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1

Using Decline Map Anlaysis (DMA) to Test Well Completion Influence on Gas Production Decline Curves in Barnett Shale (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant Counties)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing interest and focus on unconventional reservoirs is a result of the industry's direction toward exploring alternative energy sources. It is due to the fact that conventional reservoirs are being depleted at a fast pace. Shale gas reservoirs are a very favorable type of energy sources due to their low cost and long-lasting gas supply. In general, according to Ausubel (1996), natural gas serves as a transition stage to move from the current oil-based energy sources to future more stable and environment-friendly ones. By looking through production history in the U.S Historical Production Database, HPDI (2009), we learn that the Barnett Shale reservoir in Newark East Field has been producing since the early 90's and contributing a fraction of the U.S daily gas production. Zhao et al. (2007) estimated the Barnett Shale to be producing 1.97 Bcf/day of gas in 2007. It is considered the most productive unconventional gas shale reservoir in Texas. By 2004 and in terms of annual gas production volume, Pollastro (2007) considered the Barnett Shale as the second largest unconventional gas reservoir in the United States. Many studies have been conducted to understand better the production controls in Barnett Shale. However, this giant shale gas reservoir is still ambiguous. Some parts of this puzzle are still missing. It is not fully clear what makes the Barnett well produce high or low amounts of gas. Barnett operating companies are still trying to answer these questions. This study adds to the Barnett chain of studies. It tests the effects of the following on Barnett gas production in the core area (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant counties): * Barnett gross thickness, including the Forestburg formation that divides Barnett Shale. * Perforation footage. * Perforated zones of Barnett Shale. Instead of testing these parameters on each well production decline curve individually, this study uses a new technique to simplify this process. Decline Map Analysis (DMA) is introduced to measure the effects of these parameters on all production decline curves at the same time. Through this study, Barnett gross thickness and perforation footage are found not to have any definite effects on Barnett gas production. However, zone 3 (Top of Lower Barnett) and zone 1 (Bottom of Lower Barnett) are found to contribute to cumulative production. Zone 2 (Middle of Lower Barnett) and zone 4 (Upper Barnett), on the other hand, did not show any correlation or influence on production through their thicknesses.

Alkassim, Ibrahim

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

City of Tarrant, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tarrant, Alabama (Utility Company) Tarrant, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Tarrant Place Alabama Utility Id 18472 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate (Part 2 ) Commercial Commercial Rate (Part 3 ) Commercial Commercial Rate(part 1) Commercial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0963/kWh Commercial: $0.1120/kWh Industrial: $0.1090/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from

3

Tarrant County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tarrant County, Texas: Energy Resources Tarrant County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.7732044°, -97.3516558° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.7732044,"lon":-97.3516558,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Solar Screens: $200 Energy Efficient Windows: $500 Programmable Thermostat: $50 Attic Insulation (Retrofit): $400 Attic Insulation (New Construction): $400 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $600/unit Central Heat Pumps: $700/unit Geothermal Heat Pumps: $700/unit Attic Reflective Radiant Barrier: $200 - $300

5

Denton County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Place Corinth, Texas Utility Id 5078 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Commercial-TOU (Demand Metered Customers) Commercial Commercial-TOU (Non-Coincident Peak Demand Charge) Commercial Commercial-TOU (Non-Demand Metered Customers) Residential Industrial Rate- TOU Industrial Industrial Rates Industrial Public Building Rate (1) Residential Public Building Rate (2) Residential Public Building-TOU Residential

6

City of Denton, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denton Denton Place Texas Utility Id 5063 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Small- Single Phase Commercial General Service Small- Three Phase Commercial Residential- Renewable Energy- Single Phase Residential Residential- Renewable Energy- Three Phase Residential Residential- Single Phase Residential Residential- Three Phase Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0872/kWh

7

Denton County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Elec Coop, Inc County Elec Coop, Inc (Redirected from Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric) Jump to: navigation, search Name Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Place Corinth, Texas Utility Id 5078 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Commercial-TOU (Demand Metered Customers) Commercial Commercial-TOU (Non-Coincident Peak Demand Charge) Commercial Commercial-TOU (Non-Demand Metered Customers) Residential Industrial Rate- TOU Industrial

8

Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Country United States Headquarters Location Corinth, Texas Recovery Act Funding $17,205,844.00 Total Project Value $40,966,296.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project Coordinates 33.1540091°, -97.0647322° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

9

SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington, DC 20005-3364 USA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SNR Denton US LLP SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington, DC 20005-3364 USA Thomas C. Jensen Partner thomas.jensen@snrdenton.com D +1 202 408 3956 M 703 304 5211 T +1 202 408 6400 F +1 202 408 6399 snrdenton.com March 28, 2012 BY E-MAIL Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson:: This letter is submitted on behalf of PPL Electric and Public Service Electric and Gas Company ("PSE&G") 1 ,(referred to herein as "the Companies") with respect to the Susquehanna-Roseland

10

A study of the fluid inclusion, stable isotope and mineralogical characteristics of the Denton fluorspar deposit, Cave-in-Rock, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district contains numerous vein type deposits and larger bedded replacement deposits containing fluorite with lesser amounts of sphalerite, galena and barite. Fluid inclusion, stable isotope and paragenetic studies were undertaken to determine the changes in depositional temperatures and salinities of the ore fluids responsible for mineralization at the Denton mine, and to combine these data with information from other deposits to help develop a picture of regional ore deposition. 38 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

Koellner, M.S.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sputterer: Denton Discovery 22  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nitrides: electrical isolation, etching masks. Access Information: Access to this tool requires that you have attended NanoFab safety orientation ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

12

Bosque County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bosque County, Texas: Energy Resources Bosque County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.8507607°, -97.6982272° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.8507607,"lon":-97.6982272,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Sputterer: Denton Vacuum Discovery-550  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nitrides: electrical isolation, etching masks. Access Information: Access to this tool requires that you have attended NanoFab safety orientation ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

14

Denton, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

412°, -97.1330683° 412°, -97.1330683° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.2148412,"lon":-97.1330683,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Denton Discovery-550 Vacuum Sputtering System Users ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Import and Export buttons convert the displayed file into a format that is compatible ... The names of the inlet gases, the gas correction factors ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

16

Denton E-beam Evaporator #1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Capacity: 4 wafers; Cryopumped with a base vacuum of 8E-8T; Uniformity shield yielding thickness uniformity of 5% over 100mm wafers. ...

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Descriptions and Expectations of Recommended BMPs for Improving the Bosque River Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bosque River and its watershed face complex water quality problems that are not easy to solve. Attempts have been made to improve the quality of the water moving through this watershed, but have had little success due to the broad scope of work that is needed to positively impact water quality in the Bosque River. This document is part of a multi-faceted project that aims to improve the environmental infrastructure in the watershed in a manner that focuses on existing pollution issues. The projects first phase, which included the development of an environmental infrastructure improvement plan, has been completed. This plan outlined a methodology for determining likely areas that would contribute the most significant source of pollution to the watershed and developed a tool for determining the priority in which all sub-watersheds in the basins should be evaluated for needed pollution abatement measures. The Phase I report also established a list of feasible best management practices (BMPs) and ranked them based on the recommendations of a scientific advisory committee. Six steps were identified as an effective process to choose the proper BMPs for each sub-watershed in the basin. If these steps are followed, the best BMPs for each location should be effectively identified. This document expands on the Phase I report by providing an in-depth physical description of each BMP along with an overview of potential costs and applicable areas, situations, and locations where these practices should be implemented. The BMPs are organized into five groups based on applicable location(s): on-farm BMPs, between field and creek BMPs, in-stream or gully BMPs, universal BMPs, and city BMPs. The majority of these BMPs target the excessive amount of nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), entering surface water supplies. Several BMPs also focus on sediment control, as some of the soils in the watershed are highly erosive and pose the threat of transporting nutrients with them when they erode. Some BMPs also address ecosystem health and habitat issues in the watershed. Collectively, the recommended BMPs aim to improve the overall quality and productivity of the entire watershed. Many of these BMPs involve simple, inexpensive adjustments of current practices while others require more significant changes that may require technical and financial assistance. The last section of this document highlights potential sources of technical information and methods for disseminating educational materials to landowners and other interested parties. Potential federal and state sources of funding are also listed in this section for the use of parties considering the installation of multiple or more expensive BMPs on their land. This document serves as a source of general information about BMPs that would benefit landowners and agency personnel assisting landowners in the Bosque River watershed. This information can help guide interested parties to BMPs that are most feasible for their needs as well as provide a general overview of how to implement the selected practice(s) to yield the best results for their location. Successful BMP implementation will reduce the impact of human activities and lead to environmental improvement in the Bosque watershed.

