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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production...

2

Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir-A Numerical Simulation Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir- A Numerical Simulation for storage and enhanced gas recovery may be organic-rich shales, which CO2 is preferentially adsorbed comprehensive simulation studies to better understand CO2 injection process in shale gas reservoir. This paper

Mohaghegh, Shahab

4

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulation has been used, as common practice, to estimate the CO2 storage capacity of depleted reservoirs. However, this method is time consuming, expensive and requires detailed input data. This investigation proposes an analytical method to estimate the ultimate CO2 storage in depleted oil and gas reservoirs by implementing a volume constrained thermodynamic equation of state (EOS) using the reservoir?s average pressure and fluid composition. This method was implemented in an algorithm which allows fast and accurate estimations of final storage, which can be used to select target storage reservoirs, and design the injection scheme and surface facilities. Impurities such as nitrogen and carbon monoxide, usually contained in power plant flue gases, are considered in the injection stream and can be handled correctly in the proposed algorithm by using their thermodynamic properties into the EOS. Results from analytical method presented excellent agreement with those from reservoir simulation. Ultimate CO2 storage capacity was predicted with an average difference of 1.3%, molar basis, between analytical and numerical methods; average oil, gas, and water saturations were also matched. Additionally, the analytical algorithm performed several orders of magnitude faster than numerical simulation, with an average of 5 seconds per run.

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

Gardner, William Payton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

Gardner, William Payton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Exploratory Simulation Studies of Caprock Alteration Induced byStorage of CO2 in Depleted Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents numerical simulations of isothermalreactive flows which might be induced in the caprock of an Italiandepleted gas reservoir by the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.Our objective is to verify that CO2 geological disposal activitiesalready planned for the study area are safe and do not induce anyundesired environmental impact.Gas-water-rock interactions have beenmodelled under two different intial conditions, i.e., assuming that i)caprock is perfectly sealed, or ii) partially fractured. Field conditionsare better approximated in terms of the "sealed caprock model". Thefractured caprock model has been implemented because it permits toexplore the geochemical beahvior of the system under particularly severeconditions which are not currently encountered in the field, and then todelineate a sort of hypothetical maximum risk scenario.Major evidencessupporting the assumption of a sealed caprock stem from the fact that nogas leakages have been detected during the exploitation phase, subsequentreservoir repressurization due to the ingression of a lateral aquifer,and during several cycles of gas storage in the latest life of reservoirmanagement.An extensive program of multidisciplinary laboratory tests onrock properties, geochemical and microseismic monitoring, and reservoirsimulation studies is underway to better characterize the reservoir andcap-rock behavior before the performance of a planned CO2 sequestrationpilot test.In our models, fluid flow and mineral alteration are inducedin the caprock by penetration of high CO2 concentrations from theunderlying reservoir, i.e., it was assumed that large amounts of CO2 havebeen already injected at depth. The main focus is on the potential effectof these geochemical transformations on the sealing efficiency of caprockformations. Batch and multi-dimensional 1D and 2D modeling has been usedto investigate multicomponent geochemical processes. Our simulationsaccount for fracture-matrix interactions, gas phase participation inmultiphase fluid flow and geochemical reactions, and kinetics offluid-rock interactions.The main objectives of the modeling are torecognize the geochemical processes or parameters to which theadvancement of high CO2 concentrations in the caprock is most sensitive,and to describe the most relevant mineralogical transformations occurringin the caprock as a consequence of such CO2 storage in the underlyingreservoir. We also examine the feedback of these geochemical processes onphysical properties such as porosity, and evaluate how the sealingcapacity of the caprock evolves in time.

Gherardi, Fabrizio; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

9

Numerical modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock alteration induced by CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents numerical simulations of reactive transport which may be induced in the caprock of an on-shore depleted gas reservoir by the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The objective is to verify that CO{sub 2} geological disposal activities currently being planned for the study area are safe and do not induce any undesired environmental impact. In our model, fluid flow and mineral alteration are induced in the caprock by penetration of high CO{sub 2} concentrations from the underlying reservoir, where it was assumed that large amounts of CO{sub 2} have already been injected at depth. The main focus is on the potential effect of precipitation and dissolution processes on the sealing efficiency of caprock formations. Concerns that some leakage may occur in the investigated system arise because the seal is made up of potentially highly-reactive rocks, consisting of carbonate-rich shales (calcite+dolomite averaging up to more than 30% of solid volume fraction). Batch simulations and multi-dimensional 1D and 2D modeling have been used to investigate multicomponent geochemical processes. Numerical simulations account for fracture-matrix interactions, gas phase participation in multiphase fluid flow and geochemical reactions, and kinetics of fluid-rock interactions. The geochemical processes and parameters to which the occurrence of high CO{sub 2} concentrations are most sensitive are investigated by conceptualizing different mass transport mechanisms (i.e. diffusion and mixed advection+diffusion). The most relevant mineralogical transformations occurring in the caprock are described, and the feedback of these geochemical processes on physical properties such as porosity is examined to evaluate how the sealing capacity of the caprock could evolve in time. The simulations demonstrate that the occurrence of some gas leakage from the reservoir may have a strong influence on the geochemical evolution of the caprock. In fact, when a free CO{sub 2}-dominated phase migrates into the caprock through fractures, or through zones with high initial porosity possibly acting as preferential flow paths for reservoir fluids, low pH values are predicted, accompanied by significant calcite dissolution and porosity enhancement. In contrast, when fluid-rock interactions occur under fully liquid-saturated conditions and a diffusion-controlled regime, pH will be buffered at higher values, and some calcite precipitation is predicted which leads to further sealing of the storage reservoir.

Xu, Tianfu; Gherardi, Fabrizio; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

,"Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural...

11

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings:...

12

Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

Olsen, G.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic...

14

Production and Handling Slide 42: Typical Depleted Cylinder Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Typical Depleted Cylinder Storage Yard Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Typical Depleted Cylinder Storage Yard...

15

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

16

Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

17

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

18

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

19

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

20

Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

22

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

23

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

24

New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)...

25

Injecting Carbon Dioxide into Unconventional Storage Reservoirs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will also be investigated with a targeted CO 2 injection test into a depleted shale gas well. Different reservoir models will be used before, during, and after injection...

26

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

27

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: If reinjection and production wells intersect connected fractures, it is expected that reinjected fluid would cool the production well much sooner than would be predicted from calculations of flow in a porous medium. A method for calculating how much sooner that cooling will occur was developed. Basic assumptions of the method are presented, and possible application to the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the Raft River System, and to reinjection of supersaturated fluids is discussed.

28

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

29

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

30

New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

31

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Underground hydrogen storage. Final report. [Salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers and depleted fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of storing hydrogen in underground storage reservoirs is evaluated. The past and present technology of storing gases, primarily natural gas is reviewed. Four types of reservoirs are examined: salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields. A technical investigation of hydrogen properties reveals that only hydrogen embrittlement places a limit on the underground storage by hydrogen. This constraint will limit reservoir pressures to 1200 psi or less. A model was developed to determine economic feasibility. After making reasonable assumptions that a utility might make in determining whether to proceed with a new storage operation, the model was tested and verified on natural gas storage. A parameteric analysis was made on some of the input parameters of the model to determine the sensitivity of the cost of service to them. Once the model was verified it was used to compute the cost of service of storing hydrogen in the four reservoir types. The costs of service for hydrogen storage ranged from 26 to 150% of the cost of the gas stored. The study concludes that it is now both safe and economic to store hydrogen in underground reservoirs.

Foh, S.; Novil, M.; Rockar, E.; Randolph, P.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Production and Handling Slide 38: 48G Depleted UF6 Storage Cylinder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

48G Depleted UF6 Storage Cylinder Refer to caption below for image description After enrichment, depleted uranium hexafluoride is placed in large steel cylinders for storage....

36

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas reservoirs are obvious targets for carbon sequestration by direct carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection by virtue of their proven record of gas production and integrity against gas escape. Carbon sequestration in depleted natural gas reservoirs can be coupled with enhanced gas production by injecting CO{sub 2} into the reservoir as it is being produced, a process called Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR). In this process, supercritical CO{sub 2} is injected deep in the reservoir while methane (CH{sub 4}) is produced at wells some distance away. The active injection of CO{sub 2} causes repressurization and CH{sub 4} displacement to allow the control and enhancement of gas recovery relative to water-drive or depletion-drive reservoir operations. Carbon dioxide undergoes a large change in density as CO{sub 2} gas passes through the critical pressure at temperatures near the critical temperature. This feature makes CO{sub 2} a potentially effective cushion gas for gas storage reservoirs. Thus at the end of the CSEGR process when the reservoir is filled with CO{sub 2}, additional benefit of the reservoir may be obtained through its operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this paper, we present discussion and simulation results from TOUGH2/EOS7C of gas mixture property prediction, gas injection, repressurization, migration, and mixing processes that occur in gas reservoirs under active CO{sub 2} injection.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

37

Sequestration of CO2 in a Depleted Oil Reservoir: An Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a Depleted Oil Reservoir: An Overview H. Westrich (hrwestr@sandia.gov; 505-844-9092) J. Lorenz (jcloren@sandia.gov; 505-3695) S. Cooper (spcoope@sandia.gov; 505-844-3977) C....

38

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground...

39

FAQ 33-What are the potential health risks from storage of depleted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health risks from storage of depleted uranium as an oxide? Once depleted uranium has been converted from UF6 to the oxide form, the risk associated with storage and handling is...

40

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) generated during the oil shale extraction process. AMSO, which holds a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) lease from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for a 160-acre parcel of Federal land in northwest Colorado's oil-shale rich Piceance Basin, will provide technical assistance and oil shale core samples. If AMSO can demonstrate an economically viable and environmentally acceptable extraction process, it retains the right to acquire a 5,120-acre commercial lease. When subject to high temperatures and high pressures, oil shale (a sedimentary rock that is rich in hydrocarbons) can be converted into oil. Through mineralization, the CO 2 could be stored in the shale

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider West Virginia Department of Commerce Lays out guidelines for the conditions under which coal mining operations must notify state authorities of intentions to mine where underground gas

43

Modeling CO2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial,

44

Effects of capillarity and vapor adsorption in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs in natural (undisturbed) conditions contain water as both vapor and liquid phases. The most compelling evidence for the presence of distributed liquid water is the observation that vapor pressures in these systems are close to saturated vapor pressure for measured reservoir temperatures (White et al., 1971; Truesdell and White, 1973). Analysis of natural heat flow conditions provides additional, indirect evidence for the ubiquitous presence of liquid. From an analysis of the heat pipe process (vapor-liquid counterflow) Preuss (1985) inferred that effective vertical permeability to liquid phase in vapor-dominated reservoirs is approximately 10{sup 17} m{sup 2}, for a heat flux of 1 W/m{sup 2}. This value appears to be at the high end of matrix permeabilities of unfractured rocks at The Geysers, suggesting that at least the smaller fractures contribute to liquid permeability. For liquid to be mobile in fractures, the rock matrix must be essentially completely liquid-saturated, because otherwise liquid phase would be sucked from the fractures into the matrix by capillary force. Large water saturation in the matrix, well above the irreducible saturation of perhaps 30%, has been shown to be compatible with production of superheated steam (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1982). In response to fluid production the liquid phase will boil, with heat of vaporization supplied by the reservoir rocks. As reservoir temperatures decline reservoir pressures will decline also. For depletion of ''bulk'' liquid, the pressure would decline along the saturated vapor pressure curve, while for liquid held by capillary and adsorptive forces inside porous media, an additional decline will arise from ''vapor pressure lowering''. Capillary pressure and vapor adsorption effects, and associated vapor pressure lowering phenomena, have received considerable attention in the geothermal literature, and also in studies related to geologic disposal of heat generating nuclear wastes, and in the drying of porous materials. Geothermally oriented studies were presented by Chicoine et al. (1977), Hsieh and Ramey (1978, 1981), Herkelrath et al. (1983), and Nghiem and Ramey (1991). Nuclear waste-related work includes papers by Herkelrath and O'Neal (1985), Pollock (1986), Eaton and Bixler (1987), Pruess et al. (1990), Nitao (1990), and Doughty and E'ruess (1991). Applications to industrial drying of porous materials have been discussed by Hamiathy (1969) arid Whitaker (1977). This paper is primarily concerned with evaluating the impact of vapor pressure lowering (VPL) effects on the depletion behavior of vapor-dominated reservoirs. We have examined experimental data on vapor adsorption and capillary pressures in an effort to identify constitutive relationships that would be applicable to the tight matrix rocks of vapor-dominated systems. Numerical simulations have been performed to evaluate the impact of these effects on the depletion of vapor-dominated reservoirs.

Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Analysis of an interwell tracer test in a depleted heavy-oil reservoir  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents field data and analyses of an interwell tracer test conducted in the Niitsu oil field, which is a fully depleted heavy-oil reservoir of unconsolidated sand formation. Water containing a chemical tracer was injected at a constant rate into an injector surrounded by three production wells. Effluent analyses showed very early breakthrough of injected water at two of the producing wells. The test results suggest a strong areal heterogeneity of the tested formation. An appropriate analytic model was used to obtain a preliminary interpretation of the results. A modified three-dimensional (3D) black-oil model developed to simulate th polymer flood process was then used for analyzing the data in more detail. The model treats tracer solution as a fourth component and can also account for adsorption of tracer. Simulation efforts were concentrated on matching the breakthrough times and tracer profiles after breakthrough. Through both the analytic and the simulation work, the reservoir is characterized by a highly heterogeneous distribution of horizontal permeability, a thin layer of high permeability, and a natural waterdrive that cause a preferential flow trend in a direction toward one producer. The authors conclude that the interwell tracer test is an effective tool for evaluating reservoir heterogeneities and a quantitative analysis of test data is done with the polymer option of a black-oil simulator.

Ohno, K.; Nanba, T.; Horne, R.N.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storage reservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively,reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities. Nonetheless,USA The Yaggy natural gas storage facility is located seven

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside an aluminum coreholder that is then evacuated. Second, with or without connate water, the carbonate core is saturated with methane. Third, supercritical CO2 is injected into the core with 300 psi overburden pressure. From the volume and composition of the produced gas measured by a wet test meter and a gas chromatograph, the recovery of methane at CO2 breakthrough is determined. The core is scanned three times during an experimental run to determine core porosity and fluid saturation profile: at start of the run, at CO2 breakthrough, and at the end of the run. Runs were made with various temperatures, 20°C (68°F) to 80°C (176°F), while the cell pressure is varied, from 500 psig (3.55 MPa) to 3000 psig (20.79 MPa) for each temperature. An analytical study of the experimental results has been also conducted to determine the dispersion coefficient of CO2 using the convection-dispersion equation. The dispersion coefficient of CO2 in methane is found to be relatively low, 0.01-0.3 cm2/min.. Based on experimental and analytical results, a 3D simulation model of one eighth of a 5-spot pattern was constructed to evaluate injection of supercritical CO2 under typical field conditions. The depleted gas reservoir is repressurized by CO2 injection from 500 psi to its initial pressure 3,045 psi. Simulation results for 400 bbl/d CO2 injection may be summarized as follows. First, a large amount of CO2 is sequestered: (i) about 1.2 million tons in 29 years (0 % initial water saturation) to 0.78 million tons in 19 years (35 % initial water saturation) for 40-acre pattern, (ii) about 4.8 million tons in 112 years (0 % initial water saturation) to 3.1 million tons in 73 years (35 % initial water saturation) for 80-acre pattern. Second, a significant amount of natural gas is also produced: (i) about 1.2 BSCF or 74 % remaining GIP (0 % initial water saturation) to 0.78 BSCF or 66 % remaining GIP (35 % initial water saturation) for 40-acre pattern, (ii) about 4.5 BSCF or 64 % remaining GIP (0 % initial water saturation) to 2.97 BSCF or 62 % remaining GIP (35 % initial water saturation) for 80-acre pattern. This produced gas revenue could help defray the cost of CO2 sequestration. In short, CO2 sequestration in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a win-win technology.

Seo, Jeong Gyu

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

50

Joule-Thomson Cooling Due to CO2 Injection into Natural Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy & Fuels, 17(super-cushion gas for natural gas storage (Oldenburg, 2003).storage of carbon dioxide in depleted natural gas reservoirs

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

52

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

53

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:05 PM"

54

Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storage reservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities. Nonetheless,USA The Yaggy natural gas storage facility is located sevenreservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively,

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Experimental and analytic studies to model kinetics and mass transport of carbon dioxide sequstration in depleted carbonate reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

There is undeniable evidence that concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising at an increasingly rapid rate primarily as the result of burning fossil fuels. Although the debate continues, most of the scientific community believes that higher levels of atmospheric CO2 will lead to a significant warming of the Earth’s climate and that there is already evidence that this is occurring. There are two ways to ameliorate this problem. One is to significantly reduce production of CO2, which is primarily a political-economic problem, and the other is to remove CO2 from emissions and/or the atmosphere and find some way to sequester it. Several possible ways to sequester CO2 are under investigation or have been suggested. These include removal by chemical reaction, deep seabed disposal, and pumping supercritical CO2 into various subsurface environments. Sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a viable option, with a possible economic spin-off from the recovery of significant gas reserves. At the elevated temperatures and pressures encountered in reservoirs, carbon dioxide behaves as a supercritical fluid. Under these conditions, little was known regarding the, diffusion of carbon dioxide in natural gas, and displacement of natural gas by carbon dioxide. A major objective of this research was to obtain the necessary data to model these processes. Also, the added CO2 will react with reservoir waters that are often chemically complex high ionic strength brines making them more acidic. This can result in the dissolution of calcium carbonate (calcite) that is a common host rock or sandstone cement in reservoirs and lead to potentially serious problems for CO2 injection and the integrity of the reservoir. It was consequently a second major objective of this project to determine calcite solubility and dissolution kinetics in solutions representative of subsurface brines and produce a general dissolution rate equation. Both objectives were accomplished. Reservoir simulations indicated a large amount of CO2 would be sequestered, with the amount depending on reservoir water saturation. Simulation results also indicate a significant amount of natural gas could be produced. For an 80-acre pattern, natural gas production was calculated to be 3.2 BSCF or 63% of remaining gas-in-place for 30% reservoir water saturation. Gas revenues would help defray the cost of CO2 sequestration. Therefore, CO2 sequestration in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a win-win technology. Considerable effort went into testing and refining the ability to predict calcite solubility in brines using a Pitzer-equation based computer model, with particular difficulties being encountered in solutions with high dissolved calcium concentrations. After that was accomplished, calcite dissolution kinetics were determined a wide range of brine compositions both including and not including potential inhibitors from 25 to 83 oC and a CO2 partial pressure from 0.1 to 1 atm. The reaction was found to be first order for undersaturations of 0.2 to ~1 and was surface controlled. The rate constant was fit to a multiple regression model, thus making it possible to predict calcite dissolution rates over a wide range of solution compositions, partial pressures of CO2 and temperature. Results indicate that equilibrium is likely to be reached relatively quickly in front of an advancing supercritical CO2 fluid.

Morse, John W; Mamora, Daulat

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modeling studies of cold water injection into fluid-depleted, vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physical processes involved in cold water injection into a ''superheated'' fractured reservoir are not yet fully understood, and this insufficient knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms limits the possibility of forecasting future resevoir behavior and optimizing the heat extraction process. Numerical simulation can be a very effective tool in the study of the complex phenomena involved, allowing a rapid examination of different situations and conditions, a systematic investigation of the effects of various parameters on reservoir performance, and some insight into long term behavior. We have performed simulation experiments on simple one-dimensional, porous and fractured reservoir models in order to study the migration of injected water, thermodynamic conditions in the boiling zone, heat extraction, and vapor generation. A two-dimensional radial porous medium model, with some characteristics typical of the high productivity zones of Larderello, has also been applied for studying the evolution of the shape and the thermodynamic conditions of the injection plume in the presence of gravity, reservoir heterogeneities and anisotropy.

Calore, C.; Pruess, K.; Celati, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Isotopic identification of leakage gas from underground storage reservoirs. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois State Geological Survey reports that in areas where bacteriogenic methane occurs in the near-surface groundwater, isotopic analysis of methane reliably distinguishes this gas from gas that has leaked from underground storage reservoirs. Bacteriogenic methane generally has an isotopic-carbon composition of -64 to -90 per mil, whereas the pipeline and reservoir gases analyzed thus far have all had isotopic-carbon compositions in the range of -40 to -46 per mil.

Coleman, D.D.; Meents, W.F.; Liu, C.L.; Keogh, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion  

SciTech Connect

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing, waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. This report includes work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and the demonstration project objective.

NONE

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

60

Impact of reservoir properties on mixing of inert cushion and natural gas in storage reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground natural gas storage is a process which effectively balances a variable demand market with a nearly constant supply of energy provided by the pipeline… (more)

Srinivasan, Balaji S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

62

Design and Implementation of a C02 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective is to utilize reservoir characteristics and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. Also the project seeks to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field.

None

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

CO/sub 2/ trends in the depletion of the Larderello vapor-dominated reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present paper is concerned with the origin of CO/sub 2/ in the Larderello discharges from a reservoir engineering point of view. Specifically, we consider the question of fluid reserves (water and CO/sub 2/) at Larderello, and we carry out numerical simulations to obtain insight into temporal trends of CO/sub 2/ released from idealized models of vapor-dominated systems. Important constraints in the modeling arise from observed temperatures and enthalpies at Larderello. Discharge enthalpies are generally close to those of saturated steam near 250/sup 0/C (2.8 MJ/kg), with some degree of superheat which tends to increase with time. Flow rates of most wells decrease rapidly during the first few years of production and subsequently decline very slowly.

