oil reservoirs Mitigate well cementcome only from depleted oil and gas reservoirs worldwide forof the very mature depleted oil and gas reservoirs that are

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

An approach to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaqun Costa reservoir as a case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11931199 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An approach to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaquín Costa reservoir as a case to integrated assessement of reservoir siltation: the Joaquín Costa reservoir as a case study A. Navas1 , B of the main environments in the reservoir. Records of known flood events and of reservoir management data have

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

422

Modeling of fate and transport of co-injection of H2S with CO2 in deep saline formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operation in a depleted sandstone oil reservoir on theformations, and depleted oil or gas reservoirs, for allinclude depleted or depleting oil and gas reservoirs, un-

Zhang, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Characterization of options and their analysis requirements for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining alternative strategies for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) currently stored at the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, and on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This paper describes the methodology for the comprehensive and ongoing technical analysis of the options being considered. An overview of these options, along with several of the suboptions being considered, is presented. The long-term management strategy alternatives fall into three broad categories: use, storage, or disposal. Conversion of the depleted UF6 to another form such as oxide or metal is needed to implement most of these alternatives. Likewise, transportation of materials is an integral part of constructing the complete pathway between the current storage condition and ultimate disposition. The analysis of options includes development of pre-conceptual designs; estimates of effluents, wastes, and emissions; specification of resource requirements; and preliminary hazards assessments. The results of this analysis will assist DOE in selecting a strategy by providing the engineering information necessary to evaluate the environmental impacts and costs of implementing the management strategy alternatives.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rosen, R.S.; Zoller, J.N.; Harri, J.W.; Schwertz, N.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Resolving waterinflux and reservoir permeability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods for geophysical model assessment, in particuale thecomputation of model parameter resolution, indicate the value and thelimitations of time-lapse data in estimating reservoir flow properties. Atrajectory-based method for computing sensitivities provides an effectivemeans to compute model parameter resolutions. We examine the commonsituation in which water encroaches into a resrvoir from below, as due tothe upward movement of an oil-water contact. Using straight-forwardtechniques we find that, by inclusing reflections off the top and bottomof a reservoir tens of meters thick, we can infer reservoir permeabilitybased upon time-lapse data. We find that, for the caseof water influxfrom below, using multiple time-lapse 'snapshots' does not necessarilyimprove the resolution of reservoir permeability. An application totime-lapse data from the Norne field illustrates that we can resolve thepermeability near a producing well using reflections from threeinterfaces associated with the reservoir.

Vasco, D.W.; Keers, Henk

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Legalization of Ground Water Storage," Water Resourcesprocedure to above ground storage of heat in huge insulatedthis project is heat storage in ground-water regions storage

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Sandia National Laboratories: Batteries & Energy Storage Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

StorageBatteries & Energy Storage Publications Batteries & Energy Storage Publications Batteries & Energy Storage Fact Sheets Achieving Higher Energy Density in Flow Batteries at...

428

Energy storage capacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of capacitors are reviewed in general, including dielectrics, induced polarization, and permanent polarization. Then capacitance characteristics are discussed and modelled. These include temperature range, voltage, equivalent series resistance, capacitive reactance, impedance, dissipation factor, humidity and frequency effects, storage temperature and time, and lifetime. Applications of energy storage capacitors are then discussed. (LEW)

Sarjeant, W.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reservoir characterization Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program Summary: and fracture analysis, multi-component seismic reservoir characterization, quantitative reservoir...