Meier, Megan; Gregory, Lucas

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Bosque River Environmental Infrastructure Improvement Plan: Phase II BMP Modeling Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bosque River Watershed is located in the Brazos River Basin in central Texas and is facing a suite of water quality issues resulting in sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. These loadings are potentially derived from improperly managed cropland and grazing land, land-applied dairy waste, and effluent discharge from eight wastewater treatment plants. The first phase of the project developed an effective methodology for determining priority areas in the watershed where best management practice (BMP) implementation would likely yield the greatest improvements in water quality. The objectives of this project (Phase II) are to apply the Soil and Watershed Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to simulate and evaluate the impacts of implementing several best management practices (a) in the entire watershed, and (b) at incremental levels in high, medium, and low priority areas of the watershed, identified using three different impact indices. Initially, the SWAT model was calibrated for long-term annual and monthly flow at a USGS gaging station located in the lower portion of the watershed for the period from 1980 through 2005 and was validated at the same location for the period 1960 through 1979. The model was also calibrated, at a monthly time step, for water quality parameters including sediment, organic and mineral nitrogen, and phosphorus at two locations, Hico and Valley Mills. Model performance statistics (coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe modeling efficiency) indicated that model performance was satisfactory and could be used for evaluating the impacts of alternative management scenarios to reduce nonpoint source pollution. BMPs including streambank stabilization, gully plugs, recharge structures, conservation tillage, terraces, contour farming, grazing management, manure incorporation, edge-of-field filter strips, and PL-566 reservoirs were simulated as being implemented in the watershed areas that met the respective practices specific criteria for implementation. These BMPs were simulated individually and the resulting farm level (HRU level), subwatershed level, and watershed outlet level impacts were quantified for each BMP. Reductions in sediment load at the watershed outlet, as a result of implementing these BMPs individually, was as much as 37 percent while reductions in total nitrogen (TN) ranged from 1 percent to 24 percent and total phosphorus (TP) varied from a 3 percent increase to a 30 percent decrease. The 3 percent increase is indicative of conservation tillage and is likely caused by the lack of soil inversion and mixing, which yields an accumulation of dissolved (mineral) phosphorus in the soils surface layer. At subwatershed levels, reductions brought about by implementing the BMPs were relatively greater as compared to the watershed outlet reductions. Reductions in sediment were as high as 47 percent and reductions in TN and TP were 37 percent and 32 percent, respectively. Subwatersheds were categorized into high, medium, and low priority based on calibrated simulation results. Considering sediment, TN, and TP (as pollutants), three types of total impact indices were estimated. The Concentration Impact Index is based on pollutant concentrations (SWAT output values extracted from the reach output file), considers contributions from the subwatershed as well as the entire upstream watershed, and is effective in determining priority areas for addressing localized pollution problems in low and high flow conditions. The Load Per Unit Area Impact Index is based on the total pollutant load coming from a specific area (SWAT output values extracted from the subbasin output file), considers contributions from an individual subwatershed, and is used to effectively assign a priority to each subwatershed. The Load Impact Index is based on pollutant loads from subwatersheds and upstream areas (SWAT output values extracted from the reach output file) and portrays the cumulative effects of pollutant loading throug

Tuppad, Pushpa; Srinivasan, Raghavan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Solar Rebate Program ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

must contact the DME GreenSense Program Manager for details Equipment Requirements Solar Water Heaters must preheat water for a permanently installed electric water heater...

20

Denton County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Texas: Energy Resources County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.1418611°, -97.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1418611,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denton bosque tarrant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Heat pumps, Programmable Thermostats, Windows, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Attic Reflective Barrier, Solar Screens Active Incentive Yes...

22

Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Solar Rebate Program ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate PV: 15,000 per structure Solar Water Heater: 300 per unit Program Info Start Date 0101...

23

Denton Municipal Electric - Standard Offer Rebate Program (Texas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

than or equal to 100 kW: 100kW saved over the minimum set by city, state, and federal energy efficiency standards Savings of more than 100 kW: 125kW saved over the minimum...

24

Biocombustibles y Bosques Neotropicales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, is the world's leading producer of bioethanol from sugar cane, while Colombia is the leading producer down into sugars, but once the appropriate conversion technologies are developed many of the concerns primarily from plant materials, the most commonly used of which are bioethanol and biodiesel. Bioethanol

Haller, Gary L.

25

Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

throughout CoServ Electric's service territory and explores the application of distribution automation and customer systems. The project is aimed at improving customer...

26

The effect of mass media on the short-term cognitive development on the participants at a Tarrant County extension garden seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of the Texas population now lives in urban areas. In rural areas, the traditional Extension audience prefers to receive Extension information at an Extension meeting, from a county agent??s visit to the farm, or a farm demonstration. A rural county Extension agent can invite their target audience to a seminar and probably have almost the entire audience attend. In an urban county, most county Extension agents would not even have a location large enough to hold their target audience. The Extension seminar/meeting model has been successful for many years and will continue to meet the needs of the rural Extension audience and most urban audiences. To determine the preferred delivery method in an urban audience and test the delivery method for gain in knowledge, participants at two garden seminars were asked to complete a questionnaire after attending breakout sessions about landscape maintenance practices. The same information was delivered by different methods; newspaper, television, Extension fact sheet, and a presentation. Participants were asked questions about what they learned in each session, how they preferred to received information, what was their primary source for information, how they perceived their landscape knowledge expertise before and after treatment, and about their past contact with Extension. Results indicate a gain inknowledge from newspaper, video, fact sheet, and presentation; most participants preferred and were receiving most information about landscape maintenance from print media particularly newspaper; participants who perceived their expertise as high before and after the treatment scored higher on the landscape knowledge test; and over half the participants had some previous contact with Extension. The results may be used to guide urban county Extension agents to select education delivery methods to effectively deliver best management practice information to homeowners about landscape maintenance.

Woodson, Dorothy McDaniel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 20, PAGES 37593762, OCTOBER 15, 1998 The role of electron dissipation on the rate of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for PlasmaResearch,Universityof Maryland, CollegePark R. E. Denton Department of Physicsand Astronomy

Shay, Michael

28

Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Barnett Shale is a Mississippian age, very tight matrix, naturally fractured reservoir in the Ft. Worth Basin in north Texas. Unprecedented drilling activity has occurred in the current core productive area (primarily Denton, Wise and Tarrant co.), and Barnett activity continues as the second largest Texas gas field. Since 1981, field cumulative production is roughly 0.365 TCF, and is on pace to reach 1.5 TCF cumulative by 2006. The U.S.G.S. estimates between 3.4 and 10.0 TCF of shale gas are recoverable 1 within the identified play area, making the Barnett an important piece of the economic puzzle for shale gas resources in the U.S. There are many Barnett successes for operators, but a focused, integrated study could help enhance the knowledge base and provide a springboard for improved overall ultimate recoveries. While a percentage of wells are better than 1 BCF, and refrac treatments do improve well reserves overall gas resource recovery-per-well is lower than the industry needs, considering the activity level. Barnett challenges include: Higher liquid volumes & poorer fracture dehydration than desired for gas wells. The need for better baseline data, and understanding of core properties as it relates to Barnett Shale completion and production methods. Developing approaches and technologies to give Barnett fieldwide recovery an opportunity to approach to upper end of U.S.G.S. recoverable gas spectrum. The Barnett is a very successful Play for a number of operators including Republic Energy, Inc. (Dallas, Texas). However, Republic has taken the pro-active step in joining

Jason Lacewell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Denton) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03182010 Location(s): Denton, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 18,...

