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1

Amplifying Magnetic Fields in High Energy Density Plasmas | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Amplifying Magnetic Fields in High Energy Density Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities...

2

High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. TRIDENT target chamber Sasi Palaniyappan, right, and Rahul Shah left inside a target chamber where the TRIDENT short pulse laser is aimed at a very thin diamond- foil target, a fraction of a micrometer thick. The laser delivers a power on target of 150 Terawatts focused into a 7 micrometer spot, yielding laser brilliance over 100 times more intense than needed to make the target electrons fully relativistic. These experiments test novel methods of producing intense

3

Plasma digital density determining device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

Sprott, Julien C. (Madison, WI); Lovell, Thomas W. (Madison, WI); Holly, Donald J. (Madison, WI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas Robert Rosner The University of Chicago Dec. 12, 2000 Austin, TX (http://flash.uchicago.edu) #12;Burning Plasma Science Workshop Austin ¥ Plasma conditions ¥ Overview of plasma physics issues for astrophysics ¥ Specific examples #12;Burning

5

Science Education Lab | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Lab Science Education Laboratory Overview Gallery: (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by DC Glow Discharges for Undergraduate Laboratories) (Photo by Atmospheric Plasma Laboratory) (Photo by 3D Printing Laboratory) (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by Plasma Speaker with 200 Hz input) (Photo by Dusty Plasma Laboratory) The Science Education Laboratory is a fusion (pun intended) of research between education and plasma science. This unique facility includes a teaching laboratory/classroom, two research labs, and student offices/storage/prep room. The research performed in the Science Education Laboratory is currently centered upon dusty plasmas, plasma speakers, remote control of plasmas for educational purposes, atmospheric plasmas and

6

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas K. Tathe resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore bepro?le, the betatron radiation emitted by theses electrons

Ta Phuoc, Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Science Education Programs | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Science Education Student Programs Undergraduates Community College Internship (CCI) National Undergraduate Fellowship Program (NUF) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) High School High School Internship New Jersey Regional Science Bowl PathSci Young Women's Conference in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics K-8 New Jersey Regional Science Bowl Young Women's Conference in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Science Education Educator Programs Teacher Professional Development CLOuDS: Classroom Leadership: Operating in µ-gravity while Discovering Science Plasma Camp Science Education Outreach Programs Requests Classroom Visits Seminar Series Science on Saturday Lecture Series Community

8

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Home > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas...

9

Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

Plasma wave propagation with a plasma density gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma waves with the plasma diffusion velocity u{sub n} due to a plasma density gradient are described in a positive column plasma. The ion wave is generated by the perturbation of the operating frequency 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and it propagates with the group velocity u{sub g{approx}}c{sub s}{sup 2}/u{sub n{approx}}(10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}) m/s, where c{sub s} is the acoustic velocity in a fine tube fluorescent lamp, while the electron wave cannot be generated with a turbulence of low frequency less than the electron oscillation frequency {omega}{sub pe}. The propagation of the lighting signal observed in long tube fluorescent lamps is well understood with the propagation of ion waves occurring along the plasma density gradient.

Cho, Guangsup; Choi, Eun-Ha; Uhm, Han Sup [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Nowon Wallgye, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Basic Plasma Science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are carried out today in the United States, the European Union, Russia, Japan, Korea and China. PPPL research has expanded knowledge of the science behind such systems and...

12

Interferometric measurements of plasma density in high-. beta. plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The coupled-cavity laser interferometer technique is particularly applicable to the measurement of pulsed plasma densities. This technique is based on the fact that if a small fraction of a gas laser's output radiation is reflected into the laser with an external mirror, the intensity of the laser output is modulated. These amplitude or intensity modulations are produced by changes in the laser gain. A rotating corner mirror or an oscillating mirror can be used to produce a continuous feedback modulation of the interferometer which produces a continuous background fringe pattern. The presence of plasma in the outer cavity causes an additional change which results in a phase shift of the regular period of the background fringe pattern. The integral of the plasma density along the line of sight can be evaluated by comparison of the time history of the fringes obtained with and without plasma.

Quinn, W.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Science literacy | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science literacy Science literacy Subscribe to RSS - Science literacy Having the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes necessary to make informed decisions on scientific issues. Science on Saturday starts Jan. 11 Science fans of all ages can explore a rich variety of science and technology topics at the popular Science on Saturday lecture series hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The series marks its 30-year anniversary when it begins on Saturday, Jan. 11. Science on Saturday offers free lectures about current topics from "The physics of cancer," to "What art can tell us about the brain," that are aimed at the general public from high school age and up. Read more about Science on Saturday starts Jan. 11

14

Interferometer for the measurement of plasma density  

SciTech Connect

An interferometer which combines the advantages of a coupled cavity interferometer requiring alignment of only one light beam, and a quadrature interferometer which has the ability to track multi-fringe phase excursions unambiguously. The device utilizes a Bragg cell for generating a signal which is electronically analyzed to unambiguously determine phase modulation which is proportional to the path integral of the plasma density.

Jacobson, Abram R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Science literacy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science-literacy Having the knowledge science-literacy Having the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes necessary to make informed decisions on scientific issues. en Science on Saturday starts Jan. 11 http://www.pppl.gov/news/2014/01/science-saturday-starts-jan-11

Science fans of all ages can explore a rich variety of science and technology topics at the popular Science on Saturday lecture series hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The series marks its 30-year anniversary when it begins on Saturday, Jan. 11.Science on Saturday offers free lectures about current

16

Turbulent Density Spectrum in Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density fluctuation spectrum in the solar wind reveals a Kolmogorov-like scaling with a spectral slope of -5/3 in wavenumber space. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind, characterized typically by MHD turbulence, over extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories, raising the question of how a compressible magnetofluid exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma fluid. It is shown that a Kolmogorov-like density spectrum can develop by plasma motions that are dominated by Alfv\\'enic cascades whereas compressive modes are dissipated.

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Density Spectrum in the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density fluctuation spectrum in the solar wind reveals a Kolmogorov-like scaling with a spectral slope of -5/3 in wavenumber space. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind, characterized typically by MHD turbulence, over extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories, raising the question of how a compressible magnetofluid exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma fluid. It is shown that a Kolmogorov-like density spectrum can develop by plasma motions that are dominated by Alfv\\'enic cascades whereas compressive modes are dissipated.

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Kinetics driving high-density chlorine plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple fluid model was developed in order to investigate the driving kinetics of neutral and charged species in high-density chlorine plasmas. It was found that the dissociation degree of Cl{sub 2} molecules is directly linked to the power balance of the discharge which controls the electron density. The model was also used to identify those reactions that could be neglected in the particle balance of charged species and those that must be included. Our results further indicate that diffusion losses need to be considered up to a pressure that depends on magnetic-field intensity and reactor aspect ratio. Finally, it is shown that the dominant charged carriers are linked to the dissociation level of Cl{sub 2} molecules.

Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Vidal, F.; Chaker, M.; Giroux, K.; Poirier, J.-S.; Quintal-Leonard, A.; Saussac, J. [Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Density effect on relativistic electron beams in a plasma fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense short-petawatt-laser driven relativistic electron beams in a hollow high-Z plasma fiber embedded in low-Z plasmas of different densities are studied. When the plasma is of lower density than the hollow fiber, resistive filamentation of the electron beam is observed. It is found that the electron motion and the magnetic field are highly correlated with tens of terahertz oscillation frequency. Depending on the material property around the hollow fiber and the plasma density, the beam electrons can be focused or defocused as it propagates in the plasma. Relativistic electron transport and target heating are also investigated.

Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang, X. G. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu, S. Z. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Cai, H. B. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, F. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) and the Panel on Opportunities in Plasma Science and Technology (OPST)  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of plasma science in the United States and identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the PLSC to meet its charge. During July 1992, the PLSC sponsored a workshop on nonneutral plasmas in traps. Although no written report on the workshop results, was prepared for public distribution, a summary of highlights was provided to the OPST Subpanel on Nonneutral Plasmas. The PLSC also continued its follow-up briefings and discussions on the results of the results of the report Plasma Processing of materials. Scientific and Technological Opportunities. As a result of these activities, the Committee is now working with the NRC Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) to organize a symposium on database needs in plasma processing of materials.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion left: research>alctor>meetings scheduled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology Upcoming Meetings Workshops, conferences, meetings will be announced on this page as information becomes...

24

MIT's Plasma Science Fusion Center: Tokamak Experiments Come...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIT's Plasma Science Fusion Center: Tokamak Experiments Come Clean about Impurity Transport American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: MIT's...

25

Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients  

SciTech Connect

Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

Houshmandyar, Saeid [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effects of flow on density profiles in laser irradiated plasmas  

SciTech Connect

When the plasma outflow velocity relative to the critical surface is supersonic, compressional density profiles can form in the critical region. These compressions involve dissipative processes like those in collisionless shocks; associated plasma instabilities and reflected ions may inhibit energy transport and enhance laser light absorption.

Max, C.E.; McKee, C.F.

1977-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

27

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma...

28

Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Program | National Nuclear Security Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Home > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Steady advances in increasing the energy, power, and brightness of lasers and particle beams and advances in pulsed power systems have made possible

30

Magnetohydrodynamics in Tokamak Reactors and its Effect on Plasma Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The worlds energy consumption is at a crossroads. While petroleum coffers continuously yield enough petroleum to meet the current state of energy consumption, increases in energy consumption and advancements in technology bear significant weight on our ability to maintain current standards. Looking ahead, plasma fusion is a means of yielding vast amounts of clean, renewable and virtually limitless amounts of energy. With many advancements taking place since the 1950s, the current Tokamak reactor claims to be able to produce more energy than it consumes, realizing a dream over 60 years in the making. Many characteristics, including plasma density, have to be tuned to maintain optimal conditions. By using finite element method embodied in COMSOL and first principles, one attempts to show how the plasma density evolves through a Tokomaks modes of operation and to quantify the density against a known standard.

Morelli, Franco

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog HEDLP High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > University Partnerships / Academic Alliances > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

32

Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma  

SciTech Connect

Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE D. Meade Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II General Atomics San Diego, CA May for a Next Step Experiment in Magnetic Fusion · Compact High Field Approach - General Parameters · Burning, Madison, WI · Charge for First and Second meetings Scientific value of a Burning Plasma experiment

34

Science Education | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

35

About Science Education | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

36

Science Education Blog | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

37

Science Education Upcoming Events | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

38

Surface science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface science Surface science Subscribe to RSS - Surface science The study of the chemical and physical processes that occur in the interface between two phases of matter, such as solid to liquid or liquid to gas. Bruce E Koel Bruce Koel is professor of chemical and biological engineering at Princeton University. He is associated faculty in chemistry at the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM); associated faculty in the Princeton Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and a collaborator on the National Spherical Torus Experiment at PPPL. Koel is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the American Vacuum Society, and a member of the governing board of the Council for Chemical Research.

39

Helicon Plasma Source Configuration Analysis by Means of Density Measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial results have been obtained from operation of a helicon plasma source built to conduct optimization studies for space propulsion applications. The source features an easily reconfigurable antenna to test different geometries. Operating with He as the source gas, peak densities >= 1.6X10{sup 19} m{sup -3} have been achieved. Radial and axial plasma profiles have been obtained using a microwave interferometer that can be scanned axially and a Langmuir probe. The source will be used to investigate operation at high magnetic field, frequency, and input power.

Angrilli, F.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.; Maggiora, R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D.O.

1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

SciTech Connect: "plasma science"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

plasma science" Find plasma science" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Proceedings of the Semiannual Meetings of the Plasma Science Committee  

SciTech Connect

Fall 2001: (September 29-30, 2001; Irvine, CA) This meeting focused on presentations and plans for two ad hoc projects sponsored by the committee?the burning plasma study and the partially ionized plasma proposals. Ongoing discussions with CHEDPP chair Ron Davidson were also included. Significant attention was given to FESAC and the Fusion Energy Snowmass meeting planned for Summer 2002. These discussions lead to continued development of the proposal for the burning plasma project. A science talk on plasma processing of materials from an industry perspective provided a backdrop for discussion of the partially ionized plasmas project. Spring 2002: (April 5-6, 2003; Washington, DC) This meeting included updates from the funding agencies (DOE, NSF, ONR, and NASA) and a discussion panel amongst them, a review of the burning plasma study proposal, and a discussion of the HED study?s progress. Future work items such as the plasma physics volume of the decadal physics survey and potential studies on computer modeling and simulation were also discussed. Fall 2002: (September 28-29, 2002; Irvine, CA) This meeting discussed the status of the then-recently started burning plasma study, heard the findings and recommendations of the HED study, and discussed the prospects for fusion in light of the Snowmass summer study and the FESAC sub-panel on burning plasma program options. A science talk addressed the role of plasmas in astrophysics and brought attention to the need for greater rapport between plasma physicists and NASA?s space sciences programs. The Plasma 2010 project was discussed in detail and a draft proposal was reviewed. Spring 2003: (April 4-5, 200; Washington, DC) This meeting centered on the activies of BPAC and discussion of the proposed Plasma 2010 project. Agency representatives discussed their program plans; they also commented on the possibilities of an ITER-future and discussed the status of the joint DOE/NSF funding program in basic plasma science. A presentation and a panel discussion addressed the loss of ONR funding in basic plasma science. The Plasma 2010 project was advanced to the stage of final proposal development. A science talk on inertial confinement fusion helped to balance the magnetic fusion emphasis of the meeting. Fall 2003: (September 27-28, 2003) At the fall 2003 meeting, the committee heard testimony from several speakers and further developed its plans for the Plasma 2010 project. Patric Muggli presented an overview of the goals and methods of the Coalition for Plasma Science. As co-chairs of the recently released final report of the Burning Plasma Assessment Committee, Ray Fonck and John Ahearne outlined their committee?s key findings and recommendations for the committee. Jeff Hopwood presented a science talk on the current state of research in plasma microdischarges. The committee then took up a discussion of the Plasma 2010 committee and deliberated about the focus of the project. The committee tasked a subcommittee to develop draft wording that would reflect the need to identify the common themes of plasma science in the study. On the second day of the meeting, Mike Roberts presented an update by videoconference about the status of U.S. negotiations to participate in ITER. The committee then evaluated several emerging issues for future discussion and agreed to pursue the topics of scientific computing and low-temperature plasma physics at its next meeting. Spring 2004: (April 2-3, 2004) The committee discussed the federal program for plasma physics with representatives from DOE, NNSA, NSF, and NASA. It was learned that the budgets for this year and the next are squeezed from all directions, but agency program managers are doing the best they can. There appear to be significant opportunities emerging in the area of computing, including simulation and modeling, as identified in a science talk delivered by Bill Dorland. Charles Baker shared a status report about his FESAC priorities subpanel and Ed Thomas presented a summary of his subpanel?s final report on plasma science and engineering wo

Plasma Science Committee

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Plasma density gradient injection of low absolute momentum spread electron bunches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Esarey et al. , IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 24, 252 (1996). [3]G. R. Geddes et al. , Phys. Plasmas 12, 056709 (2005). [13]laser (A, red) drives a plasma density wake (grey) in the

Geddes, C.G.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Technology & Engineering Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Useful Links Alcator C-Mod 5 Year Program Plan Review, May 13 - 14, 2003, PSFC NW17-218 Agenda Tuesday, May 13, 2003 8:00 Executive Session 8:30 Welcome M. Porkolab 8:40 Introduction I. Hutchinson 8:50 Charge J. Willis/R. Dagazian 9:00 Program Overview E. Marmar 10:15 Break 10:30 Advanced Tokamak Program A. Hubbard 11:20 Burning Plasma Support Program S. Wolfe 12:10 Lunch (on-site) 1:00 Facility Tour 1:30 Transport A. Hubbard 2:15 RF S. Wukitch 3:00 Break 3:15 Divertor and Edge Physics B. Lipschultz 4:00 MHD and Stability Research R. Granetz 4:30 Executive Session Wednesday, May 14, 2003 8:00 Executive Session 8:30 PPPL Collaboration G. Schilling 9:00 Operations and Facilities J. Irby

44

MIT's Plasma Science Fusion Center: I-Mode Powers Up on Alcator...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIT's Plasma Science Fusion Center: I-Mode Powers Up on Alcator C-Mod Tokamak American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: MIT's Plasma Science...