430

Analysis of stress sensitivity and its influence on oil production from tight reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

low-permeability tight oil reservoirs are inadvisable to beconditions, to study tight oil reservoir stress sensitivity.oil production from tight oil reservoirs, in addition to

Lei, Qun; Xiong, Wei; Yuan, Cui; Wu, Yu-Shu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Surfactant-enhanced spontaneous imbibition process in highly fractured carbonate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Highly fractured carbonate reservoirs are a class of reservoirs characterized by high conductivity fractures surrounding low permeability matrix blocks. In these reservoirs, wettability alteration is… (more)

Chen, Peila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Seismic low-frequency effects from oil-saturated reservoir zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency effects from oil-saturated reservoir zones Gennadyeffects from oil-saturated reservoir zones. The seismic datatwo different types of oil-saturated reservoirs (Fig.2). The

Goloshubin, Gennady M.; Korneev, Valeri A.; Vingalov, Vjacheslav M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fractured shale reservoirs: Towards a realistic model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fractured shale reservoirs are fundamentally unconventional, which is to say that their behavior is qualitatively different from reservoirs characterized by intergranular pore space. Attempts to analyze fractured shale reservoirs are essentially misleading. Reliance on such models can have only negative results for fractured shale oil and gas exploration and development. A realistic model of fractured shale reservoirs begins with the history of the shale as a hydrocarbon source rock. Minimum levels of both kerogen concentration and thermal maturity are required for effective hydrocarbon generation. Hydrocarbon generation results in overpressuring of the shale. At some critical level of repressuring, the shale fractures in the ambient stress field. This primary natural fracture system is fundamental to the future behavior of the fractured shale gas reservoir. The fractures facilitate primary migration of oil and gas out of the shale and into the basin. In this process, all connate water is expelled, leaving the fractured shale oil-wet and saturated with oil and gas. What fluids are eventually produced from the fractured shale depends on the consequent structural and geochemical history. As long as the shale remains hot, oil production may be obtained. (e.g. Bakken Shale, Green River Shale). If the shale is significantly cooled, mainly gas will be produced (e.g. Antrim Shale, Ohio Shale, New Albany Shale). Where secondary natural fracture systems are developed and connect the shale to aquifers or to surface recharge, the fractured shale will also produce water (e.g. Antrim Shale, Indiana New Albany Shale).

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Applied Earth Science, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Integral cesium reservoir: Design and transient operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electrically heated thermionic converter has been designed built and successfully tested in air (Homer et.al., 1995). One of the unique features of this converter was an integral cesium reservoir thermally coupled to the emitter. The reservoir consisted of fifteen cesiated graphite pins located in pockets situated in the emitter lead with thermal coupling to the emitter, collector and the emitter terminal; there were no auxiliary electric heaters on the reservoir. Test results are described for conditions in which the input thermal power to the converter was ramped up and down between 50% and 100% of full power in times as short as 50 sec, with data acquisition occurring every 12 sec. During the ramps the emitter and collector temperature profiles. the reservoir temperature and the electric output into a fixed load resistor are reported. The converter responded promptly to the power ramps without excessive overshoot and with no tendency to develop instabilities. This is the rust demonstration of the performance of a cesium-graphite integral reservoir in a fast transient

Smith, J.N. Jr.; Horner, M.H.; Begg, L.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Wrobleski, W.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Reservoir. Quarterly technical report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research and the pilot project planned is to test the feasibility of CO{sub 2} for recovering oil from the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in the Midland Basin. This notoriously marginal reservoir has confounded operators for 40 years with rapid depletion, low recovery during primary, disappointing waterflood results and low ultimate recovery. Yet, the tremendous areal coverage and large amount of remaining oil (up to 10 Bbbl) warrants further investigation to expend all possible process options before large numbers of Spraberry wellbores need to be plugged and abandoned. CO{sub 2} injection on a continuous, pattern-wide basis has not been attempted in the Spraberry Trend. This is due to the obvious existence of a network of naturally-occurring fractures. However, it has become clear in recent years that neglecting CO{sub 2} injection as an option in fractured reservoirs may overlook potential projects which may be viable. The 15-well pilot field demonstration and supporting research will provide the necessary information to quantify the conditions whereby CO{sub 2} flooding would be economic in the Spraberry Trend.