30

General screening criteria for shale gas reservoirs and production data analysis of Barnett shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas reservoirs are gaining importance in United States as conventional oil and gas resources are dwindling at a very fast pace. The purpose of this study is twofold. First aim is to help operators with simple screening criteria which can help them in making certain decisions while going after shale gas reservoirs. A guideline chart has been created with the help of available literature published so far on different shale gas basins across the US. For evaluating potential of a productive shale gas play, one has to be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the parameters affecting the decision to drill a horizontal well or a vertical well in shale gas reservoirs? 2. Will the shale gas well flow naturally or is an artificial lift required post stimulation? 3. What are the considerations for stimulation treatment design in shale gas reservoirs? A comprehensive analysis is presented about different properties of shale gas reservoirs and how these properties can affect the completion decisions. A decision chart presents which decision best answers the above mentioned questions. Secondly, research focuses on production data analysis of Barnett Shale Gas reservoir. The purpose of this study is to better understand production mechanisms in Barnett shale. Barnett Shale core producing region is chosen for the study as it best represents behavior of Barnett Shale. A field wide moving domain analysis is performed over Wise, Denton and Tarrant County wells for understanding decline behavior of the field. It is found that in all of these three counties, Barnett shale field wells could be said to have established pressure communication within the reservoir. We have also studied the effect of thermal maturity (Ro %), thickness, horizontal well completion and vertical well completion on production of Barnett Shale wells. Thermal maturity is found to have more importance than thickness of shale. Areas with more thermal maturity and less shale thickness are performing better than areas with less thermal maturity and more shale thickness. An interactive tool is developed to access the production data according to the leases in the region and some suggestions are made regarding the selection of the sample for future studies on Barnett Shale.

Deshpande, Vaibhav Prakashrao

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Underground Infrastructure Research and Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

productivity, environmental improvement and renewal of the aging underground infrastructure. OrganizationalCenter for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education CUIRE Board Members Sam Arnaout Pipe Association Tim Kennedy, AMERON NOV Chad Kopecki, Dallas Water Utilities David Marshall, Tarrant

Texas at Arlington, University of

32

The pobladores and local democracy in Chile : the case of El Bosque and Pealoln  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) models of local governance, questioning blanket statements about the virtues of political decentralization. The managerial elitist" model favors individual participation and technical/centralized decision-making ...

Rivera-Ottenberger, Anny Ximena, 1955-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

http:energy.govoedownloadssituation-reports-ohio-valley-and-mid-atlantic-storm-2012 Rebate Denton Municipal Electric- Standard Offer Rebate Program Within the...

34

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Texas Commercial Construction InstallerContractor Residential Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization...

35

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denton Municipal Electric pays residential and small commercial customers to reduce energy demand and consumption in order to reduce the utility bills of DME customers,...

36

FSW13: Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

June 9-11, 2013 University of North Texas Denton, Texas. COURSE CANCELLED. Thank you for your interest in The Fundamentals of Friction Stir Welding...

37

CX-004550: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: Categorical Exclusion Determination 50: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004550: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act State Energy Program University of North Texas - Denton Phase II CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/29/2010 Location(s): Denton, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The University of North Texas, Denton County, proposes to install three 100-kilowatt wind turbines (Northwind 100) within an existing water retention basin in the vicinity of athletic practice fields and a new football stadium on their campus in the town of Denton (Denton County), Texas. The turbine towers would be 121 feet tall, and with an approximate 35-foot blade length, the maximum height of the structure would be 156 feet. The proposed site is approximately 125 feet from a paved road, 1,000

38

CX-002130: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30: Categorical Exclusion Determination 30: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002130: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - State Energy Program - University of North Texas, Denton CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 04/30/2010 Location(s): Denton, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The State of Texas will provide $2,000,000 in Recovery Act funds to the University of North Texas at Denton for the installation of three 100 kilowatt wind turbines on the Denton campus. The turbines are to supply some of the power needs of the campus and support the educational purposes of the institution. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002130.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002129: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002127: Categorical Exclusion Determination

39

Market Design and Motivated Human Trading Behavior in Electricity Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is based on a series of controlled experiments in the trading of wholesale electricity that expands substantially the scope of the research program reported previously. (Backerman, Rassenti and Smith, 1998; Backerman, Denton, Rassenti and ...

Mark A. Olson; Mary L. Rigdon; Michael J. Ziegler

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Perspectives on Strategy From International Research Leaders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Rogers Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 R. E. Denton for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, Col­ lege Park, MD 20742. (email: drake@glue.umd.edu: shay

Waliser, Duane E.

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41

Checklist of the Anostraca  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Checklist of the Anostraca. Denton Belk' & J6n Brtek2. 'Biology Department, Our Lady of the Lake University of San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78207-4666, USA.

42

north central texas water quality Through the Water Quality Education and Planning for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

north central texas water quality Through the Water Quality Education and Planning for North Central Texas project, the Texas Water Resources Institute and Texas AgriLife Extension Service are collabo- rating with Tarrant Regional Water District (TRWD), Texas A&M Spatial Sciences Laboratory

Wilkins, Neal

43

CX-001316: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16: Categorical Exclusion Determination 16: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001316: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments (Denton) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/18/2010 Location(s): Denton, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Installation of Ethanol-85 and biodiesel refueling infrastructure for the City of Denton. This categorical exclusion form is for 1 of 11 proposed locations for project selected under Clean Cities Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-PS26-09NT01236, Area of Interest #4. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001316.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000327: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002841: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001429

44

Two Texas Wind Energy Leaders Win 2011 Public Power Award | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Two Texas Wind Energy Leaders Win 2011 Public Power Award Two Texas Wind Energy Leaders Win 2011 Public Power Award Two Texas Wind Energy Leaders Win 2011 Public Power Award June 28, 2011 - 5:27pm Addthis 2011 Public Power Award trophies | Photo Courtesy of the American Public Power Association 2011 Public Power Award trophies | Photo Courtesy of the American Public Power Association Randy Manion Director of Renewable Energy, Western Area Power Administration With their successful and creative use of wind power, Texas' CPS Energy and Denton Municipal Electric beat out 15 other nominees to win the 2011 Public Power Award last week. CPS Energy, based in San Antonio, Texas, provides 10 percent of its total energy through its voluntary Windtricity program -- and expects to increase this to 20 percent by 2020. And Denton Municipal Electric of Denton, Texas, purchased enough wind power

45

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 23780 of 26,764 results. 71 - 23780 of 26,764 results. Rebate DTE Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE offers a combination of energy audit discounts and rebates for the installation of energy efficiency improvements in Detroit Edison Electric and Michigan Consolidated Gas Co. service areas.... http://energy.gov/savings/dte-energy-electric-residential-energy-efficiency-program Rebate Denton Municipal Electric- GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Denton Municipal Electric pays residential and small commercial customers to reduce energy demand and consumption in order to reduce the utility bills of DME customers, reduce peak load, reduce... http://energy.gov/savings/denton-municipal-electric-greensense-energy-efficiency-rebate-program Rebate Duquesne Light Company- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