45

Wave localization and density bunching in pair ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

By investigating the nonlinear propagation of high intensity electromagnetic (EM) waves in a pair ion plasma, whose symmetry is broken via contamination by a small fraction of high mass immobile ions, it is shown that this new and interesting state of (laboratory created) matter is capable of supporting structures that strongly localize and bunch the EM radiation with density excess in the region of localization. Testing of this prediction in controlled laboratory experiments can lend credence, inter alia, to conjectures on structure formation (via the same mechanism) in the MEV era of the early universe.

Mahajan, Swadesh M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Shatashvili, Nana L. [Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi 0128 (Georgia) and Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi 0177, Georgia (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatron oscillations, and beam steering in a plasma wakefield experiment at 30 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gearhart,Construction of a Cerenkov light source, Rev.Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatroncal considerations in the use of Cerenkov radiation as an

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

2012 PLASMA PROCESSING SCIENCE GRC & GRS, JULY 22-27, 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Plasma Processing Science will feature a comprehensive program that will highlight the most cutting edge scientific advances in plasma science and technology as well as explore the applications of this nonequilibrium medium in possible approaches relative to many grand societal challenges. Fundamental science sessions will focus on plasma kinetics and chemistry, plasma surface interactions, and recent trends in plasma generation and multi-phase plasmas. Application sessions will explore the impact of plasma technology in renewable energy, the production of fuels from renewable feedstocks and carbon dioxide neutral solar fuels (from carbon dioxide and water), and plasma-enabled medicine and sterilization.

Chang, Jane

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Plasma Science Committee final progress report, July 15, 1994--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Organized in 1988 as a standing activity of the National Research Council (NRC), the PLSC [Plasma Science Committee] is charged with monitoring the continuing health and development of plasma science in the United States. Its goals are to identify the needs of the plasma science community, make recommendations about those needs, and provide guidance about existing research programs in plasma science. Its operating guidelines include the following tasks: (1) to provide a continuing forum for the discussion of problems in the field of plasma science; (2) to initiate, develop, and oversee special studies focused on high-priority topics; (3) to maintain a broad and unified definition of plasma science as a field; (4) to maintain a clear and comprehensive formulation of current plasma science policy issues and give guidance to decisionmakers in universities, nonprofit research centers, and government agencies; (5) to promote coordination among institutions involved in plasma science; (6) to make recommendations aimed at plasma science education; (7) to monitor the plasma-related industrial technological base; and (8) to sponsor workshops and symposia as a means of communication among different branches of the field. During this reporting period, the PLSC was involved with two major projects: a decadal assessment of the field as a whole, conducted by the Panel on Opportunities in Plasma Science and Technology (OPST), and a study of data needs in the modeling and simulation of plasma processing of materials, conducted by the Panel on Database Needs in Plasma Processing.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Metrology Challenges for High Energy Density Science Target Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, High Energy Density Science (HEDS) experiments are used to support and qualify predictive physics models. These models assume ideal conditions such as energy (input) and device (target) geometry. The experiments rely on precision targets constructed from components with dimensions in the millimeter range, while having micrometer-scale, functional features, including planar steps, sine waves, and step-joint geometry on hemispherical targets. Future target designs will likely have features and forms that rival or surpass current manufacturing and characterization capability. The dimensional metrology of these features is important for a number of reasons, including qualification of sub-components prior to assembly, quantification of critical features on the as-built assemblies and as a feedback mechanism for fabrication process development. Variations in geometry from part to part can lead to functional limitations, such as unpredictable instabilities during an experiment and the inability to assemble a target from poorly matched sub-components. Adding to the complexity are the large number and variety of materials, components, and shapes that render any single metrology technique difficult to use with low uncertainty. Common materials include metal and glass foams, doped transparent and opaque plastics and a variety of deposited and wrought metals. A suite of metrology tools and techniques developed to address the many critical issues relevant to the manufacture of HEDS targets including interferometry, x-ray radiography and contact metrology are presented including two sided interferometry for absolute thickness metrology and low force probe technology for micrometer feature coordinate metrology.

Seugling, R M; Bono, M J; Davis, P

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

4D-HD for high energy density plasmas: shedding light into rapidly...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D-HD for high energy density plasmas: shedding light into rapidly changing, opaque plasmas Wednesday, July 24, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Marta Fajardo,...

51

Issues in "Burning Plasma Science" S. J. Zweben, D. S. Darrow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues in "Burning Plasma Science" S. J. Zweben, D. S. Darrow (with inputs from many people at PPPL) Burning Plasma Science Workshop Austin, Texas 12/11/00 · Burning plasma physics issues · Fusion energy development issues => big issue: local burn control in an AT · Our conclusions · Alternate path #12;Burning

52

SAND2011-6616A Page 1 Session 2: High Energy Density, Plasmas, Magnetic Fields  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

616A 616A Page 1 Session 2: High Energy Density, Plasmas, Magnetic Fields Dynamical Materials Experiments on Sandia's Z Machine: Obtaining Data with High Precision at HED Conditions Thomas R. Mattsson and Seth Root Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM USA Summary: The Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories has successfully been used to study a wide range of materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, we will discuss the methodology resulting in high-pressure measurements at multi-Mbar pressures as well as present experimental data for shock compression of poly methyl-pentene, a hydrocarbon plastic. Introduction During the last few years, there has been a notable increase in the interest of high-pressure science. The increase in interest has been driven by the remarkable capabilities of new and improved platforms like

53

Production of high-density high-temperature plasma by collapsing small solid-density plasma shell with two ultra-intense laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the anisotropic collapse of a plasma microshell by impact of two oppositely directed intense laser pulses can create at the center of the shell cavity a submicron-sized plasma of high density and temperature suitable for generating fusion neutrons.

Xu, H. [National Laboratory for Parallel and Distributed Processing, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yu Wei [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, Bochum D-44780 (Germany); Wong, A. Y. [Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Electronic Structure Measurement of Solid Density Plasmas using X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Landen, O L; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R

2003-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Solid Density Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Forest, F J; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Faussurier, G; Blancard, C; Renaudin, P; Landen, O L

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

56

Plasma impedance and electron density in a pulsed laser channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of plasma impedance of gas laserdischarge and spark gap channels by an inductancecapacitance (L p ?C p ) tank circuit has been useful in describing the frequency response of a pulsed superradiant laser charging circuit. The impedance matching of these plasma channels can lead to resonant narrowing of the laser pulsewidth in superradiant nitrogen lasers. Using fluid equations to model the electron and ion plasmas

K. H. Tsui; G. H. Cavalcanti; A. S. Farias; M. D. S. Marinha; L. M. Soares; C. A. Massone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Feasibility of measuring density and temperature of laser produced plasmas using spectroscopic techniques.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wide variety of experiments on the Z-Beamlet laser involve the creation of laser produced plasmas. Having a direct measurement of the density and temperature of these plasma would an extremely useful tool, as understanding how these quantities evolve in space and time gives insight into the causes of changes in other physical processes, such as x-ray generation and opacity. We propose to investigate the possibility of diagnosing the density and temperature of laser-produced plasma using temporally and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques that are similar to ones that have been successfully fielded on other systems. Various researchers have measured the density and temperature of laboratory plasmas by looking at the width and intensity ratio of various characteristic lines in gases such as nitrogen and hydrogen, as well as in plasmas produced off of solid targets such as zinc. The plasma conditions produce two major measurable effects on the characteristic spectral lines of that plasma. The 1st is the Stark broadening of an individual line, which depends on the electron density of the plasma, with higher densities leading to broader lines. The second effect is a change in the ratio of various lines in the plasma corresponding to different ionization states. By looking at the ratio of these lines, we can gain some understanding of the plasma ionization state and consequently its temperature (and ion density when coupled with the broadening measurement). The hotter a plasma is, the higher greater the intensity of lines corresponding to higher ionization states. We would like to investigate fielding a system on the Z-Beamlet laser chamber to spectroscopically study laser produced plasmas from different material targets.

Edens, Aaron D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energetic particle production, cavition formation, and nonlinear development at a plasma density maximum  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated several phenomena of importance to laser-plasma interactions. In our studies, these are modeled by microwave and rf-plasma interactions. Our focus has been on resonant absorption of intense electromagnetic radiation at the plasma critical layer. Electron plasma wave (EPW) growth and caviton formation have been shown to be most efficient for shallow density gradients at the critical layer, where EPW convection losses are minimized. EPW electric field energies of 5000 times the plasma thermal energy, and energetic electron tails out to 5000T{sub e}, have been observed at the top of an inverse parabolic density profile. Ions receive delta-function-like impulses from localized electron plasma waves and wave-breaking electron ejection; the disruption of the ion fluid can only partially be described by the ponderomotive force. Our attempt is to test and illuminate some of the fundamental concepts of strong turbulence and EM wave-plasma interaction. 7 refs.

Wong, A.Y.; Bauer, B.S. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

59

Experimental simulation of a gaseous divertor: Measurements of neutral density inside the plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct measurements of the neutral density in the core of hydrogen plasma with a density of 3--4{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} and electron temperature of 15--20 eV in a magnetic field of 0.2 T, injected into hydrogen neutral gas at a pressure of 0.1--2 Torr are performed with plasma emission spectroscopy. The data are in agreement with the results of measured plasma decay (Phys. Fluids B {bold 2}, 837 (1990)) and can be explained by radial pressure balance between fast neutrals inside the plasma and cold background gas.

Fiksel, G.; Kishinevsky, M.; Hershkowitz, N. (Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1687 (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Controlling Plasmas for a Cleaner World | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Plasmas for a Cleaner World Controlling Plasmas for a Cleaner World Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 Controlling Plasmas for a Cleaner World New findings indicate that ionized plasmas like those in neon lights and plasma TVs can be used to sterilize water, making it antimicrobial for as long as a week after treatment. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

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61

Excitation of surface plasma waves by a density modulated electron beam at a conductor-dusty plasma interface  

SciTech Connect

A density modulated electron beam propagating through a conductor-dusty plasma interface drives electromagnetic surface plasma waves (SPWs) to instability via Cerenkov and cyclotron interaction. The SPWs propagate across an external magnetic field parallel to the interface. Numerical calculations of the growth rate and unstable mode frequencies have been carried out for the typical parameters of the SPWs. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave instability increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains {delta} (= n{sub io}/n{sub eo}, where n{sub io} is the ion plasma density and n{sub eo} is the electron plasma density). The phase velocity of the unstable waves also increases with {delta}. In addition, the growth rate of the instability increases with the beam density and scales as one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and square root of beam density in fast cyclotron interaction. Moreover, the dispersion relation of SPWs has been retrieved in the absence of the modulated beam and without dust grains.

Gupta, Ruby [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi-110036 (India); Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, Rohini, Delhi-110086 (India); Prakash, Ved [India Meteorological Department, Ministry of Earth Science, Lodi Road, New Delhi-110003 (India)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile  

SciTech Connect

By using a transient density profile, we have demonstrated stationary self-focusing of an electromagnetic Gaussian beam in cold quantum plasma. The paper is devoted to the prospects of using upward increasing ramp density profile of an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium with quantum effects in self-focusing mechanism of high intense laser beam. We have found that the upward ramp density profile in addition to quantum effects causes much higher oscillation and better focusing of laser beam in cold quantum plasma in comparison to that in the classical relativistic case. Our computational results reveal the importance and influence of formation of electron density profiles in enhancing laser self-focusing.

Habibi, M. [Department of Physics, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Department of Physics, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

The discharge condition to enhance electron density of capacitively coupled plasma with multi-holed electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multi-holed electrode that has been reported to enhance the electron density of the capacitively coupled plasma is now being adopted to speed up the processes. However, the discharge condition when the multi-holed electrode enhances the electron density of the discharge at fixed power is not studied. At low pressure, the multi-holed electrode increased the electron density of the plasma at fixed power. However, the multi-holed electrode is experimentally revealed to lower the electron density at high pressure. In this paper, the different roles of the multi-holed electrode are experimentally studied.

Lee, Hun Su [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Eunha-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do, 565-902 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Seong; Chang, Hong Young [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Density profiles of plasmas confined by the field of a Levitating Dipole Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 4-channel microwave interferometer (center frequency: 60 GHz) has been constructed to measure the density profiles of plasmas confined within the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). LDX is the first and only experiment ...

Boxer, Alexander C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Characterization of low-frequency density fluctuations in dipole-confined laboratory plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-frequency fluctuations of plasma density, floating potential, ion saturation current, visible light intensity, and edge magnetic field are routinely observed in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). For the purposes ...

Ellsworth, Jennifer L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Tomographic reconstruction of high energy density plasmas with picosecond temporal resolution  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional reconstruction of the electron density in a plasma can be obtained by passing multiple beams at different field angles simultaneously through a plasma and performing a tomographic reconstruction of the measured field-dependent phase profiles. In this letter, a relatively simple experimental setup is proposed and simulations are carried out to verify the technique. The plasma distribution is modeled as a discreet number of phase screens and a Zernike polynomial representation of the phase screens is used to reconstruct the plasma profile. Using a subpicosecond laser, the complete three-dimensional electron density of the plasma can be obtained with a time resolution limited only by the transit time of the probe through the plasma.

Baker, K L

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Two-dimensional modeling of high plasma density inductively coupled sources for materials processing  

SciTech Connect

Inductively coupled plasma sources are being developed to address the need for high plasma density (10[sup 11]--10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3]), low pressure (a few to 10--20 mTorr) etching of semiconductor materials. One such device uses a flat spiral coil of rectangular cross section to generate radio-frequency (rf) electric fields in a cylindrical plasma chamber, and capacitive rf biasing on the substrate to independently control ion energies incident on the wafer. To investigate these devices we have developed a two-dimensional hybrid model consisting of electromagnetic, electron Monte Carlo, and hydrodynamic modules; and an off line plasma chemistry Monte Carlo simulation. The results from the model for plasma densities, plasma potentials, and ion fluxes for Ar, O[sub 2], Ar/CF[sub 4]/O[sub 2] gas mixtures will be presented.

Ventzek, P.L.G.; Hoekstra, R.J.; Kushner, M.J. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Plasma density measurements using FM-CW millimeter wave radar techniques  

SciTech Connect

Modified FM-CW radar techniques using swept millimeter-wave oscillators are useful for determining when a particular density has been reached in a plasma. Narrowband measurements on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) demonstrate the suitability of these techniques for controlling high-power auxiliary plasma heating systems. Broadband measurements using these same techniques are proposed, by which the density profile could be determined.

Doane, J.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Schmidt, G.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electron density and temperature profile diagnostics for C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The 9-point Thomson scattering diagnostic system for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas is improved and the measured electron temperature profiles are consistent with theoretical expectations. Rayleigh scattering revealed a finite line width of the ruby laser emission, which complicates density calibration. Taking advantage of the plasma wobble motion, density profile reconstruction accuracy from the 6-chord two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe interferometer data is improved.

Deng, B. H.; Kinley, J. S.; Schroeder, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Activities of the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-4, 2008 Livermore, CA on behalf of the HEDLP FESAC subpanel #12;"joint HEDLP program [OFES+NNSA and 28 contributed talks M. Donovan (NNSA) NNSA perspective G. Nardella (OFES) OFES perspective HEDLP #12;IFE HEDLP science: conventional and alternative concepts · Conventional ICF (NNSA funded

71

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toroidal current in the plasma. Most tokamaks, including CMOD, depend on an ohmic transformer as the primary means of driving toroidal current in the plasma. A transformer works...