Pruess, K.; Celati, R.; Calore, C.; D'Amore, F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermal depletion of a geothermal reservoir with both fracture and pore permeability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for estimating the useful lifetime of a reservoir in porous rock where the injection and production wells intersect a fracture system is presented. Equations were derived for the pore-fluid and fracture-fluid temperatures averaged over large regions of the geothermal field. Problems such as incomplete areal sweep and interfingering of cool and hot fluids are ignored. Approximate equations relating average temperatures to the heat flowing from rock to fluid were developed, and their use is justified by comparing the results with solutions of the exact equations. The equations for the temperature decline can be solved quickly. In the model, fractures are characterized by three parameters: aperture w, permeability k/sub fr/, and spacings between fractures D. For certain values of these parameters, cool reinjected fluid in fractures may reach the production wells long before all the warm pore fluid has been tapped, shortening the useful lifetime of the field. The traditional (and important) problems of reservoir engineering, flow rate determination, drawdown, sweep patterns, etc. were ignored. Thus the results are most useful in providing a correction factor which can be applied to lifetime estimates obtained from a detailed simulation of a field assuming porous rock. That correction factor is plotted for clean fractures (k/sub fr/ = w/sup 2//12) as a function of w and D for several lifetime ranges. Small-scale fractures seen in cores from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field are too closely spaced to reduce lifetime estimates. However, large-scale fault systems exist within that field, and they are attractive drilling targets because they produce large flow rates. If large scale faults communicate between injection and production wells, they may reduce the useful lifetime of those wells.

Kasameyer, P.W.; Schroeder, R.C.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Water coning in porous media reservoirs for compressed air energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general purpose of this work is to define the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of a CAES porous media reservoir subjected to simulated air mass cycling. This research will assist in providing design guidelines for the efficient and stable operation of the air storage reservoir. This report presents the analysis and results for the two-phase (air-water), two-dimensional, numerical modeling of CAES porous media reservoirs. The effects of capillary pressure and relative permeability were included. The fluids were considered to be immisicible; there was no phase change; and the system was isothermal. The specific purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the reservoir parameters that were believed to be important to water coning. This phenomenon may occur in reservoirs in which water underlies the air storage zone. It involves the possible intrusion of water into the wellbore or near-wellbore region. The water movement is in response to pressure gradients created during a reservoir discharge cycle. Potential adverse effects due to this water movement are associated with the pressure response of the reservoir and the geochemical stability of the near-wellbore region. The results obtained for the simulated operation of a CAES reservoir suggest that water coning should not be a severe problem, due to the slow response of the water to the pressure gradients and the relatively short duration in which those gradients exist. However, water coning will depend on site-specific conditions, particularly the fluid distributions following bubble development, and, therefore, a water coning analysis should be included as part of site evaluation.

Wiles, L.E.; McCann, R.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Use of depleted uranium metal as cask shielding in high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal systems  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE has amassed over 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium from its uranium enrichment operations. Rather than dispose of this depleted uranium as waste, this study explores a beneficial use of depleted uranium as metal shielding in casks designed to contain canisters of vitrified high-level waste. Two high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal shielded cask systems are analyzed. The first system employs a shielded storage and disposal cask having a separate reusable transportation overpack. The second system employs a shielded combined storage, transport, and disposal cask. Conceptual cask designs that hold 1, 3, 4 and 7 high-level waste canisters are described for both systems. In all cases, cask design feasibility was established and analyses indicate that these casks meet applicable thermal, structural, shielding, and contact-handled requirements. Depleted uranium metal casting, fabrication, environmental, and radiation compatibility considerations are discussed and found to pose no serious implementation problems. About one-fourth of the depleted uranium inventory would be used to produce the casks required to store and dispose of the nearly 15,400 high-level waste canisters that would be produced. This study estimates the total-system cost for the preferred 7-canister storage and disposal configuration having a separate transportation overpack would be $6.3 billion. When credits are taken for depleted uranium disposal cost, a cost that would be avoided if depleted uranium were used as cask shielding material rather than disposed of as waste, total system net costs are between $3.8 billion and $5.5 billion.

Yoshimura, H.R.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; McAllaster, M.E. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Depletion and recovery behavior of the Gladys McCall geopressured geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many sedimentary basins throughout the world contain sealed fault blocks in which the pore fluids are at higher pressures and temperatures than normal as a consequence of their depositional environment. The U.S. Department of Energy has drilled, completed, and tested four deep research wells in selected geopressured geothermal prospects in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region to evaluate the recoverability of the thermal, hydraulic, and chemical (methane) energy in this potential energy resource. The wells are expensive and the specific energy of the fluids is relatively small, but the total recoverable energy from a single well can be extremely large. Long-term testing of the Gladys McCall No. 1 research well, located in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, U.S.A., has defined an impressively large geopressured geothermal reservoir. In this paper an integrated analysis of the test data is presented, and a numerical model is constructed that matches the available data for the 6.5-year test history of the well.

Riney, T.D. (S-CUBED, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Potential petrophysical and chemical property alterations in a compressed air energy storage porous rock reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) systems depends on long-term stability of the underground reservoirs subjected to somewhat unique operating conditions. Specifically, these conditions include elevated and time varying temperatures, effective stresses, and air humidities. To minimize the requirements for premium fuels, it may be desirable to retain the thermal energy of compression. Porous media, e.g., sandstone, may hold promise as elevated temperature reservoirs. In this study, a reservoir composed of clean quartz sandstone and injection air temperatures of 300 to 575/sup 0/K are assumed. Numerical modeling is used to estimate temperature, stress, and humidity conditions within this reference porous media reservoir. A discussion on relative importance to CAES of several potential porous media damage mechanisms is presented. In this context, damage is defined as a reduction in intrinsic permeability (measure of air transport capability), a decrease in effective porosity (measure of storage capability), or an increase in elastic and/or inelastic deformation of the porous material. The potential damage mechanisms presented include: (1) disaggregation, (2) particulate plugging, (3) boundary layer viscosity anomalies, (4) inelastic microstructural consolidation, (5) clay swelling and dispersion, (6) hydrothermal mineral alteration, (7) oxidation reactions, and (8) well casing corrosion. These mechanisms are placed in perspective with respect to anticipated CAES conditions and mechanisms suggested are: (1) of academic interest only, (2) readily identified and controlled via engineering, or (3) potential problem areas requiring additional investigation.

Stottlemyre, J.A.; Erikson, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities  

SciTech Connect

A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description Date 0 Original document 1/29/2008 1 Estimate for carbon content of crude oil was incorrect (see pThe Economics of CO2 Transport by Pipeline and Storage in Saline Aquifers and Oil Reservoirs Sean T for this work was provided by the US Department of Energy under contract numbers DE-FC26-00NT40935 and DE-AC26

71

Design and Implementation of a C02 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in a Shallow Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first project objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second project objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work during the fourth quarter falls within the demonstration project.

J. Scott Bles; Kimberly B. Dollens.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

SciTech Connect

The first project objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second project objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work during the fourth quarter falls within the demonstration project.

Czirr, Kirk

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

SciTech Connect

The first project objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second project objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work during the second quarter falls within the demonstration project.

Czirr, Kirk

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

Design and Implementation of a CO(2) Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work this quarter falls within the demonstration project.

Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.; Durrett, E.G.; Bles, J.S

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Stability and design criteria studies for compressed air energy storage reservoirs. Progress report, FY 1977.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress made during FY-1977 in establishing design criteria to ensure the successful operation and long-term stability of Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) reservoirs in underground porous media, such as aquifers is summarized. The formulation of pertinent criteria is important since the long-term stability of air storage reservoirs is probably the item of greatest risk to the successful demonstration and commercialization of the CAES concept. The study has been divided into four phases: (1) state-of-the-art survey, (2) analytical modeling studies, (3) laboratory studies, and (4) field testing. The first of these phases, the state-of-the-art survey for air storage in porous reservoirs, has been completed on schedule and is reported in Section 2. Sections 3 and 4 are progress reports on Phases 2 and 3. No work has been done on Phase 4. It is planned that the field testing phase of this study will be carried out in conjunction with the Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE/EPRI) CAES Demonstration Program. This phase is not scheduled to begin until FY-1979.

Smith, G.C.; Stottlemyre, J.A.; Wiles, L.E.; Loscutoff, W.V.; Pincus, H.J.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

D0 Decomissioning : Storage of Depleted Uranium Modules Inside D0 Calorimeters after the Termination of D0 Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dzero liquid Argon calorimeters contain hadronic modules made of depleted uranium plates. After the termination of DO detector's operation, liquid Argon will be transferred back to Argon storage Dewar, and all three calorimeters will be warmed up. At this point, there is no intention to disassemble the calorimeters. The depleted uranium modules will stay inside the cryostats. Depleted uranium is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. It is slightly radioactive, emits alpha, beta and gamma radiation. External radiation hazards are minimal. Alpha radiation has no external exposure hazards, as dead layers of skin stop it; beta radiation might have effects only when there is a direct contact with skin; and gamma rays are negligible - levels are extremely low. Depleted uranium is a pyrophoric material. Small particles (such as shavings, powder etc.) may ignite with presence of Oxygen (air). Also, in presence of air and moisture it can oxidize. Depleted uranium can absorb moisture and keep oxidizing later, even after air and moisture are excluded. Uranium oxide can powder and flake off. This powder is also pyrographic. Uranium oxide may create health problems if inhaled. Since uranium oxide is water soluble, it may enter the bloodstream and cause toxic effects.

Sarychev, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

77

Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO2 Storage in the Alberta Basin, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO 2 Storage in the Alberta Basin, Canada Stefan Bachu (Stefan.Bachu@gov.ab.ca; 780-427-1517) Alberta Energy and Utilities Board 4999-98 Avenue Edmonton, AB, T6B 2X3, Canada Introduction Human activity since the industrial revolution has had the effect of increasing atmospheric concentrations of gases with a greenhouse effect, such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ), leading to climate warming and weather changes (Bryant, 1997; Jepma and Munasinghe, 1998). Because of its relative abundance compared with the other greenhouse gases, CO 2 is by far the most important, being responsible for about 64% of the enhanced "greenhouse effect" (Bryant, 1997). Given their inherent advantages, such as availability, competitive cost, ease of

78

Preliminary stability criteria for compressed air energy storage in porous media reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from the initial phase of a study to establish subsurface design and operating criteria for a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) facility are summarized. The primary objective was to derive a preliminary set of criteria that would help ensure the long term (30 to 40 year) integrity of CAES reservoirs in porous media, such as aquifers or abandoned natural gas reservoirs. In addition, appropriate research and development tasks were to be defined if the current technology was found to be inadequate. Preliminary stability and design criteria for storage of compressed air in porous media were determined on the basis of a survey of the open literature and the experience of experts in industry and universities. The results were separated into two categories: criteria for low temperature air injection (under 200/sup 0/F) and criteria for high temperature air injection (200 to 650/sup 0/F). Results are presented as maximum and/or minimum bounds for a number of parameters such as porosity, permeability, closure, storage pressure, caprock thickness, delta pressure, and caprock slope. One of the prime conclusions derived from an evaluation of the low temperature concept is that the technology currently exists to handle the potential design and operating problems. Therefore, there appears to be no technical roadblocks to the successful demonstration of the CAES concept, and a pilot project could be constructed in the near future.

Stottlemyre, J.A.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

80

Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing number of open hole horizontal well completions in low-pressure and depleted reservoirs requires the use of non-damaging low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) to avoid formation damage and realize optimum well productivity. To address this need we have formulated new LDDIFS with specific density lower than 1.0 sg (8.34 ppg) specifically to drill and complete low pressure and depleted reservoirs with minimum formation damage and maximum production. These materials exhibit typical drilling fluid characteristics, allowing the well to be safely drilled (0 required well depth but also perform as completion fluids, lessening formation damage to a greater extent than fluids with greater density and higher wellbore pressures. The new LDDIF incorporates low-density hollow glass spheres (HGS) to allow near-balanced drilling in low pressure and depleted reservoirs. The LDDIF uses potassium chloride (KCI) brine as the base fluid because of its low density and inhibition of clay hydration and employs low concentrations of the HGS so that fluid rheology is not altered. We have conducted extensive laboratory testing to compare performance of the HGS LDDIF with that of conventional horizontal well DIFs. Experiments consisted of permeability regain tests on unconsolidated sands with sand control screens. Test variables included temperature, concentration of drill solids cleanup technique and HGS concentration. Test results have shown that the new fluids are up to 50% easier to remove from the wellbore formation faces and provide higher productivity than higher density fluids. Such results indicate that higher well productivity from wells with less impairment would offset any added costs of HGS additives in the fluids.

Chen, Guoqiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

Lykins, M.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Structural analysis of porous rock reservoirs subjected to conditions of compressed air energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigations are described which were performed to assess the structural behavior of porous rock compressed air energy storage (CAES) reservoirs subjected to loading conditions of temperature and pressure felt to be typical of such an operation. Analyses performed addressed not only the nominal or mean reservoir response but also the cyclic response due to charge/discharge operation. The analyses were carried out by assuming various geometrical and material related parameters of a generic site. The objective of this study was to determine the gross response of a generic porous reservoir. The site geometry for this study assumed a cylindrical model 122 m in dia and 57 m high including thicknesses for the cap, porous, and base rock formations. The central portion of the porous zone was assumed to be at a depth of 518 m and at an initial temperature of 20/sup 0/C. Cyclic loading conditions of compressed air consisted of pressure values in the range of 4.5 to 5.2 MPa and temperature values between 143 and 204/sup 0/C.Various modes of structural behavior were studied. These response modes were analyzed using loading conditions of temperature and pressure (in the porous zone) corresponding to various operational states during the first year of simulated site operation. The results of the structural analyses performed indicate that the most severely stressed region will likely be in the wellbore vicinity and hence highly dependent on the length of and placement technique utilized in the well production length. Analyses to address this specific areas are currently being pursued.

Friley, J.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a CO{sub 2} project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. This report includes work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and the demonstration project objective.

Chimahusky, J.S.

1996-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluating Potential for Large Releases from CO2 StorageReservoirs: Analogs, Scenarios, and Modeling Needs  

SciTech Connect

While the purpose of geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential exists for CO{sub 2} to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward along permeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. Such discharge is not necessarily a serious concern, as CO{sub 2} is a naturally abundant and relatively benign gas in low concentrations. However, there is a potential risk to health, safety and environment (HSE) in the event that large localized fluxes of CO{sub 2} were to occur at the land surface, especially where CO{sub 2} could accumulate. In this paper, we develop possible scenarios for large CO{sub 2} fluxes based on the analysis of natural analogues, where large releases of gas have been observed. We are particularly interested in scenarios which could generate sudden, possibly self-enhancing, or even eruptive release events. The probability for such events may be low, but the circumstances under which they might occur and potential consequences need to be evaluated in order to design appropriate site selection and risk management strategies. Numerical modeling of hypothetical test cases is needed to determine critical conditions for such events, to evaluate whether such conditions may be possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, to evaluate the potential HSE impacts of such events and design appropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Tsang,Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

85

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

87

PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF CO2 SEPARATION AND STORAGE PROPERTIES OF COAL GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

An attractive alternative of sequestering CO{sub 2} is to inject it into coalbed methane reservoirs, particularly since it has been shown to enhance the production of methane during near depletion stages. The basis for enhanced coalbed methane recovery and simultaneous sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep coals is the preferential sorption property of coal, with its affinity for carbon dioxide being significantly higher than that for methane. Yet, the sorption behavior of coal under competitive sorptive environment is not fully understood. Hence, the original objective of this research study was to carry out a laboratory study to investigate the effect of studying the sorption behavior of coal in the presence of multiple gases, primarily methane, CO{sub 2} and nitrogen, in order to understand the mechanisms involved in displacement of methane and its movement in coal. This had to be modified slightly since the PVT property of gas mixtures is still not well understood, and any laboratory work in the area of sorption of gases requires a definite equation of state to calculate the volumes of different gases in free and adsorbed forms. This research study started with establishing gas adsorption isotherms for pure methane and CO{sub 2}. The standard gas expansion technique based on volumetric analysis was used for the experimental work with the additional feature of incorporating a gas chromatograph for analysis of gas composition. The results were analyzed first using the Langmuir theory. As expected, the Langmuir analysis indicated that CO{sub 2} is more than three times as sorptive as methane. This was followed by carrying out a partial desorption isotherm for methane, and then injecting CO{sub 2} to displace methane. The results indicated that CO{sub 2} injection at low pressure displaced all of the sorbed methane, even when the total pressure continued to be high. However, the displacement appeared to be occurring due to a combination of the preferential sorption property of coal and reduction in the partial pressure of methane. As a final step, the Extended Langmuir (EL) model was used to model the coal-methane-CO{sub 2} binary adsorption system. The EL model was found to be very accurate in predicting adsorption of CO{sub 2}, but not so in predicting desorption of methane. The selectivity of CO{sub 2} over methane was calculated to be 4.3:1. This is, of course, not in very good agreement with the measured values which showed the ratio to be 3.5:1. However, the measured results are in good agreement with the field observation at one of the CO{sub 2} injection sites. Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that low pressure injection of CO{sub 2} can be fairly effective in displacing methane in coalbed reservoirs although this might be difficult to achieve in field conditions. Furthermore, the displacement of methane appears to be not only due to the preferential sorption of methane, but reduction in partial pressure as well. Hence, using a highly adsorbing gas, such as CO{sub 2}, has the advantages of inert gas stripping and non-mixing since the injected gas does not mix with the recovered methane.

John Kemeny; Satya Harpalani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DUF6 Storage Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Safety Depleted UF6 Storage line line How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored DUF6 Storage Safety Cylinder Leakage Depleted UF6 Storage Safety Continued cylinder storage is...

89

Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Disposal A discussion of the environmental impacts...

90

Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous experiments - injecting pure CO2 into carbonate cores - showed that the process is a win-win technology, sequestrating CO2 while recovering a significant amount of hitherto unrecoverable natural gas that could help defray the cost of CO2 sequestration. In this thesis, I report my findings on the effect of flue gas ??impurities?? on the displacement of natural gas during CO2 sequestration, and results on unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests to carbonate samples. In displacement experiments, corefloods were conducted at 1,500 psig and 70??C, in which flue gas was injected into an Austin chalk core containing initially methane. Two types of flue gases were injected: dehydrated flue gas with 13.574 mole% CO2 (Gas A), and treated flue gas (N2, O2 and water removed) with 99.433 mole% CO2 (Gas B). The main results of this study are as follows. First, the dispersion coefficient increases with concentration of ??impurities??. Gas A exhibits the largest dispersion coefficients, 0.18-0.25 cm2/min, compared to 0.13-0.15 cm2/min for Gas B, and 0.15 cm2/min for pure CO2. Second, recovery of methane at breakthrough is relatively high, ranging from 86% OGIP for pure CO2, 74-90% OGIP for Gas B, and 79-81% for Gas A. Lastly, injection of Gas A would sequester the least amount of CO2 as it contains about 80 mole% nitrogen. From the view point of sequestration, Gas A would be least desirable while Gas B appears to be the most desirable as separation cost would probably be cheaper than that for pure CO2 with similar gas recovery. For UCS tests, corefloods were conducted at 1,700 psig and 65??C in such a way that the cell throughput of CO2 simulates near-wellbore throughput. This was achieved through increasing the injection rate and time of injection. Corefloods were followed by porosity measurement and UCS tests. Main results are presented as follows. First, the UCS of the rock was reduced by approximately 30% of its original value as a result of the dissolution process. Second, porosity profiles of rock samples increased up to 2.5% after corefloods. UCS test results indicate that CO2 injection will cause weakening of near-wellbore formation rock.

Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs L. A. Davis Lorne.Davis@coe.ttu.edu Department of Petroleum Engineering A. L. Graham Alan.Graham@coe.ttu.edu H. W. Parker** Harry.Parker@coe.ttu.edu Department of Chemical Engineering Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409 M. S. Ingber ingber@me.unm.edu A. A. Mammoli mammoli@me.unm.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 L. A. Mondy lamondy@engsci.sandia.gov Energetic and Multiphase Processes Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0834 Quanxin Guo quan@advantekinternational.com Ahmed Abou-Sayed a.abou-sayed@att.net

92

THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Information retrieval system: impacts of water-level changes on uses of federal storage reservoirs of the Columbia River.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project undertaken to provide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with information needed to conduct environmental assessments and meet requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Regional Act) is described. Access to information on environmental effects would help BPA fulfill its responsibilities to coordinate power generation on the Columbia River system, protect uses of the river system (e.g., irrigation, recreation, navigation), and enhance fish and wildlife production. Staff members at BPA identified the need to compile and index information resources that would help answer environmental impact questions. A computer retrieval system that would provide ready access to the information was envisioned. This project was supported by BPA to provide an initial step toward a compilation of environmental impact information. Scientists at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) identified, gathered, and evaluated information related to environmental effects of water level on uses of five study reservoirs and developed and implemented and environmental data retrieval system, which provides for automated storage and retrieval of annotated citations to published and unpublished information. The data retrieval system is operating on BPA's computer facility and includes the reservoir water-level environmental data. This project was divided into several tasks, some of which were conducted simultaneously to meet project deadlines. The tasks were to identify uses of the five study reservoirs, compile and evaluate reservoir information, develop a data entry and retrieval system, identify and analyze research needs, and document the data retrieval system and train users. Additional details of the project are described in several appendixes.

Fickeisen, D.H.; Cowley, P.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Impact of injecting inert cushion gas into a gas storage reservoir.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground natural gas storage is a process which ensures constant supply of natural gas by storing the excess gas produced and quickly supply when required.… (more)

Lekkala, Sudheer R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Prediction of the effects of compositional mixing in a reservoir on conversion to natural gas storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increased interest in the development of new Gas Storage Fields over the lastseveral decades has created some interesting challenges for the industry. Most existinggas… (more)

Brannon, Alan W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Although models that simulate the fracturing process exist, they can be significantly improved by extending the models to account for nonsymmetric, nonplanar fractures, coupling the models to more realistic reservoir simulators, and implementing advanced multiphase flow models for the transport of proppant. Third, it may be possible to deviate from current hydraulic fracturing technology by using different proppants (possibly waste materials that need to be disposed of, e.g., asbestos) combined with different hydraulic fracturing carrier fluids (possibly supercritical CO2 itself). Because current technology is mainly aimed at enhanced oil recovery, it may not be ideally suited for the injection and storage of CO2. Finally, advanced concepts such as increasing the injectivity of the fractured geologic formations through acidization with carbonated water will be investigated. Saline formations are located through most of the continental United States. Generally, where saline formations are scarce, oil and gas reservoirs and coal beds abound. By developing the technology outlined here, it will be possible to remove CO2 at the source (power plants, industry) and inject it directly into nearby geological formations, without releasing it into the atmosphere. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a technology capable of sequestering CO2 in geologic formations at a cost of US $10 per ton.