46

Estimates of Energy Cost Savings Achieved from 2009 IECC Code-Compliant, Single Family Residences in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of the energy cost savings to be achieved from 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) code-compliant, single-family residences in Texas compared to the pre-2009 IECC codes, including: the 2001 IECC, the 2006 IECC, and the 2006 IECC w/ Houston amendments (w/ HA). A series of simulations were performed using an ESL simulation model (BDL version 4.01.07 of IC3) based on the DOE-2.1e simulation and the appropriate TMY2 weather files for three counties representing three 2009 IECC Climate Zones across Texas: Harris County for Climate Zone 2, Tarrant County for Climate Zone 3, and Potter County for Climate Zone 4. Two options based on the choice of heating fuel type were considered: (a) an electric/gas house (gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating), and (b) a heat pump house (heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating). The base-case building was assumed to be a 2,325 sq. ft., square-shape, one story, single-family, detached house with a floor-to-ceiling height of 8 feet. The house has an attic with a roof pitched at 23 degrees. The base-case building envelope and system characteristics were determined from the general characteristics and the climate-specific characteristics as specified in the 2001 IECC, the 2006 IECC, the 2006 IECC w/HA, and the 2009 IECC. In addition, to facilitate a better comparison with the 2009 code, several modifications were applied to the pre-2009 IECC codes. As a result, the estimated annual energy cost savings per house associated with the 2009 IECC compared to the 2001 and 2006 IECC are: (a) an electric/gas house: $462/year and $206/year for Harris County, $432/year and $216/year for Tarrant County, and $576/year and $153/year for Potter County and (b) a heat pump house: $490/year and $203/year for Harris County, $487/year and $226/year for Tarrant County, and $680/year and $155/year for Potter County. The corresponding % savings of total energy cost of a 2009 IECC code-compliant house are: (a) an electric/gas house: 22.7% and 10.1% for Harris County, 21.8% and 10.9% for Tarrant County, and 28.9% and 7.7% for Potter County and (b) a heat pump house: 21.6% and 8.9% for Harris County, 20.9% and 9.7% for Tarrant County, and 25.7% and 5.8% for Potter County.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Mapping the Human Genome: UC SANTA CRUZUC SANTA CRUZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in industry. She is vice president for sales and marketing at Pacific Power Manage- ment, a solar energy grad student Timothy Jordan and featured students from a variety of disciplines in the acting roles Denton and presented her with the UC Santa Cruz Chancellor's Medallion. "Diversity is a kind of energy

California at Santa Cruz, University of

48

64 Int. J. Business Intelligence and Data Mining, Vol. x, No. x, 200x Copyright 2007 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as follows: Perrizo, W., Ding, Q., Khan, M., Denton, A. and Ding, Q. (200x) `An efficient weighted nearest author Maleq Khan Department of Computer Science, Purdue University, 250 N. University St., West research interests include data mining, database, bioinformatics and spatial data. Maleq Khan received BS

Khan, Maleq

49

Gibbs Energy Minimization in Gas + Liquid + Solid Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gibbs Energy Minimization in Gas + Liquid + Solid Systems DENTON S. EBEL,1 MARK S. GHIORSO,2 in solar nebula gas,4 and more recent treatments of gas + solid + liquid equilibria in solar gas.5, 6 nonideal liquid and solid solutions and a vapor composed of a mixture of ideal gas species, all at fixed

Grossman, Lawrence

50

USC Alumni Association President's Award Past Recipients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Lisa Denton Barnum, Usher and Liz Barton, Kenneth Bensussen, Jane Berlin, Alan E. Bergquist, Zoe, Stephanie Francis, LaVerne L. Fuller, Leonard R. Gabard, Donald L. Garner, Donald K. George, Joanne Marie Hale McCaffrey, Robert A. McCluggage, Vicki McKeever, Sue McKinley, Mark A. Miller, Courtney Morris, Jo

Crump, Gage DeKoeyer

51

Throughput Optimization in Multi-Cell CDMA Dept of Computer Science and Eng.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. University of North Texas Denton, Texas, 76207 rakl@cse.unt.edu Mort Naraghi-Pour Dept of Electrical subject to upper bounds on the blocking probabilities and a lower bound on the bit energy to interference ratio. The goal is to optimize the usage of network resources, provide consistent grade

Akl, Robert

52

THE GRADUATES The Commencement program is a roster of candidates, not an official list of graduates. Appropriate degrees and honors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Biology Brian David Wilt (also BS), German Benjamin Paul Winter, English Jason Shing-Yan Wong, Music, Accounting Brian Decker, Criminal Justice + Elizabeth Mary Deeken, Biology Victor Luigino DeMarco, Health Cardin Henderson, Political Science Patrick Carnell Hess, Psychology John Denton Hitson, Linguistics

Gering, Jon C.

53

NETL: NEPA Categorical Exclusions - January 2014 to Present  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Other Publications and Reports NEPA Categorical Exclusions - January 2014 to Present Archive (November 2009 - January 2013) ARRA Date Title Recipient Name Location DOE/NETL Sponsors N 1/9/2014 Commercialization of an Atmospheric Iron-Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) Process for Power Production - Phase II Prime: Babcock and Wilcox Power Generation Group Sub: Ohio State University Columbus, OH FE/SCC/AESD Y 1/8/2014 Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project Prime: Metropolitan Energy Center, Inc. Sub: Lee's Summit School District R7 Lee's Summit, MO EE/OEPM/PVTD Y 1/8/2014 North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments Prime: North Central Texas Council of Governments Sub: City of Denton Denton, TX EE/OEPM/PVTD

54

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 30, 2010 November 30, 2010 CX-004635: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas- City- Denton CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Denton, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004633: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida- City- Port Saint Lucie CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Port Saint Lucie, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004632: Categorical Exclusion Determination California- City- Visalia CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 11/30/2010 Location(s): Visalia, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 30, 2010 CX-004631: Categorical Exclusion Determination California- City- Turlock CX(s) Applied: B5.1

55

American Alternative Energy Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Energy Systems Alternative Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name American Alternative Energy Systems Place Denton, Texas Zip 76209 Product An American company involved in project development through the provision of technology and engineering. References American Alternative Energy Systems[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Alternative Energy Systems is a company located in Denton, Texas . References ↑ "American Alternative Energy Systems" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Alternative_Energy_Systems&oldid=342107" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

56

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnology --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Eastin, Matthew D. (Matthew D. Eastin) - Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Eaton, Brett (Brett Eaton) - Department of Geography, University of British Columbia Eaton, L. Scott (L. Scott Eaton) - Department of Geology and Environmental Science, James Madison University Eaton, Timothy (Timothy Eaton) - School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College, City University of New York Ebel, Denton (Denton Ebel) - Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, American Museum of Natural History Ebert, Beth (Beth Ebert) - Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology & (CSIRO) Eckstein, Yoram (Yoram Eckstein) - Department of Geology, Kent State

57

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 18610 of 26,764 results. 01 - 18610 of 26,764 results. Download CX-004550: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act State Energy Program University of North Texas - Denton Phase II CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/29/2010 Location(s): Denton, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004550-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004532: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/24/2010 Location(s): Piscataway, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004532-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004536: Categorical Exclusion Determination

58

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Awards  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Awards Awards Wind Powering America has presented Public Power Wind Awards to public-owned utilities, Wind Cooperative of the Year Awards to cooperatives, Carpe Ventum (Seize the Wind) Awards for the first utility-scale wind projects in a state, Wind Powering America Outstanding Partner Awards, and Advocacy Awards. Public Power Wind Awards Southern California Public Power Authority and Snohomish County Public Utility District Glendora, California; and Everett, Washington; June 2013 Moorhead Public Service, City of Palo Alto Utilities, and Minnesota Municipal Power Agency Moorhead, Minnesota; Palo Alto, California; and Minneapolis, Minnesota; June 2012 CPS Energy and Denton Municipal Electric San Antonio, Texas and Denton, Texas; June 2011 Nebraska Public Power District and Princeton Municipal Light Department

59

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste 9/6/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

989 989 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 173 / Friday, September 6, 2002 / Notices 1 The only exception to this decision was the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico, which will ship its TRU waste to the Los Alamos National Laboratory for disposal preparation and storage before disposal at WIPP. SANDEL, E. A. MS. SAUL, E. L. MR. SCHAEFER, J. C. MR. SCHAEFER JR, W. J. MR. SCHNEIDER, P. A. MR. SCHREGARDOUS, D. R. MR. SCHUBERT, D. CAPT SHEA, R. M. MAJGEN SHECK, E. E. MR. SHEPHARD, M. R. MS. SIMON, E. A. MR. SOMOROFF, A. R. DR. STELLOH-GARNER, C. MS. STOREY, R. C. MR. STUSSIE, W. A. MR. SULLIVAN, P. E. RADML TAMBURRINO, P. M. MR. TARRANT, N. J. MS. TESCH, T. G. MR. THOMAS, J. R. BGEN THOMAS, R. O. MR. THOMPSON, R. C. MR. THROCKMORTON JR., E. L. MR. TOWNSEND, D. K. MS.