72

Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shan Zhang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Hong Xueren [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Hongyu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd, Shanghai 200136 (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Lower hybrid current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Driving current in high-density plasmas is essential for the progress of thermonuclear fusion energy research based on the tokamak concept. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, is potentially the most suitable tool for driving current at large plasma radii, consistent with the needs of ITER steady state scenario. Unfortunately, experiments at reactor grade high plasma densities with kinetic profiles approaching those required for ITER, have shown problems in penetration of the LH power into the core plasma. These plasmas represent a basic reference for designing possible methods useful for assessing the LHCD concept in ITER. On the basis of the phenomenology observed during LHCD experiments carried out in different machines, and model of the spectral broadening effect due to parametric instability, an interpretation and possible solution of the related important problem is presented.

Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Amicucci, L. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Calculation of emission from hydrogenic ions in super liquid density plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous calculations of line emission were extended to higher density, lower temperature plasmas, typical of those expected in early ablative compression experiments. Emission from Ne-seeded fuel was analyzed in order to diagnose the density and temperature of the compressed core. The Stark/Doppler broadened emission profile is calculated for the H-like Ne resonance line. The observable lineshape is then obtained by time-averaging over expected density and temperature profiles and by including the effects of radiative transfer.

Bailey, D.S.; Valeo, E.J.

1976-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

On the breaking of a plasma wave in a thermal plasma. I. The structure of the density singularity  

SciTech Connect

The structure of the singularity that is formed in a relativistically large amplitude plasma wave close to the wave breaking limit is found by using a simple waterbag electron distribution function. The electron density distribution in the breaking wave has a typical 'peakon' form. The maximum value of the electric field in a thermal breaking plasma is obtained and compared to the cold plasma limit. The results of computer simulations for different initial electron distribution functions are in agreement with the theoretical conclusions. The after-wavebreak regime is then examined, and a semi-analytical model of the density evolution is constructed. Finally the results of two dimensional particle in cell simulations for different initial electron distribution functions are compared, and the role of thermal effects in enhancing particle injection is noted.

Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Nakamura, Tatsufumi [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-8-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Bulanov, Stepan S. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Califano, Francesco; Pegoraro, Francesco [Physics Department, University of Pisa, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) and the Panel on Opportunities in Plasma Science and Technology (OPST). Technical progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of plasma science in the United States and identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the PLSC to meet its charge. During July 1992, the PLSC sponsored a workshop on nonneutral plasmas in traps. Although no written report on the workshop results, was prepared for public distribution, a summary of highlights was provided to the OPST Subpanel on Nonneutral Plasmas. The PLSC also continued its follow-up briefings and discussions on the results of the results of the report Plasma Processing of materials. Scientific and Technological Opportunities. As a result of these activities, the Committee is now working with the NRC Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) to organize a symposium on database needs in plasma processing of materials.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

National Science Bowl bound! | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Science Bowl bound! National Science Bowl bound! April 28, 2013 Congratulations to Princeton High School, of Princeton, NJ for ranking 14th place in the top 16 High School teams at the National Science Bowl from April 26-30, 2012. Gallery: Out of 69 high school teams from all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Princeton High School Science Team placed 14th in the top 16 High School teams at the National Science bowl!! Thanks to their efforts Princeton High School will receive $1000 towards the purchase of supplies for their Science Department! Kudos to Thomas Grover Middle School for making it to and for participating at finals... They competed like champs!!! See you next year!! You can learn more about the National Science Bowl here. To learn more about the NJ Regional Science Bowl competition visit our website.

79

NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 22, 2013, 8:00am February 22, 2013, 8:00am Science Education Lab-wide Event NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl Teams of students are invited to participate in the Department of Energy's National Science Bowl Competition. Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy and mathematics plus general and earth sciences. Questions are given in a toss-up with a bonus format. For more information, visit our Science Bowl website! Contact Information Website: NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl Coordinator(s): Deedee Ortiz

80

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kenneth Marr The Role of Momentum Transport Near the Plasma Edge Updated on July 7, 2006 We are studying momentum transport near the plasma edge on Alcator C-Mod. Momentum...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma to Take Out the Trash (APS 2011) Hot and Dense Plasmas with Low Power Loads on Reactor Walls: A Hurdle to Fusion Energy Overcome in Alcator C-Mod (APS 2010) How Big is...

82

Levitated Dipole Experiment MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Shaping Control) Hot Electron Plasma (500,000,000 °K) Vessel Levitation Coil Charging Coil Floating Coil current-carrying conductor to investigate convective- cell and field-error control with weak toroidal between edge plasma and a hot plasma core, (iii) the possible elimination of drift-wave turbulence

83

Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel  

SciTech Connect

Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic simulations of density evolution in Tore Supra sawtoothing plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The plasma density evolution in sawtooth regime on the Tore Supra tokamak is analyzed. The density is measured using fast-sweeping X-mode reflectometry which allows tomographic reconstructions. There is evidence that density is governed by the perpendicular electric flows, while temperature evolution is dominated by parallel diffusion. Postcursor oscillations sometimes lead to the formation of a density plateau, which is explained in terms of convection cells associated with the kink mode. A crescent-shaped density structure located inside q = 1 is often visible just after the crash and indicates that some part of the density withstands the crash. 3D full MHD nonlinear simulations with the code XTOR-2F recover this structure and show that it arises from the perpendicular flows emerging from the reconnection layer. The proportion of density reinjected inside the q = 1 surface is determined, and the implications in terms of helium ash transport are discussed.

Nicolas, T.; Sabot, R.; Garbet, X.; Decker, J.; Merle, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Luetjens, H.; Luciani, J.-F. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Guimaraes-Filho, Z. [Aix-Marseille University, IIFS-PIIM, UMR 7345, F-13397 Marseille (France); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Plasma density measurements and the behavior of transport coefficients during adiabatic compression in the Tuman-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Data on the electon density obtained during experiments on the compression of toroidal plasmas is analysed, and the transport coefficients are evaluated and discussed. (AIP)

Ipatov, V.A.; Kalmykov, S.G.; Lipin, B.M.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Efficiency of caviton formation as a function of plasma density gradient  

SciTech Connect

The effect of a zeroth-order density gradient on the development of cavitons has been investigated experimentally and numerically. The cavitons were produced via excitation of electron plasma waves (EPW) with a modest ({ital E}{sup 2}/4{pi}{ital nT}{sub {ital e}}{much lt}1) resonant radio-frequency pump. The location of the resonance, on an inverse-parabolic density profile, was varied, with all other parameters being held constant. The depth of the caviton, and the strength of its associated trapped electric fields, are found to depend strongly on the density gradient scale length at the critical layer, with a maximum occurring when this length is infinite, at the flat top of the density profile. The results are accounted for by the dependence on the density gradient of the EPW convection rate and wave-breaking time. The study helps illuminate recent large-scale ionospheric density modification experiments.

Bauer, B.S.; Wong, A.Y.; Scurry, L.; Decyk, V.K. (Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

TIME-DEPENDENT DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF SOLAR FLARE PLASMAS USING SDO/EVE  

SciTech Connect

Temporally resolved electron density measurements of solar flare plasmas are presented using data from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The EVE spectral range contains emission lines formed between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 7} K, including transitions from highly ionized iron ({approx}>10 MK). Using three density-sensitive Fe XXI ratios, peak electron densities of 10{sup 11.2}-10{sup 12.1} cm{sup -3} were found during four X-class flares. While previous measurements of densities at such high temperatures were made at only one point during a flaring event, EVE now allows the temporal evolution of these high-temperature densities to be determined at 10 s cadence. A comparison with GOES data revealed that the peak of the density time profiles for each line ratio correlated well with that of the emission measure time profile for each of the events studied.

Milligan, Ryan O.; Kennedy, Michael B.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nathan Howard Advisor: Dr. Martin Greenwald Updated: 071406 Transport, the loss of energy, particles, momentum, etc. from a plasma, is perhaps the most significant problem left...

89

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alexandre Parisot Thesis title: Mode Conversion Current Drive experiments on Alcator C-Mod Updated: 071406 Advisor: Prof. R. R. Parker Supervisor: Dr. S. J. Wukitch Plasma waves...

90

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Waves & Beams Useful Links Budget Planning Presentations FY11-FY13 Presentation (March 2011) FY10-FY12 Presentation (March 2010)...

91

COLLOQUIUM: The Promise of Urban Science | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

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Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

92

DOE's NJ HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE BOWL | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

93

Levitated Dipole Experiment MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 Coupling to the Scrape-Off Layer: The Compressibility Constraint . . . . . . . . 11 5.3 Stability of Hot Electrons in the Field of a Levitated Dipole . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 5.4 Convective Cells and the Pumping, (2) the relation between edge plasma and a hot plasma core, (3) the possible elimination of drift

94

New Jersey Regional Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Jersey Regional Science Bowl New Jersey Regional Science Bowl Competition Overview: Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C.! The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy, mathematics and general and earth sciences. Middle School: Teams of a coach and five middle school students (four members and an alternate) in grades 6-8 from middle schools and home schools are invited to enter. High School: Teams of a coach and five high school students (four members and an alternate) in grades 9-12 from high schools and home schools are invited to enter. The NJ Regional Competition is open to all of NJ and surrounding areas that

95

Effect of electron density profile on power absorption of high frequency electromagnetic waves in plasma  

SciTech Connect

Considering different typical electron density profiles, a multi slab approximation model is built up to study the power absorption of broadband (0.75-30 GHz) electromagnetic waves in a partially ionized nonuniform magnetized plasma layer. Based on the model, the power absorption spectra for six cases are numerically calculated and analyzed. It is shown that the absorption strongly depends on the electron density fluctuant profile, the background electron number density, and the collision frequency. A potential optimum profile is also analyzed and studied with some particular parameters.

Xi Yanbin; Liu Yue [MOE Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Low Temperature Plasma Science: Not Only the Fourth State of Matter but All of Them. Report of the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Workshop on Low Temperature Plasmas, March 25-57, 2008  

SciTech Connect

Low temperature plasma science (LTPS) is a field on the verge of an intellectual revolution. Partially ionized plasmas (often referred to as gas discharges) are used for an enormous range of practical applications, from light sources and lasers to surgery and making computer chips, among many others. The commercial and technical value of low temperature plasmas (LTPs) is well established. Modern society would simply be less advanced in the absence of LTPs. Much of this benefit has resulted from empirical development. As the technology becomes more complex and addresses new fields, such as energy and biotechnology, empiricism rapidly becomes inadequate to advance the state of the art. The focus of this report is that which is less well understood about LTPs - namely, that LTPS is a field rich in intellectually exciting scientific challenges and that addressing these challenges will result in even greater societal benefit by placing the development of plasma technologies on a solid science foundation. LTPs are unique environments in many ways. Their nonequilibrium and chemically active behavior deviate strongly from fully ionized plasmas, such as those found in magnetically confined fusion or high energy density plasmas. LTPs are strongly affected by the presence of neutral species-chemistry adds enormous complexity to the plasma environment. A weakly to partially ionized gas is often characterized by strong nonequilibrium in the velocity and energy distributions of its neutral and charged constituents. In nonequilibrium LTP, electrons are generally hot (many to tens of electron volts), whereas ions and neutrals are cool to warm (room temperature to a few tenths of an electron volt). Ions and neutrals in thermal LTP can approach or exceed an electron volt in temperature. At the same time, ions may be accelerated across thin sheath boundary layers to impact surfaces, with impact energies ranging up to thousands of electron volts. These moderately energetic electrons can efficiently create reactive radical fragments and vibrationally and electronically excited species from collisions with neutral molecules. These chemically active species can produce unique structures in the gas phase and on surfaces, structures that cannot be produced in other ways, at least not in an economically meaningful way. Photons generated by electron impact excited species in the plasma can interact more or less strongly with other species in the plasma or with the plasma boundaries, or they can escape from the plasma. The presence of boundaries around the plasma creates strong gradients where plasma properties change dramatically. It is in these boundary regions where externally generated electromagnetic radiation interacts most strongly with the plasma, often producing unique responses. And it is at bounding surfaces where complex plasma-surface interactions occur. The intellectual challenges associated with LTPS center on several themes, and these are discussed in the chapters that follow this overview. These themes are plasma-surface interactions; kinetic, nonlinear properties of LTP; plasmas in multiphase media; scaling laws for LTP; and crosscutting themes: diagnostics, modeling, and fundamental data.

None

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Excitation of surface plasma waves by a density-modulated electron beam in a magnetized plasma cylinder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A density-modulated electron beam propagating through a plasma cylinder excites surface plasma waves (SPWs) via Cerenkov and fast cyclotron interaction. A nonlocal theory of this process has been developed. Numerical calculations of the growth rate and unstable mode frequencies have been carried out for the typical parameters of the SPWs. The growth rate {gamma} (in rad/s) of the unstable wave instability increases with the modulation index {Delta} and has the largest value for {Delta}{approx}1 in addition to when the frequency and wave number of the modulation are comparable to that of the unstable wave. For {Delta}=0, {gamma} turns out to be {approx}6.06x10{sup 9} rad/s for Cerenkov interaction and {approx}5.47x10{sup 9} rad/s for fast cyclotron interaction. The growth rate of the instability increases with the beam density and scales as one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in fast cyclotron interaction. The real part of the frequency of the unstable wave increases as almost the square root of the beam voltage. The results of the theory are applied to explain some of the experimental observations.

Gupta, Ruby [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi 110036 (India); Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, PSP Area Plot No.-1, Sector-22, Rohini, Delhi 110086 (India); Prakash, Ved [India Meteorological Department, Ministry of Earth Science, Lodi Road, New Delhi 110003 (India)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Collisionless absorption of light waves incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisionless absorption of laser light incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients is studied analytically and numerically. For the normal incidence case, it is shown that both sheath inverse bremsstrahlung and the anomalous skin effect are limiting cases of the same collisionless absorption mechanism. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, the effects of finite sheath-transit time and finite density gradient are investigated. The analyses are extended to oblique incident cases. For p-polarized obliquely incident light, the results are significantly different from those for the normal incidence case. Most noticeable is the absorption enhancement for the p-polarized light due to the interaction of the electrons with the normal (parallel to the density gradient) component of the laser electric field in the sheath region.

Yang, T.Y.B.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Shock waves in a Z-pinch and the formation of high energy density plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Z-pinch liner, imploding onto a target plasma, evolves in a step-wise manner, producing a stable, magneto-inertial, high-energy-density plasma compression. The typical configuration is a cylindrical, high-atomic-number liner imploding onto a low-atomic-number target. The parameters for a terawatt-class machine (e.g., Zebra at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada Terawatt Facility) have been simulated. The 2-1/2 D MHD code, MACH2, was used to study this configuration. The requirements are for an initial radius of a few mm for stable implosion; the material densities properly distributed, so that the target is effectively heated initially by shock heating and finally by adiabatic compression; and the liner's thickness adjusted to promote radial current transport and subsequent current amplification in the target. Since the shock velocity is smaller in the liner, than in the target, a stable-shock forms at the interface, allowing the central load to accelerate magnetically and inertially, producing a magneto-inertial implosion and high-energy density plasma. Comparing the implosion dynamics of a low-Z target with those of a high-Z target demonstrates the role of shock waves in terms of compression and heating. In the case of a high-Z target, the shock wave does not play a significant heating role. The shock waves carry current and transport the magnetic field, producing a high density on-axis, at relatively low temperature. Whereas, in the case of a low-Z target, the fast moving shock wave preheats the target during the initial implosion phase, and the later adiabatic compression further heats the target to very high energy density. As a result, the compression ratio required for heating the low-Z plasma to very high energy densities is greatly reduced.