Schechter, D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research in this annual report falls into three tasks each dealing with a different aspect of enhanced oil recovery. The first task strives to develop procedures for accurately modeling reservoirs for use as input to numerical simulation flow models. This action describes how we have used a detail characterization of an outcrop to provide insights into what features are important to fluid flow modeling. The second task deals with scaling-up and modeling chemical and solvent EOR processes. In a sense this task is the natural extension of task 1 and, in fact, one of the subtasks uses many of the same statistical procedures for insight into the effects of viscous fingering and heterogeneity. The final task involves surfactants and their interactions with carbon dioxide and reservoir minerals. This research deals primarily with phenomena observed when aqueous surfactant solutions are injected into oil reservoirs.

Lake, L.W.; Pope, G.A.; Schechter, R.S.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

439

Learning about ozone depletion Paul J. Crutzen & Michael Oppenheimer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning about ozone depletion Paul J. Crutzen & Michael Oppenheimer Received: 12 January 2007 Mainz, Germany M. Oppenheimer (*) Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA e-mail: omichael@princeton.edu M. Oppenheimer Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International

Oppenheimer, Michael

440

Lithium depletion and the rotational history of exoplanet host stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Israelian et al. (2004) reported that exoplanet host stars are lithium depleted compared to solar-type stars without detected massive planets, a result recently confirmed by Gonzalez (2008). We investigate whether enhanced lithium depletion in exoplanet host stars may result from their rotational history. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow and fast solar-type rotators from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to the age of the Sun and compare them to the distribution of rotational periods observed for solar-type stars between 1 Myr and 5 Gyr. We show that slow rotators develop a high degree of differential rotation between the radiative core and the convective envelope, while fast rotators evolve with little core-envelope decoupling. We suggest that strong differential rotation at the base of the convective envelope is responsible for enhanced lithium depletion in slow rotators. We conclude that lithium-depleted exoplanet host stars were slow rotators on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) and argue that slow rotation results from a long lasting star-disk interaction during the PMS. Altogether, this suggests that long-lived disks (> 5 Myr) may be a necessary condition for massive planet formation/migration.

Jerome Bouvier

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hypolimnetic Oxygen Depletion in Eutrophic Lakes Beat Muller,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hypolimnetic Oxygen Depletion in Eutrophic Lakes Beat Muller,*, Lee D. Bryant,, Andreas Matzinger obtained from 11 eutrophic lakes and suggests a model describing the consumption of dissolved oxygen (O2) in the hypolimnia of eutrophic lakes as a result of only two fundamental processes: O2 is consumed (i) by settled

Wehrli, Bernhard

442

The Variation of Magnesium Depletion with Line of Sight Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we report on the gas-phase abundance of singly-ionized magnesium (Mg II) in 44 lines of sight, using data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We measure Mg II column densities by analyzing medium- and high-resolution archival STIS spectra of the 1240 A doublet of Mg II. We find that Mg II depletion is correlated with many line of sight parameters (e.g. F(H_2), E_(B-V), E_(B-V)/r, A_V, and A_V/r) in addition to the well-known correlation with . These parameters should be more directly related to dust content and thus have more physical significance with regard to the depletion of elements such as magnesium. We examine the significance of these additional correlations as compared to the known correlation between Mg II depletion and . While none of the correlations are better predictors of Mg II depletion than , some are statistically significant even assuming fixed . We discuss the ranges over which these correlations are valid, their strength at fixed , and physical interpretations.

Adam G. Jensen; Theodore P. Snow

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

443

EIS-0269: Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexaflouride  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this programmatic environmental impact statement to assess the potential impacts of alternative management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride currently stored at three DOE sites: Paducah site near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth site near Portsmouth, Ohio; and K-25 site on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

444

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Depleted Uranium Metal Microspheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that combines these previous two methods to characterize the diffusivity of a packed bed of microspheres of depleted uranium (DU) metal, which have a nominal diameter of 250 micrometers. The new apparatus is designated as the Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA...