60

Dendrothermal dream threatened in the Philippines: plantation yields and budgets are slowing progress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The components were there - educated personnel with managerial skills, large areas of underutilized land, excellent climate for tree growth, low-cost labor. The incentive was there - escalating oil prices in the 1970s. Thus, in 1979, the Philippine Dendrothermal Power Program got under way. Planners envisioned 60 to 70 wood-fired electric power plants with a total generating capacity of 200 megawatts (Denton 1983). The power plants - fueled by wood from fast-growing tree plantations-promised employment and income for tree farmers, stable electric rates for consumers, reduced oil imports, rural-to-urban migration, and additional hectares of reforested land. This paper discusses the status of the program.

Durst, P.B.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denton bosque tarrant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Council of Govt Texas Council of Govt EE DE-EE0002548 PMC / PVT Division 2010 Neil Kirschner Oct 2009 through July 2010 1100 S. Mayhill Rd, Denton, TX North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments Installation of E85 and biodiesel refueling infrastructure for the City of Denton. This CX form is for 1 of 11 proposed locations for project selected under Clean Cities FOA DE-PS26-09NT01236, AOI #4. 02 25 2010 NMK Signature.jpg Digitally signed by Neil Kirschner DN: cn=Neil Kirschner, o=US DOE / NETL, ou, email=Neil.Kirschner@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I attest to the accuracy and integrity of this document Date: 2010.02.25 09:49:11 -05'00' 03 18 2010 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=NETL- DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

62

Data:D4fd8c67-9705-45f2-a710-ff9e2481abcd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D4fd8c67-9705-45f2-a710-ff9e2481abcd D4fd8c67-9705-45f2-a710-ff9e2481abcd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Residential-TOU Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/TimeofUse/tabid/205/Default.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

63

Data:D406d6b4-95f4-42ee-98ac-77ee271fdc4b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D406d6b4-95f4-42ee-98ac-77ee271fdc4b D406d6b4-95f4-42ee-98ac-77ee271fdc4b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Public Building-TOU Sector: Residential Description: Available to members receiving or eligible to receive service under the Public Building rate upon request by the member. Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/TimeofUse/tabid/205/Default.aspx Source Parent: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/tabid/74/Default.aspx

64

u.s. DEPARn-IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM EN T CEN T  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARn-IENT OF ENERGY DEPARn-IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM EN T CEN T ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION RECIPIENT:TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PROJECT TITLE: ARRA SEP UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS - DENTON Page 1 of2 STATE; TX Funding Opportunity AUDouDCl'ment Numbt'r Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOOO116 EEOOOO116 EE116 Based on my nvil'w orlhl' information ('onenning thl' proposed adioD, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorizt'd under DOE Order451.lA). I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (includ ing, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (suCh as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

65

file://C:\Documents and Settings\cofield\Desktop\GC-62 Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elisabeth Brown [brown@orcc.org] Elisabeth Brown [brown@orcc.org] Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 4:45 PM To: GC-62 Cc: Kim Denton; Ballard, Thomas B.; Mason, Thom (OR); Smith, Jeff (ORNL) Subject: DOE Request Dear Sir/Madam: The Oak Ridge Economic Partnership is an economic development corporation in Oak Ridge, TN and a partner in Innovation Valley Inc., a regional economic development initiative. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is vital to the growth and success of both our community and region. The resources available at the lab are second to none and are indeed paramount to economic development success in the region. One such example of this success includes the VW assembly plant announcement in Chattanooga, TN. ORNL and its technology capabilities were instrumental in landing this $1 billion manufacturing win for our entire region. We are

66

home edit2 whole TSD November 2002 PDF format.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toxics Hot Spots Program Toxics Hot Spots Program Risk Assessment Guidelines Part II Technical Support Document for Describing Available Cancer Potency Factors December 2002 Secretary for Environmental Protection California Environmental Protection Agency Winston H. Hickox Director Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment Joan E. Denton, Ph.D. Technical Support Document for Describing Available Cancer Potency Factors December 2002 California Environmental Protection Agency Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment Air Toxicology and Epidemiology Section Prepared by: John D. Budroe, Ph.D. Jefferson R. Fowles, Ph.D. Judy Polakoff, M.S. John B. Faust, Ph.D. Jean Rabovsky, Ph.D. Richard Lam, Ph.D. James F. Collins, Ph.D. Melanie A. Marty, Ph.D.

67

Barnett shale rising star in Fort Worth basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippian-age Barnett shale of the Fort Worth basin, North Texas, has emerged as a new and active natural gas play. Natural gas production from the Barnett shale at Newark East field in Denton and Wise counties, Texas, has reached 80 MMcfd from more than 300 wells. However, very little publicly available information exists on resource potential and actual well performance. The US Geological Survey 1995 National Assessment of US Oil and Gas Resources categorized the Mississippian Barnett shale play (play number 4503) as an unconventional gas play but did not quantitatively assess this resource. This article, which expands upon a recent USGS open-file resource assessment report, provides an updated look at the Barnett shale and sets forth a new quantitative assessment for the play.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Koperna, G. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Schmoker, J.W.; Quinn, J.C. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

68

Data:D9bd462e-d822-4658-8142-a1aeabc8b7b6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62e-d822-4658-8142-a1aeabc8b7b6 62e-d822-4658-8142-a1aeabc8b7b6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Public Building Rate (1) Sector: Residential Description: Applicable to public buildings (including schools, churches and community halls, but not municipal facilities) with a demand requirement less than 35 kW Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/PublicBuildings/tabid/204/Default.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

69

Texas's 26th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6th congressional district: Energy Resources 6th congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Texas. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Texas's 26th congressional district Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Texas's 26th congressional district Aecom Government Services AGS American Alternative Energy Systems Caprock Roofing ENTECH Energy Financing Inc Entech Inc Entech Solar Inc formerly WorldWater Solar Technologies ExxonMobil Fluor Corp GreenHunter Energy Inc Higher Power Energy LLC InfiniRel Corporation NatEl Paquin Energy and Fuel Power Generating Inc Shermco Industries Inc Sunluz

70

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility DFW Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Denton County, Texas Coordinates 33.1418611°, -97.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1418611,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Data:F6044a4c-3eea-435b-aee7-514b06737a3b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

044a4c-3eea-435b-aee7-514b06737a3b 044a4c-3eea-435b-aee7-514b06737a3b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Denton, Texas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential- Single Phase Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.cityofdenton.com/Home/ShowDocument?id=17274 Source Parent: http://www.cityofdenton.com Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

72

Data:Aa9e5261-deab-4281-ae40-a23be465e226 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aa9e5261-deab-4281-ae40-a23be465e226 Aa9e5261-deab-4281-ae40-a23be465e226 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Public Building Rate (2) Sector: Residential Description: Applicable to public buildings (including schools, churches and community halls, but not municipal facilities) with a demand requirement of 35 kW or greater. (Billing demand is never less than 50 percent of the highest adjusted kW demand established in the preceding May-to-October billing period, or 35 kW, whichever is greater.)