Rahman, H. U. [Magneto-Inertial Fusion Technologies Inc. (MIFTI), Irvine, California 92612 (United States) and Department of Physics, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Irvine, Irvine California 92697 (United States); Ney, P. [Mount San Jacinto College, Menifee, California 92584 (United States); Presura, R. [University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, Nevada 89557-0208 (United States); Ellahi, Rahmat [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, FBAS, IIU, Islamabad (Pakistan) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Shukla, P. K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Science on Saturday starts Jan. 11 | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science on Saturday starts Jan. 11 By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe January 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Joshua E. G. Peek, a Hubble Fellow at Columbia University's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Comparisons with GYRO E. Marmar Alcator C-Mod Research Highlights J. Rice Counter-Current Rotation in Alcator C-Mod LHCD Plasmas M. Reinke Flux Surface Assymetries in VUVSXR...

102

National Security Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSS cover - april NSS cover - april Read the April 2013 issue: web | interactive| pdf Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Utility Navigation Skip to Top Navigation Skip to Content Navigation Los Alamos National Laboratory submit About | Mission | Business | Newsroom | Phonebook Los Alamos National Laboratory links to site home page Science & Innovation Collaboration Careers, Jobs Community, Environment Science & Innovation Home » Science & Engineering Capabilities Accelerators, Electrodynamics Bioscience, Biosecurity, Health Chemical Science Earth, Space Sciences Energy Engineering High Energy Density Plasmas, Fluids Information Science, Computing, Applied Math Materials Science National Security, Weapons Science Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

103

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links What is Fusion? The nucleus of an atom consists of protons, which have a positive electrical charge,...

104

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Useful Links The links below explain what the main objectives of the project are, and what are the unique aspects of...

105

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research> alcator> computers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Useful Links Computer & Data...

106

Plasma-Density Determination from X-Ray Radiography of Laser-Driven Spherical Implosions F. J. Marshall, P. W. McKenty, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, J. P. Knauer, and V. A. Smalyuk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to sampling the areal density at the time of fusion particle production. In non-igniting capsules, the cold, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Se´guin Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute confinement fusion (ICF) relies on the com- pression of spherical targets by means of a high power driver

107

Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

Marquez, Ariel [CNEA and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche (Argentina); Gonzalez, Jose [INVAP-CONICET and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche, Argentina. (Argentina); Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [CCHEN, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Atomic hydrogen density measurements in an ion source plasma using a vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectrometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system to determine the density and temperature of ground state hydrogen atoms in a plasma by vacuum ultraviolet laser absorption spectroscopy is described. The continuous tunability of the spectrometer allows for analysis at any of the Lyman transitions. The narrow bandwidth of the laser system allows for the accurate determination of the absorption lineshape and hence the translational temperature. The utility of the system is exemplified by data obtained on an ion-source plasma. The measurements demonstrate the quality of the data as well as illustrating the behavior of this ion source under varying discharge conditions. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Stutzin, G.C.; Young, A.T.; Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B.; Worth, G.T.; Stevens, R.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ANTHEM simulation of the early time magnetic field penetration of the plasma surrounding a high density Z-pinch  

SciTech Connect

The early time penetration of magnetic field into the low density coronal plasma of a Z-pinch fiber is studied with the implicit plasma simulation code ANTHEM. Calculations show the emission of electrons from the cathode, pinching of the electron flow, magnetic insulation of the electrons near the anode, and low density ion blow off. PIC-particle ion calculations show a late time clumping of the ion density not seen with a fluid ion treatment. 4 refs., 4 figs.

Mason, R.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Behavior of a plasma in a high-density gas-embedded Z-pinch configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theoretical analysis of a high density Z-pinch (HDZP) begins with an examination of the steady state energy balance between ohmic heating and bremsstrahlung radiation losses for a plasma column in pressure equilibrium. The model is then expanded to include the time-varying internal energy and results in a quasi-equilibrium prescription for the load current through a constant radius plasma channel. This set of current waveforms is useful in the design of experimental systems. The behavior of a plasma for physically realizable conditions is first examined by allowing adiabatic changes in the column radius. A more complete model is then developed by incorporating inertial effects into the momentum equation, and the resultant global MHD computational model is compared with more sophisticated, and costly, one- and two-dimensional computer simulations. These comparisons demonstrate the advantages of the global MHD description over previously developed zero-dimensional models.

Shlachter, J.S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

60 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 27, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Plasmoid Formation and Multiple Steady States in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 27, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Plasmoid Formation in a low pressure inductively coupled plasma in chlorine gas. A bowl-shaped bright structure with sharply was chilled with a water- Manuscript received July 7, 1998. This work was supported by the National Science

Economou, Demetre J.

113

A new method for determining the plasma electron density using three-color interferometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for determining the plasma electron density using the fractional fringes on three-color interferometer is proposed. Integrated phase shift on each interferometer is derived without using the temporal history of the fractional fringes. The dependence on the fringe resolution and the electrical noise are simulated on the wavelengths of CO{sub 2} laser. Short-time integrations of the fractional fringes enhance the reliability of this method.

Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Science on Saturday attracts science fans of all ages | Princeton Plasma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science on Saturday attracts science fans of all ages Science on Saturday attracts science fans of all ages By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe January 28, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Joshua E. G. Peek, a Hubble Fellow at Columbia University's Department of Astronomy and son of PPPL physicist and former director Robert Goldston, discusses "Outer Space!" (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Joshua E. G. Peek, a Hubble Fellow at Columbia University's Department of Astronomy and son of PPPL physicist and former director Robert Goldston, discusses "Outer Space!" Gallery: High school senior Varuni Bewtra comes to the lectures to learn about possible careers in science. (Photo by Photo by Jeanne Jackson DeVoe/PPPL Office of Communications) High school senior Varuni Bewtra comes to the lectures to learn about

115

Three-dimensional simulations of anomalous absorption of laser radiation by plasma with supercritical density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional (3D) model of the interaction of laser radiation with plasma in the framework of Maxwell-Vlasov equations has been used to calculate the anomalous optical absorption in plasma of supercritical density. The results of calculations confirmed the development of anomalous absorption that was previously revealed by 2D models, which were insufficient for comparison to the experiment. Calculations were performed for a system containing about 10{sup 6} macroparticles that allowed the absorption coefficient and other characteristics of anomalous absorption in plasma with an inhomogeneous surface to be determined as functions of various parameters of the incident radiation and plasma target. Results are analyzed and estimations are obtained for the contributions of ionization processes and pair collisions of electrons, which show that these factors were quite reasonably ignored in the model. All quantitative results are obtained for the third harmonic of neodymium laser ({lambda} = 0.351 {mu}m) at a tenfold excess of the substance density over a critical value for this radiation.

Ginzburg, S. L.; Dyachenko, V. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute for Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Imshennik, V. S. [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Paleychik, V. V.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, electron temperature Almost-Equal-To 1.4 eV, velocity Almost-Equal-To 30 km/s, M Almost-Equal-To 14, ionization fraction Almost-Equal-To 0.96, diameter Almost-Equal-To 5 cm, and length Almost-Equal-To 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment, which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is at the very low end of the 8-160 times drop predicted by ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Awe, T. J.; Davis, J. S.; Dunn, J. P. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Brockington, S. J. E.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Cassibry, J. T. [Propulsion Research Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Gilmore, M. A.; Lynn, A. G. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of critical surface diagnostic based on the ion acoustic decay instability in laser produced high density plasma  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a large angle, UV collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic for high density, hot plasma relevant to laser fusion. The CTS measured the basic parameters of the plasma waves (frequency, wave number), or the spectral density function for selected wave vectors of plasma waves, which were excited by the IADI (ion acoustic parametric decay instability). It is a good diagnostic tool for a local electron temperature measurement. The electron temperature was estimated by measuring either ion acoustic wave or electron plasma wave in the laser intensity window of 1plasma waves in laser produced high density plasma.

Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

MIT Plasma Fusion Sciences Center IAP Seminar! Jan 10th, 2012!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIT Plasma Fusion Sciences Center IAP Seminar! Jan 10th, 2012! ! ! ! ! ! Otto Landen! Associate-07NA27344 Inertial Confinement Fusion Physics and Challenges*! #12;The NIF ignition experiments-degenerate fuel Spherical collapse of the shell produces a central hot spot surrounded by cold, dense main fuel

119

Fusion and Plasmas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion and Fusion and Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (104KB) FES Budget FES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Fusion and Plasmas Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » About Fusion and Plasmas Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page WHAT IS FUSION? a Fusion the process that powers the sun and the stars. In one type of this reaction, two atoms of hydrogen combine together, or , to form an atom of helium. In the process some of the mass of the hydrogen is converted into energy. The easiest fusion reaction to make happen combines (or "heavy hydrogen") with (or "heavy-heavy hydrogen") to make and a . Deuterium is plentifully available in ordinary water. Tritium can be produced by combining the fusion neutron with the abundant light metal . Thus fusion has the potential to be an inexhaustible source of energy.

120

Gold charge state distributions in highly ionized, low-density beam plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of Au charge state distributions (CSDs) from low density, nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas created in the Livermore electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and EBIT-II). X-ray emission from Ni-like to Kr-like Au ions has been recorded from monoenergetic electron beam plasmas having E{sub beam}=2.66, 2.92, 3.53, and 4.54 keV, and the CSDs of the beam plasmas have been inferred by fitting the collisionally excited line transitions and radiative recombination emission features with synthetic spectra. We have modeled the beam plasmas using a collisional-radiative code with various treatments of the atomic structure for the complex M- and N-shell ions and find that only models with extensive doubly excited states can properly account for the dielectronic recombination (DR) channels that control the CSDs. This finding would be unremarkable for plasmas with thermal electron distributions, where many such states are sampled, and the importance of DR is well established. But in an EBIT source, the beam is resonant with only a subset of such states having spectator electrons in orbitals with high principal quantum number n (8{<=}n{<=}20). The inclusion of such states in the model was also necessary to obtain agreement with observed stabilizing transitions in the x-ray spectra.

May, M. J.; Scofield, J.; Schneider, M.; Wong, K.; Beiersdorfer, P. [PO Box 808 L260, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94551 (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, ICF Target Design, Albuquerque New Mexico, 87185-1186 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Investigation of non-stationary self-focusing of intense laser pulse in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile  

SciTech Connect

The authors have investigated the non-stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser pulse in cold quantum plasma. In case of high dense plasma, the nonlinearity in the dielectric constant is mainly due to relativistic high intense interactions and quantum effects. In this paper, we have introduced a ramp density profile for plasma and presented graphically the behavior of spot size oscillations of pulse at rear and front portions of the pulse. It is observed that the ramp density profile and quantum effects play a vital role in stronger and better focusing at the rear of the pulse than at the front in cold quantum plasmas.

Habibi, M. [Department of Physics, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Department of Physics, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Analysis of pulsed high-density HBr and Cl{sub 2} plasmas: Impact of the pulsing parameters on the radical densities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic of charged particles in pulsed plasma is relatively well known since the 1990s. In contrast, works reporting on the impact of the plasma modulation frequency and duty cycle on the radicals' densities are scarce. In this work, we analyze the impact of these modulation parameters on the radicals' composition in Cl{sub 2} and HBr plasmas. The radicals' densities are measured by broad-band UV and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy and modulated-beam mass spectrometry. We show that pulsing the rf power allows controlling the plasma chemistry and gives access to the plasma conditions that cannot be reached in continuous wave plasmas. In particular, we show that above 500 Hz, the pulsing frequency has no influence on the plasma chemistry, whereas in contrast the duty cycle is an excellent knob to control the fragmentation of the parent gas, thus the chemical reactivity of the discharge. At low duty cycle, a reduced gas fragmentation combined with a large ion flux leads to new etching conditions, compared to cw plasmas and the expected consequences on pulsed-etching processes are discussed.

Bodart, P.; Brihoum, M.; Cunge, G.; Joubert, O.; Sadeghi, N. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS-LTM, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38054 (France)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Real-time control of electron density in a capacitively coupled plasma  

SciTech Connect

Reactive ion etching (RIE) is sensitive to changes in chamber conditions, such as wall seasoning, which have a deleterious effect on process reproducibility. The application of real time, closed loop control to RIE may reduce this sensitivity and facilitate production with tighter tolerances. The real-time, closed loop control of plasma density with RF power in a capacitively coupled argon plasma using a hairpin resonance probe as a sensor is described. Elementary control analysis shows that an integral controller provides stable and effective set point tracking and disturbance attenuation. The trade off between performance and robustness may be quantified in terms of one parameter, namely the position of the closed loop pole. Experimental results are presented, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis.

Keville, Bernard; Gaman, Cezar; Turner, Miles M. [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Research and Engineering Building, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland) and School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Zhang Yang; Daniels, Stephen [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Research and Engineering Building, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland) and School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Holohan, Anthony M. [School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 6, JUNE 2011 1507 Microfabricated Flexible Electrodes for Multiaxis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--As conventional sensors are scaled down in size for proper usage in high-density laboratory plasmas, they become in multiple axis. MEMS electric-field probes have been successfully used to detect electron solitary-density space plasmas. Index Terms--B-dot microcoil, electric-field (E-field) measure- ments

California at Los Angles, University of

126

H sup 0 temperature and density measurements in a Penning surface-plasma H sup minus ion source. I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using vacuum ultraviolet laser-absorption spectroscopy, the H{sup 0} density and temperature are measured as a function of discharge current and H{sub 2}-gas flow in both the plasma column and the drift region between the plasma column and the emitter in the 4X source. For typical source operating parameters, the atom temperature is 1.5 eV in the plasma column and 0.6 eV in the drift region; the atom density 7{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} in the plasma column and 4{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} in the drift region. Separate measurements give 2% for the ratio of H{sub 2} molecules in the first vibrational level to the total H{sub 2} density.

Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Pitcher, E.J.; Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Worth, G.T. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (US)); Stutzin, G.C.; Young, A.T.; Schlachter, A.S.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Relations between light emission and electron density and temperature fluctuations in a helium plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relations between three atomic lines, He I 667.8 nm (3{sup 1}D{yields} 2{sup 1}P), 706.5 nm (3{sup 3}S{yields} 2{sup 3}P), and 728.1 nm (3{sup 1}S{yields} 2{sup 1}P), and the underlying fluctuations in a helium plasma are investigated for the quantitative interpretation of optical observations in plasma fluctuation measurements. Frequency dependent fluctuation amplitude ratios and phase delays between the line emission fluctuation and the electron density and temperature fluctuations are calculated based on a quasi-static collisional-radiative model and a linear approximation technique. For frequencies up to the upper limit of practical interest (<1 MHz), the fluctuation amplitude ratios and phase delays are similar to those directly evaluated by the quasi-static model. It is found that the difference between the results from the linear approximation technique and from the quasi-static model is due to the absence of metastable fluctuations. Contributions of the 2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S metastable fluctuations to the three helium line emission fluctuations are analyzed. The linearity between fluctuations in the line emission and in the electron density and temperature is valid for fluctuation levels higher than 10%.

Ma Shuiliang; Howard, John; Thapar, Nandika [Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

DEGAS 2 Neutral Transport Modeling of High Density, Low Temperature Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutral transport in the high density, low temperature plasma regime is examined using the degas 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. Degas 2 is shown to agree with an analytic fluid neutral model valid in this regime as long as the grid cell spacing is less than twice the neutral mean-free path. Using new atomic physics data provided by the collisional radiative code cramd, degas 2 is applied to a detached Alcator C-Mod discharge. A model plasma with electron temperature # 1 eV along detached flux tubes, between the target and the ionization front, is used to demonstrate that recombination is essential to matching the experimental data. With the cramd data, # 20% of the total recombination is due to molecular activated recombination. # Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Plasma Fusion Center, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA + Also at I. V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098, Russia # Presently at McKinsey & Company, Inc., London...