L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect

The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN  

SciTech Connect

The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can be used by operators to guide treatment selection in wells with significant non-darcy damage component. In addition, the effectiveness of the remediation treatment designed to reduce damage caused by the inorganic precipitate siderite was measured, and the benefits of this work are extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry. Similarly the potential benefits realized from more effective identification and treatment of wells with significant nondarcy damage component are also presented, and these benefits are also extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry.

J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Depleted uranium is uranium that has had some of its U-235 content removed. Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce uranium having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the 0.72% that occurs naturally (called "enriched" uranium) for use in U.S. national defense and civilian applications. "Depleted" uranium is also a product of the enrichment process. However, depleted uranium has been stripped of some of its natural uranium-235 content. Most of the Department of Energy's (DOE) depleted uranium inventory contains between 0.2 to 0.4 weight-percent uranium-235, well

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Economic Evaluation of CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancement Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO2 in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of the carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MWe integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study w...

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A CO2 FLOOD UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL INJECTION WELLS IN A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE APPROACHING WATERFLOOD DEPLETION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO{sub 2} horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields. The Unit was a mature waterflood with water cut exceeding 95%. Oil must be mobilized through the use of a miscible or near-miscible fluid to recover significant additional reserves. Also, because the unit was relatively small, it did not have the benefit of economies of scale inherent in normal larger scale projects. Thus, new and innovative methods were required to reduce investment and operating costs. Two primary methods used to accomplish improved economics were use of reservoir characterization to restrict the flood to the higher quality rock in the unit and use of horizontal injection wells to cut investment and operating costs. The project consisted of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. In this phase Reservoir Analysis, Characterization Tasks and Advanced Technology Definition Tasks were completed. Completion enabled the project to be designed, evaluated, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation submitted to working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consisted of the implementation and execution of the project in the field. Phase II was completed in July 2001. Performance monitoring, during Phase II, by mid 1998 identified the majority of producing wells which under performed their anticipated withdrawal rates. Newly drilled and re-activated wells had lower offtake rates than originally forecasted. As a result of poor offtake, higher reservoir pressure was a concern for the project as it limited CO{sub 2} injectivity. To reduce voidage balance, and reservoir pressure, a disposal well was therefore drilled. Several injection surveys indicated the CO{sub 2} injection wells had severe conformance issues. After close monitoring of the project to the end of 1999, it was evident the project would not recover the anticipated tertiary reserves. The main reasons for under-performance were poor in zone CO{sub 2} injection into the upper San Andres layers, poorer offtake rates from newly drilled replacement wells and a higher than required reservoir pressure. After discussion internally within Phillips, externally with the Department of Energy (DOE) and SCU partners, a redevelopment of South Cowden was agreed upon to commence in year 2000. The redevelopment essentially abandoned the original development for Budget Phase II in favor of a revised approach. This involved conformance techniques to resolve out of zone CO{sub 2} injection and use of horizontal wells to improve in zone injectivity and productivity. A phased approach was used to ensure short radius lateral drilling could be implemented effectively at South Cowden. This involved monitoring drilling operations and then production response to determine if larger investments during the second phase were justified. Redevelopment Phase 1 was completed in May 2000. It was deemed a success in regard to finding suitable/cost-effective technology for drilling horizontal laterals and finding a technique that could sustain long-term productivity from the upper layers of the San Andres reservoir. Four existing vertical producing wells were isolated from their existing completions and sidetracked with horizontal laterals into the upper layers of the San Andres. Overall average offtake rates for the four wells increased by a factor of 12 during the first four months after completion of Phase 1. Phase 2 of the redevelopment focused on current CO{sub 2} vertical injection wells. Techniques were applied to resolve near well conformance concerns and then either single or dual laterals were dril

K.J. Harpole; Ed G. Durrett; Susan Snow; J.S. Bles; Carlon Robertson; C.D. Caldwell; D.J. Harms; R.L. King; B.A. Baldwin; D. Wegener; M. Navarrette

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

105

Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as the final technical report and users manual for the 'Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II SBIR project. Advanced Resources International has developed a screening tool by which users can technically screen, assess the storage capacity and quantify the costs of CO2 storage in four types of CO2 storage reservoirs. These include CO2-enhanced oil recovery reservoirs, depleted oil and gas fields (non-enhanced oil recovery candidates), deep coal seems that are amenable to CO2-enhanced methane recovery, and saline reservoirs. The screening function assessed whether the reservoir could likely serve as a safe, long-term CO2 storage reservoir. The storage capacity assessment uses rigorous reservoir simulation models to determine the timing, ultimate storage capacity, and potential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Finally, the economic assessment function determines both the field-level and pipeline (transportation) costs for CO2 sequestration in a given reservoir. The screening tool has been peer reviewed at an Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical meeting in March 2009. A number of useful observations and recommendations emerged from the Workshop on the costs of CO2 transport and storage that could be readily incorporated into a commercial version of the Screening Tool in a Phase III SBIR.

George J. Koperna Jr.; Vello A. Kuuskraa; David E. Riestenberg; Aiysha Sultana; Tyler Van Leeuwen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

U.S. Weekly Natural Gas Storage Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Production and Net Imports Natural Gas Storage Storage Reservoirs by Type Underground Natural Gas Storage Facilities in the ... (written copies ...

107

DUF6 Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of depleted UF6 is stored in steel cylinders at three sites in the U.S. Depleted UF6 Inventory and Storage Locations U.S. DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 consists of approximately...

108

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

109

Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of theTransport in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs, Geothermics,Depletion of Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, Lawrence

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only to conventional consolidated reservoirs (with constant formation compressibility) but also to unconsolidated reservoirs (with variable formation compressibility) by including geomechanics, permeability deterioration and compartmentalization to estimate the OGIP and performance characteristics of each compartment in such reservoirs given production data. A geomechanics model was developed using available correlation in the industry to estimate variable pore volume compressibility, reservoir compaction and permeability reduction. The geomechanics calculations were combined with gas material balance equation and pseudo-steady state equation and the model was used to predict well performance. Simulated production data from a conventional gas Simulator was used for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each compartment in a compartmentalized gas reservoir and predict the subsequent reservoir performance. The analysis was done by history-matching gas rate with the model using an optimization technique. The model gave satisfactory results with both consolidated and unconsolidated reservoirs for single and multiple reservoir layers. It was demonstrated that for unconsolidated reservoirs, reduction in permeability and reservoir compaction could be very significant especially for unconsolidated gas reservoirs with large pay thickness and large depletion pressure.

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formations, such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs,sedimentary formations, including oil and gas reservoirs andassociated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). At the North-

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates

115

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

116

Predicting Well Stimulation Results in a Gas Storage Field in the Absence of Reservoir Data, Using Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sand. The Clinton is a tight gas-bearing sandstone. Natural fracturing is thought to account storage field located in Northeastern Ohio. The formation is a tight gas sandstone known as the Clinton for production in economic quantities. Sand occurs in lenses and is largely discontinuous from one well

Mohaghegh, Shahab

117

Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Compressed Air Energy Storage Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a scoping and conceptual engineering analysis of the compressed air energy storage (CAES) technology and how it can be deployed within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) services territory, with specific focus on the use of one or more Solano County, California, depleted gas reservoirs, which are underneath the SMUD Solano Wind Farm near the city of Rio Vista, California. Results are presented on the geologic opportunities for building a CAES plant that uses sites near ...

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimum Reservoir Operation for Flood Control and Conservation Purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid population and economic growth in Texas is accompanied by increased needs for water supply and flood control. Depleting groundwater reserves are resulting in an increased reliance on surface water. The rising cost of fossil fuel during the 1970's has focused attention on increasing hydroelectric power generation. Instream flow needs for fish and wildlife habitat and maintenance of fresh water inflows to bays and estuaries have received increased attention in recent years. The climate of the state is characterized by extremes of floods and droughts. Reservoirs are necessary to control and utilize the highly variable streamflow. Due to a number of economic, environmental, institutional, and political factors, construction of additional new reservoir projects is much more difficult now than in the past. Consequently, optimizing the beneficial use of existing reservoirs is becoming increasingly more important. In addition to ever increasing water related needs, other factors affecting reservoir operation change over time as well. Watershed and flood plain conditions are dynamic. Construction of numerous small flood retarding dams by the Soil Conservation Service and other entities in the watersheds of major reservoirs have reduced flood inflows to the reservoirs. Construction of numerous small ponds for recreation or watering livestock have also decreased reservoir inflows and yields. Increased runoff caused by watershed urbanization is significantly contributing to flooding problems in certain locations. The existing flood control reservoirs were planned and designed based on the expectation of ever increasing intensification of flood plain land use. However, the National Flood Insurance Program has resulted in zoning and regulation of 100-year flood plains. With stringent flood plain management, susceptibility to flooding could actually decrease over time as existing activities choose to leave the flood plain and regulation prevents other activities from moving into the flood plain. Reservoir sedimentation reduces available storage capacity. Construction of additional reservoirs, as well as other related types of projects such as conveyance facilities, flood control levees and channel improvements, and electric power plants, affect the operation of existing reservoirs. Technological advancements in hydrologic data collection, streamflow forecasting, system modeling and analysis, and computer technology provide opportunities for refining operating policies. Reservoir storage capacities and operating policies are generally established prior to construction and tend to remain constant thereafter. However, public needs and objectives and numerous factors affecting reservoir effectiveness significantly change over time. The increasing necessity to use limited storage capacity as effectively as possible warrants periodic reevaluations of operating policies. Operating procedures should be responsive to changing needs and conditions. Reallocation of storage capacity between flood control and conservation purposes represents one general strategy for modifying operating policies in response to changing needs and conditions. Reservoir operation is based upon the conflicting objectives of maximizing the amount of water available for conservation purposes and maximizing the amount of empty space available for storing flood waters. Conservation purposes include municipal, industrial, and agricultural water supply, hydroelectric power, recreation, and instream flow maintenance. Common practice is to operate a reservoir only for conservation purposes or only for flood control or to designate a certain reservoir volume, or pool, for conservation purposes and a separate pool for flood control. The conservation and flood control pools in a multiple purpose reservoir are fixed by a designated top of conservation (bottom of flood control) pool elevation. Planning, design, and operating problems associated with flood control are handled separately from those associated with conservation. Institutional arra

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Cabezas, L. Morris; Tibbets, Michael N.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Charge Depleting:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.5 seconds 0.5 seconds Acceleration 1/4 Mile Time: 18.6 seconds Maximum Speed: 83.2 MPH Acceleration 1 Mile Maximum Speed: 100.6 MPH Charge Sustaining: Acceleration 0-60 MPH Time: 10.6 seconds Acceleration 1/4 Mile Time: 18.6 seconds Maximum Speed: 82.8 MPH Acceleration 1 Mile Maximum Speed: 101.9 MPH Brake Test @ 60 MPH Distance Required: 145.1 ft UDDS Fuel Economy 6 HWFET Fuel Economy 6,10 Distance (miles) Fuel Economy (mpg) AC Energy Consumed (kWh) 7 Distance (miles) Fuel Economy (mpg) AC Energy Consumed (kWh) 7 10 118.5 2.85 10 53.0 1.80 20 116.8 5.49 20 56.6 3.37 40 116.0 10.50 40 58.0 6.38 60 90.7 11.34 60 55.3 9.48 80 76.6 11.34 80 51.4 11.11 100 68.0 11.34 100 47.2 11.13 200 50.9 11.34 200 38.7 11.13 Fuel Economy with A/C Off 1 Cold Start Charge Depleting 2 : Fuel Economy: 119.7 MPG AC kWh Consumed 7 : 0.282 kWh/mi Charge Depleting

120

Assessing the Effect of Timing of Availability for Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Largest Oil and Gas Pools in the Alberta Basin: Description of Data and Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from large stationary sources and storage in geological media is a technologically-feasible mitigation measure for the reduction of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere in response to climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO2) can be sequestered underground in oil and gas reservoirs, in deep saline aquifers, in uneconomic coal beds and in salt caverns. The Alberta Basin provides a very large capacity for CO2 storage in oil and gas reservoirs, along with significant capacity in deep saline formations and possible unmineable coal beds. Regional assessments of potential geological CO2 storage capacity have largely focused so far on estimating the total capacity that might be available within each type of reservoir. While deep saline formations are effectively able to accept CO2 immediately, the storage potential of other classes of candidate storage reservoirs, primarily oil and gas fields, is not fully available at present time. Capacity estimates to date have largely overlooked rates of depletion in these types of storage reservoirs and typically report the total estimated storage capacity that will be available upon depletion. However, CO2 storage will not (and cannot economically) begin until the recoverable oil and gas have been produced via traditional means. This report describes a reevaluation of the CO2 storage capacity and an assessment of the timing of availability of the oil and gas pools in the Alberta Basin with very large storage capacity (>5 MtCO2 each) that are being looked at as likely targets for early implementation of CO2 storage in the region. Over 36,000 non-commingled (i.e., single) oil and gas pools were examined with effective CO2 storage capacities being individually estimated. For each pool, the life expectancy was estimated based on a combination of production decline analysis constrained by the remaining recoverable reserves and an assessment of economic viability, yielding an estimated depletion date, or year that it will be available for CO2 storage. The modeling framework and assumptions used to assess the impact of the timing of CO2 storage resource availability on the region’s deployment of CCS technologies is also described. The purpose of this report is to describe the data and methodology for examining the carbon dioxide (CO2) storage capacity resource of a major hydrocarbon province incorporating estimated depletion dates for its oil and gas fields with the largest CO2 storage capacity. This allows the development of a projected timeline for CO2 storage availability across the basin and enables a more realistic examination of potential oil and gas field CO2 storage utilization by the region’s large CO2 point sources. The Alberta Basin of western Canada was selected for this initial examination as a representative mature basin, and the development of capacity and depletion date estimates for the 227 largest oil and gas pools (with a total storage capacity of 4.7 GtCO2) is described, along with the impact on source-reservoir pairing and resulting CO2 transport and storage economics. The analysis indicates that timing of storage resource availability has a significant impact on the mix of storage reservoirs selected for utilization at a given time, and further confirms the value that all available reservoir types offer, providing important insights regarding CO2 storage implementation to this and other major oil and gas basins throughout North America and the rest of the world. For CCS technologies to deploy successfully and offer a meaningful contribution to climate change mitigation, CO2 storage reservoirs must be available not only where needed (preferably co-located with or near large concentrations of CO2 sources or emissions centers) but also when needed. The timing of CO2 storage resource availability is therefore an important factor to consider when assessing the real opportunities for CCS deployment in a given region.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Bachu, Stefan

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Development of high through-put Sr isotope analysis for monitoring reservoir integrity for CO{sub 2} storage.  

SciTech Connect

Recent innovations in multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have allowed for rapid and precise measurements of isotope ratios in geological samples. Naturally occurring Sr isotopes has the potential for use in Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) associated with geologic CO2 storage. Sr isotopes can be useful for: Sensitive tracking of brine migration; Determining seal rock leakage; Studying fluid/rock reactions. We have optimized separation chemistry procedures that will allow operators to prepare samples for Sr isotope analysis off site using rapid, low cost methods.

Wall, Andy; Jain, Jinesh; Stewart, Brian; Capo, Rosemary; Hakala, Alexandra J.; Hammack, Richard; Guthrie, George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB GeologicPilot Test  

SciTech Connect

WESTCARB, one of seven U.S. Department of Energypartnerships, identified (during its Phase I study) over 600 gigatonnesof CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations located in the Westernregion. The Western region includes the WESTCARB partnership states ofAlaska, Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington and theCanadian province of British Columbia. The WESTCARB Phase II study iscurrently under way, featuring three geologic and two terrestrial CO2pilot projects designed to test promising sequestration technologies atsites broadly representative of the region's largest potential carbonsinks. This paper focuses on two of the geologic pilot studies plannedfor Phase II -referred to-collectively as the Rosetta-Calpine CO2 StorageProject. The first pilot test will demonstrate injection of CO2 into asaline formation beneath a depleted gas reservoir. The second test willgather data for assessing CO2 enhanced gas recovery (EGR) as well asstorage in a depleted gas reservoir. The benefit of enhanced oil recovery(EOR) using injected CO2 to drive or sweep oil from the reservoir towarda production well is well known. EaR involves a similar CO2 injectionprocess, but has received far less attention. Depleted natural gasreservoirs still contain methane; therefore, CO2 injection may enhancemethane production by reservoir repressurization or pressure maintenance.CO2 injection into a saline formation, followed by injection into adepleted natural gas reservoir, is currently scheduled to start inOctober 2006.

Trautz, Robert; Benson, Sally; Myer, Larry; Oldenburg, Curtis; Seeman, Ed; Hadsell, Eric; Funderburk, Ben

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unminable coalformations, including oil and gas reservoirs and deep salineGCS consist mainly of oil and gas reservoirs and deep saline

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Health Risks Associated with Disposal of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Disposal of Depleted Uranium A discussion of risks associated with disposal...

125

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Printer-Friendly Version Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and maintenance costs, deliverability rates, and cycling capability), which govern its suitability to particular applications. Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be withdrawn-its deliverability rate (see Storage Measures, below, for key definitions).

126

CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage and Sink Enhancements: Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics Richard G. Rhudy (rrhudy@epri.com; 650-855-2421) Electric Power Research Institute P.O. Box 10412 Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 Bert R. Bock (brbock@tva.gov; 256-386-3095) David E. Nichols (denichols@tva.gov; 256-386-2489) Tennessee Valley Authority P.O. Box 1010 Muscle Shoals, AL 35662-1010 Abstract One of the major difficulties in evaluating CO 2 sequestration technologies and practices, both geologic storage of captured CO 2 and storage in biological sinks, is obtaining consistent, transparent, accurate, and comparable economics. This paper reports on a project that compares the economics of major technologies and practices under development for CO 2 sequestration, including captured CO 2 storage options, such as active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas

127

Carbon Storage R&D | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Carbon Capture and Storage Capture Storage Utilization MVA Regional Partnerships Oil & Gas Carbon dioxide storage in geologic formations includes oil and gas reservoirs,...

128

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OFFICE OF DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE MANAGEMENT Issuance Of Final Report On Preconceptual Designs For Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants The Department of Energy...

129

Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poly DU Poly DU Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium Technology Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed preliminary work to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating DU in low density polyethylene to form a stable, dense product. DU loadings as high as 90 wt% were achieved. A maximum product density of 4.2 g/cm3 was achieved using UO3, but increased product density using UO2 is estimated at 6.1 g/cm3. Additional product density improvements up to about 7.2 g/cm3 were projected using DU aggregate in a hybrid technique known as micro/macroencapsulation.[1] A U.S. patent for this process has been received.[2] Figure 1 Figure 1: DU Encapsulated in polyethylene samples produced at BNL containing 80 wt % depleted UO3 A recent DU market study by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. for DOE thoroughly identified and rated potential applications and markets for DU metal and oxide materials.[3] Because of its workability and high DU loading capability, the polyethylene encapsulated DU could readily be fabricated as counterweights/ballast (for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships and missiles), flywheels, armor, and projectiles. Also, polyethylene encapsulated DU is an effective shielding material for both gamma and neutron radiation, with potential application for shielding high activity waste (e.g., ion exchange resins, glass gems), spent fuel dry storage casks, and high energy experimental facilities (e.g., accelerator targets) to reduce radiation exposures to workers and the public.

130

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and

131

Overview of geologic storage of natural gas with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of storing hydrogen.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many regions across the nation geologic formations are currently being used to store natural gas underground. Storage options are dictated by the regional geology and the operational need. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in understanding theses various geologic storage options, the advantages and disadvantages, in the hopes of developing an underground facility for the storage of hydrogen as a low cost storage option, as part of the hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Currently, depleted gas/oil reservoirs, aquifers, and salt caverns are the three main types of underground natural gas storage in use today. The other storage options available currently and in the near future, such as abandoned coal mines, lined hard rock caverns, and refrigerated mined caverns, will become more popular as the demand for natural gas storage grows, especially in regions were depleted reservoirs, aquifers, and salt deposits are not available. The storage of hydrogen within the same type of facilities, currently used for natural gas, may add new operational challenges to the existing cavern storage industry, such as the loss of hydrogen through chemical reactions and the occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement. Currently there are only three locations worldwide, two of which are in the United States, which store hydrogen. All three sites store hydrogen within salt caverns.

Lord, Anna Snider

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

133

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual Report, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The work reported herein covers select tasks remaining in Budget Phase I and many of the tasks of Budget Phase II. The principal Tasks in Budget Phase I included in this report are Reservoir Analysis and Characterization; Advanced Technical Studies; and Technology Transfer, Reporting and Project Management Activities for Budget Phase I. The principle Task in Budget Phase II included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of these tasks has enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection scheduled for start-up in mid-July, 1996. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} texture. The {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non-reservoir rock.

Chimahusky, J.S.; Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

EOS7C Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen in Natural Gas (Methane) Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy&Fuels ,2 as a cushion gas for natural gas storage can be found inin natural gas reservoirs and gas storage reservoirs (

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Moridis, George J.; Spycher, Nicholas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

FAQ 23-How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium hexafluoride -- is stored in the United States? In addition to the depleted uranium stored...

137

A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the middle Capay Shale (depleted gas) and McCormick Sand (depleted gas reservoir located within the Middle Capay shaleCO 2 gas will occur in the 2-3 m thick Capay Shale interval

Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Irrigation Depletions 1928-1989 : 1990 Level of Irrigation, Snake Yakima and Deschutes River Basins.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The vast amount of irrigation in relation to the available water and extensive system of reservoirs located in the Snake River Basin above Brownlee reservoir precludes this area from using methods such as Blaney-Criddle for estimating irrigation depletions. Also the hydrology, irrigation growth patterns, and water supply problems are unique and complex. Therefore regulation studies were utilized to reflect the net effect on streamflow of the changes in irrigated acreage in terms of corresponding changes in storage regulation and in the amount of water depleted and diverted from and returned to the river system. The regulation study for 1990 conditions was conducted by the Idaho Department of Water Resources. The end product of the basin simulation is 61 years of regulated flows at various points in the river system that are based on 1990 conditions. Data used by the Idaho Department of Water Resources is presented in this section and includes natural gains to the river system and diversions from the river system based on a 1990 level of development and operation criteria. Additional information can be obtained for an Idaho Department of Water Resources Open-File Report ``Stream Flows in the Snake River Basin 1989 Conditions of Use and Management`` dated June 1991. Similar considerations apply to the Yakima and Deschutes river basins.