Humrickhouse, Carissa Joy

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

445

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

An Intelligent Systems Approach to Reservoir Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, the major challenge in reservoir characterization is integrating data coming from different sources in varying scales, in order to obtain an accurate and high-resolution reservoir model. The role of seismic data in this integration is often limited to providing a structural model for the reservoir. Its relatively low resolution usually limits its further use. However, its areal coverage and availability suggest that it has the potential of providing valuable data for more detailed reservoir characterization studies through the process of seismic inversion. In this paper, a novel intelligent seismic inversion methodology is presented to achieve a desirable correlation between relatively low-frequency seismic signals, and the much higher frequency wireline-log data. Vertical seismic profile (VSP) is used as an intermediate step between the well logs and the surface seismic. A synthetic seismic model is developed by using real data and seismic interpretation. In the example presented here, the model represents the Atoka and Morrow formations, and the overlying Pennsylvanian sequence of the Buffalo Valley Field in New Mexico. Generalized regression neural network (GRNN) is used to build two independent correlation models between; (1) Surface seismic and VSP, (2) VSP and well logs. After generating virtual VSP's from the surface seismic, well logs are predicted by using the correlation between VSP and well logs. The values of the density log, which is a surrogate for reservoir porosity, are predicted for each seismic trace through the seismic line with a classification approach having a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The same methodology is then applied to real data taken from the Buffalo Valley Field, to predict inter-well gamma ray and neutron porosity logs through the seismic line of interest. The same procedure can be applied to a complete 3D seismic block to obtain 3D distributions of reservoir properties with less uncertainty than the geostatistical estimation methods. The intelligent seismic inversion method should help to increase the success of drilling new wells during field development.

Shahab D. Mohaghegh; Jaime Toro; Thomas H. Wilson; Emre Artun; Alejandro Sanchez; Sandeep Pyakurel

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

Water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir: Its unique behaviour and influence on reservoir engineering calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The salinity of the produced water from First Eocene reservoir of Wafra field was studied through its past history. The change in the salinity of the initially produced water (from about 500 to 20,000 ppm NaCl) was attributed to the meteoric water which might have entered the reservoir through its outcrops to the west of the field. The correct value of the connate water salinity (23,000 ppm) that should be used in estimating the original oil in place by the volumetric method was determined by three different approaches. In addition, a technique to be followed in calculating the volumetric original oil in place for the First Eocene reservoir is outlined to overcome the complex behaviour of aquifer salinity. The change in the produced water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir with time was studied and proved that water is dumping from an upper water bearing zone into First Eocene reservoir. Upper water dumping, which apparently has supported the reservoir pressure, was confirmed to occur behind casing in many deeper wells penetrating the First Eocene reservoir by the analysis of their temperature and noise logs.

Ghoniem, S.A.A.; Al-Zanki, F.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Water salinity of First Eocene reservoir: Unique behavior and influence on reservoir engineering calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The salinity of the produced water from the First Eocene reservoir of the Wafra field was studied through its history. The change in the salinity of the initially produced water (from about 500 to 20,000 ppm NaCl) was attributed to meteoric water that might have entered the reservoir through outcrops west of the field. The correct value of the interstitial water salinity (23,000ppm) that should be used in estimating the original oil in place (OOIP) by the volumetric method was determined by three different approaches. In addition, a technique to overcome the complex behavior of aquifer salinity in calculating the volumetric OOIP for the First Eocene reservoir is outlined. A study of the change in the produced water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir with time proved that water is dumping from an upper water-bearing zone into the reservoir. Analysis of temperature and noise logs confirmed that this upper water dumping, which apparently has supported the reservoir pressure, occurred behind casing in many deeper wells penetrating the First Eocene reservoir.

Ghoniem, S.A.; Al-Zanki, F.H.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

Sherman, Max H.; Hult, Erin L.

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

454

Pesticide use in Kentucky reservoir watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes information on the types, uses, and amounts of pesticides applied to Kentucky Reservoir and its immediate watershed. Estimates for the quantities and types of the various pesticides used are based primarily on the land uses in the watershed. A listing of commonly used pesticides is included describing their uses, mode of action, and potential toxicological effects. This report will inform the the public and the Kentucky Reservoir Water Resources Task Force of the general extent of pesticide usage and is not an assessment of pesticide impacts. 10 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Butkus, S.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Prediction of Kizildere reservoir behavior under exploitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kizildere geothermal reservoir is under exploitation since 1984. During the four years of operation, electricity production showed a decline from the initially designed power output of 20.4 MW{sub e}. The scaling in wells necessitates periodic mechanical cleaning. However decline in well flow rates even after cleaning, indicate either decrease in productivity index due to scaling in fractures or due to rapid decline in reservoir pressure due to insufficient recharge and strong interference between wells. In this paper the results of a lumped parameter model prepared for Kizildere will be presented with the analysis of natural state of the field.