D. P. Stotler; A. Yu. Pigarov; C. F. F. Karney; S. I. Krasheninnikov; B. LaBombard; B. Lipschultz; G. M. McCracken; A. Niemczewski; J. A. Snipes; J. L. Terry; R. A. Vesey

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DENSITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 2: Principal mineral phases found in the granite rock. Mineral phase. ... Table 4. Average density of 12 granite rocks by Archimedes and CT. ...

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

Origin of electrical signals for plasma etching end point detection: Comparison of end point signals and electron density  

SciTech Connect

Electrical signals are used for end point detection in plasma etching, but the origin of the electrical changes observed at end point is not well understood. As an etch breaks through one layer and exposes an underlayer, the fluxes and densities of etch products and reactants in the gas phase will change. The resulting perturbation in gas composition may alter the plasma electron density, which in turn may affect the electrical signals. Alternatively, changes in substrate electrical properties or surface properties, such as work function or emitted electron yield, may be involved. To investigate these effects, experiments were performed in a radio-frequency (rf)-biased, inductively coupled reactor, during CF{sub 4}/Ar plasma etching of silicon dioxide films on silicon substrates. A complete set of electrical parameters, for the bias as well as the inductive source, was measured and compared. The most useful end point signal was found to be the fundamental rf bias impedance, which decreases when the oxide is removed. A simultaneous increase in plasma electron density was measured by a wave cutoff probe. Analytical sheath models indicate that the measured change in electron density accounts for nearly all of the impedance decrease. The change in electron density can in turn be explained by the effects of etch products or reactants on gas composition. In contrast, electrons emitted from the wafer surface play at most a minor role in the changes in electron density and impedance observed at end point.

Sobolewski, Mark A.; Lahr, David L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8364 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications & news,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Philadelphia, 2006 8th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Philadelphia, 2006 Invited Orals A. Hubbard H-mode pedestal and threshold studies over an expanded operating space on Alcator C-Mod R. Parker Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod J. Terry Investigation of Edge Localized Modes on Alcator C-Mod (talk | poster) Contributed Orals M. Bakhtiari Using Mixed Gases for Massive Gas Injection Disruption Mitigation on Alcator C-Mod I. Cziegler Structure and Characteristics of the Quasi-Coherent Mode in EDA H-mode Plasmas M. Greenwald Density peaking at low collisionality on Alcator C-Mod (pdf | powerpoint) V. Izzo Simulations of gas jet disruption mitigation B. Labombard Critical edge gradients and flows with reversed magnetic field in Alcator C-Mod

132

Measurements of electron density and temperature in the H-1 heliac plasma by helium line intensity ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron density and temperature distributions in the H-1 heliac plasma are measured using the helium line intensity ratio technique based on a collisional-radiative model. An inversion approach with minimum Fisher regularization is developed to reconstruct the ratios of the local emission radiances from detected line-integrated intensities. The electron density and temperature inferred from the He I 667.8/728.1 and He I 728.1/706.5 nm line ratios are in good agreement with those from other diagnostic techniques in the inner region of the plasma. The electron density and temperature values appear to be a little high in the outer region of the plasma. Some possible causes of the discrepancy in the outer region are discussed.

Ma Shuiliang; Howard, John; Blackwell, Boyd D.; Thapar, Nandika [Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Recently, novel experiments on magnetic reconnection have been conducted in laser-produced plasmas in a high-energy-density regime. Individual plasma bubbles self-generate toroidal, mega-gauss-scale magnetic fields through the Biermann battery effect. When multiple bubbles are created at small separation, they expand into one another, driving reconnection of this field. Reconnection in the experiments was reported to be much faster than allowed by both Sweet-Parker, and even Hall-MHD theories, when normalized to the nominal magnetic fields self-generated by single bubbles. Through particle-in-cell simulations (both with and without a binary collision operator), we model the bubble interaction at parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments. This paper discusses in detail the reconnection regime of the laser-driven experiments and reports the qualitative features of simulations. We find substantial flux-pileup effects, which boost the relevant magnetic field for reconnection in the current sheet. When this is accounted for, the normalized reconnection rates are much more in line with standard two-fluid theory of reconnection. At the largest system sizes, we additionally find that the current sheet is prone to breakup into plasmoids.

Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K. [Center for Integrated Computation and Analysis of Reconnection and Turbulence, and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO{sub 2} interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

Gupta, Deepak K.; Deng, B. H.; Knapp, K.; Sun, X.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fusion Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rotating Plasma Finding is Key for ITER Heavy-Ion Fusion Science (HIFS) Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights HPC Requirements Reviews NERSC HPC Achievement...

136

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

137

Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Neutral beam shine-through power and its dependence on the line density of the DIII-D plasma  

SciTech Connect

Neutral beams are the primary source of auxiliary plasma heating in the DIII-D Tokamak. Part of the beam power passes through the plasma and is deposited on the wall of the tokamak (shine-through power) and does not contribute to plasma heating. It is therefore crucial to know the shine-through power in order to give an accurate account of the total power deposited in the plasma. The authors have recently remeasured the shine-through power using data taken from thermocouples embedded in the beam target tiles of the tokamak vessel. The tile temperature rise was correlated to the injected beam power. A dependence of the tile temperature rise don the initial tile temperature has been empirically measured and accounted for in order to obtain a more accurate determination of the shine-through beam power. Measurements of the shine-through beam power as a function of plasma density and beam energy confirm that shine-through power decreases exponentially with plasma density, and increases linearly with beam energy.

Riggs, S.; Hong, R.; Kessler, D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A study of fast electron energy transport in relativistically intense laser-plasma interactions with large density scalelengths  

SciTech Connect

A systematic experimental and computational investigation of the effects of three well characterized density scalelengths on fast electron energy transport in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions has been performed. Experimental evidence is presented which shows that, when the density scalelength is sufficiently large, the fast electron beam entering the solid-density plasma is best described by two distinct populations: those accelerated within the coronal plasma (the fast electron pre-beam) and those accelerated near or at the critical density surface (the fast electron main-beam). The former has considerably lower divergence and higher temperature than that of the main-beam with a half-angle of {approx}20 Degree-Sign . It contains up to 30% of the total fast electron energy absorbed into the target. The number, kinetic energy, and total energy of the fast electrons in the pre-beam are increased by an increase in density scalelength. With larger density scalelengths, the fast electrons heat a smaller cross sectional area of the target, causing the thinnest targets to reach significantly higher rear surface temperatures. Modelling indicates that the enhanced fast electron pre-beam associated with the large density scalelength interaction generates a magnetic field within the target of sufficient magnitude to partially collimate the subsequent, more divergent, fast electron main-beam.

Scott, R. H. H.; Norreys, P. A. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Perez, F.; Baton, S. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7605, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Santos, J. J.; Nicolai, Ph.; Hulin, S. [Univ. Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Ridgers, C. P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davies, J. R. [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, A. R.; Tzoufras, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Rose, S. J. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications & news,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long Beach, 2001 Long Beach, 2001 Review Talk M. Greenwald Density Limits in Toroidal Plasmas Review_PDF Invited Orals A. Mazurenko An Experimental Study of ICRF Wave propagation and Mode Conversion to IBW by Phase Contrast Imaging in Alcator C-Mod Invited_PDF S.J. Wukitch Double Transport Barrier Experiments onAlcator C-Mod Invited_PDF S.J. Zweben Edge Turbulence Imaging in Alcator C-Mod Invited_PDF Contributed Orals P.T. Bonoli Analysis of ICRF Heated Internal Transport Barrier Modes in Alcator C-Mod Oral_PDF C. Boswell Inner wall Da emission on Alcator C-Mod Oral_PDF C.L. Fiore Transport Properties in Alcator C-Mod ITB Plasmas Oral_PDF J. Hughes Structure and Scalings of the H-Mode Pedestal on Alcator C-Mod Oral_PDF J. Irby Recent Results from the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak Oral_PDF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Electron Temperature and Density Measurement of Cylindrical Parallel MCS Discharge Plasma in Atmosphericpressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a cylindrical parallel microhollow cathode sustained (MCS) discharge plasma as a new large-area plasma source at atmospheric pressure. We measured the electron temperature and the density of this plasma source by using a Langmuir probe method and spectroscopy. The electron temperature at r=R/2 was measured to be 0.18 eV by using the Boltzmann plot method under the conditions that the inner radius of cylinder was R = 6.3 mm; MHCD supply voltage, 600 V at 50?s and 1 kHz; MHCD current, 10 mA for each electrode; the voltage of the third electrode, 1.5 kV; and pressure, 10 kPa. Furthermore, this temperature remained approximately constant irrespective of the pressure and the MHCD current.

M. Maeyama; Y. Akashi; K. Nagano

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Topical Area MFE Title: Burning Plasma Science_____________________________________________ Description Fusion energy is released by burning light elements using nuclear reactions which consume mass and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Topical Area MFE Title: Burning Plasma Science_____________________________________________ · Description Fusion energy is released by burning light elements using nuclear reactions which consume mass-sustained purely by its alpha particle heating. The science of burning plasmas consists of: (1) the physics

143

Interaction between a high density-low temperature plasma and a frozen hydrogen pellet in a railgun injector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model has been developed which describes the ablation process of frozen hydrogen pellets in an electromagnetic railgun. The model incorporates the neutral gas shielding model in which the pellet surface is heated by incident electrons from the plasma arc. The heated surface then ablates, forming a neutral cloud which attenuates the incoming electrons. The energy lost in the cloud by the electrons heats the ablatant material as it flows into the plasma arc. Under steady-state conditions, a scaling law for the ablation rate was derived as a function of plasma-arc temperature and density. In addition, flow conditions and the criteria for the existence of a steady-state solution were formulated and subsequently examined under simplifying assumptions. Comparison with experimentally observed ablation rates shows good qualitative agreement.

Grapperhaus, M.J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

First results from plasma density measurements in the FTU tokamak by means of a two-frequency pulsed time-of-flight refractometer  

SciTech Connect

A pulsed time-of-flight refractometer was developed and tested to determine the mean plasma density in the T-11M tokamak by measuring the propagation time of nanosecond microwave pulses in plasma. Later, it was also proposed to use such an instrument to measure and control the mean plasma density in the ITER tokamak by probing the plasma with an extraordinary wave, the electric field of which is perpendicular to the magnetic field in plasma, in the transparency window at frequencies of 50-100 GHz. To avoid the effect of the density profile shape on the measurement results in the nonlinear mode of refractometer operation (near the cutoff), a system operating at two different probing frequencies was developed and tested. Such a system provides two values of the time delay, which can be used to estimate the peaking factor of the density distribution {alpha} and correctly determine the linear density Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Nl Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket , regardless of the density profile (assuming a smooth density profile of the form of N({rho}) = N(0)(1 - {rho}{sup 2}){sup {alpha}}, where N(0) is the central plasma density and {rho} = r/a is the normalized plasma radius). The first experiments on density measurements in the FTU tokamak performed with this refractometer are described, and results from these experiments are presented. The formation of a thin dense plasma layer in the zone of a strong magnetic field (the so-called MARFE layer) at a relatively low (for FTU) plasma density of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} was detected. The thickness of this layer, determined from the refractometry data, agrees well with the data obtained using a digital camera.

Petrov, V. G.; Malyshev, A. Yu.; Markov, V. K.; Petrov, A. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Avino, F.; Angelis, R. de; Tudisco, O. [ENEA-UT Fusione Centro Ricerche Frascati (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Estimation of electron temperature and density of the decay plasma in a laser-assisted discharge plasma extreme ultraviolet source by using a modified Stark broadening method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the plasma expansion behaviors and the electrical recovery process after the maximum implosion in our tin fueled laser-assisted discharge plasma (LDP) 13.5 nm EUV source, we developed and evaluated a cost-efficient spectroscopic method to determine the electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} simultaneously, by using Stark broadenings of two Sn II isolated lines (5s{sup 2}4f{sup 2}F{sup o}{sub 5/2} - 5s{sup 2}5d{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} 558.9 nm and 5s{sup 2}6d{sup 2}D{sub 5/2} - 5s{sup 2}6p{sup 2}P{sup o}{sub 3/2} 556.2 nm) spontaneously emitted from the plasma. The spatial-resolved evolutions of T{sub e} and n{sub e} of the expansion plasma over 50 to 900 ns after the maximum implosion were obtained using this modified Stark broadening method. According to the different n{sub e} decay characteristics along the Z-pinch axis, the expansion velocity of the electrons was estimated as {approx}1.2 x 10{sup 4} ms{sup -1} from the plasma shell between the electrodes towards the cathode and the anode. The decay time constant of n{sub e} was measured as 183 {+-} 24 ns. Based on the theories of plasma adiabatic expansion and electron-impact ionization, the minimum time-span that electrical recovery between the electrodes needs in order to guarantee the next succeeding regular EUV-emitting discharge was estimated to be 70.5 {mu}s. Therefore, the maximum repetition rate of our LDP EUV source is {approx}14 kHz, which enables the output to reach 125 W/(2{pi}sr).

Zhu Qiushi; Muto, Takahiro; Yamada, Junzaburo; Kishi, Nozomu; Watanabe, Masato; Okino, Akitoshi; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Hotta, Eiki [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs, CMod_2003.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy- Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links Program Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda, February 20-21, 2003 Thursday, February 20, 2003 8:15 Executive Session 8:30 Welcome/Introduction M. Porkolab 8:35 Introduction/Charge to PACsp; Hutchinson 8:45 Program Overview E. Marmar 9:45 Break 10:00 Advanced Tokamak Program A. Hubbard 10:50 Burning Plasma Support Program S. Wolfe 11:30 Transport Program M. Greenwald 12:10 Lunch 1:15 RF S. Wukitch 1:45 Divertor and Edge Physics Program B. Lipschultz 2:30 MHD Stability Research Program R. Granetz 3:00 Break 3:15 Executive Session 5:15 Feedback/Questions from PAC 7:00 Dinner (off-site) Friday, 21 February 2003 8:15 Executive Session 9:00 PPPL Collaboration G. Schilling

147

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics Research Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links earl marmar head of alcator reviewing data Dr. Earl Marmar, leader of the Alcator Project, studies C-Mod data. Today, we are closer than ever to realizing the dream of harnessing the nuclear process that powers our sun. This stellar process, called fusion, produces minimal waste and offers the hope of an almost limitless supply of safe, dependable energy. Among fusion research groups, MIT's Alcator C-Mod project is unique in its dedication to compact size and high performance. It is the world's highest magnetic field tokamak plasma confinement experiment. As a result, Alcator experiments have performed at levels rivaling the largest fusion experiments in the world.

148

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>research program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Program Information & Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Useful Links Collaborations at Alcator C-Mod Collaborations form an integral and important part of the Alcator C-Mod research effort. Among the major facilities, C-Mod has a relatively small scientific staff, and collaborations provide a high leverage avenue to increase our productivity. Opportunities for collaboration can be found across the entire spectrum of our research activities. Education is a primary mission of MIT, and we particularly welcome and encourage student participation in our program. The Alcator program is centered around the overall theme of: Compact

149

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications & news,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quebec City, 2000 Quebec City, 2000 Invited Talks Fiore, C.L. - Core Internal Transport Barriers in Alcator C-Mod Plasmas Invited PDF (0.5MB) LaBombard, B. - Particle Transport in the Scrape-Off Layer of Alcator C-Mod Invited PDF (0.7MB) Hubbard, A.E. - Pedestal Profiles and Fluctuations in C-Mod Enhanced D-alpha H-modes Invited PDF (1.0MB) Oral Presentations Boivin, R.L. - Recent Results from the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak Oral PDF (1.7MB) Rice, J.E. - Central Toroidal Rotation Reversal with ITB Formation in Alcator C-Mod Plasmas IAEA Paper PDF (0.6MB) Snipes, J.A. - Peaked Density Profiles in H-mode in Alcator C-Mod Oral PDF (0.2MB) Oral PDF (0.3MB) Greenwald, M. - Studies of EDA H-mode and Its Relation to the Micro-Stability of the Pedestal Oral PDF (0.3MB) Zweben, S.J. - Two Dimensional Imaging of Edge Turbulence in Alcator C-Mod, PPPL

150

Study of density fluctuations and particle transport at the edge of I-mode plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wide range of plasma parameters available on Alcator C-Mod has led to the accessibility of many regimes of operation. Since its commissioning, C-Mod has accessed the Linear ohmic confinement, Saturated ohmic confinement, ...