73

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 26160 of 28,904 results. 51 - 26160 of 28,904 results. Rebate DTE Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE offers a combination of energy audit discounts and rebates for the installation of energy efficiency improvements in Detroit Edison Electric and Michigan Consolidated Gas Co. service areas.... http://energy.gov/savings/dte-energy-electric-residential-energy-efficiency-program Rebate DTE Energy (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE offers a combination of energy audit discounts and rebates for the installation of energy efficiency improvements in Detroit Edison Electric and Michigan Consolidated Gas Co. service areas.... http://energy.gov/savings/dte-energy-gas-residential-energy-efficiency-program Rebate Denton Municipal Electric- GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate

74

Data:47e8e9be-4d6a-4712-beab-816d10ef6a88 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7e8e9be-4d6a-4712-beab-816d10ef6a88 7e8e9be-4d6a-4712-beab-816d10ef6a88 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Wind Rate Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/Wind/tabid/256/Default.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

75

Data:5f38bd92-9f46-4768-b9e5-67b926849ba7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:5f38bd92-9f46-4768-b9e5-67b926849ba7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Denton, Texas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential- Renewable Energy- Single Phase Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.cityofdenton.com/Home/ShowDocument?id=17274 Source Parent: http://www.cityofdenton.com Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

76

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT Board of Directors Reply to: Ronald Rayner C. W. Adams James D. Downing, P.E. Chairman Billy Hickman 66768 Hwy 60 Brian Turner Marvin John P.O. Box 99 Vice-Chairman Jason Pierce Salome, AZ 85348 Denton Ross Jerry Rovey Secretary James N. Warkomski ED8@HARCUVARCO.COM John Utz Gary Wood PHONE:(928) 859-3647 Treasurer FAX: (928) 859-3145 Sent via e-mail Mr. Darrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P. O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 moe@wapa.gov; dswpwrmrk@wapa.gov Re: ED5-Palo Verde Hub Project Dear Mr. Moe, In response to the request for comments issued at the October 6 Parker-Davis Project customer th meeting, and in conjunction with comments previously submitted by the Southwest Public Power

77

Data:C4cf0179-146c-4474-a402-fa4b0245779a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:C4cf0179-146c-4474-a402-fa4b0245779a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial-TOU (Non-Demand Metered Customers) Sector: Residential Description: Applicable for temporary and construction power, but not for shared service. Applicable to members receiving or eligible to receive service under the Commercial rate upon request by the member. Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/TimeofUse/tabid/205/Default.aspx

78

N:\WORK\WORDPERF\CLEANCO1\MEETINGS\PUBLIC\CCPIREG.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Initiative Power Initiative Public Meeting, January 17, 2002 Participants Name Company Location 1 Webcast Attendees David Akers CQ Inc. Homer City PA Richard Armstrong Alchemix Corporation Carefree AZ Piyush Banafar Mitsui Babcock (US) LLC Atlanta GA Bob Bellemare SCIENTECH Inc. Albuquerque NM Berkeley Booth Reliant Energy Houston TX Christine Booth Alchemix Corporation Carefree AZ Mark Bring Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc. Grand Forks ND Leon Chuck U. of Dayton Research Institute Dayton OH Patrick Curry CiDRA Corporation Wallingford CT Alan Darby Rocketdyne Canoga Park CA Dana Davis Charleston WV Bruce Dean Gilead Resources, Inc. Mount Gilead OH Richard Delaney Fluor Corp. Aliso Viejo CA Don Denton Duke Engineering & Services Charlotte NC Steven Derenne Wisconsin Electric Power Milwaukee WI Ray Drnevich

79

Data:540961e2-cb14-46e8-b54e-74d85130830f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cb14-46e8-b54e-74d85130830f cb14-46e8-b54e-74d85130830f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Rate Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to all members having less than 35 kW of maximum demand taking the type of service described in this rate schedule for all of the electric service supplied at one point of delivery and measured through one meter used for all commercial purposes Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/Commercial/tabid/171/Default.aspx

80

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATION FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

548 548 North Central Texas Council of Govt EE DE-EE0002548 PMC PVT Division 2010 Neil Kirschner 12/1/09 - 11/31/13 Various - see below North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX for administrative work to be performed at North Central Texas Council of Governments' office location(s). The EQ identifies Dallas, Irving, Denton, Mansfield, Fort Worth, and Southlake, TX. paper only - no construction NMK Signature.jpg Digitally signed by Neil Kirschner DN: cn=Neil Kirschner, o=US DOE / NETL, ou, email=Neil.Kirschner@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I attest to the accuracy and integrity of this document Date: 2009.11.24 11:55:04 -05'00' 11 24 2009 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=NETL- DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denton bosque tarrant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Data:7c4d4aba-b568-4edd-8507-d811c0a7bdc1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:7c4d4aba-b568-4edd-8507-d811c0a7bdc1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Denton, Texas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service Small- Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to any commercial or industrial customer having a maximum demand of less than 21. 0 kW in each of the previous twelve (12) months for all electric service supplied at one point of delivery and measured through one meter. Source or reference: http://www.cityofdenton.com/Home/ShowDocument?id=17274

82

Hydraulic Fracturing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Fracturing Hydraulic Fracturing Jump to: navigation, search More info on OpenEI Oil and Gas Gateway Federal Environmental Statues Federal Oil and Gas Statutes Oil and Gas Companies United States Oil and Gas Boards International Oil and Gas Boards Other Information Fracking Regulations by State Wells by State Fracking Chemicals Groundwater Protection Related Reports A Perspective on Health and Natural Gas Operations: A Report for Denton City Council Just the Fracking Facts The Politics of 'Fracking': Regulating Natural Gas Drilling Practices in Colorado and Texas Addressing the Environmental Risks from Shale Gas Development Water Management Technologies Used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers Methane contamination of drinking wateraccompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing

83

A Framework for Historic Bridge Preservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an inevitably occurring process, bridges possessing historic, artistic, and engineering significance deteriorate and must be maintained and rehabilitated in order to be kept in service. Ideally, all potentially significant bridges would be properly preserved and continue to beautify and bring character to their surroundings for years to come. However, funding is currently limited for transportation projects in general, and even more so for historic bridge preservation, which some may consider less critical in comparison to other transportation needs. Because of this limitation on resources, it is important that bridge-owning agencies use proper planning and management strategies in order to make the best use of available funding. This thesis presents a framework designed to assist agencies in this process. The framework is devised specifically for TxDOT for use in Tarrant County, Texas, but can be used as a model for agencies anywhere with some modifications to fit the inventory under evaluation. Included in the framework are a methodology for prioritization of bridges within an inventory, guidance on financial and legal procedures, identification of potential funding sources, summary and review of condition assessment practices and bridge mitigation strategies, a template for individual bridge preservation plans, and a framework for resource allocation within a bridge inventory. It can be concluded from this research that early detection of defects, preventive maintenance, condition assessment beyond routine inspection, adjustment of evaluation methodology, and use of engineering judgment when using numerical evaluation methods are critical components of proper management of historic bridges.

Puls, Eric Mark

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comparison of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, 189.1 and IECC Codes for Large Office Buildings in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six energy codes were compared in terms of annual site and source energy consumption. This comparison includes ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, IECC 2009 and ASHRAE 189.1-2009. The analysis was performed for three Texas counties: Harris (climate zone 2A), Tarrant (climate zone 3A) and Potter (climate zone 4B). Both annual site and source energy consumption were compared. ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989 was considered as the base case. ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989 was considered as the base-case. When considering site energy consumption, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 provides an improvement of 16.7%-18.6%. ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 provides an improvement of 22.3%-32.6%, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 provides an improvement of 28.1%-33.9%, IECC 2009 provides an improvement of 27.4%-35.3%, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 provides an improvement of 42.1%-47.7%, and ASHRAE 189.1- 2009 provides an improvement of 46.9%-54.9% above the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989 base-case. When considering source energy consumption, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 provides an improvement of 14.5%- 15.0%, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 provides an improvement of 21.6%- 27.2%, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 provides an improvement of 23.5%-28.4%, and IECC 2009 provides an improvement of 23.4%-30.5%. ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 provides an improvement of 41.8%-45.7% and ASHRAE 189.1-2009 provides an improvement of 44.5%-51.8% above the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989 base-case.

Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J.C.; Kim, H.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Data:4ee08233-4f39-449b-9f02-546fe79e1121 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8233-4f39-449b-9f02-546fe79e1121 8233-4f39-449b-9f02-546fe79e1121 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial-TOU (Non-Coincident Peak Demand Charge) Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/TimeofUse/tabid/205/Default.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

86

Data:630c53c3-dbef-4be4-8f78-db89fc97c7ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

630c53c3-dbef-4be4-8f78-db89fc97c7ad 630c53c3-dbef-4be4-8f78-db89fc97c7ad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Denton, Texas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential- Three Phase Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.cityofdenton.com/Home/ShowDocument?id=17274 Source Parent: http://www.cityofdenton.com Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

87

Data:9d362535-6f01-4f01-9e2a-86fdd27b45b1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9d362535-6f01-4f01-9e2a-86fdd27b45b1 9d362535-6f01-4f01-9e2a-86fdd27b45b1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Denton, Texas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential- Renewable Energy- Three Phase Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.cityofdenton.com/Home/ShowDocument?id=17274 Source Parent: http://www.cityofdenton.com Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

88

Data:A58c7802-71b9-4a1e-a0e2-7154b7fe7627 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A58c7802-71b9-4a1e-a0e2-7154b7fe7627 A58c7802-71b9-4a1e-a0e2-7154b7fe7627 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Rate- TOU Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to members receiving or eligible to receive service under the Industrial rate upon request by the member. Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/TimeofUse/tabid/205/Default.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

89

Data:D60e9910-05d7-4601-aa25-cb85b407f1c5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D60e9910-05d7-4601-aa25-cb85b407f1c5 D60e9910-05d7-4601-aa25-cb85b407f1c5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Rates Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to all members taking the type of service described in this rate schedule for all service supplied at one point of delivery and taken through a single meter for all commercial, industrial and municipal uses requiring 35 kW or more of maximum demand. Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/Industrial/tabid/172/Default.aspx

90

Data:21dd4ca5-257b-4d23-8d7e-e9f1cc751e44 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dd4ca5-257b-4d23-8d7e-e9f1cc751e44 dd4ca5-257b-4d23-8d7e-e9f1cc751e44 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/06/21 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial-TOU (Demand Metered Customers) Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable for temporary and construction power, but not for shared service. Applicable to members receiving or eligible to receive service under the Commercial rate upon request by the member. (Optional for Customers over 10 kWh) Source or reference: http://www.coserv.com/Electric/CustomerService/CurrentRatesandTariff/TimeofUse/tabid/205/Default.aspx

91

Data:83d4da5e-77d7-468f-9143-273b2389c0b5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

83d4da5e-77d7-468f-9143-273b2389c0b5 83d4da5e-77d7-468f-9143-273b2389c0b5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Denton, Texas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service Small- Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to any commercial or industrial customer having a maximum demand of less than 21. 0 kW in each of the previous twelve (12) months for all electric service supplied at one point of delivery and measured through one meter. Source or reference: http://www.cityofdenton.com/Home/ShowDocument?id=17274 Source Parent: http://www.cityofdenton.com

92

Intern experience at the Center for Urban Programs: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report discusses the author's internship at Texas A&M University Center for Urban Programs from May, 1978 through February, 1979. The objectives of the internship were to: 1. Increase the intern's technical competence in problems facing local governments; 2. Improve the administration of the Center for Urban Programs so that the Center can more effectively serve Texas local governments; and 3. Gain insight into the decision making process of local governments by active participation. The intern's responsibilities included work on Center staff-directed research projects, Center-coordinated research projects, and Center administration. The intern's major project responsibilities included directing the Community Energy Conservation project of the Texas Energy Extension Service, developing a street maintenance priority ranking system for the City of Denton, serving as University Coordinator for the Garland Urban Observatory and devising a Budget Forecasting System for the Center. To accomplish the third objective, the author served on the College Station Parks and Recreation Board during the internship. In evaluating the internship, the intern found that it fulfilled all the objectives set forth by the intern, his internship supervisor, and his academic committee chairman. The intern increased his technical competence in solving problems facing local governments. He effectively handled administrative responsibilities at the Center and he participated in the decision making process of a local government. The intern also developed personal contacts with local, state, and federal government officials.

Kerbel, Richard (Richard Ira), 1950-

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are proposed activities for quarter 2 (9/15/00-12/14/00): (1) Conduct TGA and fuel characterization studies--Task 1; (2) Perform re-burn experiments--Task 2; (3) Fabricate fixed bed gasifier/combustor--Task 3; and (4) Modify the 3D combustion modeling code for feedlot and litter fuels--Task 4. The following were achieved During Quarter 2 (9/15/00-12/14/00): (1) The chicken litter has been obtained from Sanderson farms in Denton, after being treated with a cyclonic dryer. The litter was then placed into steel barrels and shipped to California to be pulverized in preparation for firing. Litter samples have also been sent for ultimate/proximate laboratory analyses.--Task 1; (2) Reburn-experiments have been conducted on coal, as a base case for comparison to litter biomass. Results will be reported along with litter biomass as reburn fuel in the next report--Task 2; (3) Student has not yet been hired to perform task 3. Plans are ahead to hire him or her during quarter No. 3; and (4) Conducted a general mixture fraction model for possible incorporation in the code.

Dr. Kalyan Annamalai; Dr. John Sweeten; Dr. Sayeed Mukhtar

2001-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Appendix D  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analysis of Natural Attenuation as the Preferred Groundwater Analysis of Natural Attenuation as the Preferred Groundwater Remedial Alternative at the DOE UMTRA Site Near Riverton, WY This page intentionally left blank Analysis of Natural Attenuation as the Preferred Groundwater Remedial Alternative at the DOE UMTRA Site Near Riverton, W Robert G. Knowlton, ~ r . ' , David M. peterson2, and Hubao zhang2 Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 1 DecisionFX, Inc. Bosque Farms, New Mexico 2 ~ u k e Engineering and Services Albuquerque, New Mexico February 1998 Riverton Analysis Final Report Table of Contents 1. Introduction 1.1 Natural Attenuation Processes 1.2 Evaluation Model 2. Modeling Objectives 3. Model Function 4. General Setting 5. Conceptual Model 5.1 Aquifer System 5.2 Hydrologic Boundaries 5.3 Hydraulic Properties