United States. Bonneville Power Administation; A.G. Crook Company

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Microsoft Word - CCS Geologic Storage-Intro_2011l.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Geologic carbon sequestration involves the storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep underground geologic formations. The majority of geologic formations considered for CO 2 storage, deep saline or depleted oil and gas reservoirs, are layers of subsurface porous rock that are overlain by a layer or multiple layers of low-permeability rock. Under high pressures, CO 2 is a supercritical fluid, with the high- density characteristics of a liquid but behaves like a gas by filling all available volume. Coal seams are also a viable option for geologic storage. When CO 2 is injected into a coal formation it is adsorbed onto the coal surfaces and methane gas is released and produced in adjacent wells. NETL's Core R&D research is focused on developing the ability to characterize a geologic formation

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141

Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 1999-2012 Alabama 11,000 11,000 11,000 11,000 13,500 13,500 1999-2012 Arkansas 22,000 22,000 21,760 21,760 21,359 21,853 1999-2012 California 487,711 498,705 513,005 542,511 570,511 592,411 1999-2012 Colorado 98,068 95,068 105,768 105,768 105,858 124,253 1999-2012 Illinois 103,731 103,606 103,606 218,106 220,070 220,070 1999-2012 Indiana 32,804 32,946 32,946 30,003 30,003 30,003 1999-2012 Iowa 0 1999-2012 Kansas 287,996 281,291 281,370 283,891 283,800 283,974 1999-2012 Kentucky 210,792 210,792 210,801 212,184 212,184 212,184 1999-2012 Louisiana 527,051 527,051 528,626 528,626 528,626 402,626 1999-2012 Maryland 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1999-2012

142

Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Existing fields ...

143

Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon dioxide a year under fully operational conditions in 2006, the multiple-partner Teapot Dome project could be one of the world's largest CO2 storage sites. CO2 injection has been used for decades to improve oil recovery from depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the CO2 sequestration technique, the aim is to "co-optimize" CO2 storage and oil recovery. In order to achieve the goal of CO2 sequestration, this study uses reservoir simulation to predict the amount of CO2 that can be stored in the Tensleep Formation and the amount of oil that can be produced as a side benefit of CO2 injection. This research discusses the effects of using different reservoir fluid models from EOS regression and fracture permeability in dual porosity models on enhanced oil recovery and CO2 storage in the Tensleep Formation. Oil and gas production behavior obtained from the fluid models were completely different. Fully compositional and pseudo-miscible black oil fluid models were tested in a quarter of a five spot pattern. Compositional fluid model is more convenient for enhanced oil recovery evaluation. Detailed reservoir characterization was performed to represent the complex characteristics of the reservoir. A 3D black oil reservoir simulation model was used to evaluate the effects of fractures in reservoir fluids production. Single porosity simulation model results were compared with those from the dual porosity model. Based on the results obtained from each simulation model, it has been concluded that the pseudo-miscible model can not be used to represent the CO2 injection process in Teapot Dome. Dual porosity models with variable fracture permeability provided a better reproduction of oil and water rates in the highly fractured Tensleep Formation.

Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulation methods are used to study how the exploitation of different horizons affects the behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir. The reservoir model is a schematic representation of the Olkaria field in Kenya. The model consists of a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlying the main liquid dominated reservoir. Four different cases were studied, with fluid produced from: 1) the vapor zone only, 2) the liquid zone only, 3) both zones and 4) both zones, but assuming lower values for vertical permeability and porosity. The results indicate that production from the shallow two-phase zone, although resulting in higher enthalpy fluids, may not be advantageous in the long run. Shallow production gives rise to a rather localized depletion of the reservoir, whereas production from deeper horizons may yield a more uniform depletion proces, if vertical permeability is sufficiently large.

Boedvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.; Bjoernsson, S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

FAQ 18-What does a cylinder storage yard look like?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cylinder storage yard look like? What does a cylinder storage yard look like? Pictures of depleted UF6 cylinder storage yards are shown below. Storage yards are large outdoor areas...

146

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: The Role of Injection-Induced Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at In Salah CO2 Storage Project: Status ReportQuarter end, June 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Salah Gas Project (ISG), a joint venture (JV) of BP, Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro, has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 bcfy natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian Central Sahara, and (2) successful minimization of the associated environmental footprint by capture and subsurface isolation of the excess CO{sub 2} extracted from production streams and subsurface isolation in the Krechba sandstone reservoir. The In Salah project provides an opportunity to study key physical and chemical processes in operational deployment of geological carbon sequestration. The objectives of the research are to study two components relevant to storage effectiveness and operational success at In Salah: Reactive chemistry of the brine-CO{sub 2}-reservoir-caprock-wellbore system, and the geomechanical effects of large-scale injection on crustal deformation and fault leakage hazards. Results from this work will enhance predictive capability of field performance, provide a new basis for interpretation of geophysical monitoring at In Salah, and provide additional information relevant to the creation of geological sequestration standards. The Joint Industry Partners (JIP: BP, StatoilHydro, Sonatrach) and LLNL will share data and results to achieve the objectives of the proposed work. The objective of the work performed at LLNL is to integrate LLNL core strengths in geochemistry and geomechanics to better understand and predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2} in the field. The mechanical, chemical and transport properties of the reservoir-caprock system are coupled. We are using LLNL-developed quantitative tools to assess the potential for CO{sub 2} migration/leakage caused by injection-induced deformation. The geomechanical work is focused upon fault activation, fluid induced fracturing of the caprock and permeability field evolution of the fractured reservoir. These results will be used in concert with reactive transport calculations to predict the ultimate fate of the CO{sub 2}. We will integrate laboratory and reactive transport modeling to assess CO{sub 2} plume migration and partitioning between different trapping mechanisms. Geochemical reactive transport modeling will be used to address multiphase flow (supercritical CO{sub 2} and water), CO{sub 2} dissolution, mineral sequestration, and porosity/permeability changes. The reactive transport portion of the work ultimately couples with geomechanical modeling. In particular, the distribution of the pressure perturbation induced by injection drives the geomechanical response. Subsequently, the geochemical work determines if water-rock interactions eventually enhance or suppress fractures. A key focus of this work is to establish the site specific interactions of geomechanics, reactive flow and transport. This involves building and refining models of the reservoir and overburden. The models will undergo continual refinement in response to data collected in the field and experiments performed at LLNL and elsewhere. This project commenced in FY08, with DOE funding starting in April, FY08. We have successfully initiated a cross-disciplinary study of the In Salah CO{sub 2} sequestration project and have met all FY08 and FY09 Q1, Q2 and Q3 milestones. During the reporting period, we continued to acquire and process data from the JIP to import into our own geomechanical and geochemical computational tools. The lab testing program continued using both locally formulated cements and field samples from Krechba. The geomechanical studies indicate that pore fluid pressures induced by injection will lead to significant permeability enhancement of the combination of fracture network and fault network within the reservoir in the vicinity of the injectors. We continued reactive transport calculations for CO{sub 2} rich fluids flowing through fractures. These calculations demonstrate that although porosity and permeability changes are expected in response to CO{sub 2} injection they are not anticipated to have a significant effect upon transport properties within the reservoir or c

Morris, J P; McNab, W W; Carroll, S K; Hao, Y; Foxall, W; Wagoner, J L

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the viscosity of crude oil systems, J. Pet. Tech. (Sep. ),gases released from the BP oil well blowout, Natureof reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Battery depletion monitor  

SciTech Connect

A cmos inverter is used to compare pacemaker battery voltage to a referenced voltage. When the reference voltage exceeds the measured battery voltage, the inverter changes state to indicate battery depletion.

Lee, Y.S.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

Depleted uranium valuation  

SciTech Connect

The following uses for depleted uranium were examined to determine its value: a substitute for lead in shielding applications, feed material in gaseous diffusion enrichment facilities, feed material for an advanced enrichment concept, Mixed Oxide (MOx) diluent and blanket material in LMFBRs, and fertile material in LMFBR systems. A range of depleted uranium values was calculated for each of these applications. The sensitivity of these values to analysis assumptions is discussed. 9 tables.

Lewallen, M.A.; White, M.K.; Jenquin, U.P.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY  

SciTech Connect

DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

R.E. Rogers

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

152

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Full-field simulation for development planning and reservoir management at Kuparuk River field  

SciTech Connect

The Kuparuk River oil field on the Alaskan North Slope produces from two stratigraphically independent sands of the Kuparuk River formation. A full-field reservoir model was constructed to support field management and development planning. The model captures essential aspects of two independent producing horizons, hydraulically coupled at the wellbores, and simulates dynamic interactions between the reservoir stands and surface facilities. This paper reports that the field model is used to plan field development on the basis of performance ranking of drillsite expansions, to assess depletion performance effects of reservoir management strategies, and to evaluate alternative depletion processes and associated reservoir and facility interactions of field projects.

Starley, G.P.; Masino, W.H. Jr.; Weiss, J.L.; Bolling, J.D. (Arco Alaska Inc. (US))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Elastic and elastoplastic finite element simulations of injection into porous reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground gas injection has attracted remarkable attention for natural gas storage and carbon dioxide (CO2) geologic sequestration applications. Injection of natural gas into depleted hydrocarbon… (more)

Chamani, Amin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Video: The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Story  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Story The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Story An overview of Uranium, its isotopes, the need and history of diffusive separation, the handling of the Depleted Uranium...

159

Structural Reliability: Assessing the Condition and Reliability of Casing in Compacting Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Casing has a higher risk of failure in a compacting reservoir than in a typical reservoir. Casing fails when reservoir compaction induces compression and shear stresses onto it. They compact as reservoir pressure depletes during production. High compaction reservoirs typically are composed of unconsolidated, overpressured rocks such as chalk, diatomite, and sandstone. Pore pressure depletion increases effective stress, which is the rock matrix stress pushing upward against overburden pressure. Effective stress may exceed rock compressive strength, inducing compaction. Wells in compacting reservoirs risk high failure and deformation rates. This project introduces the concept of structural reliability to quantify casing failure risks in compacting reservoirs. This research developed probabilistic models for casing capacities using current design methods and a reservoir compaction load using finite-element model simulations. Probabilistic models were used in creating two limit-states functions to predict casing failure: axial yielding and buckling failures. A limit-state function describes the casing condition as the casing experiences a reservoir compaction load. The limit state function is the input in component and system analyses for casing fragility and conditional probability of casing failure. Fragilities can predict casing probability of failure as reservoir pressure is depleting. Sensitivity and importance analyses are also performed to determine the importance of parameters affecting the casing reliability. Applying the knowledge produced from this research to casing design methods can improve design reliabilities and forecast the risk of casing failure in compacting reservoirs.

Chantose, Prasongsit

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a simple 3D compositional reservoir simulation study to examine the possibility of waterflooding the Soku E7 gas-condensate reservoir. This study shows that water injection results in higher condensate recovery than natural depletion. To achieve this recovery, the reservoir should return to natural depletion after four years of water injection, before water invades the producing wells. Factors that affect the effectiveness of water injection in this reservoir include aquifer strength, reservoir property distribution, timing of the start of injection, and intra-reservoir shale thickness and continuity. Sensitivity analyses used to quantify the effects of these factors on condensate recovery indicate the need to acquire more production, pressure and log data to reduce the present large uncertainty on aquifer strength before proceeding on waterflooding this reservoir. The study also shows that the injection scheme should be implemented as soon as possible to avoid further loss of condensate recovery. The result of this study is applicable to other gas condensate reservoirs in the Niger delta with similar depositional environments.

Ajayi, Arashi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

162

How safe is CO2 storage? Natural analogues for CO2 storage sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How safe is CO2 storage? Natural analogues for CO2 storage sites Johannes Miocic, Stuart Gilfillan. Introduction Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only technology available to reduce greenhouse gas and analysed a global dataset of natural CO2 reservoirs as analogues for CO2 storage sites. Initial results

163

Modeling of reservoir compaction and surface subsidence at South Belridge  

SciTech Connect

Finite-element models of depletion-induced reservoir compaction and surface subsidence have been calibrated with observed subsidence, locations of surface fissures, and regions of subsurface casing damage at South Belridge and used predictively for the evaluation of alternative reservoir-development plans. Pressure maintenance through diatomite waterflooding appears to be a beneficial means of minimizing additional subsidence and fissuring as well as reducing axial-compressive-type casing damage.

Hansen, K.S. [Shell Western E and P Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Chan, C.K. [Shell Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States); Prats, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for DUF 6 Conversion Project Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Meetings November/December 2001 Overview Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 2 DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart EM-10 Policy EM-40 Project Completion EM-20 Integration EM-50 Science and Technology EM-31 Ohio DUF6 Management Program EM-32 Oak Ridge EM-33 Rocky Flats EM-34 Small Sites EM-30 Office of Site Closure Office of Environmental Management EM-1 DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 3 DUF 6 Management Program DUF 6 Management Program * Mission: Safely and efficiently manage the DOE inventory of DUF 6 in a way that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, and protects the environment DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 4 DUF 6 Inventory Distribution

165

Prediction of reservoir compaction and surface subsidence  

SciTech Connect

A new loading-rate-dependent compaction model for unconsolidated clastic reservoirs is presented that considerably improves the accuracy of predicting reservoir rock compaction and surface subsidence resulting from pressure depletion in oil and gas fields. The model has been developed on the basis of extensive laboratory studies and can be derived from a theory relating compaction to time-dependent intergranular friction. The procedure for calculating reservoir compaction from laboratory measurements with the new model is outlined. Both field and laboratory compaction behaviors appear to be described by one single normalized, nonlinear compaction curve. With the new model, the large discrepancies usually observed between predictions based on linear compaction models and actual (nonlinear) field behavior can be explained.

De Waal, J.A.; Smits, R.M.M.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

MONTHLY UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE REPORT FORM EIA-191M ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Page 2 DEFINITIONS Base (Cushion) Gas: The volume of gas needed as a permanent inventory to maintain adequate storage reservoir pressures and deliverability rates.

167

INJECTING CARBON DIOXIDE INTO UNCONVENTIONAL STORAGE RESERVOIRS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CBM wells over a one-year period Perform a small Huff and Puff test in a Devonian shale gas well Duration: 4 years (October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2015) Research...

168

Health Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Conversion A discussion of health risks associated with conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form. General Health Risks of Conversion The potential environmental impacts, including potential health risks, associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This section discusses in general the types of health risks associated with the conversion process. The conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form will be done in an industrial facility dedicated to the conversion process. Conversion will involve the handling of depleted UF6 cylinders. Hazardous chemicals, such

169

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Depleted UF6 Overview Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information network Web Site. The presentation covers the following topics: The uranium mining and enrichment processes - how depleted UF6 is created, How and where...

171

Status of Norris Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rock compressibility, compaction, and subsidence in a high-porosity Chalk Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

A case study of the North Sea Valhall chalk reservoir demonstrates the significant impact that rock compressibility can have on field performance. Porosity reduction, reservoir interval compaction, and seabed subsidence have been observed in conjunction with reservoir pressure depletion. Full-diameter samples from a recently cut core of the unconsolidated high-porosity chalk were subjected to a series of uniaxial-strain experiments to determine compaction and PV compressibility. The laboratory measurements were corrected to field stress rates and pressure, and porosity-dependent rock-compressibility curves were developed. The uniaxial compaction data were used both in a reservoir model to recognize the significant additional reservoir energy resulting from the lithic drive of large-scale rock compaction and in a subsidence model to predict the impact of reservoir depletion on seabed displacements.

Ruddy, I. (Amoco Norway Oil Co. (US)); Andersen, M.A.; Pattillo, P.D.; Bishiawi, M. (Amoco Production Co., Tulsa, OK (USA)); Foged, N. (Danish Geotechnical Inst. (US))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Recovery Act: 'Carbonsheds' as a Framework for Optimizing United States Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale  

SciTech Connect

Carbonsheds are regions in which the estimated cost of transporting CO{sub 2} from any (plant) location in the region to the storage site it encompasses is cheaper than piping the CO{sub 2} to a storage site outside the region. We use carbonsheds to analyze the cost of transport and storage of CO{sub 2} in deploying CCS on land and offshore of the continental U.S. We find that onshore the average cost of transport and storage within carbonsheds is roughly $10/t when sources cooperate to reduce transport costs, with the costs increasing as storage options are depleted over time. Offshore transport and storage costs by comparison are found to be roughly twice as expensive but t may still be attractive because of easier access to property rights for sub-seafloor storage as well as a simpler regulatory system, and possibly lower MMV requirements, at least in the deep-ocean where pressures and temperatures would keep the CO{sub 2} negatively buoyant. Agent-based modeling of CCS deployment within carbonsheds under various policy scenarios suggests that the most cost-effective strategy at this point in time is to focus detailed geology characterization of storage potential on only the largest onshore reservoirs where the potential for mitigating emissions is greatest and the cost of storage appears that it will be among the cheapest.

Pratson, Lincoln

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

FAQ 40-What are the potential environmental impacts from storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental impacts from storage of depleted uranium as an oxide? Storage as an oxide could result in potential adverse impacts to air, water, and soil quality as a result of...

175

FAQ 19-Is storage of uranium hexafluoride safe?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

storage of uranium hexafluoride safe? Is storage of uranium hexafluoride safe? The advanced age of some of the steel cylinders in which the depleted UF6 is contained, and the way...

176

News Media Exits for Depleted Uranium and Depleted UF6 Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

line line Archived News and Events News Media Links News Media Exits for Depleted Uranium and Depleted UF6 Articles Online editions of newspapers that cover Depleted Uranium...

177

Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

most of which from natural gas storage and groundwaterconducted in the Hudson natural gas storage field in 1969 (storage of carbon dioxide in unused aquifers and in depleted natural gas

Birkholzer, J.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Status of Wheeler Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal  

SciTech Connect

During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete. Another possibility could be the use of depleted uranium for the blending of High enriched Uranium (HEU) or with Plutonium to MOX-elements. (authors)

Moeller, Kai D. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BFS, Postfach 10 01 49, D-38201 Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs Hydrothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hydrothermal Reservoirs Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Reservoir: Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Natural, shallow hydrothermal reservoirs naturally occurring hot water reservoirs, typically found at depths of less than 5 km below the Earth's surface where there is heat, water and a permeable material (permeability in rock formations results from fractures, joints, pores, etc.). Often, hydrothermal reservoirs have an overlying layer that bounds the reservoir and also serves as a thermal insulator, allowing greater heat retention. If hydrothermal reservoirs

183

Depleted UF6 Internet Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUF6 Guide DU Uses DUF6 Management and Uses DUF6 Conversion EIS Documents News FAQs Internet Resources Glossary Home Internet Resources Depleted UF6 Internet Resources Links...

184

Depleted UF6 Health Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(depleted UF6) is released to the atmosphere, the uranium compounds and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gas that are formed by reaction with moisture in the air can be chemically...

185

Depleted Uranium (DU) Dioxide Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fill Depleted Uranium (DU) Dioxide Fill DU dioxide in the form of sand may be used to fill the void spaces in the waste package after the package is loaded with SNF. This...

186

FAQ 6-What is depleted uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium? What is depleted uranium? Depleted uranium is created during the processing that is done to make natural uranium suitable for use as fuel in nuclear power plants...

187

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

188

Field Demonstration of Horizontal Infill Drilling Using Cost-effective Integrated Reservoir Modeling--Mississippian Carbonates, Central Kansas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mississippian carbonate reservoirs have produced in excess of 1 billion barrels of oil in Kansas accounting for over 16% of the state's production. With declining production from other age reservoirs, the contribution of Mississippian reservoirs to Kansas's oil production has risen to 43% as of 2004. However, solution-enhanced features such as vertical shale intervals extending from the karst erosional surface at the top introduce complexities/compartmentalizations in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs. Coupled with this, strong water drives charge many of these reservoirs resulting in limited drainage from vertical wells due to high water cuts after an initial period of low water production. Moreover, most of these fields are operated by small independent operators without access to the knowledge bank of modern research in field characterization and exploitation/development practices. Thus, despite increasing importance of Mississippian fields to Kansas production, these fields are beset with low recovery factors and high abandonment rates leaving significant resources in the ground. Worldwide, horizontal infill wells have been successful in draining compartmentalized reservoirs with limited pressure depletion. The intent of this project was to demonstrate the application of horizontal wells to successfully exploit the remaining potential in mature Mississippian fields of the mid-continent. However, it is of critical importance that for horizontal wells to be economically successful, they must be selectively targeted. This project demonstrated the application of initial and secondary screening methods, based on publicly available data, to quickly shortlist fields in a target area for detailed studies to evaluate their potential to infill horizontal well applications. Advanced decline curve analyses were used to estimate missing well-level production data and to verify if the well produced under unchanging bottom-hole conditions--two commonly occurring data constraints afflicting mature Mississippian fields. A publicly accessible databank of representative petrophysical properties and relationships was developed to overcome the paucity of such data that is critical to modeling the storage and flow in these reservoirs. Studies in 3 Mississippian fields demonstrated that traditional reservoir models built by integrating log, core, DST, and production data from existing wells on 40-acre spacings are unable to delineate karst-induced compartments, thus making 3D-seismic data critical to characterize these fields. Special attribute analyses on 3D data were shown to delineate reservoir compartments and predict those with pay porosities. Further testing of these techniques is required to validate their applicability in other Mississippian reservoirs. This study shows that detailed reservoir characterization and simulation on geomodels developed by integrating wireline log, core, petrophysical, production and pressure, and 3D-seismic data enables better evaluation of a candidate field for horizontal infill applications. In addition to reservoir compartmentalization, two factors were found to control the economic viability of a horizontal infill well in a mature Mississippian field: (a) adequate reservoir pressure support, and (b) an average well spacing greater than 40-acres.