Okandan, Ender

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs-caprockinclude depleted or depleting oil and gas reservoirs, un-

Zhang, Wei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K. [David K. Davies & Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Doublet, L.E. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

460

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for optimizing the recovery from naturally fractured reservoir systems. The next logical extension of this work is to apply the proposed methods to an actual field case study to provide information for verification and modification of the techniques and simulator. This report provides the details of the proposed techniques and summarizes the activities undertaken during the course of this project. Technology transfer activities were highlighted by a two-day technical conference held in Oklahoma City in June 2002. This conference attracted over 90 participants and included the presentation of seventeen technical papers from researchers throughout the United States.

Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir.

463

Evaluating human fecal contamination sources in Kranji Reservoir Catchment, Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singapore government through its Public Utilities Board is interested in opening Kranji Reservoir to recreational use. However, water courses within the Kranji Reservoir catchment contain human fecal indicator bacteria ...

Nshimyimana, Jean Pierre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Techniques of High Performance Reservoir Simulation for Unconventional Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quest to improve the performance of reservoir simulators has been evolving with the newly encountered challenges of modeling more complex recovery mechanisms and related phenomena. Reservoir subsidence, fracturing and fault reactivation etc...

Wang, Yuhe

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

465

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in tight gas fields is challenging, not only because of the wide range of depositional environments and large variability in reservoir properties, but also because the evaluation often has to deal with a multitude of wells, limited reservoir information...

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements By MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES Engineering Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements Abstract Engineering solutions to the environmental impacts of hydropower operations on downstream aquatic ecosystem are studied

Lund, Jay R.

467

Stress-dependent permeability on tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

test analysis of tight gas reservoirs. Estimation of these parameters depends on draw down in the reservoir. The great impact of permeability, skin factor and OGIP calculations are useful in business decisions and profitability for the oil company...

Rodriguez, Cesar Alexander

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

Multiported storage devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade the demand for systems that can process and deliver massive amounts of storage has increased. Traditionally, large disk farms have been deployed by connecting several disks to a single server. A problem with this configuration...

Grande, Marcus Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

Monitored Retrievable Storage Background  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

`The U.S. Government is seeking a site for a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). Employing proven technologies used in this country and abroad, the MRS will be an Integral part of the...

470

Gas Storage Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

471

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Encrgy Storage Plant" , EPRI Report EM-3457, April 1984. [4521st century. REFERENCES The EPRI Regional Systems preparedby J. J. Mulvaney, EPRI Report EPRI P-19S0SR, (1981). [2J O.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hydrogen storage compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

473

Storage Tanks (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Storage Tanks regulations is a set of rules and permit requirements mandated by the Arkansas Pollution and Ecology Commission in order to protect the public health and the lands and the waters...

474

Petrophysics -The Integration of Reservoir Geosciences Date: 8th -11th September 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Integrated Petrophyiscs and Uncertainty Management Date: 2nd - 7th February 2015 Reservoir SurveillancePetrophysics - The Integration of Reservoir Geosciences Date: 8th - 11th September 2014 Integrating Petrophysics and Seismic Data for Reservoir Characterisation GL55518 Reservoir Surveillance