95

Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Search Term(s) Search Term(s) (supports AND and OR operators and phrase in "double quotes") Register Number Title Abstract Principal Investigator PI Lookup Institution Institution Lookup City Adelaide SA 5001 Aiken Albany Albuquerque Alcoa Center Alexandria Ames Amherst Anchorage Ann Arbor Ardmore Argonne Arlington Asheville Athens Atlanta Auburn Auburn University Augusta Aurora Austin Bailrigg, Lancaster UK, LA1 4Y Baltimore Bar Harbor Batavia Baton Rouge Beaufort Beaverton Belleville Bellevue Bellingham Beltsville Berkeley Bern Bethesda Billerica Bilthoven Binghamton Birmingham Blacksburg Bloomington Boise Boston Bothell Boulder Bozeman Bronx Bronxville Brooklyn Buffalo Burlington Calverton Cambridge Cambridge CB1 4RN Canal Point Carbondale Champaign Chapel Hill Charleston Charlottesville Chestnut Hill Chicago Chico Cincinnati Claremont Clayton Clemson Cleveland Clifton Park Colchester Cold Spring Harbor College Park College Station Colorado Springs Columbia Columbus Concord Cookeville Copenhagen Coral Gables Corvallis Dallas Danville Davis Dayton DeBilt DeKalb Delft Denton Denver Des Plaines Detroit Docklands, Victoria Downsview Duarte Durham East Lansing El Paso Esch-sur-Alzette Essen Eugene Evanston Fairbanks Fairfax Falmouth Flagstaff Fort Collins Gainesville Gaithersburg Galveston Germantown Gloucester Point Golden Grand Forks Grand Junction Great Falls Greenbelt Greenville Guelph Halifax Hamburg Hamilton, Ontario Hampton Hanover Hattiesburg Helsinki Hershey Honolulu Houghton Houston Hunt Valley Huntsville Hyde Park Idaho Falls Indianapolis Iowa City Irvine Ithaca Jerusalem Kalamazoo Kansas City Kennewick Kent Keystone Kingston Kingsville Klamath Falls Knoxville LS2 9JT La Jolla La Jolla, Lafayette Lake Placid Lakewood Lanham Laramie Las Cruces Las Vegas Lausanne Lawrence Lawrenceville Leawood Lethbridge Lewes Lexington Lincoln Little Rock Livermore Loma Linda London London NW1 2BE Los Alamos Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Lutherville Lyngby Madison Manchester Manhattan Mayaguez McLean Medford Melbourne Memphis Menands Menlo Park Merced Mercer Island Miami Middlesex Middletown Millbrook Milwaukee Minneapolis Mississippi State Missoula Moab Mobile Modena Moffett Field Monash, Australia Monterey Montreal Montreal (Quebec) Morgantown Moscow Moss Landing Mountain View Nashua Nashville New Brunswick New Haven New Orleans New York Newark Newport News Newtown Square Norfolk Norman North Dartmouth Norwich Notre Dame Oak Brook Oak Ridge Oakdale Oakland Oklahoma City Old Westbury Omaha Ontario Ontario K1N 6N5 Orlando Orono Ottawa Oxford Oxon Palisades Palo Alto Pasadena Pasco Peoria Philadelphia Phoenix Piscataway Pittsburgh Placitas Plymouth Portland Potsdam Princeton Providence Pullman Radnor Raleigh Rapid City Reading Redmond Reno Rensselaer Research Triangle Pk Reston Richland Richmond Riverside Roanoke Rochester Rockville Rohnert Park Rome Royal Oak Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Fransisco San Jose San Marcos Santa Barbara Santa Cruz Santa Fe Santa Monica Santiago Savannah Scranton Seattle Sequims Sharon Hill Shreveport Silver Spring Silverthorne Sioux Falls Socorro Sonoma St. Louis St. Paul St. Petersburg Stanford State College Stennis Space Center Stennis Space Ctr. Stillwater Stockholm Stockton Stony Brook Storrs Storrs Mansfield Stowe Syracuse Tallahassee Tampa Tempe Thousand Oaks Toledo Toronto Toronto, ON Troy Tucson Tulsa Tuscaloosa Tuskegee Ulm University University Park Upton Urbana Victoria Walpole Waltham Washington Watkinsville West Kingston West Lafayette Westhampton Beach Wheeling Winston-Salem Woodland Park Woods Hole Worcester Yorktown Heights

96

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excessive phosphorus (P) in runoff contributes to eutrophication of fresh water bodies. Studies have shown that manure and effluent applied from animal feeding operations to waste application fields (WAFs) have contributed to excess P in segments of the North Bosque River in east central Texas. There is a growing need for environmentally sound, economically viable, and easy to establish best management practices to control such pollution. Vegetative buffer strips offer a potential solution for reducing runoff P from WAFs by extracting it from soil and by reducing sediment P delivery (due to reduced runoff and soil erosion) to streams. In a field study, ten plots (5m x 5m) were assigned to five replicated treatments, namely control (bare, without having any plant cover), cool season grass, warm season forb, warm season grass, and warm season legume to assess their efficacy of runoff sediment control and P sequestration potential from soil. These plots were established on a coastal Bermuda grass WAF that received dairy lagoon effluent. A runoff collection system, a 1m x 1m sub-plot with a runoff conveyance and collection apparatus, was installed on the upstream and downstream margins of each plot. Natural rainfall runoff samples were collected and analyzed subsequently for total P, soluble P, and total suspended solids in the laboratory. Additionally, the total mass of runoff collected from each sub-plot was calculated. Results suggested that the warm season forb and warm season grass were the most effective vegetative covers for the reduction of runoff P, followed by coastal Bermuda and cool season grass, respectively. The lesser amount of runoff total P in these two treatments was due to lesser runoff mass and lesser sediments in the runoff due to initial interception of rain and less raindrop impact on soil because of denser vegetative cover in both treatments compared to all other treatments.

Giri, Subhasis

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Economic implications of anaerobic digesters on dairy farms in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, air and water have been considered common property resources and, therefore, over utilized as waste receptors. Dairy waste is a leading environmental concern in the North Bosque River watershed in Texas. Changing societal attitudes are forcing dairies and policymakers to balance environmental concerns with farm profitability. Dairies are entering a realm filled with technologies to combat waste concerns. Anaerobic digester technology may play a role in helping dairies balance profit and the environment. Digesters capture methane from livestock waste and transform it into electricity which can be sold to utilities or used on-farm. Because a digester facility is confined, air and water pollution can be reduced. Technological advancement and institutional factor changes allowing the sale of on-farm produced electricity and green power requirements have increased the economic feasibility of digesters. The study of the economic implications of anaerobic digesters for Texas dairies provides producers and policymakers with information to make good decisions concerning adoption and subsidization of this technology. At the beginning of this study, no digesters were operating in Texas. Dairies operating digesters in four states, therefore, were interviewed on-site to provide necessary data. The expected net present value, E(NPV), of a plug-flow digester is negative with and without selling electricity, indicating it should not be constructed based strictly on its financial contribution. At the current electricity-selling price, digesters are less economically feasible than current waste management strategies, lagoons, even after considering potential environmental penalties. However, selling electricity and capturing by-product heat for cost savings makes the digester's E(NPV) less negative than lagoons. The E(NPV) of a covered lagoon digester is positive. This indicates digesters are a potentially feasible waste management strategy. For plug-flow digesters to show a positive E(NPV), the selling price needs to be approximately 82.38% higher than the current price. The breakeven selling price is 12% higher than the current price. Below the breakeven price, lagoons have a larger E(NPV) than plug-flow digesters, therefore making lagoons the preferred waste management strategy. Results suggest changes in rules and technology efficiency make digesters economically competitive with current waste management systems.

Jackson, Randy Scott, Jr.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the ??Cattle Feeding Capital of the World?, producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure /year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO??s), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Waco??the primary source of potable water for Waco??s 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 ?? Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 ?? Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological & Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and Califor

John M. Sweeten, Kalyan Annamalai Brent Auvermann Saqib Mukhtar Sergio C. Capareda Cady Engler Wyatte Harman J.N. Reddy, Robert DeOtte David B. Parker Dr. B.A. Stewart

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the 'Cattle Feeding Capital of the World', producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure/year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO's), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Waco - the primary source of potable water for Waco's 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 - Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 - Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A and M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass) and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and California, cofiring of low quality CB with high quality coal, emission results and ash fouling beh

Kalyan Annamalai, John M. Sweeten, Brent W. Auvermann, Saqib Mukhtar, Sergio Caperada Cady R. Engler, Wyatte Harman Reddy JN Robert Deotte

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

100

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the â??Cattle Feeding Capital of the Worldâ?, producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure /year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOâ??s), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Wacoâ??the primary source of potable water for Wacoâ??s 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 â?? Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 â?? Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological & Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys a

John M. Sweeten, Kalyan Annamalai Brent Auvermann Saqib Mukhtar Sergio C. Capareda Cady Engler Wyatte Harman J.N. Reddy, Robert DeOtte David B. Parker Dr. B.A. Stewart

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

102

Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z