Saibal Bhattacharya

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Research to understand and predict geopressured reservoir characteristics with confidence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geopressured Geothermal Program has sponsored a series of geoscience studies to resolve key uncertainties in the performance of geopressured reservoirs. The priority areas for research include improving the ability to predict reservoir size and flow capabilities, understanding the role of oil and gas in reservoir depletion and evaluating mechanisms for reservoir pressure maintenance. Long-term production from the Gladys McCall well has provided the basis for most of the current research efforts. The well was shut-in on October 29, 1987, for pressure recovery after producing over 27 million barrels of brine with associated gas. Geologic investigations are evaluating various mechanisms for pressure maintenance in this reservoir, including recharge from adjacent reservoirs or along growth faults, shale dewatering, and laterally overlapping and connected sandstone layers. Compaction studies using shale and sandstone core samples have provided data on the relationship between rock compression and reservoir pressure decline and the correlation to changes in porosity and permeability. The studies support the use of a porosity-coupled reservoir simulation model which has provided an excellent match to the well's production history. 10 refs., 3 figs.

Stiger, S.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Environmental Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Conversion A general discussion of the potential environmental impacts associated with depleted UF6 conversion activities. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The potential environmental impacts associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This page discusses in general the types of impacts that might be associated with the conversion process based on the PEIS analysis. The PEIS evaluated the potential environmental impacts for representative conversion facilities. Conversion to uranium oxide and uranium metal were considered. Potential impacts were evaluated for a representative site, and

191

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

CO{sub 2} Injectivity, Storage Capacity, Plume Size, and Reservoir and Seal Integrity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone and the Cambrian Potosi Formation in the Illnois Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins underlie most of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan. This interval also extends through much of the Midwest of the United States and, for some areas, may be the only available target for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We evaluated the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the basal Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir for sequestration potential. The two targets were the Cambrian carbonate intervals in the Knox and the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of these two formations was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the USDOE-funded Illinois Basin â?? Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. Interpretations were completed using log analysis software, a reservoir flow simulator, and a finite element solver that determines rock stress and strain changes resulting from the pressure increase associated with CO{sub 2} injection. Results of this research suggest that both the St. Peter Sandstone and the Potosi Dolomite (a formation of the Knox) reservoirs may be capable of storing up to 2 million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for a 20-year period. Reservoir simulation results for the St. Peter indicate good injectivity and a relatively small CO{sub 2} plume. While a single St. Peter well is not likely to achieve the targeted injection rate of 2 million tonnes/year, results of this study indicate that development with three or four appropriately spaced wells may be sufficient. Reservoir simulation of the Potosi suggest that much of the CO{sub 2} flows into and through relatively thin, high permeability intervals, resulting in a large plume diameter compared with the St. Peter.

Hannes Leetaru; Alan Brown; Donald Lee; Ozgur Senel; Marcia Coueslan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Geothermal reservoir technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A status report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Reservoir Technology projects under DOE's Hydrothermal Research Subprogram is presented. During FY 1985 significant accomplishments were made in developing and evaluating methods for (1) describing geothermal systems and processes; (2) predicting reservoir changes; (3) mapping faults and fractures; and (4) field data analysis. In addition, LBL assisted DOE in establishing the research needs of the geothermal industry in the area of Reservoir Technology. 15 refs., 5 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

FAQ 26-Are there any uses for depleted uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uses for depleted uranium? Are there any uses for depleted uranium? Several current and potential uses exist for depleted uranium. Depleted uranium could be mixed with highly...

195

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer modeling systems that simulate the storage, flow, and diversion of water in a system of reservoirs and river reaches. Generalized means that a computer modeling system is designed for application to a range of concerns dealing with river basin systems of various configurations and locations, rather than being site-specific customized to a particular system. User-oriented implies the modeling system is designed for use by professional practitioners (model-users) other than the original model developers and is thoroughly tested and well documented. User-oriented generalized modeling systems should be convenient to obtain, understand, and use and should work correctly, completely, and efficiently. Modeling applications often involve a system of several simulation models, utility software products, and databases used in combination. A reservoir/river system model is itself a modeling system, which often serves as a component of a larger modeling system that may include watershed hydrology and river hydraulics models, water quality models, databases and various software tools for managing time series, spatial, and other types of data. Reservoir/river system models are based on volume-balance accounting procedures for tracking the movement of water through a system of reservoirs and river reaches. The model computes reservoir storage contents, evaporation, water supply withdrawals, hydroelectric energy generation, and river flows for specified system operating rules and input sequences of stream inflows and net evaporation rates. The hydrologic period-of-analysis and computational time step may vary greatly depending on the application. Storage and flow hydrograph ordinates for a flood event occurring over a few days may be determined at intervals of an hour or less. Water supply capabilities may be modeled with a monthly time step and several decade long period-of-analysis capturing the full range of fluctuating wet and dry periods including extended drought. Stream inflows are usually generated outside of the reservoir/river system model and provided as input to the model. However, reservoir/river system models may also include capabilities for modeling watershed precipitation-runoff processes to generate inflows to the river/reservoir system. Some reservoir/river system models simulate water quality constituents along with water quantities. Some models include features for economic evaluation of system performance based on cost and benefit functions expressed as a function of flow and storage.

Wurbs, Ralph A.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research developed a numerical simulation based on the latest reservoir description to evaluate the feasibility of new infill wells to maximize the recovery specifically in the eastern region of the reservoir operated by Petroleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA). This research provides a full-field numerical simulation that predicts performance and aids in planning future development with infill wells for a reservoir located at the south of Block V, Lamar in Lake Maracaibo. The simulation is especially promising for the eastern region, which has the current highest oil production behavior. The final model achieved an acceptable history match for pressure and fluids for the entire reservoir, especially for the eastern area. On the basis of this model and an opportunity index, the best six infill wells should be located in the eastern area of the reservoir, which would increased the cumulated production in 44.5 MMSTB. This work is important because it provides the first numerical simulation for the entire reservoir that considers the new geological model developed during reservoir description. Furthermore, it provides PDVSA with a powerful tool for planning and reservoir management decisions, especially in the eastern area of the reservoir. Predictions resulting from this area show an important increment in the final reservoir recovery over the base case, production depletion under current conditions without any change. On the basis of these results, I strongly recommend starting a new infill drilling campaign in the eastern area as indicated by the simulation results to increase the oil rate reservoir productions and to improve total ultimate recovery.

Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Depleted UF6 Management Program Overview Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Management Program Overview Presentation Cylinders Photo Next Screen A Legacy of Uranium Enrichment...

199

Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis integrated geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering data to build a detailed reservoir characterization models for three gas pay sands in the Grand Isle 33 & 43 fields, offshore Louisiana. The reservoirs are Late Miocene in age and include the upper (PM), middle (QH), and lower (RD) sands. The reservoir models address the stratigraphy of the upper (PM) sand and help delineate the lower (RD) reservoir. In addition, this research addresses the partially depleted QH-2 reservoir compartment. The detailed models were constructed by integrating seismic, well log, and production data. These detailed models can help locate recoverable oil and gas that has been left behind. The upper PM model further delineated that the PM sand has several areas that are shaled-out effectively creating a flow barrier within reservoir compartments. Due to the barrier in the PM-1 reservoir compartment, an area of potentially recoverable hydrocarbons remains. In Grand Isle 33, the middle QH sand was partially depleted in the QH-2 reservoir compartment by a series of development wells. Bottom hole pressure data from wells in Grand Isle 32 & 33 reveal that the two QH fault compartments are in communication across a leaking fault. Production wells in the QH-1 compartment produced reserves from the QH-2 compartment. The lower RD sand model helped further delineate the reservoir in the RD-2 compartment and show that this compartment has been depleted. The RD model also shows the possible presence of remaining recoverable hydrocarbons in the RD-1 compartment. It is estimated that about 6.7 billion cubic feet of gas might remain within this reservoir waiting to be recovered. A seismic amplitude anomaly response from the QH and RD sands is interpreted to be a lithologic indicator rather than the presence of hydrocarbons. Amplitude response from the PM level appears to be below the resolution of the seismic data. A synthetic seismogram model was generated to represent the PM and surrounding sands. This model shows that by increasing the frequency of the seismic data from 20 Hz to a dominant frequency of 30 Hz that the PM and surrounding sands could be seismically resolvable. Also the PM-1 compartment has possible recoverable hydrocarbons of 1.5 billion cubic feet of gas remaining.

Casey, Michael Chase

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Geysers reservoir studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LBL is conducting several research projects related to issues of interest to The Geysers operators, including those that deal with understanding the nature of vapor-dominated systems, measuring or inferring reservoir processes and parameters, and studying the effects of liquid injection. All of these topics are directly or indirectly relevant to the development of reservoir strategies aimed at stabilizing or increasing production rates of non-corrosive steam, low in non-condensable gases. Only reservoir engineering studies will be described here, since microearthquake and geochemical projects carried out by LBL or its contractors are discussed in accompanying papers. Three reservoir engineering studies will be described in some detail, that is: (a) Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs; (b) Numerical modeling studies of Geysers injection experiments; and (c) Development of a dual-porosity model to calculate mass flow between rock matrix blocks and neighboring fractures.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Pruess, K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Number of Existing Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

326 324 331 331 329 330 1999-2012 326 324 331 331 329 330 1999-2012 Alabama 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 Arkansas 2 2 2 2 2 2 1999-2012 California 12 12 13 13 13 14 1999-2012 Colorado 8 8 9 9 9 10 1999-2012 Illinois 11 10 10 11 11 11 1999-2012 Indiana 10 10 10 9 9 10 1999-2012 Kansas 18 18 18 18 18 18 1999-2012 Kentucky 20 20 20 20 20 20 1999-2012 Louisiana 8 8 8 8 8 7 1999-2012 Maryland 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 Michigan 43 43 43 43 43 43 1999-2012 Mississippi 5 5 6 6 6 6 1999-2012 Montana 5 5 5 5 5 5 1999-2012 Nebraska 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 New Mexico 2 2 2 2 2 2 1999-2012 New York 23 23 25 25 25 26 1999-2012 Ohio 24 24 24 24 24 24 1999-2012 Oklahoma 13 13 13 13 13 12 1999-2012 Oregon 7 7 7 7 7 7 1999-2012

202

West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2000's 733,125 497,995 494,457 510,827 512,143 512,377 513,416 536,702 528,442 531,456 2010's 531,480 524,324 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not Available; W...

203

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 13: 2000's: 13: 13: 13: 12: 12: 11: 11: 11: 10: 10: 2010's: 11: 11-

204

Reservoir description through pulse testing in a mature field  

SciTech Connect

Pulse testing was used in the Fortescue field to clarify reservoir geometries and fluid communication pathways. The high communication levels demonstrated in the test data required a nonstandard analysis of the pressure responses. In addition, proper attention to test planning, data acquisition, and data processing allowed valuable insights into reservoir limits. Most of the structural implications derived from the pulse tests have been supported subsequently by a recent 3D seismic survey of the area. The results and insights gained from these tests are being incorporated into a full-field simulation model of the Fortescue field, which is an integral part of a continuing depletion field study.

Braisted, D.M.; Spengler, R.M. (Esso Australia Ltd., Sydney (Australia)); Youie, R.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest ...

206

Best Practice Guidelines for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Geologic Storage Options, Site Evaluation, and Monitoring/Mitigatio n  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to set forth a set of "best practices" that support long-term, secure storage of captured carbon dioxide (CO2). For each of a suite of geologic storage options, the report establishes background and basic concepts, defines site selection criteria and procedures, and sets forth monitoring and mitigation options. The initial suite of geologic CO2 storage options to be addressed includes saline aquifers, depleted oil fields, depleted natural gas fields, and deep unmineable coal...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

207

Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

Kelkar, M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Underground-Energy-Storage Program, 1982 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two principal underground energy storage technologies are discussed--Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). The Underground Energy Storage Program objectives, approach, structure, and milestones are described, and technical activities and progress in the STES and CAES areas are summarized. STES activities include aquifer thermal energy storage technology studies and STES technology assessment and development. CAES activities include reservoir stability studies and second-generation concepts studies. (LEW)

Kannberg, L.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Reservoir and injection technology and Heat Extraction Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the Stanford Geothermal Program in the fiscal year 1989, the task areas include predictive modeling of reservoir behavior and tracer test interpretation and testing. Major emphasis is in reservoir technology, reinjection technology, and heat extraction. Predictive modeling of reservoir behavior consists of a multi-pronged approach to well test analysis under a variety of conditions. The efforts have been directed to designing and analyzing well tests in (1) naturally fractured reservoirs; (2) fractured wells; (3) complex reservoir geometries; and, (4) gas reservoirs including inertial and other effects. The analytical solutions for naturally fractured reservoirs are determined using fracture size distribution. In the study of fractured wells, an elliptical coordinate system is used to obtain semi-analytical solutions to finite conductivity fractures. Effort has also been directed to the modeling and creation of a user friendly computer program for steam/gas reservoirs including wellbore storage, skin and non-Darcy flow effects. This work has a complementary effort on modeling high flow rate wells including inertial effects in the wellbore and fractures. In addition, work on gravity drainage systems is being continued.

Horne, R.N.; Ramey, H.H. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the 60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site Summary This site-specific EIS analyzes the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; transportation of all cylinders (DUF6, enriched, and empty) currently stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Portsmouth; construction of a new cylinder storage yard at Portsmouth (if required) for ETTP cylinders; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride

211

Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

212

Geology and Reservoir Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service: 1-800-553-7681 Geology and Reservoir Simulation Background Natural gas from shale is becoming ever more recognized as an abundant and economically viable fuel in the...

213

Potential Uses of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM Robert R. Price U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20874 M. Jonathan Haire and Allen G. Croff Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 June 2000 For American Nuclear Society 2000 International Winter and Embedded Topical Meetings Washington, D.C. November 12B16, 2000 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________

214

Session: Reservoir Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

An Operation-Based Scheme for a Multiyear and Multipurpose Reservoir to Enhance Macroscale Hydrologic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops an operation-based numerical scheme for simulating storage in and outflow from a multiyear and multipurpose reservoir at a daily time step in order to enhance the simulation capacity of macroscale land surface hydrologic ...

Yiping Wu; Ji Chen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A study to assess the value of post-stack seismic amplitude data in forecasting fluid production from a Gulf-of-Mexico reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Gulf-of-Mexico reservoir Maika GambĂşs-Ordaz, Carlos Torres-VerdĂ­n The University of Texas in the Gulf of Mexico. The availability of measured time records of fluid production and pressure depletion

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

217

Method and apparatus for storage battery electrolyte circulation  

SciTech Connect

An electrolyte reservoir in fluid communication with the cell of a storage battery is intermittently pressurized with a pulse of compressed gas to cause a flow of electrolyte from the reservoir to the upper region of less dense electrolyte in the cell. Upon termination of the pressure pulse, more dense electrolyte is forced into the reservoir from the lower region of the cell by the differential pressure head between the cell and reservoir electrolyte levels. The compressed gas pulse is controlled to prevent the entry of gas from the reservoir into the cell.

Inkmann, Mark S. (Milwaukee, WI)

1980-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

218

Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DU Uses DU Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Research & Development A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore beneficial uses of depleted uranium (DU) and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6. A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore the safe, beneficial use of depleted uranium and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6 (e.g., fluorine and empty carbon steel cylinders) for the purposes of resource conservation and cost savings compared with disposal. This program explored the risks and benefits of several depleted uranium uses, including uses as a radiation shielding material, a catalyst, and a semi-conductor material in electronic devices.

219

The lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO[subscript 2] is captured at power plants and then injected underground into reservoirs like deep saline aquifers for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued ...

Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

220

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Reservoir engineering report for the magma-SDG and E geothermal experimental site near the Salton Sea, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir is given and includes approximate fault locations, geology (lithology), temperatures, and estimates of the extent of the reservoir. The reservoir's temperatures and chemical composition are also reviewed. The flow characteristics are discussed after analyses of drillstem tests and extended well tests. The field production, reserves and depletion are estimated, and the effects of fractures on flow and depletion are discussed. The reservoir is believed to be separated into an ''upper'' and ''lower'' portion by a relatively thick and continuous shale layer. The upper reservoir is highly porous, with high permeability and productivity. The lower reservoir is at least twice as large as the upper but has much lower storativity and permeability in the rock matrix. The lower reservoir may be highly fractured, and its temperatures and dissolved solids are greater than those of the upper reservoir. The proven reserves of heat in the upper reservoir are about /sup 1///sub 4/ GW.yr (in the fluid) and /sup 1///sub 3/ GW.yr (in the rock). In the lower reservoir the proven reserves of heat are 5/sup 3///sub 4/ GW.yr (in the fluid) and 17 GW.yr (in the rock). Unproven reserves greatly exceed these numbers. Injection tests following well completion imply that hydraulic fracturing has taken place in two of the SDG and E wells and at least one other well nearby.

Schroeder, R.C.

1976-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Building the Cost Curve for CO2 Storage: North American Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study has assessed geological storage opportunities both in on-shore USA and Canada. The Canadian component concentrated on the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin where the main storage potential for Canada is considered to exist. The CO2 storage options considered in the study included: Storage in depleted/disused oil and gas fields, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) combined with CO2 storage, Enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM) combined with CO2 storage, Storage in deep saline aquifers (open and cl...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermodynamic behaviour of simplified geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Starting from the basic laws of conservation of mass and energy, the differential equations that represent the thermodynamic behavior of a simplified geothermal reservoir are derived. Its application is limited to a reservoir of high permeability as it usually occurs in the central zone of a geothermal field. A very practical method to solve numerically the equations is presented, based on the direct use of the steam tables. The method, based in one general equation, is extended and illustrated with a numerical example to the case of segregated mass extraction, variable influx and heat exchange between rock and fluid. As it is explained, the method can be easily coupled to several influx models already developed somewhere else. The proposed model can become an important tool to solve practical problems, where like in Los Azufres Mexico, the geothermal field can be divided in an inner part where flashing occurs and an exterior field where storage of water plays the main role.

Hiriart, G.; Sanchez, E.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

Pruess, Karsten

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters June 15, 2012 - 6:00pm Addthis Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over its lifetime. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JulNichols. Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over its lifetime. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JulNichols. Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for the home. Here you'll find basic information about how storage water heaters work; what criteria to use when selecting the right model; and some installation, maintenance, and safety tips. How They Work A single-family storage water heater offers a ready reservoir -- from 20 to

226

Real natural gas reservoir data Vs. natural gas reservoir models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas reservoir per se model is an exceedingly simple model of a natural gas reservoir designed to develop the physical relationship between ultimate recovery and rate(s) of withdrawal for production regulation policy assessment. To be responsive, ...

Ellis A. Monash; John Lohrenz

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Transient pressure analysis in composite reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of fluid flow in a radially composite reservoir is discussed. Recently published was the most general analytic solution available thus far. That analytic solution is analyzed, and the results are presented. The solution is dependent upon the following dimensionless parameters (if well-bore storage and skin effect are neglected): (1) dimensionless time based on the discontinuity radius, (2) the dimensionless discontinuity radius, (3) the mobility ratio, and (4) the diffusivity ratio. The range of parameters used in generating the results include dimensionless radius time of 0.01 t

Tang, R.W.K.; Brigham, W.E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The practice of underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in the USA in 1916, provides useful insight into the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide--the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. In many ways, UNGS is directly relevant to geologic CO{sub 2} storage because, like CO{sub 2}, natural gas (essentially methane) is less dense than water. Consequently, it will tend to rise to the top of any subsurface storage structure located below the groundwater table. By the end of 2001 in the USA, about 142 million metric tons of natural gas were stored underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine aquifers. Based on their performance, UNGS projects have shown that there is a safe and effective way of storing large volumes of gases in the subsurface. In the small number of cases where failures did occur (i.e., leakage of the stored gas into neighboring permeable layers), they were mainly related to improper well design, construction, maintenance, and/or incorrect project operation. In spite of differences in the chemical and physical properties of the gases, the risk-assessment, risk-management, and risk-mitigation issues relevant to UNGS projects are also pertinent to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Depleted Argon from Underground Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Jadwin Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H. [Augustana College, Physics Department, 2001 South Summit Ave., Sioux Fall, SD 57197 (United States); Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

High-voltage-compatible, fully depleted CCDs  

SciTech Connect

We describe charge-coupled device (CCD) developmentactivities at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).Back-illuminated CCDs fabricated on 200-300 mu m thick, fully depleted,high-resistivity silicon substrates are produced in partnership with acommercial CCD foundry.The CCDs are fully depleted by the application ofa substrate bias voltage. Spatial resolution considerations requireoperation of thick, fully depleted CCDs at high substrate bias voltages.We have developed CCDs that are compatible with substrate bias voltagesof at least 200V. This improves spatial resolution for a given thickness,and allows for full depletion of thicker CCDs than previously considered.We have demonstrated full depletion of 650-675 mu m thick CCDs, withpotential applications in direct x-ray detection. In this work we discussthe issues related to high-voltage operation of fully depleted CCDs, aswell as experimental results on high-voltage-compatible CCDs.

Holland, Stephen E.; Bebek, Chris J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Emes, JohnE.; Fabricius, Max H.; Fairfield, Jessaym A.; Groom, Don E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, William F.; Palaio, Nick P.; Roe, Natalie A.; Wang, Guobin

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

subsurface activities such as oil and gas production. It hasis conducted in depleted oil or gas reservoirs, where fluidsresources in the area, such as oil and gas or geothermal

Birkholzer, J.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A dual-porosity reservoir model with a nonlinear coupling term  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since their introduction by Barenblatt et al. (1960), double-porosity models have been widely used for simulating flow in fractured reservoirs, such as geothermal reservoirs. In a dual-porosity system, the matrix blocks provide most of the storage of the reservoir, whereas the fractures provide the global transmissivity. Initially, most work on dual-porosity models emphasized the development of analytical solutions to idealized reservoir problems. Increasingly, the dual-porosity approach is being implemented by numerical reservoir simulators. Accurate numerical simulation of a dual-porosity problem often requires a prohibitively large number of computational cells in order to resolve the transient pressure gradients in the matrix blocks. We discuss a new dual-porosity model that utilizes a nonlinear differential equation to approximate the fracture/matrix interactions, When implemented into a numerical simulator, it eliminates the need to discretize the matrix blocks, and thereby allows more efficient simulation of reservoir problems.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Chen, G.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

237

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Depleted Uranium De-conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Environmental Report (ER) constitutes one portion of an application being submitted by International Isotopes Fluorine Products (IIFP) to construct and operate a facility that will utilize depleted DUF6 to produce high purity inorganic fluorides, uranium oxides, and anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. The proposed IIFP facility will be located near Hobbs, New Mexico. IIFP has prepared the ER to meet the requirements specified in 10 CFR 51, Subpart A, particularly those requirements set forth in 10 CFR 51.45(b)-(e). The organization of this ER is generally consistent with NUREG-1748, “Environmental Review Guidance for Licensing Actions Associated with NMSS Programs, Final Report.” The Environmental Report for this proposed facility provides information that is specifically required by the NRC to assist it in meeting its obligations under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and the agency’s NEPA-implementing regulations. This ER demonstrates that the environmental protection measures proposed by IIFP are adequate to protect both the environment and the health and safety of the public. This Environmental Report evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and its reasonable alternatives. This ER also describes the environment potentially affected by IIEF’s proposal,

Fluorine Extraction Process

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Depleted argon from underground sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

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241

THE RIMINI PROTOCOL Oil Depletion Protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soaring oil prices have drawn attention to the issue of the relative supply and demand for crude oil. This fact alone tells us that oil is a finite resource, which in turn means that it is subject to depletion1 THE RIMINI PROTOCOL an Oil Depletion Protocol ~ Heading Off Economic Chaos and Political Conflict

Keeling, Stephen L.