Levi, Ran

475

IDENTIFICATION OF AN {sup 84}Sr-DEPLETED CARRIER IN PRIMITIVE METEORITES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THERMAL PROCESSING IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existence of correlated nucleosynthetic heterogeneities in solar system reservoirs is now well demonstrated for numerous nuclides. However, it has proven difficult to discriminate between the two disparate processes that can explain such correlated variability: incomplete mixing of presolar material or secondary processing of a well-mixed disk. Using stepwise acid-leaching of the Ivuna CI-chondrite, we show that unlike other nuclides such as {sup 54}Cr and {sup 50}Ti, Sr-isotope variability is the result of a carrier depleted in {sup 84}Sr. The carrier is most likely presolar SiC, which is known to have both high Sr-concentrations relative to solar abundances and extremely depleted {sup 84}Sr compositions. Thus, variability in {sup 84}Sr in meteorites and their components can be attributed to varying contributions from presolar SiC. The observed {sup 84}Sr excesses in calcium-aluminum refractory inclusions (CAIs) suggest their formation from an SiC-free gaseous reservoir, whereas the {sup 84}Sr depletions present in differentiated meteorites require their formation from material with an increased concentration of SiC relative to CI chondrites. The presence of a positive correlation between {sup 84}Sr and {sup 54}Cr, despite being hosted in carriers of negative and positive anomalies, respectively, is not compatible with incomplete mixing of presolar material but instead suggests that the solar system's nucleosynthetic heterogeneity reflects selective thermal processing of dust. Based on vaporization experiments of SiC under nebular conditions, the lack of SiC material in the CAI-forming gas inferred from our data requires that the duration of thermal processing of dust resulting in the vaporization of CAI precursors was extremely short-lived, possibly lasting only hours to days.

Paton, Chad; Schiller, Martin; Bizzarro, Martin, E-mail: chadpaton@gmail.com, E-mail: schiller@snm.ku.dk, E-mail: bizzarro@snm.ku.dk [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen DK-1350 (Denmark)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Analog storage integrated circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

477

Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee, Dr. Ding Zhu Dr. Hadi Nasrabadi Horizontal well placement determination within a reservoir is a significant and difficult step... optimization is an important criterion during the reservoir development phase of a horizontal-well project in gas reservoirs, but it is less significant to vertical wells in a homogeneous reservoir. It is also shown that genetic algorithms are an extremely...

Gibbs, Trevor Howard

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

478

Feasibility of seasonal multipurpose reservoir operation in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constant top of conservation pool elevation. Managing Texas reservoirs by seasonal rule curve operation shows the potential for increasing the firm yield from a reservoir and at the same time decreasing damages due to flooding. However, seasonal rule... Framework for Reservoir Management . . Flood Control Versus Conservation Purposes Conservation Operations . Flood Control Operations Operating Procedures Seasonal Rule Curve Operation in Texas CHAPTER III SEASONAL FACTORS AFFECTING RESERVOIR OPERATION...

Tibbets, Michael N

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 245402 (2013) Limits of mechanical energy storage and structural changes in twisted carbon nanotube ropes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include gravitational potential energy in water reservoirs, electrical potential energy in capacitors and batteries, nuclear potential energy in unsta- ble isotopes, chemical potential energy in fossil fuels and explosives, and thermal energy in steam. Mechanical energy storage, used in wind-up watches and flywheels

Tománek, David

480

Non-Darcy flow in geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of non-Darcy flow laws are investigated for two geothermal reservoir types: multiphase and Hot Dry Rock (HDR). Long-term thermal behavior is emphasized as short-term pressure transient behavior is addressed in the oil field literature. Comparisons of Darcy and non-Darcy flow laws are made.

Zyvoloski, G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Greentree Reservoir Management Matthew J. Gray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Greentree Reservoir Management Matthew J. Gray University of Tennessee Hardwood Bottomlands in Openings Guy Baldassarre Should Manage for Forest Openings >1 acre #12;4 Other Important Functions Bottomline on Bottomlands Hardwood bottomlands are critical ecosystems that play an integral role

Gray, Matthew

484

1 RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION 1.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin, are important targets for CO2 enhanced recovery of oil. The Spraberry reservoirs were discovered in 1949, and have been producing oil since then. Traditionally marginal producers, these clastic, determination of targets in horizontal drilling, isopach mapping, reserve estimations and input data

Schechter, David S.