242

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of ...

243

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi Stevinweg 1 Delft, 2628 CN, The Netherlands e-mail: h.salimi@tudelft.nl ABSTRACT The Delft Geothermal

Stanford University

244

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geothermal reservoir management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. An investigation team was immediately formed to determine the cause of the failures and their impact on future storage procedures and to recommend corrective actions. Subsequent investigation showed that the failures most probably resulted from mechanical damage that occurred at the time that the cylinders had been placed in the storage yard. In both cylinders evidence pointed to the impact of a lifting lug of an adjacent cylinder near the front stiffening ring, where deflection of cylinder could occur only by tearing the cylinder. The impacts appear to have punctured the cylinders and thereby set up corrosion processes that greatly extended the openings in the wall and obliterated the original crack. Fortunately, the reaction products formed by this process were relatively protective and prevented any large-scale loss of uranium. The main factors that precipitated the failures were inadequate spacing between cylinders and deviations in the orientations of lifting lugs from their intended horizontal position. After reviewing the causes and effects of the failures, the team's principal recommendation for remedial action concerned improved cylinder handling and inspection procedures. Design modifications and supplementary mechanical tests were also recommended to improve the cylinder containment integrity during the stacking operation. 4 refs., 2 figs.

DeVan, J.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Improved Upscaling & Well Placement Strategies for Tight Gas Reservoir Simulation and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas reservoirs provide almost one quarter of the current U.S. domestic gas production, with significant projected increases in the next several decades in both the U.S. and abroad. These reservoirs constitute an important play type, with opportunities for improved reservoir simulation & management, such as simulation model design, well placement. Our work develops robust and efficient strategies for improved tight gas reservoir simulation and management. Reservoir simulation models are usually acquired by upscaling the detailed 3D geologic models. Earlier studies of flow simulation have developed layer-based coarse reservoir simulation models, from the more detailed 3D geologic models. However, the layer-based approach cannot capture the essential sand and flow. We introduce and utilize the diffusive time of flight to understand the pressure continuity within the fluvial sands, and develop novel adaptive reservoir simulation grids to preserve the continuity of the reservoir sands. Combined with the high resolution transmissibility based upscaling of flow properties, and well index based upscaling of the well connections, we can build accurate simulation models with at least one order magnitude simulation speed up, but the predicted recoveries are almost indistinguishable from those of the geologic models. General practice of well placement usually requires reservoir simulation to predict the dynamic reservoir response. Numerous well placement scenarios require many reservoir simulation runs, which may have significant CPU demands. We propose a novel simulation-free screening approach to generate a quality map, based on a combination of static and dynamic reservoir properties. The geologic uncertainty is taken into consideration through an uncertainty map form the spatial connectivity analysis and variograms. Combining the quality map and uncertainty map, good infill well locations and drilling sequence can be determined for improved reservoir management. We apply this workflow to design the infill well drilling sequence and explore the impact of subsurface also, for a large-scale tight gas reservoir. Also, we evaluated an improved pressure approximation method, through the comparison with the leading order high frequency term of the asymptotic solution. The proposed pressure solution can better predict the heterogeneous reservoir depletion behavior, thus provide good opportunities for tight gas reservoir management.

Zhou, Yijie

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Advanced reservoir simulation using soft computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir simulation is a challenging problem for the oil and gas industry. A correctly calibrated reservoir simulator provides an effective tool for reservoir evaluation that can be used to obtain essential reservoir information. A long-standing problem ... Keywords: fuzzy control, history matching, parallel processing, reservoir simulation

G. Janoski; F.-S. Li; M. Pietrzyk; A. H. Sung; S.-H. Chang; R. B. Grigg

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Session 4: Geothermal Reservoir Definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of geothermal reservoir behavior is presently in a state of change brought about by the discovery that reservoir heterogeneity--fractures in particular--is responsible for large scale effects during production. On the other hand, some parts of a reservoir, or some portions of its behavior. may be unaffected by fractures and behave, instead, as if the reservoir were a homogeneous porous medium. Drilling has for many years been guided by geologists prospecting for fractures (which have been recognized as the source of production), but until recently reservoir engineers have not studied the behavior of fractured systems under production. In the last three years research efforts, funded by the Department of Energy and others, have made significant progress in the study of fractures. The investigations into simulation of fracture flow, tracer analysis of fractured systems, and well test analysis of double porosity reservoirs are all advancing. However, presently we are at something of a conceptual impasse in defining a reservoir as fractured or porous. It seems likely that future directions will not continue to attempt to distinguish two separate reservoir types, but will focus instead on defining behavior types. That is, certain aspects of reservoir behavior may be considered to be generally of the porous medium type (for example, field wide decline), while others may be more frequently fracture type (for example, breakthrough of reinjected water). In short, our overall view of geothermal reservoir definition is becoming a little more complex, thereby better accommodating the complexities of the reservoirs themselves. Recent research results already enable us to understand some previously contradictory results, and recognition of the difficulties is encouraging for future progress in the correct direction.

Horne, Roland N.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by...

251

Understanding reservoir mechanisms using phase and component streamline tracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventionally streamlines are traced using total flux across the grid cell faces. The visualization of total flux streamlines shows the movement of flood, injector-producer relationship, swept area and movement of tracer. But they fail to capture some important signatures of reservoir dynamics, such as dominant phase in flow, appearance and disappearance of phases (e.g. gas), and flow of components like CO2. In the work being presented, we demonstrate the benefits of visualizing phase and component streamlines which are traced using phase and component fluxes respectively. Although the phase and component streamlines are not appropriate for simulation, as they might be discontinuous, they definitely have a lot of useful information about the reservoir processes and recovery mechanisms. In this research, phase and component streamline tracing has been successfully implemented in three-phase and compositional simulation and the additional information obtained using these streamlines have been explored. The power and utility of the phase and component streamlines have been demonstrated using synthetic examples and two field cases. The new formulation of streamline tracing provides additional information about the reservoir drive mechanisms. The phase streamlines capture the dominant phase in flow in different parts of the reservoir and the area swept corresponding to different phases can be identified. Based on these streamlines the appearance and disappearance of phases can be identified. Also these streamlines can be used for optimizing the field recovery processes like water injection and location of infill wells. Using component streamlines the movement of components like CO2 can be traced, so they can be used for optimizing tertiary recovery mechanisms and tracking of tracers. They can also be used to trace CO2 in CO2 sequestration project where the CO2 injection is for long term storage in aquifers or reservoirs. They have also other potential uses towards study of reservoir processes and behavior such as drainage area mapping for different phases, phase rate allocations to reservoir layers, etc.

Kumar, Sarwesh

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A. Hsieh 1e$ Pressure Buildup Monitoring of the Krafla Geothermal Field, . . . . . . . . 1'1 Xceland - 0 Initial Chemical and Reservoir Conditions at Lo6 Azufres Wellhead Power Plant Startup - P. Kruger, LSGP-TR-92 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

Stanford University

253

Reservoir Modeling for Production Management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For both petroleum and geothermal resources, many of the reservoirs are fracture dominated--rather than matrix-permeability controlled. For such reservoirs, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (i.e., pre-existing fractures) is critical to the efficient exploitation of the resource through proper pressure management. Our experience and that reported by others indicates that a reduction in the reservoir pressure sometimes leads to an overall reduction in production rate due to the ''pinching off'' of the joint network, rather than the anticipated increase in production rate. This effect occurs not just in the vicinity of the wellbore, where proppants are sometimes employed, but throughout much of the reservoir region. This follows from the fact that under certain circumstances, the decline in fracture permeability (or conductivity) with decreasing reservoir pressure exceeds the far-field reservoir ''drainage'' flow rate increase due to the increased pressure gradient. Further, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs or reinjection procedures for geothermal reservoirs.

Brown, Donald W.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

255

Reservoir management using streamline simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geostatistical techniques can generate fine-scale description of reservoir properties that honor a variety of available data. The differences among multiple geostatistical realizations indicate the presence of uncertainty due to the lack of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions. However, this approach is not feasible in practice because of the computational costs associated with multiple detailed flow simulations. Other major reservoir management challenges include the determination of the swept and unswept areas at a particular time of interest in the life of a reservoir. Until now, sweep efficiency correlations have generally been limited to homogeneous 2-D cases. Calculating volumetric sweep efficiency in a 3-D heterogeneous reservoir is difficult due to the inherent complexity of multiple layers and arbitrary well configurations. Identifying the swept and unswept areas is primarily important for making a decision on the infill locations. Most of the mature reservoirs all over the world are under waterflood. Managing a waterflood requires an understanding of how injection wells displace oil to producing wells. By quantifying the fluid movements, the displacement process can be actively managed. Areas that are not being swept can be developed, and inefficiencies, such as water cycling, can be removed. Conventional simulation provides general answers to almost all of these problems, however time constraint prohibits using a detailed model to capture complexities for each well. Three dimensional streamline simulation can meet most of these reservoir management challenges. Moreover use of fast streamline-based simulation technique offers significant potential in terms of computational efficiency. Its high performance simulation speed makes it well suited for describing flow characteristics for high resolution reservoir models and can be used on a routine basis to make effective and efficient reservoir management decisions. In this research, we extend the capability of streamline simulation as an efficient tool for reservoir management purposes. We show its application in terms of swept volume calculations, ranking of stochastic reservoir models, pattern rate allocation and reservoir performance forecasting under uncertainty.

Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

successful waterfloods ­ Wellington field · CO2 sequestration potential of CO2-EOR ­ minor compared to deep active wells, 20.5 MM BO ­ Unitized and owned by BEREXCO ­ Excellent waterflood ­ ideal for CO2-EOR

Peterson, Blake R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

Cox, J.P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Depleted UF6 Production and Handling Slide Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production and Handling Depleted UF6 Production and Handling Slide Presentation An online slide presentation about production and handling of depleted UF6, from mining of uranium...

263

FAQ 14-What does a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look like? What does a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look like? A picture is worth a thousand words The pictures below show typical...

264

Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion," DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion," DOEIG-0642 Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

265

Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion, IG-0751...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion, IG-0751 Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

266

Depleted Uranium Operations at the Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Depleted Uranium Operations at the Y-12 National Security Complex, G-0570 Depleted Uranium Operations...

267

Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report  

SciTech Connect

A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

HIGH-DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DENSITY CONCRETE WITH CERAMIC AGGREGATE BASED ON DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE S.G. Ermichev, V.I. Shapovalov, N.V.Sviridov (RFNC-VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia) V.K. Orlov, V.M. Sergeev, A. G. Semyenov, A.M. Visik, A.A. Maslov, A. V. Demin, D.D. Petrov, V.V. Noskov, V. I. Sorokin, O. I. Uferov (VNIINM, Moscow, Russia) L. Dole (ORNL, Oak Ridge, USA) Abstract - Russia is researching the production and testing of concretes with ceramic aggregate based on depleted uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). These DU concretes are to be used as structural and radiation-shielded material for casks for A-plant spent nuclear fuel transportation and storage. This paper presents the results of studies aimed at selection of ceramics and concrete composition, justification of their production technology, investigation of mechanical properties, and chemical stability.

269

Summary of the engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is reviewing ideas for the long-term management and use of its depleted uranium hexafluoride. DOE owns about 560,000 metric tons (over a billion pounds) of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This material is contained in steel cylinders located in storage yards near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. On November 10, 1994, DOE announced its new Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program by issuing a Request for Recommendations and an Advance Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (59 FR 56324 and 56325). The first part of this program consists of engineering, costs and environmental impact studies. Part one will conclude with the selection of a long-term management plan or strategy. Part two will carry out the selected strategy.

Dubrin, J.W., Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

Goldberg, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Avci, H.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bradley, C.E. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks. First quarterly report, January--March 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

US Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir simulation. Final report (Year 3)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several reservoir model improvements incorporated into the UTA model are described. The most significant modification to the model was the inclusion of semiimplicit treatment of transmissibilities so as to better handle two-phase flow problems associated with flow near the wellbore. A description of the reservoir mechanics presumed operative in geopressured-geothermal reservoirs is included. A mathematical model describing two-dimensional flow in compacting porous media is developed from the Lagrangian point of view. A description of the way the differential equations are approximated by finite differences and subsequently solved by means of numerical procedures is presented. Various sensitivity studies made with the reservoir model are described. Particular emphasis was given to the study of potential shale dewatering effects on reservoir depletion and the effects of compaction on fluid recovery. To study shale dewatering, the shale thickness and the shale vertical permeability were treated as variables in several simulation experiments. The effects of compaction were modeled with optimistic and pessimistic values for the uniaxial compaction coefficient in an attempt to define a region of expected reservoir performance. Laboratory analysis of core samples obtained from the geopressured-geothermal test well was completed by the end of year 3. These data indicate that the uniaxial compaction coefficient is of the same order of magnitude as the pessimistic value used on the sensitivity studies. Because of this the expected fluid recovery from geopressured reservoirs has been reduced to a nominal 5% of the in-place volumes rather than the previously reported 10%.

MacDonald, R.C.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Chang, M.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Coal bed methane reservoir simulation studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to perform simulation studies for a specific coal bed methane reservoir. First, the theory and reservoir engineering aspects of… (more)

Karimi, Kaveh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Greenhouse gas cycling in experimental boreal reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydroelectric reservoirs account for 59% of the installed electricity generating capacity in Canada and 26% in Ontario. Reservoirs also provide irrigation capacity, drinking water, and… (more)

Venkiteswaran, Jason James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

NETL: Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW Shale Gas Flow Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW, a fractured reservoir modeling software developed by the...

276

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bibliography Definition of Geothermal Reservoir EngineeringDevelopment of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering. * 1.4 DataF i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

280

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability  

SciTech Connect

The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data, geologic data, well completion data and the production data. A reservoir simulation model was built to forecast reservoir performance for a variety of exploitation and well completion strategies. Reserve forecasts have been made using the reservoir model. The methodology applied in this research consists of eight tasks: 1) build a data base with existing data, 2) analyze the log and core data, 3) analyze the pressure and production data, 4) analyze the PVT data, 5) analyze the hydraulic fracture treatments, 6) build the reservoir model, 7) determine the possible reservoir management strategies, and 8) perform economic evaluations for the management strategies. While much of the data for the field studied was supplied by PDVSA, we did not receive all of the data we requested. For example, no pressure buildup data were available. When necessary, we used correlations to determine values for reservoir data that we were not supplied. In this research four formations were studied and characterized, determining porosity and permeability values. Also, fracture treatments were analyzed and a reservoir model was developed. Runs for black oil and volatile oil were performed. The results show that the upper zones are the most prospective areas, but fracture treatments must be performed to reduce the damage on the sand face. Lower formations (Cretaceous) have a lower permeability value, but high OOIP that justify performing fracture treatments and completing this zone. Economics were developed to support this conclusion. Optimum well spacing was calculated showing that 960 acres is the optimum well spacing, but also that 640 acres can be maintained for all the reservoirs and dual completions can be performed, first hydraulic fracturing and completing the Cretaceous formation, and then, completing any upper zone. Reservoir simulation results show that up to 31% of OOIP may be incrementally recovered by hydraulic fracturing the Cretaceous formation and 10 or less from the upper zones.

Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Package Package Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package The steel components of the waste package could be replaced with a uranium cermet. The cermet contains uranium dioxide particulates, which are embedded in steel. Cermets are made with outer layers of clean steel; thus, there is no radiation-contamination hazard in handling the waste packages. Because cermets are made of the same materials that would normally be found in the YM repository (uranium dioxide and steel), there are no chemical compatibility issues. From half to all of the DU inventory in the United States could be used for this application. Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Cross Section of a Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Follow the link below for more information on Cermets:

284

Carbon Storage R&D | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D R&D Carbon Storage R&D Carbon dioxide storage in geologic formations includes oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline reservoirs. These are structures that have stored crude oil, natural gas, brine and CO2 over millions of years. The primary goal of our carbon storage research is to understand the behavior of CO2 when stored in geologic formations. For example, studies are being conducted to determine the extent to which the CO2 moves within the geologic formation, and when CO2 is injected, what physical and chemical changes occur within the formation. This information is key to ensure that carbon storage will not affect the structural integrity of an underground formation, and that CO2 storage is secure and environmentally

285

Tritium Transport Vessel Using Depleted Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Storage, Distribution, and Transportation / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology In Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

L. K. Heung

286

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts Associated with Continued Storage of the Entire Portsmouth Site Cylinder Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51 3.5.1 Approach Used to...

287

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Alternate Methods in Reservoir Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As time progresses, more and more oil fields and reservoirs are reaching maturity; consequently, secondary and tertiary methods of oil recovery have become increasingly important in the petroleum industry. This significance has added to the industry's ...

Guadalupe I. Janoski; Andrew H. Sung

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fracture characterization of multilayered reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fracture treatment optimization techniques have been developed using Long-Spaced-Digital-Sonic (LSDS) log, pumpin-flowback, mini-frac, and downhole treating pressure data. These analysis techniques have been successfully applied in massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) of ''tight gas'' wells. Massive hydraulic fracture stimulations have been used to make many tight gas reservoirs commercially attractive. However, studies have shown that short highly conductive fractures are optimum for the successful stimulation of wells in moderate permeability reservoirs. As a result, the ability to design and place optimal fractures in these reservoirs is critical. This paper illustrates the application of fracture analysis techniques to a moderate permeability multi-layered reservoir. These techniques were used to identify large zonal variations in rock properties and pore pressure which result from the complex geology. The inclusion of geologic factors in fracture treatment design allowed the placement of short highly conductive fractures which were used to improve injectivity and vertical sweep, and therefore, ultimate recovery.

Britt, L.K.; Larsen, M.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

291

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

292

NETL: Carbon Storage - Small-Scale Field Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Scale Field Tests Small-Scale Field Tests Carbon Storage Small-Scale Field Tests The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting a number of small-scale field tests (injection of less than 500,000 million metric tons of CO2 per year) to explore various geologic CO2 storage opportunities within the United States and portions of Canada. DOE's small-scale field test efforts are designed to demonstrate that regional reservoirs have the capability to store thousands of years of CO2 emissions and provide the basis for larger volume, commercial-scale CO2 tests. The field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The data gathered during these small-scale tests provides valuable information regarding specific formations that have historically not been evaluated for the purpose of CO2 storage. The Carbon Storage Program strategy includes an established set of field test objectives applicable to the small-scale projects:

293

Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Improving Gas Storage Development Planning Through Simulation-Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first of two papers describing the application of simulator-optimization methods to a natural gas storage field development planning problem. The results presented here illustrate the large gains in cost-effectiveness that can be made by employing the reservoir simulator as the foundation for a wide-ranging search for solutions to management problems. The current paper illustrates the application of these techniques given a deterministic view of the reservoir. A companion paper will illustrate adaptations needed to accommodate uncertainties regarding reservoir properties.

Johnson, V.M.; Ammer, J.; Trick, M.D.

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear conflict and ozone depletion Quick summary o Regional nuclear war could cause global which traps pollutants o Nuclear weapons cause explosions, which then causes things around the vicinity to start burning, which in turn releases black carbon; it is not the nuclear material or fallout causing

Toohey, Darin W.

296

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Title Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1089E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Anders, André, Jonathan L. Slack, and Thomas J. Richardson Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 1 Date Published 08/2003 Call Number LBNL-1089E Abstract Proof-of-principle gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have been investigated. In contrast to conventional electrochromic approaches, hydrogen is stored (at low concentration) in the gas volume between glass panes of the insulated glass units (IGUs). The elimination of a solid state ion storage layer simplifies the layer stack, enhances overall transmission, and reduces cost. The cyclic switching properties were demonstrated and system durability improved with the incorporation a thin Zr barrier layer between the MnNiMg layer and the Pd catalyst. Addition of 9% silver to the palladium catalyst further improved system durability. About 100 full cycles have been demonstrated before devices slow considerably. Degradation of device performance appears to be related to Pd catalyst mobility, rather than delamination or metal layer oxidation issues originally presumed likely to present significant challenges.

297

Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important, but often ignored, factors affecting the transport and the seismic properties of hydrocarbon reservoir is pore shape. Transport properties depend on the dimensions, geometry, and distribution of pores and cracks. Knowledge of pore shape distribution is needed to explain the often-encountered complex interrelationship between seismic parameters (e.g. seismic velocity) and the independent physical properties (e.g. porosity) of hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, our knowledge of reservoir pore shape distribution is very limited. This dissertation employs a pore structure parameter via a rock physics model to characterize mean reservoir pore shape. The parameter was used to develop a new physical concept of critical clay content in the context of pore compressibility as a function of pore aspect ratio for a better understanding of seismic velocity as a function of porosity. This study makes use of well log dataset from offshore Norway and from North Viking Graben in the North Sea. In the studied North Sea reservoir, porosity and measured horizontal permeability was found to increase with increasing pore aspect ratio (PAR). PAR is relatively constant at 0.23 for volumes of clay (V_cl) less than 32% with a significant decrease to 0.04 for V_cl above 32%. The point of inflexion at 32% in the PAR –V_cl plane is defined as the critical clay volume. Much of the scatters in the compressional velocity-porosity cross-plots are observed where V_cl is above this critical value. For clay content higher than the critical value, Hertz-Mindlin (HM) contact theory over-predicts compressional velocity (V_p) by about 69%. This was reduced to 4% when PAR distribution was accounted for in the original HM formulation. The pore structure parameter was also used to study a fractured carbonate reservoir in the Sichuan basin, China. Using the parameter, the reservoir interval can be distinguished from those with no fracture. The former has a pore structure parameter value that is ? 3.8 whereas it was < 3.8 for the latter. This finding was consistent with the result of fracture analysis, which was based on FMI image. The results from this dissertation will find application in reservoir characterization as the industry target more complex, deeper, and unconventional reservoirs.

Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are performed in order to investigate the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on fluid recovery and matrix depletion in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The model used is that of a well producing at a constant bottomhole pressure from a two-phase fractured reservoir. The results obtained have received a complex fracture-matrix interaction due to the thermodynamics of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures. Although the matrix initially contributes fluids (liquid and gas) to the fractures, later on, the flow directions reverse and the fractures backflow fluids into the matrix. The amount of backflow depends primarily upon the flowing gas saturation in the fractures; the lower the flowing gas saturation in the fractures the more backflow. It is shown that the recoverable fluid reserves depend strongly on the amount of CO/sub 2/ present in the reservoir system.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Gaulke, S.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infill drilling if wells on a uniform spacing without regard to reservoir performance and characterization foes not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations.

None

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

SciTech Connect

Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

P. K. Pande

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

302

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Storage News Carbon Capture and Storage News FE Carbon Capture and Storage News RSS June 9, 2010 Award-Winning DOE Technology Scores Success in Carbon Storage Project The ability to detect and track the movement of carbon dioxide in underground geologic storage reservoirs -- an important component of carbon capture and storage technology -- has been successfully demonstrated at a U.S. Department of Energy New Mexico test site. April 20, 2010 Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration program. March 15, 2010 Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward

303

A STOCHASTIC METHOD FOR MODELING FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andFLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andachieve optimal recovery of petroleum from a reservoir, it

Anderson, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Compressed Air Energy Storage Demonstration Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Demonstration Project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration, and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. One plant will be a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage, and the other will be a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project that is necessary to enable higher penetration of ...

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

307

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. We then examine some applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation

308

Reservoir technology research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research being carried out at LBL as part of DOE/GTD's Reservoir Technology Program includes field, theoretical and modeling activities. The purpose is to develop, improve and validate methods and instrumentation to: (1) determine geothermal reservoir parameters, (2) detect and characterize reservoir fractures and boundaries, and (3) identify and evaluate the importance of reservoir processes. The ultimate objective of this work is to advance the state-of-the-art for characterizing geothermal reservoirs and evaluating their productive capacity and longevity under commercial exploitation. LBL's FY1986 accomplishments, FY1987 progress to date, and possible future activities under DOE's Reservoir Technology Program are discussed.

Lippmann, M.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Depleted UF6 Conversion facility EIS Topics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topics Topics Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EIS Topics A listing of topics included in the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs. DOE addressed the following environmental issues when assessing the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives in the two site-specific EISs. DOE solicited comment from the Federal agencies, Native American tribes, state and local governments, and the general public on these and any other issues as part of the public scoping process: Potential impacts on health from DUF6 conversion activities, including potential impacts to workers and the public from exposure to radiation and chemicals during routine and accident conditions for the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of DUF6 conversion facilities.

310

Depleted Uranium Uses: Regulatory Requirements and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Depleted Uranium Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Regulatory Requirements Regulatory Requirements and Issues and Issues Nancy L. Ranek Nancy L. Ranek Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory August 5, 1998 August 5, 1998 Beneficial Reuse '98 Beneficial Reuse '98 Knoxville, TN Knoxville, TN NOTES Work Performed for: Office of Facilities (NE-40) Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed by: Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Phone: 202/488-2417 E-mail: ranekn@smtplink.dis.anl.gov 2 2 2 Programmatic Environmental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Impact Statement (PEIS) Draft PEIS Published 12/97 * Preferred Alternative = 100% Use

311

Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Uranio impoverito: perché? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of understanding the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

Germano D'Abramo

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

314

Compressed air energy storage technology program. Annual report for 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) program are to establish stability criteria for large underground reservoirs in salt domes, hard rock, and porous rock used for air storage in utility applications, and to develop second-generation CAES technologies that have minimal or no dependence on petroleum fuels. During the year reported reports have been issued on field studies on CAES on aquifers and in salt, stability, and design criteria for CAES and for pumped hydro-storage caverns, laboratory studies of CAES in porous rock reservoris have continued. Research has continued on combined CAES/Thermal Energy Storage, CAES/Solar systems, coal-fired fluidized bed combustors for CAES, and two-reservoir advanced CAES concepts. (LCL)

Loscutoff, W.V.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. (MHR)

Pratt, H.R.; Simonson, E.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Usage Storage Storage Energy storage isnt just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research...

320

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEEfor SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", inSuperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant, Advances in

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

322

Unsubscribe from the Depleted UF6 E-mail List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Unsubscribe Unsubscribe from the Depleted UF6 E-mail List This form allows you to remove yourself from the Depleted UF6 e-mail list. Type your e-mail address here:...

323

FAQ 24-Who is responsible for managing depleted uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who is responsible for managing depleted uranium? Who is responsible for managing depleted uranium? In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing...

324

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Demonstration Newsletter, April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping.This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

325

Compressed Air Energy Storage Demonstration Newsletter, October 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping.This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY  

SciTech Connect

Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Demonstration Newsletter, July 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping.This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

Prevention of Reservoir Interior Discoloration  

SciTech Connect

Contamination is anathema in reservoir production. Some of the contamination is a result of welding and some appears after welding but existed before. Oxygen was documented to be a major contributor to discoloration in welding. This study demonstrates that it can be controlled and that some of the informal cleaning processes contribute to contamination.

Arnold, K.F.

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

329

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Chemisorption On Nanoparticles: An Alternative Mechanism For Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present first principles, computational predictions of a porous, nano-structured semiconductor material that will reversibly store hydrogen for fuel cell applications. The material is competitive with current metal hydride storage materials, but contains only carbon and silicon, reducing both its cost and environmental impact. Additionally, unlike metal hydrides, the core skeleton structure of this material is unaltered when cycling from full hydrogen storage to full hydrogen depletion, removing engineering complications associated with expansion/contraction of the material.

Williamson, A; Reboredo, F; Galli, G

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

Reservoir compaction loads on casings and liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure drawdown due to production from a reservoir causes compaction of the reservoir formation which induces axial and radial loads on the wellbore. Reservoir compaction loads increase during the production life of a well, and are greater for deviated wells. Presented here are casing and liner loads at initial and final pressure drawdowns for a particular reservoir and at well deviation angles of 0 to 45 degrees.

Wooley, G.R.; Prachner, W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Optimization Online - Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 7, 2013 ... Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an Extended Planning Horizon using a Benders Decomposition Algorithm Exploiting a Memory Loss ...

333

Design of Transport Casks with Depleted Uranium Gamma Shield and Advanced Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Casks with Depleted Uranium Gamma Shield and Advanced Safety Transport Casks with Depleted Uranium Gamma Shield and Advanced Safety Matveev V.Z., Morenko A.I., Shapovalov V.I. Russian Federal Nuclear Center - All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 37 Mira Prospect, Sarov, Russia, 607190, matveev@vniief.ru Maslov A.A., Orlov V.K., Semenov A.G., Sergeev V.M., Yuferov O.I., Visik A.M. Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 5-A Rogova street, p.b. 369, Moscow, Russia, 123060, majul2000@mail.ru Abstract - The report is dedicated to a problem of creation of a new generation of dual-purpose transport packing complete sets (TPCS) 1 with advanced safety. These sets are intended for transportation and storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies (SNFA) 2 of VVER reactors and spent spark elements (SSE)

334

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daniel R. Borneo, PE Daniel R. Borneo, PE Sandia National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)/CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Presentation Outline * DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - FY07 Project Review * Zinc Bromine Battery (ZBB) Demonstration * Palmdale Super capacitor Demonstration * Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Regional Transit (RT) Super capacitor demonstration * Beacon Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) 3 Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration * Memorandum of Understanding Between CEC and DOE (SNL). - In Place since 2004

335

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Concept Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Washington, DC November 2-4, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Full Air Breathing Battery Concept * Concept is to use O 2 and N 2 as the electrodes in a battery * Novel because N 2 is considered inert * Our group routinely reacts N 2 electrochemically

336

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nutrient transport model in CHAHNIMEH manmade reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Model for predicting nutrient transport to CHAHNIMEH reservoir is developed in this paper. Nitrogen and phosphorous have been simulated as the important parameters in evaluating water quality in the reservoir. Solar radiation and wind flow are considered ... Keywords: CHAHNIMEH, modeling, nutrient, reservoir, transport, water movement

Seyyed Ahmad Mirbagheri; Seyyed Arman Hashemi Monfared

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Eutrophication modelling of reservoirs in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two reservoirs in Taiwan were modeled to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality in the water column. The modelling effort was supported with data collected in the field for a 2-year period for both reservoirs. Spatial and temporal distributions ... Keywords: CE-QUAL-W2, Reservoir Eutrophication Modelling, Water quality

Jan-Tai Kuo; Wu-Seng Lung; Chou-Ping Yang; Wen-Cheng Liu; Ming-Der Yang; Tai-Shan Tang

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Reservoir characterization, performance monitoring of waterflooding and development opportunities in Germania Spraberry Unit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Germania Unit is located in Midland County, 12 miles east of Midland, Texas and is part of the Spraberry Formation in the Midland Basin which is one of the largest known oil reservoirs in the world bearing between 8.9 billion barrels and 10.5 billion barrels of oil originally in place. The field is considered geologically complex since it comprises typically low porosity, low permeability fine sandstones, and siltstones that are interbedded with shaly non-reservoir rocks. Natural fractures existing over a regional area have long been known to dominate all aspects of performance in the Spraberry Trend Area. Two stages of depletion have taken place over 46 years of production: Primary production under solution gas drive and secondary recovery via water injection through two different injection patterns. The cumulative production and injection in Germania as of July 2003 were 3.24 million barrels and 3.44 million barrels respectively and the production level is 470 BOPD through 64 active wells with an average rate per well of 7.3 BOPD and average water cut of 60 percent. This performance is considered very low and along with the low amount of water injected, waterflood recovery has never been thoroughly understood. In this research, production and injection data were analyzed and integrated to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study addresses reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflood project with the aim of proposing alternatives development, taking into account current and future conditions of the reservoir. Consequently, this project will be performed to provide a significant reservoir characterization in an uncharacterized area of Spraberry and evaluate the performance of the waterflooding to provide facts, information and knowledge to obtain the maximum economic recovery from this reservoir and finally understand waterflood management in Spraberry. Thus, this research describes the reservoir, and comprises the performance of the reservoir under waterflooding, and controlled surveillance to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and reservoir management and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. This incremental is based in both extrapolations and numerical simulation studies conducted in Spraberry.

Hernandez Hernandez, Erwin Enrique

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

342

A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility  

SciTech Connect

The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

Zagula, T.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas storage industry. But in Chemery, 17 halshs-00487175,version2-10Feb2011 #12;France, technical has occurred. According to Damen et al. (2006), nine natural gas storage reservoirs out of 900 to data on natural gas and hazardous liquids pipeline safety in USA and Europe. Finally, analogy

344

Depletion effects of silicon deposition from methyltrichlorosilane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The deposition rate of SiC on carbon-coated Nicalon fibers from methyltrichlorosilane in hydrogen was measured as a function of temperature, pressure, total flow rate, and simulated reactant depletion. The results, which are included in this paper together with kinetic information on the stability of methyltrichlorosilane, led to two conclusions: two different mechanisms of deposition can occur depending on whether the methyltrichlorosilane has an opportunity to dissociate into separate silicon- and carbon-containing precursors, and the deposition rate is strongly reduced by the generation of byproduct HCl. The data were fitted to a simple etch model to obtain a kinetic expression that accounts for the significant effect of HCl.

Besmann, T.M.; Sheldon, B.W.; Moss, T.S. III; Kaster, M.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Application-storage discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discovering application dependency on data and storage is a key prerequisite for many storage optimization tasks such as data assignment to storage tiers, storage consolidation, virtualization, and handling unused data. However, in the real world these ... Keywords: enterprise storage, experimental evaluation, storage discovery

Nikolai Joukov; Birgit Pfitzmann; HariGovind V. Ramasamy; Murthy V. Devarakonda

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

FAQ 25-What are the options for managing depleted uranium in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

options for managing depleted uranium in the future? What are the options for managing depleted uranium in the future? The options for managing depleted uranium were evaluated in...

347

Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO2 storage project: Applying the Certification Framework in a dynamic context.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage project assessed here, five wells at Krechba produce natural gasstorage project in Algeria has been injecting CO 2 stripped from produced natural gasstorage region will be the lease boundary all around the reservoir because the natural gas

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

349

4. International reservoir characterization technical conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hydrogen storage technology for metal hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advantages of using hydrogen as a secondary energy carrier are stated, and numerous factors pertinent to the technology of hydrogen storage via metal hydrides are briefly described. The technology is centered on iron-titanium hydride, FeTiH/sub x/, as the most practical choice for the safe and compact storage of hydrogen. Uses of hydride hydrogen as a fuel or energy carrier are given. The features of hydride reservoir designs are explained, and some performance data are given for two reservoirs constructed at BNL. Results of tests on the long-term behavior of FeTiH/sub x/ are presented along with information on pressure drop in a hydride bed. Two methods of accommodating hydride expansion are described. Other topics include: container materials selection, safety testing of FeTiH/sub x/, hydride materials development, storage systems work at BNL, the proposed Hydrogen-Halogen Energy Storage System, a proposed technique of storing hydrogen in hollow glass microspheres at very high pressure, and information on the commercial availability of materials and equipment for hydride hydrogen. Current development needs are included in the various sections.

Strickland, G

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second year of this three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study are to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions where fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. Simulation studies have been conducted with a dual porosity simulator capable of simulating the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Each simulation model has been initialized with properties typical of the Austin Chalk reservoir in Pearsall Field, Texas. During year one, simulations of both vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure charge. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. During the second year the performances of the same vertical and horizontal wells were evaluated with the assumption that fracture permeability was a function of reservoir pressure. This required repetition of most of the natural depletion cases simulated in year one while invoking the pressure-sensitive fracture permeability option. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, two stress conditions were simulated for each primary variable. The water injection cases, begun in year one, were extended to include most of the reservoir parameters investigated for natural depletion, including fracture permeability as a function of net stress and the use of horizontal wells. The results thus far confirm that pressure-sensitive fractures degrade well performance and that the degradation is reduced by water injection pressure maintenance. Furthermore, oil recovery can be significantly increased by water injection pressure maintenance.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Storage of burned PWR and BWR fuel  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, credit for fuel burnup has been allowed in the design and criticality safety analysis of high-density spent-fuel storage racks. Design and operating philosophies, however, differ significantly between pressurized water reactor (PWR)- and boiling water reactor (BWR)-type plants because: (1) PWR storage pools generally use soluble boron, which provides backup criticality control under accident conditions; and (2) BWR fuel generally contains gadolinium burnable poison, which results in a characteristically peaked burnup-dependent reactivity variation. In PWR systems, the reactivity decreases monotonically with burnup in a nearly linear fashion (excluding xenon effects), and a two-region concept is feasible. In BWR systems, the reactivity is initially low, increases as fuel burnup progresses, and reaches a maximum at a burnup where the gadolinium is nearly depleted. In any spent-fuel storage rack design, uncertainties due to manufacturing tolerances and in calculational methods must be included to assure that the highest reactivity (k/sub eff/) is less than the 0.95 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission limit. In the absence of definitive critical experiment data with spent fuel, the uncertainty due to depletion calculations must be assumed on the basis of judgment. High-density spent-fuel storage racks may be designed for both PWR and BWR plants with credit for burnup. However, the design must be tailored to each plant with appropriate consideration of the preferences/specifications of the utility operating staff.

Turner, S.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reservoir and injection technology and Heat Extraction Project. Fifth annual report, January 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the Stanford Geothermal Program in the fiscal year 1989, the task areas include predictive modeling of reservoir behavior and tracer test interpretation and testing. Major emphasis is in reservoir technology, reinjection technology, and heat extraction. Predictive modeling of reservoir behavior consists of a multi-pronged approach to well test analysis under a variety of conditions. The efforts have been directed to designing and analyzing well tests in (1) naturally fractured reservoirs; (2) fractured wells; (3) complex reservoir geometries; and, (4) gas reservoirs including inertial and other effects. The analytical solutions for naturally fractured reservoirs are determined using fracture size distribution. In the study of fractured wells, an elliptical coordinate system is used to obtain semi-analytical solutions to finite conductivity fractures. Effort has also been directed to the modeling and creation of a user friendly computer program for steam/gas reservoirs including wellbore storage, skin and non-Darcy flow effects. This work has a complementary effort on modeling high flow rate wells including inertial effects in the wellbore and fractures. In addition, work on gravity drainage systems is being continued.

Horne, R.N.; Ramey, H.H. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

Grid orientation effects in the simulation of cold water injection into depleted vapor zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A considerable body of field experience with injection has been accumulated at Larderello, Italy and The Geysers, California; the results have been mixed. There are well documented cases where injection has increased flow rates of nearby wells. Return of injected fluid as steam from production wells has been observed directly through chemical and isotopic changes of produced fluids (Giovannoni et al., 1981; Nuti et al., 1981). In other cases injection has caused thermal interference and has degraded the temperature and pressure of production wells. Water injection into depleted vapor zones gives rise to complex two-phase fluid flow and heat transfer processes with phase change. These are further complicated by the fractured-porous nature of the reservoir rocks. An optimization of injection design and operating practice is desirable; this requires realistic and robust mathematical modeling capabilities.

Pruess, K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation for the Paducah Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation for the Paducah Site in Support of Site-Specific NEPA Requirements for Continued Cylinder Storage, Cylinder Preparation, Conversion, and Long-Term Storage Activities Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memorandum is a product of Argonne's Environmental Assessment Division (EAD). For information on the division's scientific and engineering

358

Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's DUF DOE's DUF 6 Cylinder Inventory a Location Number of Cylinders DUF 6 (MT) b Paducah, Kentucky 36,910 450,000 Portsmouth, Ohio 16,041 198,000 Oak Ridge (ETTP), Tennessee 4,683 56,000 Total 57,634 704,000 a The DOE inventory includes DUF 6 generated by the government, as well as DUF 6 transferred from U.S. Enrichment Corporation pursuant to two memoranda of agreement. b A metric ton (MT) is equal to 1,000 kilograms, or 2,200 pounds. Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce enriched uranium for U.S. national defense and civilian purposes. The gaseous diffusion process uses uranium in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), primarily because UF 6 can conveniently be used in

359

Regulation of New Depleted Uranium Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-5 2-5 Regulation of New Depleted Uranium Uses Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The University of Chicago, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

360

Artificial Geothermal Energy Potential of Steam-flooded Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents an investigation of the concept of harvesting geothermal energy that remains in heavy oil reservoirs after abandonment when steamflooding is no longer economics. Substantial heat that has accumulated within reservoir rock and its vicinity can be extracted by circulating water relatively colder than reservoir temperature. We use compositional reservoir simulation coupled with a semianalytical equation of the wellbore heat loss approximation to estimate surface heat recovery. Additionally, sensitivity analyses provide understanding of the effect of various parameters on heat recovery in the artificial geothermal resources. Using the current state-of-art technology, the cumulative electrical power generated from heat recovered is about 246 MWhr accounting for 90percent downtime. Characteristics of heat storage within the reservoir rock were identified. The factors with the largest impact on the energy recovery during the water injection phase are the duration of the steamflood (which dictates the amount of heat accumulated in the reservoir) and the original reservoir energy in place. Outlet reservoir-fluid temperatures are used to approximate heat loss along the wellbore and estimate surface fluid temperature using the semianalytical approaches. For the injection well with insulation, results indicate that differences in fluid temperature between surface and bottomhole are negligible. However, for the conventional production well, heat loss is estimated around 13 percent resulting in the average surface temperature of 72 degrees C. Producing heat can be used in two applications: direct uses and electricity generation. For the electricity generation application that is used in the economic consideration, the net electrical power generated by this arrival fluid temperature is approximately 3 kW per one producing pattern using Ener-G-Rotors.

Limpasurat, Akkharachai

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Lithium Depletion of Nearby Young Stellar Associations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate cluster ages from lithium depletion in five pre-main-sequence groups found within 100 pc of the Sun: TW Hydrae Association, Eta Chamaeleontis Cluster, Beta Pictoris Moving Group, Tucanae-Horologium Association and AB Doradus Moving Group. We determine surface gravities, effective temperatures and lithium abundances for over 900 spectra through least squares fitting to model-atmosphere spectra. For each group, we compare the dependence of lithium abundance on temperature with isochrones from pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks to obtain model dependent ages. We find that the Eta Chamaelontis Cluster and the TW Hydrae Association are the youngest, with ages of 12+/-6 Myr and 12+/-8 Myr, respectively, followed by the Beta Pictoris Moving Group at 21+/-9 Myr, the Tucanae-Horologium Association at 27+/-11 Myr, and the AB Doradus Moving Group at an age of at least 45 Myr (where we can only set a lower limit since the models -- unlike real stars -- do not show much lithium depletion beyond this age). Here, the ordering is robust, but the precise ages depend on our choice of both atmospheric and evolutionary models. As a result, while our ages are consistent with estimates based on Hertzsprung-Russell isochrone fitting and dynamical expansion, they are not yet more precise. Our observations do show that with improved models, much stronger constraints should be feasible: the intrinsic uncertainties, as measured from the scatter between measurements from different spectra of the same star, are very low: around 10 K in effective temperature, 0.05 dex in surface gravity, and 0.03 dex in lithium abundance.

Erin Mentuch; Alexis Brandeker; Marten H. van Kerkwijk; Ray Jayawardhana; Peter H. Hauschildt

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

362

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

363

Analysis of an interwell tracer test in a depleted heavy oilreservoir  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents field data and analyses of an interwell tracer test conducted in the Niitsu oil field which is a fully depleted heavy oil reservoir of unconsolidated sand formation. The purpose of the tracer test is to diagnose reservoir heterogeneity at a location where a micellar/ polymer field test is planned. Water containing a chemical tracer was injected at a constant rate into an injector surrounded by three production wells. Effluent analyses showed very early breakthrough of injected water at two of the producing wells, no tracer, however, was detected at the third producer thoughout the test period. In addition, tracer production profiles at two wells after breakthrough differed much from each other. These test results suggest a strong areal heterogeneity of the tested formation. An appropriate analytical model was used to obtain a preliminary interpretation of the results. A modified three-dimensional black oil model developed to simulate polymer flood process was then utilized for analyzing the data in more detail. The model treats tracer solution as a fourth component, and can also account for adsorption of tracer.

Ohno, K.; Horne, R.N.; Nanba, T.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Press Release: DOE Seeks Public Input for Depleted Uranium Hexafluorid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perry, (865) 576-0885 September 24, 2001 www.oakridge.doe.gov DOE SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT Public Meetings Planned in...

365

Numerical study of error propagation in Monte Carlo depletion simulations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improving computer technology and the desire to more accurately model the heterogeneity of the nuclear reactor environment have made the use of Monte Carlo depletion… (more)

Wyant, Timothy Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Environmental Impacts of Options for Disposal of Depleted Uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

study by Oak Ridge National Laboratory evaluated the acceptability of several depleted uranium conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE...

367

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio. For several decades DOE was responsible for uranium enrichment, the uranium hexafluoride depleted in the 235U isotope (typically down...

368

Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6-related Manufacturing Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and operation of a facility to fabricate representative products containing depleted uranium. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS evaluated the general environmental impacts...

369

Depleted UF6 Management Information Network - A resource for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an online repository of information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), a product of the uranium enrichment...

370

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the production and interference tests conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 in Raft River Valley, Idaho during September--November, 1975 are presented. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. In addition to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data collected during the tests also indicated that the reservoir pressure varies systematically in response to the changes in the Earth's gravitational field caused by the passage of the sun and the moon. Overall, the results of the tests indicate that the geothermal reservoir in southern Raft River valley is fairly extensive and significantly permeable and merits further exploration.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A virtual company concept for reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how reservoir management problems were pursued with a virtual company concept via the Internet and World Wide Web. The focus of the paper is on the implementation of virtual asset management teams that were assembled with small independent oil companies. The paper highlights the mechanics of how the virtual team transferred data and interpretations, evaluated geological models of complex reservoirs, and used results of simulation studies to analyze various reservoir management strategies.

Martin, F.D. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc. (United States); Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Sorption Storage Technology Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Technology Summary DOE H2 Storage Workshop, Feb 14-15, 2011, Washington, DC 1 Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop February 14 - 15, 2011, Washington, DC...

373

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At least we used to. We are Occult Trucking and Storage andNOTHING. FLASHBACK -- OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT --I saw him. FLASHBACK - OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT -

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adki ns, "Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant- Ten Years2J O. D. Johnson, "Worldwide Pumped-Storage Projects", PowerUnderground Pumped Hydro Storage", Proc. 1976 Eng.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

376

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Oldenburg and Pan CO2 as Cushion Gas for CAES 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CAES is natural gas storage which is done in aquifers and depleted reservoirs. · Alternative cushion gas has been used in natural gas storage (specifically, N2). · Use of non-air cushion gas for CAES is natural gas storage which is done in aquifers and depleted reservoirs. · Alternative cushion gas has been

Knowles, David William

378

Slimholes for geothermal reservoir evaluation - An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The topics covered in this session include: slimhole testing and data acquisition, theoretical and numerical models for slimholes, and an overview of the analysis of slimhole data acquired by the Japanese. The fundamental issues discussed are concerned with assessing the efficacy of slimhole testing for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. the term reservoir evaluation is here taken to mean the assessment of the potential of the geothermal reservoir for the profitable production of electrical power. As an introduction to the subsequent presentations and discussions, a brief summary of the more important aspects of the use of slimholes in reservoir evaluation is given.

Hickox, C.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

380

Nonisothermal injection tests in fractured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper extends the analysis of nonisothermal pressure transient data to fractured reservoirs. Two cases are considered: reservoirs with predominantly horzontal fractures and reservoirs with predominantly vertical fractures. Effects of conductive heat transfer between the fractures and the rock matrix are modeled, and the resulting pressure transients evaluated. Thermal conduction tends to retard the movement of the thermal front in the fractures, which significantly affects the pressure transient data. The purpose of the numerical simulation studies is to provide methods for analyzing nonisothermal injection/falloff data for fractured reservoirs.

Cox, B.L.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on methods to detect naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. This report discusses 3D-3C seismic acquisition and 3D P-wave alternate processing.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

383

NETL: Carbon Storage - Regional Partnership Validation Phase (Phase II)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Validation Phase focuses on validating the most promising regional opportunities to deploy CCS technologies by building upon the accomplishments of the Characterization Phase. Two different CO2 storage approaches are being pursued in this phase: geologic and terrestrial carbon storage. The Validation Phase includes 20 geologic and 11 terrestrial CO2 storage projects. Efforts are being conducted to: Validate and refine current reservoir simulations for CO2 storage projects. Collect physical data to confirm CO2 storage potential and injectivity estimates. Demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) technologies. Develop guidelines for well completion, operations, and abandonment.

384

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality regulates the underground storage of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Prior to the use of any underground reservoir for the storage of natural gas and prior to the exercise of eminent domain by any person, firm, or corporation having such right under laws of the state of Louisiana, the commissioner, shall have found all of the following:

385

Low-pressure reservoir drilled with air/N[sub 2] in a closed system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition tests on simulated produced fluids helped determine the ideal air/nitrogen mixture for an underbalanced drilling operation that used a closed surface system to process return fluids. The low-pressure, heavy-oil target reservoir required underbalanced drilling to minimize formation damage. Underbalanced or near-balanced drilling can improve production from pressure-depleted reservoirs by reducing the chance of formation damage from drilling fluid losses. Underbalanced drilling technology currently available includes the use of gas injection through parasite strings or through drilling tubulars. No one (to the author's knowledge) has combined concentric-string commingled gas injection with through-drilling-tubular commingled gas injection. The paper describes lab work, test results, surface returns, downhole design, operations, and field results.

Teichrob, R.R. (Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Advances made in rechargeable solid hydrogen fuel storage tanks. March 21, 2012 Field experiments on the Alamosa Canyon How best to achieve the benchmark of 300 miles of travel without refueling? It may be to use the lightweight compound ammonia-borane to carry the hydrogen. With hydrogen accounting for almost 20 percent of its weight, this stable, non-flammable compound is one of the highest-capacity materials for storing hydrogen. In a car, the introduction of a chemical catalyst would release the hydrogen as needed, thus avoiding on-board storage of large quantities of flammable hydrogen gas. When the ammonia-borane fuel is depleted of hydrogen, it would be regenerated at a

387

Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PCs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large 3-D geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally non-symmetric and non-positive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000 + grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PCs provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.

Antunez, E.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Large-scale three-dimensional geothermal reservoir simulation on PCs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGH2, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's general purpose simulator for mass and heat flow and transport was enhanced with the addition of a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers and ported to a PC. The code was applied to a number of large 3-D geothermal reservoir problems with up to 10,000 grid blocks. Four test problems were investigated. The first two involved a single-phase liquid system, and a two-phase system with regular Cartesian grids. The last two involved a two-phase field problem with irregular gridding with production from and injection into a single porosity reservoir, and a fractured reservoir. The code modifications to TOUGH2 and its setup in the PC environment are described. Algorithms suitable for solving large matrices that are generally non-symmetric and non-positive definite are reviewed. Computational work per time step and CPU time requirements are reported as function of problem size. The excessive execution time and storage requirements of the direct solver in TOUGH2 limits the size of manageable 3-D reservoir problems to a few hundred grid blocks. The conjugate gradient solvers significantly reduced the execution time and storage requirements making possible the execution of considerably larger problems (10,000+ grid blocks). It is concluded that the current PCs provide an economical platform for running large-scale geothermal field simulations that just a few years ago could only be executed on mainframe computers.

Antunez, Emilio; Moridis, George; Pruess, Karsten

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Compressed air energy storage technology program. Annual report for 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All of the major research funded under the Compressed Air Energy Storage Technology Program during the period March 1980 to March 1981 is described. This annual report is divided into two segments: Reservoir Stability Studies and Second-Generation Concepts Studies. The first represents research performed to establish stability criteria for CAES reservoirs while the second reports progress on research performed on second-generation CAES concepts. The report consists of project reports authored by research engineers and scientists from PNL and numerous subcontractors including universities, architect-engineering, and other private firms.

Kannberg, L.D.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix...

392

Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new technology for energy storage called Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage (SPHS) has been evaluated from a techno-economical point of view. Intermittent renewable energy sources… (more)

Erik, Almen John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energys Vehicle Technology Program to conduct various types of energy storage...

394

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

395

Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.  

SciTech Connect

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories' petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Analysis of Hydrogen Depletion Using a Scaled Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen depletion tests of a scaled passive autocatalytic recombine (pAR) were performed in the Surtsey test vessel at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The experiments were used to determine the hydrogen depletion rate of a PAR in the presence of steam and also to evaluate the effect of scale (number of cartridges) on the PAR performance at both low and high hydrogen concentrations.

Blanchat, T.K.; Malliakos, A.

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), natural uranium hexafluoride (NUF6), and low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (LEUF6) at the DOE Paducah site in western Kentucky (DOE Paducah) and the DOE Portsmouth site near Piketon in south-central Ohio (DOE Portsmouth)1. This inventory exceeds DOE's current and projected energy and defense program needs. On March 11, 2008, the Secretary of Energy issued a policy statement (the

399

INTELLIGENT COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR RESERVOIR ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE RED RIVER FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Integrated software has been written that comprises the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). Luff Exploration Company is applying these tools for analysis of carbonate reservoirs in the southern Williston Basin. The integrated software programs are designed to be used by small team consisting of an engineer, geologist and geophysicist. The software tools are flexible and robust, allowing application in many environments for hydrocarbon reservoirs. Keystone elements of the software tools include clustering and neural-network techniques. The tools are used to transform seismic attribute data to reservoir characteristics such as storage (phi-h), probable oil-water contacts, structural depths and structural growth history. When these reservoir characteristics are combined with neural network or fuzzy logic solvers, they can provide a more complete description of the reservoir. This leads to better estimates of hydrocarbons in place, areal limits and potential for infill or step-out drilling. These tools were developed and tested using seismic, geologic and well data from the Red River Play in Bowman County, North Dakota and Harding County, South Dakota. The geologic setting for the Red River Formation is shallow-shelf carbonate at a depth from 8000 to 10,000 ft.

Kenneth D. Luff

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

INTELLIGENT COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR RESERVOIR ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE RED RIVER FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Integrated software has been written that comprises the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). Luff Exploration Company is applying these tools for analysis of carbonate reservoirs in the southern Williston Basin. The integrated software programs are designed to be used by small team consisting of an engineer, geologist and geophysicist. The software tools are flexible and robust, allowing application in many environments for hydrocarbon reservoirs. Keystone elements of the software tools include clustering and neural-network techniques. The tools are used to transform seismic attribute data to reservoir characteristics such as storage (phi-h), probable oil-water contacts, structural depths and structural growth history. When these reservoir characteristics are combined with neural network or fuzzy logic solvers, they can provide a more complete description of the reservoir. This leads to better estimates of hydrocarbons in place, areal limits and potential for infill or step-out drilling. These tools were developed and tested using seismic, geologic and well data from the Red River Play in Bowman County, North Dakota and Harding County, South Dakota. The geologic setting for the Red River Formation is shallow-shelf carbonate at a depth from 8000 to 10,000 ft.

Kenneth D. Luff

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

220-MW compressed air storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SOYLAND Power Cooperative, Inc., a Decatur, Illinois based co-op, could get reasonably priced baseload power from neighboring utilities, had a plant of its own planned for the near future as well as a share in another, but peaking power, generated by oil and gas, to meet surges in demand, was very costly. The co-op's solution, first in the U.S., is a 220-megawatt compressed air energy storage system (CAES), which the electric utility industry is watching with great interest. CAES splits the two basic stages of a conventional gas turbine, making the most of baseload power while using the least peaking or intermediate fuel. During off-peak periods, inexpensive baseload electricity from coal or nuclear power plants runs a combination motor-generator in motor mode which, in turn, operates a compressor. The compressed air is cooled and pumped into an underground storage reservoir hundreds of thousands of cubic yards in volume and about two thousand feet (about 610 m) below the surface. There the air remains, at pressures up to about 60 atm (6.1 MPa), until peaking or intermediate power is required. Then, the air is released into a combustor at a controlled rate, heated by oil or gas, and expanded through a turbine. The turbine drives the motor-generator in a generator mode, thereby supplying peaking or intermediate power to the grid.

Lihach, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

River Flow Forecasting for Reservoir management through Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In utilities using a mixture of hydroelectric and nonhydroelectric power, the economics of the hydroelectric plants depend upon the reservoir height and the inflow into the reservoir for several months into the future. Accurate forecasts of reservoir ...

Meuser Valenca; Teresa Ludermir; Anelle Valenca

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Unsteady Flow Model for Fractured Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing low permeability reservoirs is currently a big challenge to the industry. Because low permeability reservoirs are of low quality and are easily damaged, production from a single well is low, and there is unlikely to be any primary recovery. ... Keywords: Low permeability, Fractured well, Orthogonal transformation, Unsteady, Productivity

Li Yongming; Zhao Jinzhou; Gong Yang; Yao Fengsheng; Jiang Youshi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Geothermal reservoir insurance study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal goal of this study was to provide analysis of and recommendations on the need for and feasibility of a geothermal reservoir insurance program. Five major tasks are reported: perception of risk by major market sectors, status of private sector insurance programs, analysis of reservoir risks, alternative government roles, and recommendations.

Not Available

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Regulation of new depleted uranium uses.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates how the existing U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory structure and pending modifications would affect full deployment into radiologically uncontrolled areas of certain new depleted uranium (DU) uses being studied as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's DU uses research and development program. Such new DU uses include as catalysts (for destroying volatile organic compounds in off-gases from industrial processes and for hydrodesulfurization [HDS] of petroleum fuels), semiconductors (for fabricating integrated circuits, solar cells, or thermoelectric devices, especially if such articles are expected to have service in hostile environments), and electrodes (for service in solid oxide fuel cells, in photoelectrochemical cells used to produce hydrogen, and in batteries). The report describes each new DU use and provides a detailed analysis of whether any existing NRC licensing exemption or general license would be available to users of products and devices manufactured to deploy the new use. Although one existing licensing exemption was found to be possibly available for catalysts used for HDS of petroleum fuels and one general license was found to be possibly available for catalysts, semiconductors, and electrodes used in hydrogen production or batteries, existing regulations would require most users of products and devices deploying new DU uses to obtain specific source material licenses from the NRC or an Agreement State. This situation would not be improved by pending regulatory modifications. Thus, deployment of new DU uses may be limited because persons having no previous experience with NRC or Agreement State regulations may be hesitant to incur the costs and inconvenience of regulatory compliance, unless using a DU-containing product or device offers a substantial economic benefit over nonradioactive alternatives. Accordingly, estimating the risk of deploying new DU-containing products and devices in certain radiologically uncontrolled areas is recommended. If the estimated risks of such deployment are found to be acceptable, then it may be possible to justify adding new exemptions or general licenses to the NRC regulations.

Ranek, N. L.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate oojective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. This report presents a summary of technical progress of the well log analysis of Kuparuk Field, Northslope, Alaska.

Sharma, G.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization -- determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis -- source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.

Sharma, G.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization-determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis-source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. Results are discussed.

Sharma, G.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermophysical behavior of St. Peter sandstone: application to compressed air energy storage in an aquifer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-term stability of a sandstone reservoir is of primary importance to the success of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers. The purpose of this study was to: develop experimental techniques for the operation of the CAES Porous Media Flow Loop (PMFL), an apparatus designed to study the stability of porous media in subsurface geologic environments, conduct experiments in the PMFL designed to determine the effects of temperature, stress, and humidity on the stability of candidate CAES reservoir materials, provide support for the CAES field demonstration project in Pittsfield, Illinois, by characterizing the thermophysical stability of Pittsfield reservoir sandstone under simulated field conditions.

Erikson, R.L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Storage Storage Energy storage isn’t just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more. Energy storage isn't just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more.

413

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

414

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

415

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

416

A New Method for Treating Wells in Reservoir Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new method for formulating finite difference equations for reservoir simulation has been developed. It can be applied throughout the entire simulated reservoir or to… (more)

Gessel, Gregory M 1980-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Wyoming Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Wyoming Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

418

Illinois Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Illinois Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

419

Arkansas Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Arkansas Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

420

Florida Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Florida Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "depleted reservoir storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Montana Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Montana Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

422

Kentucky Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Kentucky Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

423

Michigan Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Michigan Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

424

Pennsylvania Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Pennsylvania Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

425

Oklahoma Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

426

Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

427

Louisiana--South Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Louisiana--South Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

428

California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

429

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

430

Louisiana--North Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Louisiana--North Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

431

The Influence of Reservoir Heterogeneity on Geothermal Fluid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. THE INFLUENCE OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY ON GEOTHERMAL FLUID AND METHANE RECOVERY FROM A GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Ariel Esposito...

432

Effect of matrix shrinkage on permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dynamic nature of coalbed methane reservoir permeability makes the continuous modeling of the flow process difficult. Knowledge of conventional reservoir modeling is of little… (more)

Tandon, Rohit, 1966-

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details...

434

Lower 48 States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Lower 48 States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

435

Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

436

New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

437

New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

438

Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

439

Source/Sink Matching for U.S. Ethanol Plants and Candidate Deep Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents data on the 140 existing and 74 planned ethanol production facilities and their proximity to candidate deep geologic storage formations. Half of the existing ethanol plants and 64% of the planned units sit directly atop a candidate geologic storage reservoir. While 70% of the existing and 97% of the planned units are within 100 miles of at least one candidate deep geologic storage reservoir. As a percent of the total CO2 emissions from these facilities, 92% of the exiting units CO2 and 97% of the planned units CO2 emissions are accounted for by facilities that are within 100 miles of at least one potential CO2 storage reservoir.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

440

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties - keep it cool with thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool thermal energy storage (TES) is described as a means for electric utilities to provide electricity from off-peak times, particularly in the summer when air-conditioning accounts for 50% or more of electricity consumption. Cool TES uses off-peak power to provide cooling capacity by extracting heat from a storage medium such as ice or other phase change material. A refrigeration system may may be utilized at night to provide a reservoir of cold material. During the day, the reservoir is tapped to provide cooling capacity. The advantages of TES are discussed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

"Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage,"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of carbon dioxide (CO of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). DE-FOA-0000652, titled, "Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage," addresses key geologic storage challenges and uncertainties that include improving and validating containment, improving injection operations, increasing reservoir storage efficiency, and mitigating potential releases of CO 2 from the engineered containment system. The following four technical areas of interest are addressed: Area of Interest 1 - Studies of Existing Wellbores Exposed to CO 2 ; Area of Interest 2 - Advanced Wellbore Integrity Technologies; Area of Interest 3 - Field Methods to Optimize Capacity and Ensure Storage Containment; and Area of Interest 4 - Enhanced Simulation Tools to Improve Predictions and

443

Optimizing reservoir management through fracture modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture flow will become increasingly important to optimal reservoir management as exploration of geothermal reservoirs continues and as injection of spent fluid increases. The Department of Energy conducts research focused on locating and characterizing fractures, modeling the effects of fractures on movement of fluid, solutes, and heat throughout a reservoir, and determining the effects of injection on long-term reservoir production characteristics in order to increase the ability to predict with greater certainty the long-term performance of geothermal reservoirs. Improvements in interpreting and modeling geophysical techniques such as gravity, self potential, and aeromagnetics are yielding new information for the delineation of active major conduits for fluid flow. Vertical seismic profiling and cross-borehole electromagnetic techniques also show promise for delineating fracture zones. DOE funds several efforts for simulating geothermal reservoirs. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has adopted a continuum treatment for reservoirs with a fracture component. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has developed simulation techniques which utilize discrete fractures and interchange of fluid between permeable matrix and fractures. Results of these research projects will be presented to industry through publications and appropriate public meetings. 9 refs.

Renner, J.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Integrated reservoir characterization for the Mazari oil field, Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a field study performed on the Mazari oil field located in Sind province, Pakistan. We used an integrated reservoir characterization technique to incorporate the geological, petrophysical, and reservoir performance data to interpret historical reservoir performance, to assess and refine reservoir management activities, and to make plans for future reservoir developments. We used a modified approach to characterize within the mappable geological facies. Our approach is based on the Kozeny-Carmen equation and uses the concept of mean hydraulic radius. As part of our objective to characterize the reservoir, we tabulated reservoir characteristics for each hydraulic flow unit, and we presented estimates of in-place reserves. We evaluated reservoir performance potential using the production history, well tests and cased-hole well log surveys. Suggestions for reservoir management activities in conjunction with the evaluation of the reservoir performance are discussed in detail. Finally, we give recommendations for activities in reservoir development particularly infill drilling considerations and secondary recovery efforts.

Ashraf, Ejaz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Analytical solution for Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 geo-sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caused by the speci?c heat capacity of the rock and connateis the ?uid speci?c heat capacity, w (ML ) is the density ofL T ? ) is the speci?c heat capacity of water, s (ML ?3 ) is

Mathias, S.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Status...

447

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 19, 2012 December 19, 2012 DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy publication. November 20, 2012 DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology A promising post combustion membrane technology that can separate and capture 90 percent of the carbon dioxide from a pulverized coal plant has been successfully demonstrated and received Department of Energy approval to advance to a larger-scale field test. November 19, 2012 Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in

449

Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Storage » Simulation Carbon Capture and Storage » Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage Research in simulation and risk assessment is focused on development of advanced simulation models of the subsur