485

Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

486

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Stanford Geothermal Project Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Papers Presented a t the Second United Nations Symposium on t h e Development and Use of Geothermal Resources, May 19-29, 1975, San

Stanford University

487

Coarse scale simulation of tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is common for field models of tight gas reservoirs to include several wells with hydraulic fractures. These hydraulic fractures can be very long, extending for more than a thousand feet. A hydraulic fracture width is usually no more than about 0...

El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques analyzed. Sensitivity runs with different waterflood patterns indicated that a staggered line drive results in the best performance in the analog channelized reservoir we modeled, as it allows for the best recovery factor in the least amount...

Robbana, Enis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

CRDIAC: Coupled Reactor Depletion Instrument with Automated Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When modeling the behavior of a nuclear reactor over time, it is important to understand how the isotopes in the reactor will change, or transmute, over that time. This is especially important in the reactor fuel itself. Many nuclear physics modeling codes model how particles interact in the system, but do not model this over time. Thus, another code is used in conjunction with the nuclear physics code to accomplish this. In our code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) codes and the Multi Reactor Transmutation Analysis Utility (MRTAU) were chosen as the codes to use. In this way, MCNP would produce the reaction rates in the different isotopes present and MRTAU would use cross sections generated from these reaction rates to determine how the mass of each isotope is lost or gained. Between these two codes, the information must be altered and edited for use. For this, a Python 2.7 script was developed to aid the user in getting the information in the correct forms. This newly developed methodology was called the Coupled Reactor Depletion Instrument with Automated Controls (CRDIAC). As is the case in any newly developed methodology for modeling of physical phenomena, CRDIAC needed to be verified against similar methodology and validated against data taken from an experiment, in our case AFIP-3. AFIP-3 was a reduced enrichment plate type fuel tested in the ATR. We verified our methodology against the MCNP Coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) method and validated our work against the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) data. When compared to MCWO, the difference in concentration of U-235 throughout Cycle 144A was about 1%. When compared to the PIE data, the average bias for end of life U-235 concentration was about 2%. These results from CRDIAC therefore agree with the MCWO and PIE data, validating and verifying CRDIAC. CRDIAC provides an alternative to using ORIGEN-based methodology, which is useful because CRDIAC's depletion code, MRTAU, uses every available isotope in its depletion, unlike ORIGEN, which only depletes the isotopes specified by the user. This means that depletions done by MRTAU more accurately reflect reality. MRTAU also allows the user to build new isotope data sets, which means any isotope with nuclear data could be depleted, something that would help predict the outcomes of nuclear reaction testing in materials other than fuel, like beryllium or gold.

Steven K. Logan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

COLD STORAGE DESIGN REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 1 \\ "..\\- ,,, T I (Section 1), and F. Bruce Sanford (Section 1) Table of Contents Pages Section 1 - Cold Storage Design to be Considered in the Freezing and Cold Storage of Fishery Products - Preparing, Freezing, and Cold Storage

491

Hierarchical Economic Optimization of Oil Production from Petroleum Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water into an oil reservoir. Studies on model-based dynamic optimization of waterflooding strategies to as waterflooding. It serves two purposes: sustaining reservoir pressure and sweeping the oil out of pores still be present in the reservoir. Fig. 1. Process of waterflooding using a (horizontal) in- jection

Van den Hof, Paul

492

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough S.K. Lucas School of Mathematics, revised May 2003, published 45(3), 2004, 401­422 Abstract Often in oil reservoirs a layer of water lies, for example, Muskat [8], Bear [1]). When oil is removed from the reservoir by an oil well, it will generate

Lucas, Stephen

493

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs Alvaro L.G.A. Coutinho In this work, parallel finite element techniques for the simulation of tracer injection in oil reservoirs. Supercomputers have made it possible to consider global reservoir effects which can not be represented using

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

494

Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research developed a numerical simulation based on the latest reservoir description to evaluate the feasibility of new infill wells to maximize the recovery specifically in the eastern region of the reservoir operated by Petroleos de Venezuela...

Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C