Dominguez, Arturo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the Saturn accelerator to study current flow initiation. In these first experiments

M. S. Derzon; T. J. Nash; G. O. Allshouse; A. J. Antolak; M. Hurst; J. S. McGurn; D. J. Muron; J. F. Seaman; J. MacFarlane; T. Demiris; L. Hrubesh; H. Lewis; D. Ryutov; T. Barber; T. Gilliland; D. Jobe; S. Lazier

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

5. Kodama, R. et al. Fast heating of ultrahigh-density plasma as a step towards laser fusion ignition. Nature 412, 798802 (2001).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Kodama, R. et al. Fast heating of ultrahigh-density plasma as a step towards laser fusion. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 23567­23581 (1995). 13. Hirahara, M. et al. Acceleration and heating of cold

Davis, James C.

153

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 30, NO. 3, JUNE 2002 1063 The Multifrequency Spectral Eulerian (MUSE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microwave vacuum electronics, plasma physics, fluid dynamics, dynam- ical systems, and applied math. John H with a small number of input frequencies, including studies of harmonic generation and harmonic injection] to match Christine 1-D results. B. Constant of the Motion Appendix I shows that the total energy density

Dobson, Ian

154

Hydrogenation and surface density changes in hydrocarbon films during erosion using Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas  

SciTech Connect

We report interactions of low pressure Ar, H{sub 2}, and Ar/H{sub 2} mixture plasmas with a-C:H films. Surface evolution and erosion of a-C:H films were examined for ion energies up to 200 eV by rf biasing the substrates. Film surfaces were characterized using in situ ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Multilayer models for steady-state modified surface layers are constructed using ellipsometric data and compared with results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and transport of ions in matter (TRIM) calculations. We find that Ar plasma causes a modified layer at the surface that is depleted of H atoms. The depth and degree of this modification is strongly depending on Ar ion energies. This depletion saturates quickly during plasma exposure (<1 s) and persists during steady-state erosion. We find that the thickness and density of the H-depleted layer are in good agreement with MD and TRIM simulations. The degree of surface densification decreases when small amounts of H{sub 2} are added to Ar plasmas. When more than 5% H{sub 2} is added to the plasma, long term loss in surface density is observed, indicating rehydrogenation and saturation of H in the film. As the H{sub 2} fraction increases, the near-surface atomic H increases and the ion composition bombarding the surface changes. This causes incorporation of H deeper into the a-C:H film. For a-C:H films exposed to pure H{sub 2} plasmas, H is introduced into the near-surface region to a depth of up to {approx}8 nm from the surface. As the rf bias is increased the ion energy transitions from solely chemical sputtering to one involving physical sputtering, causing the yield of C atoms from the surface to greatly increase. The increasing yield suppresses H incorporation/saturation and decreases the magnitude of the modified surface layer.

Fox-Lyon, N.; Oehrlein, G. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Ning, N.; Graves, D. B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights  

SciTech Connect

The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

Hazi, A U

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

Core Competencies Performing topical research in plasma boundary physics, fueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovation. Experimental plasma physics Plasma theory Enabling technologies High-speed hydrogen pellet injector for fueling fusion devices Fusion Nuclear Science Facility Developing plasma heating/current drive and chamber technologies to help identify and resolve fusion reactor issues, for example, high power density

157

In situ density and temperature measurements of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in ion source plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role of highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules has been postulated to be of great importance in H{sup {minus}} ion sources. However the the difficulty of making {ital in} {ital situ} measurements has led to a paucity of direct determinations of these species within the plasmas of these sources. Recently, vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure the H{sub 2} rovibrational populations up to {ital v}{double prime}=5 and {ital J}{double prime}=8 in a medium-power hydrogen plasma. This work extends those measurements to {ital v}{double prime}=8 and to {ital J}{double prime}=13. The populations of the vibrational levels still appear to be almost Boltzmann. The theoretically predicted plateau is not observed up to the detection limit. The dependence of several vibrational levels on discharge current and filling pressure is shown.

Stutzin, G.C.; Young, A.T.; Doebele, H.F.; Schlachter, A.S.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Measurement of density, temperature, and electrical conductivity of a shock-compressed nonideal nitrogen plasma in the megabar pressure range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinematic and thermodynamic parameters of shock-compressed liquid nitrogen are measured behind the front of a plane shock wave using plane wave and hemispherical shock wave generators. In these experiments, high values of compression parameters (shock-compressed hydrogen density {approx} 3.25 g/cm{sup 3} and temperature T{approx} 56000 K at a pressure of P {approx} 265 GPa) are attained. The density, pressure, temperature, and electrical conductivity of the nonideal plasma of shock-compressed liquid nitrogen are measured. A nearly isochoric behavior of the nitrogen shock adiabat is observed in the pressure range P = 100-300 GPa. The thermodynamics of shock-compressed nitrogen is an alyzed using the model of the equation of state in the quasi-chemical representation (SAHA code) as well as the semiempirical wide-range equation of state developed at the Institute of Experimental Physics. Experimental results are interpreted on the basis of calculations as the fixation of the boundary of transition of shock-compressed nitrogen from the polymer phase to the state of a strongly nonideal plasma at P {approx} 100 GPa, {approx} 3.4 g/cm{sup 3}.

Mochalov, M. A.; Zhernokletov, M. V.; Il'kaev, R. I.; Mikhailov, A. L. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences (IVTAN), Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Gryaznov, V. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation); Iosilevskiy, I. L., E-mail: ilios@orc.r [Russian Academy of Sciences (IVTAN), Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Mezhevov, A. B.; Kovalev, A. E.; Kirshanov, S. I.; Grigor'eva, Yu. A.; Novikov, M. G.; Shuikin, A. N. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

DOE Science Showcase - DOE Plasma Research | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Plasma Research DOE Plasma Research Image credit: NASA Plasma, the electrified gas that surrounds and illuminates our world, is the fourth state of matter. The behavior, nature, and complexity of plasma allows DOE scientists, research institutions and international partners to research a diverse number of applications that are significant to our world. DOE plasma theorists are developing the fundamental plasma theory and computational base needed to understand plasma. Hall thrusters are being studied that satellites and space probes use for propulsion. Research on beam dynamics is yielding applications from particle accelerators to the creation of fusion. Plasma-based systems are being developed to manufacture a radioactive element vital to medical exams. Nanomaterials are being

160

Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-4 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561, Shizuoka (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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161

DESTRUCTION OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES IN A DEVICE FOR PRODUCING A HIGH DENSITY PLASMA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for burning out neutral particles in an evacuated region and within a strong magnetic field. The method comprises injecting energetic molecular ions into the region perpendicular to the magnetic field and into the path of a dissociating, energetic arc discharge, the atomic ions formed in the dissociating process being trapped by the magnetic field, and then increasing the value of the trapped atomic ion current to such a value that the neutral particles are destroyed faster than they are formed, thereby causing a dense, energetic plasma to be built up and sustained by the magnetic field. (AEC)

Simon, A.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 34, NO. 3, JUNE 2006 825 Nonlocal Effects in a Bounded Afterglow Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surpass by many times the kinetic energy of the electron gas. Due to this large chemical activity. Steadman and D. W. Setser, "Chemical applications of metastable argon atoms II. A clean system research and technical applications. Index Terms--Afterglow plasma, diffusion cooling, electron energy

Kaganovich, Igor

163

THERMAL ANNEALING OF ZNO FILMS USING HIGH-DENSITY PLASMA ARC LAMPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanostructured materials are rarely synthesized with appropriate phase and/or morphology. In this study, critical additional of as-synthesized nanostructured materials, such as annealing and/or activation of dopants, are addressed using infrared plasma arc lamps (PAL) over areas as large as 1,000 cm2. The broad spectral range of the PAL and the spectral variation of light absorption in nanostructured materials make the selection of processing parameters extremely difficult, posing a major technological barrier. In this study, the measurement of the surface temperature using various techniques for ZnO films on crystalline silicon wafers is discussed. An energy transport model for the simulation of rapid thermal processing using PAL is presented. The experimental and computational results show that the surface temperature cannot be measured directly and that computer simulation results are an effective tool for obtaining accurate data on processing temperatures.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Xu, Jun [ORNL; Angelini, Joseph Attilio [ORNL; Harper, David C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Imaging spectroscopy diagnosis of internal electron temperature and density distributions of plasma cloud surrounding hydrogen pellet in the Large Helical Device  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the behavior of hydrogen pellet ablation, a novel method of high-speed imaging spectroscopy has been used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for identifying the internal distribution of the electron density and temperature of the plasma cloud surrounding the pellet. This spectroscopic system consists of a five-branch fiberscope and a fast camera, with each objective lens having a different narrow-band optical filter for the hydrogen Balmer lines and the background continuum radiation. The electron density and temperature in the plasma cloud are obtained, with a spatial resolution of about 6 mm and a temporal resolution of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s, from the intensity ratio measured through these filters. To verify the imaging, the average electron density and temperature also have been measured from the total emission by using a photodiode, showing that both density and temperature increase with time during the pellet ablation. The electron density distribution ranging from 10{sup 22} to 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and the temperature distribution around 1 eV have been observed via imaging. The electron density and temperature of a 0.1 m plasma cloud are distributed along the magnetic field lines and a significant electron pressure forms in the plasma cloud for typical experimental conditions of the LHD.

Motojima, G.; Sakamoto, R.; Goto, M.; Matsuyama, A.; Yamada, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho, Toki-City, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mishra, J. S. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 322-6, Oroshi-cho, Toki-City, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LITHIUM BEAM EDGE PLASMA CURRENT DENSITY DIAGNOSTIC ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 An edge plasma current density diagnostic employing a neutralized lithium ion beam system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The lithium beam control system is designed around a GE Fanuc 90-30 series PLC and Cimplicity{reg_sign} HMI (Human Machine Interface) software. The control system operates and supervises a collection of commercial and in-house designed high voltage power supplies for beam acceleration and focusing, filament and bias power supplies for ion creation, neutralization, vacuum, triggering, and safety interlocks. This paper provides an overview of the control system, while highlighting innovative aspects including its remote operation, pulsed source heating and pulsed neutralizer heating, optimizing beam regulation, and beam ramping, ending with a discussion of its performance.

PEAVY,J.J; CARY,W.P; THOMAS,D.M; KELLMAN,D.H; HOYT,D.M; DELAWARE,S.W; PRONKO,S.G.E; HARRIS,T.E

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Measurements of the parametric decay of CO/sub 2/ laser radiation into plasma waves at quarter critical density using ruby laser Thomson scattering  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of small-angle ruby laser Thomson scattering measurements of the parametric excitation of plasma waves by CO/sub 2/ laser radiation at quarter-critical density in a laser-heated gas target plasma. From supplementary data obtained from interferometry and large-angle ruby laser scattering we infer that the threshold conditions for a convective decay are satisfied.

Schuss, J.J.; Chu, T.K.; Johnson, L.C.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Numerical simulations of collisionless drift instabilities for low-density plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear behavior of the collisionless drift instabilities are studied for the universal and current driven modes by means of electrostatic particle simulations in two-and-a-half dimensions. Realistic mass ratios of the electrons to the ions are used in the simulations, where the guiding-center approximation for the electrons and the exact dynamics for the ions are employed. Several nonlinear effects including the quasilinear diffusion of the particle density, the frequency shift due to the ambipolar field, the mode competition among the unstable waves, and the quasilinear diffusion in the velocity space are found to be the dominant mechanisms for the saturation. The stabilization of the collisionless drift instabilities by the magnetic shear has also been studied.

Lee, W.W.; Yau, Y.Y.K.; Okuda, H.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

DRAFT -FOR COMMENT -26 February 2001 Workshop on Burning Plasma Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needed to ultimately optimize the design of an economic and environmentally attractive fusion power alpha physics in the solar wind, collisionless reconnection in magnetospheric and solar plasmas, plasma. #12;DRAFT - FOR COMMENT - 26 February 2001 ­ 4 ­ (c) Phase space engineering and alpha particle

169

Establishment of very uniform gas-flow pattern in the process chamber for microwave-excited high-density plasma by ceramic shower plate  

SciTech Connect

The authors developed a ceramic upper shower plate used in the microwave-excited high-density plasma process equipment incorporating a dual shower-plate structure to establish a very uniform gas-flow pattern in the process chamber. Thousands of very fine gas-injection holes are implemented on this Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} upper shower plate with optimized allocation to establish a uniform gas-flow pattern of plasma-excitation gases and radical-generation gases for generating intended radicals in the plasma-excitation region. The size of these fine holes must be 50 {mu}m or less in diameter and 8 mm or more in length because these holes perform an essential role: They completely avoid the plasma excitation in these fine holes and upper gas-supply regions resulting from the plasma penetration into these regions from excited high-density plasma, even if very high-density plasma greater than 1x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} is excited just under the ceramic upper shower plate by microwaves supplied from the radial line slot antenna. On the other hand, various process gases, such as material gases for film formations and etching gases, are supplied from the lower shower plate installed in the diffusion plasma region to this very uniform gas-flow pattern region of plasma-excitation gases and radical-generation gases. As a result, the process gases are supplied to the wafer surface in a very effective manner without excess decomposition of those process gas molecules and undesired reaction-product deposition on the inner surface of the process chamber. The process results are improved drastically by introducing the newly developed ceramic upper shower plate. But also, process uniformity on the entire wafer is improved with drastically reducing reaction-product deposition on the inner surface of the process chamber.

Goto, Tetsuya; Inokuchi, Atsutoshi; Ishibashi, Kiyotaka; Yasuda, Seij; Nakanishi, Toshio; Kohno, Masayuki; Okesaku, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masaru; Nozawa, Toshihisa; Hirayama, Masaki; Ohmi, Tadahiro [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Ltd., Tokyo 107-6325 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Technology Development Institute, Inc., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tokyo Electron AT Ltd., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); Hokuriku Seikei Industrial, Co., Ltd., Ishikawa 923-0157 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Technology Development Institute, Inc., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications & news,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1st Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Atlanta, 2009 1st Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Atlanta, 2009 Invited Orals I. Cziegler Structures and Velocities of the Edge Turbulence in Alcator C-Mod M. Greenwald Verification and Validation for Magnetic Fusion: Moving Toward Predictive Capability J. Hughes Edge Pedestal and Confinement Regulation on Alcator C-Mod L. Lin Comparison of Experimental Measurements and Gyrokinetic Turbulent Electron Transport Models in Alcator C-Mod Plasmas M. Porkolab Taming Magnetically Confined Plasmas with RF Waves: a Historical Perspective S. Shiraiwa Plasma Wave Simulation Based on a Versatile FEM Solver on Alcator C-Mod D. Whyte Runaway Electron Transport & Disruption Mitigation Optimization on Alcator C-Mod Contributed Orals B. Bose Studies of Filament Formation during Lithium Pellet Injection in Alcator C-Mod

171

Utilizing upper hybrid resonance for high density plasma production and negative ion generation in a downstream region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized wave-induced resonances are created by microwaves launched directly into a multicusp (MC) plasma device in the k Up-Tack B mode, where k is the wave vector and B is the static magnetic field. The resonance zone is identified as upper hybrid resonance (UHR), and lies r = {approx}22 mm away from the MC boundary. Measurement of radial wave electric field intensity confirms the right hand cutoff of the wave (r = 22.5-32.1 mm) located near the UHR zone. A sharp rise in the corresponding electron temperature in the resonance region by {approx}13 eV from its value away from resonance at r = 0, is favorable for the generation of vibrationally excited molecules of hydrogen. A transverse magnetic filter allows cold electrons ({approx}1-2 eV) to pass into the downstream region where they generate negative ions by dissociative attachment. Measurements of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) support the viewpoint. H{sup -} current density of {approx}0.26 mA/cm{sup 2} is obtained at a wave power density of {approx}3 W/cm{sup 2} at 2.0 mTorr pressure, which agrees reasonably well with results obtained from a steady state model using particle balance equations.

Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Science  

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149802 149802 , 1291 (2007); 318 Science et al. L. Ozyuzer, Superconductors Emission of Coherent THz Radiation from www.sciencemag.org (this information is current as of November 29, 2007 ): The following resources related to this article are available online at http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291 version of this article at: including high-resolution figures, can be found in the online Updated information and services, http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291/DC1 can be found at: Supporting Online Material found at: can be related to this article A list of selected additional articles on the Science Web sites http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291#related-content http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/318/5854/1291#otherarticles

173

SCience  

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all all SCience Chicago Office Environment, Safety and Health Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual December 2012 ~5 {?JI-- l L-H1- I Roxanne E. Purucker, Manager Date SC-CH FRAM Revision 7 Office of Science - Chicago Office SC-CH Revision History TITLE: SC-CH Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual POINT OF CONTACT: Karl Moro SCMS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) TO BE UPDATED: December 31, 2013 Revision Date Reason/Driver Description 5 Oct 10 Annual review and revision of the SC-CH ES&H Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual Changes were primarily made to address administrative and organizational changes and general improvement of text and presentation. I 6 Nov 11 Annual review and revision of

174

Fusion through the eyes of a veteran science journalist | Princeton Plasma  

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Fusion through the eyes of a veteran science journalist Fusion through the eyes of a veteran science journalist July 15, 2013 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Daniel Clery (Photo by Sadie Windscheffel-Clarke) Daniel Clery Gallery: Author Daniel Clery recently published "A Piece of the Sun," a 320-page narrative of the history of fusion research and the personalities who have devoted their careers to it. Clery is a United Kingdom-based reporter for Science magazine who holds a bachelor's degree in theoretical physics from York University and has covered fusion for more than a decade. While hardly an uncritical flag-waver for fusion, he recognizes its vast potential. He discussed his new book and the future of fusion with PPPL Science Writer John Greenwald. How did you gather your detailed information from labs like PPPL?

175

Studies of plasma transport  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the charge-coupled device camera and other plasma diagnostic equipment used to measure plasma density and other plasma properties. (LSP)

Malmberg, J.H.; O' Neil, T.M.; Driscoll, C.F.

1991-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications & news,  

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2nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Chicago, 2010 2nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Chicago, 2010 Invited Orals A. Hubbard I-mode regime with an edge energy transport barrier but no particle barrier in Alcator C-Mod B. LaBombard Scaling of the power exhaust channel in Alcator C-Mod A. Loarte High confinement/high radiated power H-mode experiments in Alcator C-Mod and consequences for ITER Qdt=10 operation A. Schmidt Investigation of LH physics through power modulation experiments on Alcator C-Mod Contributed Orals A. Bader Investigating highly energetic ions in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak D. Ernst Using modulated on-axis ICRH to control fluctuations in an internal transport barrier C. Fiore The role of rotation in C-Mod internal transport barriers R. Granetz Effect of plasma configuration on disruption runaway electrons

177

Assessment of an ORION-based experimental platform for measuring the opacity of high-temperature and high-density plasma  

SciTech Connect

The following provides an assessment of an experimental platform based on the ORION laser at AWE Aldermasten, England, for measuring the opacity of high-temperature and high-density LTE plasmas. The specific points addressed are (1) the range of electron density and temperature that can be achieved with short-pulse beams alone, as well as (2) by means of compression with a long-pulse beam; (3) the accuracy with which electron density, electron temperature, and absolute emissivity can be measured; (4) the use of pulse shaping to increase the sample density to above solid density; (5) the effect that target materials and target design have on maintaining spatial uniformity of the sample, and (6) the need for additional diagnostics to produce and characterize samples for decisive measurements.

Beiersdorfer, P; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Behaviour and stability of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in non-neutral plasma containing small density fraction of background gas ions  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the frequencies of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes in non-neutral plasma can get into the low-frequency range due to the Doppler shift caused by plasma rotation in crossed fields. TG modes interact with the ion modes that leads to plasma instability. In paper the frequency spectrum of 'cold' electron plasma completely filling a waveguide and containing small density fraction of ions of background gas is determined numerically. For ions the kinetic description is used. Oscillations having azimuthal number m= 2 are considered. In this case both low- and upper-hybrid TG modes get into the low-frequency range. The spectrum consists of families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes and electron TG modes with the frequencies equal to hybrid frequencies with the Doppler shift. The growth rates of upper-hybrid modes are much faster than the growth rates of low-hybrid and MIC modes.

Yeliseyev, Y. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Akademicheskaya St., 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements  

SciTech Connect

Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L. [Synchrotron Soleil, l'Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Booth, J. P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium in cutting arc plasmas derived from electron and gas density measurements using a two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique  

SciTech Connect

A two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique that allows inferring the electron and gas densities of axisymmetric arc plasmas without imposing any assumption regarding statistical equilibrium models is reported. This technique was applied to the study of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) departures within the core of a 30 A high-energy density cutting arc. In order to derive the electron and heavy particle temperatures from the inferred density profiles, a generalized two-temperature Saha equation together with the plasma equation of state and the quasineutrality condition were employed. Factors such as arc fluctuations that influence the accuracy of the measurements and the validity of the assumptions used to derive the plasma species temperature were considered. Significant deviations from chemical equilibrium as well as kinetic equilibrium were found at elevated electron temperatures and gas densities toward the arc core edge. An electron temperature profile nearly constant through the arc core with a value of about 14000-15000 K, well decoupled from the heavy particle temperature of about 1500 K at the arc core edge, was inferred.

Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto 2600, Santa Fe (Argentina); Artana, G. [Laboratorio de Fluidodinamica, Departamento Ing. Mecanica, Facultad de Ingenieria (UBA), Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto 2600, Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA), Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs, CMod_2004.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Technology Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Useful Links Program Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda, March 2-4, 211 Wednesday, March 2, 2011 8:30 Executive Session R. Hawryluk 9:00 Welcome and Charge M. Porkolab 9:10 Program Introduction E. Marmar 9:40 Facilities and Upgrades J. Irby 10:40 Break 10:55 Transport M. Greenwald 11:35 Pedestal J. Hughes 12:05 Lunch 13:05 Plasma Boundary B. Lipschultz 13:55 Macrostability R. Granetz 14:15 DNB R. Granetz 14:25 LHRF: Status G. Wallace 14:45 LHRF: Plans R. Parker 15:05 ITER Baseline Scenarios S. Wolfe 15:45 Executive Session R. Hawryluk 17:45 Feedback and Questions to C-Mod Staff R. Hawryluk 18:15 Adjourn 19:00 Dinner - Sidney's Grille at Le Meridien Thursday, March 3, 2011 8:30 Executive Session R. Hawryluk

182

Expansion of a plasma layer near a barrier irradiated by a laser in high-density gases  

SciTech Connect

The time dependence of shock waves in a laser-produced plasma are studied for a Nd laser with an energy of 80 J. (AIP)

Nemchinov, I.V.; Petrukhin, A.I.; Pleshanov, Y.E.; Rybakov, V.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>Conference Room  

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Density Physics Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links Conference Rooms The PSFC is using google apps for education to support calendars for shared resources. There are currently two calendars implemented. One for the Alcator C-Mod Run Schedule, and one to schedule the NW17-132 conference room. These links will display read only views of the calendars. In order to schedule the conference room visit your personal psfc calendar as described below. In order to view these calendars you must be signed in to the g-apps.psfc.mit.edu domain. When prompted by https://sso.psfc.mit.edu/ for a username and password, enter your PSFC login credentials. After you authenticate for the first time, you get a screen which asks you to accept new account. Note that: THIS IS DIFFERENT AND SEPARATE FROM YOUR OTHER GOOGLE

184

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs, CMod_2004.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Technology Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Useful Links Program Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda, February 6-8, 2008 Wednesday, February 6, 2008 8:30 am Executive Session Chuck Kessel 9:00 am Welcome & Charge Miklos Porkolab 9:10 am Comments from DoE Rostom Dagazian 9:15 am Program Overview Earl Marmar 10:05 am Transport Martin Greenwald 10:45 am Break 11:00 am ICRF Steve Wukitch 11:30 am LHRF Ron Parker 12:00 pm Lunch (on-site) 1:00 pm Macro-Stability Bob Granetz 1:30 pm Pedestal Physics Jerry Hughes 2:00 pm Plasma-Boundary Bruce Lipschultz 2:45 pm Break 3:00 pm Int. Scen.: ITER H-Mode Baseline Steve Wolfe 3:30 pm Int. Scen.: Advanced Scenarios Amanda Hubbard 4:00 pm Theory and Modeling Paul Bonoli 4:40 pm Executive Session 5:30 pm Adjourn

185

Final Technical Report, DOE Grant DE-FG02-98ER54496, Physics of High-Energy-Density X Pinch Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Abstract for the Final Technical Report, DOE Grant DE-FG02-98ER54496 An X-pinch plasma is produced by driving a high current (100-500 kiloamperes) through two or more fine wires that cross and touch at a point, forming an X in the case of two wires. The wires explode because of the high current, and then the resulting plasma is imploded radially inward by the magnetic field from the current. When the imploding material briefly stagnates at very small radius and high density, an intense burst of x-rays is produced and the plasma disassembles as rapidly as it imploded. When this project began, we could confidently state that at its minimum radius, X pinch plasmas made from such materials as titanium and molybdenum might be as hot as 10,000,000 K and had densities almost as high as the solid wire density, but their X-ray pulse durations were below one billionth of a second. We could also say that the X pinch was useful for point-projection imaging of rapidly changing objects, such as exploding wires, with high resolution, indicative of a very small X-ray source spot size. We can now confidently say that X-pinch plasma temperatures at the moment of the X-ray burst are 10-25 million K in titanium, molybdenum and several other wire X-pinches based upon the spectrum of emitted X-rays in the radiation burst. By the same means, as well as from the penetration of X-rays through the dense plasma, we know that ion densities are close to or higher than one-tenth of the density of the original (solid) wire material in molybdenum and a few other X-pinch plasmas. Furthermore, using the diffraction of X-rays radiated by the X-pinch when it reaches minimum radius, we have determined that the x-ray source size is about 1 thousandth of a millimeter for such wire materials as molybdenum and niobium, while it is 2-10 times larger for tungsten, titanium and aluminum wires. Finally, using a very high speed X-ray imaging streak camera, we have determined that X pinch X-ray pulses can be as short as 30 trillionths of a second. Additional experiments have demonstrated that a spherical shell of plasma expands away from the cross point region after the x-ray burst. It reaches millimeter scale in a few billionths of a second, leaving a small (less than 0.1 millimeter) gap in the middle that enables energetic electrons to be accelerated to 10 or a few 10s of kilovolts of energy. In addition to gaining an understanding of the physics of the X pinch plasmas, we have had to develop several new X-ray diagnostic devices in order to obtain and verify the above results. On the non-technical side, 4 students have completed Ph.D.s working under the auspices of this project, including one woman, and another woman has begun her Ph.D. research under this project. In addition, several undergraduate students have worked with us on the X-pinch experiments, including one who is now a graduate student in plasma physics at Princeton University.

David Hammer

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

186

Reconstruction of the equilibrium of the plasma in a Tokamak and identification of the current density profile in real time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reconstruction of the equilibrium of a plasma in a Tokamak is a free boundary problem described by the Grad-Shafranov equation in axisymmetric configuration. The right-hand side of this equation is a nonlinear source, which represents the toroidal ... Keywords: Finite elements method, Fusion plasma, Grad-Shafranov equation, Inverse problem, Real-time

J. Blum; C. Boulbe; B. Faugeras

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction  

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Program Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Waves & Beams Useful Links Quarterly Review, Thursday, July 14, 2005 10:00 Steve Wolfe: Status of the run campaign, and research operations weeks JOULE target 10:15 Yijun Lin: Status of "all metal wall" JOULE target 10:30 Ron Parker: Lower Hybrid status 10:45 Jim Irby: Cryopump status 10:55 Bob Granetz: DNB status 11:05 Bob Granetz: Disruption mitigation by massive gas puff -- experiments and plans 11:15 Brian LaBombard: Rotation and H-mode scrape-off layer flows, the role of the X-point and connections to the L-H power threshold in Alcator C-Mod 77 Massachusetts Avenue, NW16, Cambridge, MA 02139, info@psfc.mit.edu

188

A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create visualizations and perform analysis of their simulation data from either the MDSplus data storage environment or from locally stored HDF5 files. More advanced tools for visualization and analysis also were created in collaboration with the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling. Versions of SCIRun with the FusionViewer have been made available to fusion scientists on the Mac OS X, Linux, and other Unix based platforms and have been downloaded 1163 times. SCIRun has been used with NIMROD, M3D, BOUT fusion simulation data as well as simulation data from other SciDAC application areas (e.g., Astrophysics). The subsequent visualization results - including animations - have been incorporated into invited talks at multiple APS/DPP meetings as well as peer reviewed journal articles. As an example, SCIRun was used for the visualization and analysis of a NIMROD simulation of a disruption that occurred in a DIII-D experiment. The resulting animations and stills were presented as part of invited talks at APS/DPP meetings and the SC04 conference in addition to being highlighted in the NIH/NSF Visualization Research Challenges Report. By achieving its technical goals, the University of Utah played a key role in the successful development of a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. Many of the visualization tools developed as part of the NFC continue to be used by Fusion and other SciDAC application scientists and are currently being supported and expanded through follow-on up on SciDAC projects (Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technology, and the Visualization and Analysis in Support of Fusion SAP).

Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Particle beam dynamics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle beam dynamics Particle beam dynamics Subscribe to RSS - Particle beam dynamics The study of the physics of charged particle beams and the accelerators that produce them. This cross-disciplinary area intersects with fields such as plasma physics, high-energy density science, and ultra-fast lasers. Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science Quest Magazine Summer 2013 Welcome to the premiere issue of Quest, the annual magazine of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Read more about Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science Ronald C Davidson Ronald Davidson heads PPPL research on charged particle beam dynamics and

190

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research> alcator>tokamak data &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALCATOR C-Mod ALCATOR C-Mod Alcator Introduction Facility Information Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links Tokamak Data & Real-time Information Shot cycle display Web cameras Live video and audio from the control room - coming soon Network AC Power Switches (Authorized access only) Compact PCI Acquisition Hardware status (Local access only) Data from latest shot Logbook (Authorized access only) Engineering status Cryo Report Heat Report Torvac Report RGA Report Glow Discharge Report Engineering Reports Signals table lookup Descriptions of the signals stored in the C-Mod data set. Names, Units,

191

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>facility info  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links Alcator C-Mod Criteria for Design of Vacuum Components This document is meant to be a guideline for design and construction of components that interface with the CMOD vacuum system. It does not intend to cover all situations but instead is designed to start one thinking about the problems encountered in constructing a successful device that will operate in the Alcator vacuum environment without causing any unwanted effect on the quality of that vacuum. Material Selection The Alcator vacuum vessel is made from 304L SS, as are most of the support devices and diagnostic assemblies in the vacuum. Other than Molybdenum on the limiters and in the divertor, this is the predominate material used in

192

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs, CMod_2004.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 4-6, 2009 February 4-6, 2009 Wednesday, February 4, 2009 8:30 am Executive Session R. Hawryluk 9:00 am Welcome & Charge M. Porkolab 9:10 am Comments from DoE R. Dagazian 9:15 am Program Overview E. Marmar 10:15 am Break 10:30 am Facilities and Upgrade J. Irby 11:10 am Alternator Status R. Granetz 11:30 am Lower Hybrid RF R. Parker 12:00 pm Lunch (on-site) 1:00 pm ICRF S. Wukitch 1:30 pm Plasma Boundary B. Lipschultz 2:20 pm Pedestal J. Hughes 2:40 pm Break 2:55 pm Transport J. Hughes 3:25 pm Macrostability R. Granetz 3:45 pm Executive Session R. Hawryluk 5:30 pm Feedback and Questions to C-Mod Staff R. Hawryluk 5:45 pm Adjourn 6:30 pm Working Dinner Off-Site (if desired) Thursday, February 5, 2009 8:30 am Executive Session R. Hawryluk 9:00 am

193

IOP PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18 (2009) 045003 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0963-0252/18/4/045003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium is produced by the gas centrifuge method [7], a significant number of isotopes are still produced such an electrodeless plasma centrifuge. First we will summarize advantages of the plasma centrifuge over the gas waves. 1. Comparison with gas centrifuge The separation in a centrifuge (plasma or gas) is p

194

mathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publisher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences

Calegari, Frank

195

Density Functional Theory Simulations Predict New Materials for Magnesium-Ion Batteries (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

SciTech Connect

Multivalence is identified in the light element, B, through structure morphology. Boron sheets exhibit highly versatile valence, and the layered boron materials may hold the promise of a high-energy-density magnesium-ion battery. Practically, boron is superior to previously known multivalence materials, especially transition metal compounds, which are heavy, expensive, and often not benign. Based on density functional theory simulations, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have predicted a series of stable magnesium borides, MgB{sub x}, with a broad range of stoichiometries, 2 < x < 16, by removing magnesium atoms from MgB{sub 2}. The layered boron structures are preserved through an in-plane topological transformation between the hexagonal lattice domains and the triangular domains. The process can be reversibly switched as the charge transfer changes with Mg insertion/extraction. The mechanism of such a charge-driven transformation originates from the versatile valence state of boron in its planar form. The discovery of these new physical phenomena suggests the design of a high-capacity magnesium-boron battery with theoretical energy density 876 mAh/g and 1550 Wh/L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Gyrokinetic simulations of the nonlinear upshift of the critical density gradient for TEM turbulence in tokamak fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of collisionality on a new nonlinear upshift of the critical density gradient for onset of Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) turbulence is investigated in detail. Both linear and nonlinear, high resolution simulations ...

Zeller, Kyle M. (Kyle Montgomery)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

mathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publisher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Number Theory mathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences publishersmathematical sciences

Skorobogatov, Alexei N.

198

1004 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 34, NO. 3, JUNE 2006 Microwave Diagnostics of a Repetitive,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a pulsed electromagnetic accelerator," Phys. Plasmas, vol. 11, no. 10, pp. 4874­4858, Oct. 2004. [5] D. K

Miles, Richard

199

Estimation of the electron density and radiative energy losses in a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance discharge  

SciTech Connect

The parameters of a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge were calculated. The analysis was performed as applied to an ion cyclotron resonance system designed for separation of calcium isotopes. The plasma electrons in the source were heated by gyrotron microwave radiation in the zone of the inhomogeneous magnetic field. It was assumed that, in such a combined trap, the energy of the extraordinary microwave propagating from the high-field side was initially transferred to a small group of resonance electrons. As a result, two electron components with different transverse temperatures-the hot resonance component and the cold nonresonance component-were created in the plasma. The longitudinal temperatures of both components were assumed to be equal. The entire discharge space was divided into a narrow ECR zone, where resonance electrons acquired transverse energy, and the region of the discharge itself, where the gas was ionized. The transverse energy of resonance electrons was calculated by solving the equations for electron motion in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Using the law of energy conservation and the balance condition for the number of hot electrons entering the discharge zone and cooled due to ionization and elastic collisions, the density of hot electrons was estimated and the dependence of the longitudinal temperature T{sub e Parallel-To} of the main (cold) electron component on the energy fraction {beta} lost for radiation was obtained.

Potanin, E. P., E-mail: potanin@imp.kiae.ru; Ustinov, A. L. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1]could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 11 (2002) 426430 PII: S0963-0252(02)52640-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] Oda T, Takiyama K and Toyota H 1998 The Japan-US Workshop on Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy. Applied Phys. 33 5038­45 [10] Takiyama K, Katsuta T, Toyota H, Watanabe M, Mizuno K, Ogawa T and Oda

Howard, John

202

AFRD - Fusion Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory AFRD - Fusion Energy Sciences AFRD - Home Fusion - Home HIF-VNL Website Ion Beam Technology Group website Artist's conception of a heavy ion fusion power plant Artist's conception of an IFE powerplant We further inertial fusion energy as a future power source, primarily through R&D on heavy-ion induction accelerators. Our program is part of a "Virtual National Laboratory," headquartered in AFRD, that joins us with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in close collaboration on inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions. The related emergent science of high-energy-density physics (HEDP) has become a major focus. For further synergy, we have combined forces with the former Ion Beam

203

Extensive remote handling and conservative plasma conditions to enable fusion nuclear science R&D using a component testing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FT/P3-14 Page 1 Extensive remote handling and conservative plasma conditions to enable fusion modularization and remote handling, and allow conservative plasma assumptions including an extended divertor component modularization and capability for remote handling, and estimate the replacement times of various

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

204

Effect of plasma density scale length on the properties of bremsstrahlung x-ray sources created by picosecond laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of an experimental study of multi-MeV bremsstrahlung x-ray sources created by picosecond laser pulses are presented. The x-ray source is created by focusing the short pulse in an expanding plasma obtained by heating a solid target with a time-delayed nanosecond laser beam. The high-energy part of the x-ray spectrum and emission lobe are inferred from photonuclear activation techniques. The x-ray dose is measured with silicon diodes. Two-dimensional images of the source are reconstructed from a penumbral imaging technique. These results indicate the creation of a relatively small source, below 200 {mu}m diameter, delivering doses up to 12 mrad in air at 1 m with x-ray temperature up to 2.8 MeV. The diagnostics used give access to a whole set of coherent experimental results on the x-ray source properties which are compared to extensive numerical simulations. X-ray intensity and temperature are found to increase with the size of the preplasma.

Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Landoas, O.; Lidove, G.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.; Nuter, R.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Boscheron, A.; Grenier, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33114 Le Barp (France); Aleonard, M. M.; Gerbaux, M.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Malka, G.; Scheurer, J. N.; Tarisien, M. [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan F-33175 (France)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Fusion Institutions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Micromechanics and Plasma Processing of Materials External link . Basic Plasma Research Facility External link . UCLA's Plasma Science and Technology Institute External...

206

for size scale Experiments in Plasma Physics and Fusion Science on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contours Divertor Schematic X-section Central, armored column View of the plasma in visible light Divertor Central, armored column The primary goals of this experiment are understanding transport and confinement

Terry, Jim

207

REPORT FROM THE PLANNING WORKSHOP FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research recognizes the utility of plasma research to the nation's science and technology base beyond

208

528 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 33, NO. 2, APRIL 2005 Visualization of Current Sheet Evolution in a Pulsed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, visualization. PULSED electromagnetic accelerators are devices which use intense bursts of electrical current. Y. Choueiri, "Characterization of current sheet evo- lution in a pulsed electromagnetic accelerator canting in a pulsed electromagnetic accelerator," Phys. Plasmas, vol. 11, no. 10, pp. 4847­4858, Oct. 2004

Choueiri, Edgar

209

Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Education Organization Contact Us Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Research The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is dedicated to developing fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy and to advancing the frontiers of plasma science. The Laboratory pursues these goals through experiments and computer simulations of the behavior of plasma, the hot electrically charged gas that fuels fusion reactions and has a wide range of practical applications.

210

NEWTON's Material Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Science Videos Material Science Videos Do you have a great material science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: University of Maryland - Material Science University of Maryland - Material Science The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers a set of videos about various topics in material science to help students understand what material science is. Learn about plasma, polymers, liquid crystals and much more. LearnersTV.com - Material Science LearnersTV.com - Material Science LearnersTV.com offers a series of educational material science lectures that are available to the public for free. Learn about topics like polymers, non-crystalline solids, crystal geometry, phase diagrams, phase transformations and more. NanoWerk - Nanotechnology Videos NanoWerk - Nanotechnology Videos

211

Sintering and Related Powder Processing Science & Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for Materials Science & Technology 2013 ... including novel sintering technologies, such as Spark Plasma Sintering, nanosintering, in-situ...

212

Remote Handling and Plasma Conditions to Enable Fusion Nuclear Science R&D Using a US Component Testing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a fusion component testing facility to study and establish, during the ITER era, the remaining scientific and technical knowledge needed by fusion Demo is considered and described in this paper. This use aims to lest components in an integrated fusion nuclear environment, for the first time, to discover and understand the underpinning physical properties, and to develop improved components for further testing, in a time-efficient manner. It requires a design with extensive modularization and remote handling of activated components, and flexible hot-cell laboratories. It further requires reliable plasma conditions to avoid disruptions and minimize their impact, and designs to reduce the divertor heat flux to the level of ITER design. As the plasma duration is extended through the planned ITER level (similar to 10(3) s) and beyond, physical properties with increasing time constants, progressively for similar to 10(4) s, similar to 10(5) s, and similar to 10(6) s, would become accessible for testing and R&D. The longest time constants of these are likely to be of the order of a week ( 106 S). Progressive stages of research operation are envisioned in deuterium, deuterium-tritium for the ITER duration, and deuterium-tritium with increasingly longer plasma durations. The fusion neutron fluence and operational duty factor anticipated for this "scientific exploration" phase of a component test facility are estimated to be up to 1 MW-yr/m(2) and up to 10%, respectively.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; Neumeyer, C. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Canik, John [ORNL; Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Dorland, W. D. [University of Maryland; Fogarty, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Kotschenreuther, M. [University of Texas, Austin; LaHaye, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Mahajan, S. [University of Texas, Austin; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Tsai, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vanlanju, P. [University of Texas, Austin; Wagner, Jill C [ORNL; Yoder, III, Graydon L [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faciliBes 1st users of MECI in FY13 Recognize common interests NNSA/FES Compliment NNSA investments Stability ­ investments in HEDLP: people, departments

214

Site map for the E-print Network -- Energy, science, and technology...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technologies Environmental Sciences and Ecology Fission and Nuclear Technologies Fossil Fuels Geosciences Materials Science Mathematics Physics Plasma Physics and Fusion...

215

Microsoft Word - Defense Science Quarterly 03-09.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

March 2009 March 2009 Defense Science Quarterly Inside This Issue 1 Message from the Director 2 Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center 3 Cornell Center for the Study of Pulsed Power Driven High Energy Density Plasmas 4 Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science 5 The Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science 6 The Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University 7 The High Pressure Science and Engineering Center at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas 8 HEDP Research at the Nevada Terawatt Facility 9 Publication Highlights and Awards and Highlights Message from the Director Chris Deeney, Defense Science Division This quarterly newsletter was very therapeutic. We are embroiled in so much budget action that taking the time

216

About | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

About About Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (104KB) FES Budget FES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Fusion and Plasmas Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » About Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Mission The FES program mission is to expand the fundamental understanding of matter at very high temperatures and densities and to build the scientific foundation needed to develop a fusion energy source. This is accomplished

217

Science Afternoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Science Afternoon: From Invention to Marketplace. Science Afternoon: Focus on ... Understand It? Science Afternoons. To continue ...

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national program efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. Substantial efforts to develop integrated plasma modeling codes are also underway in the U.S., Europe and Japan. As a result of the highly collaborative nature of FES research, the community is facing new and unique challenges. While FES has a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of available tools. The NFC Project was initiated to address these challenges by creating and deploying collaborative software tools. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

SCHISSEL, D.P.; ABLA, G.; BURRUSS, J.R.; FEIBUSH, E.; FREDIAN, T.W.; GOODE, M.M.; GREENWALD, M.J.; KEAHEY, K.; LEGGETT, T.; LI, K.; McCUNE, D.C.; PAPKA, M.E.; RANDERSON, L.; SANDERSON, A.; STILLERMAN, J.; THOMPSON, M.R.; URAM, T.; WALLACE, G.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national program efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. Substantial efforts to develop integrated plasma modeling codes are also underway in the U.S., Europe and Japan. As a result of the highly collaborative nature of FES research, the community is facing new and unique challenges. While FES has a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of available tools. The NFC Project was initiated to address these challenges by creating and deploying collaborative software tools. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

SCHISSEL, D.P.; ABLA, G.; BURRUSS, J.R.; FEIBUSH, E.; FREDIAN, T.W.; GOODE, M.M.; GREENWALD, M.J.; KEAHEY, K.; LEGGETT, T.; LI, K.; McCUNE, D.C.; PAPKA, M.E.; RANDERSON, L.; SANDERSON, A.; STILLERMAN, J.; THOMPSON, M.R.; URAM, T.; WALLACE, G.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related FieldsFusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fieldscalled, in the magnetic fusion energy community, a tandem

Kwan, J.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos...

222

Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

Geddes, Cameron G.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Particle beam dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particle-beam-dynamics The study of particle-beam-dynamics The study of the physics of charged particle beams and the accelerators that produce them. This cross-disciplinary area intersects with fields such as plasma physics, high-energy density science, and ultra-fast lasers. en Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science http://www.pppl.gov/news/2013/09/premiere-issue-quest-magazine-details-pppls-strides-toward-fusion-energy-and-advances-0

224

Burning Plasma Support Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Plasma Support Research Program on Alcator C-Mod Presented by: Stephen M. Wolfe Alcator C-Mod Five Year Proposal Review MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center Cambridge, MA May...

225

Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source Hollow-Anode Plasma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36240 36240 Plasma Sources Science and Technology 4 (1995) 571-575. Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source André Anders and Simone Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge. It is shown that a drastically reduced anode area is responsible for a positive anode voltage drop of 30-40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness. This leads to an ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Langmuir probe measurements inside a specially designed hollow anode plasma source give an electron density and temperature of n e = 10 9 -10 11 cm -3 and T e = 1 - 3 eV, respectively (nitrogen, current 100 mA, flow rate 5-50 scc/min). Driven by a pressure gradient, the "anode" plasma is blown through the anode hole and forms a bright plasma jet streaming with supersonic velocity (Mach number 1.2). The plasma stream can be used, for instance, in plasma-assisted deposition of thin films

226

News & Resources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News & Resources News & Resources Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Workshop Reports FES Presentations FES Program Documents Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page ITER news can be found here External link . Other recent fusion program news can be found below. News about the U.S. Burning Plasma Organization can be found here External link . Information/Subject Date/Link FY2013 Joint High Energy Density Laboratory Plasma Program: The Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) have awarded 10 new research grants totaling $4.7 million as part of the Joint High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP) Program. November, 2013

227

AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

Sun, K. X.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Findiing Science with Science Page 1 Finding Science with Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Findiing Science with Science Page 1 Finding Science with Science: Evaluating the Use Stojanovicd , Femke Reitsmae , Lukasz Korczynskif and Boyan Brodaricg a Centre for Geospatial Science of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; e Department of Geography, University

Stock, Kristin

229

Science Pillars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Science & Innovation Science Pillars Science Pillars...

230

Science DMZ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA...

231

Design of a 50 TW/20 J chirped-Pulse Amplification Laser for High-Energy-Density Plasma Physics Experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a conceptual design for a 50 TW/20 J short-pulse laser for performing high-energy-density plasma physics experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada, Reno. The purpose of the laser is to develop proton and x-ray radiography techniques, to use these techniques to study z-pinch plasmas, and to study deposition of intense laser energy into both magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas. Our design uses a commercial diode-pumped Nd:glass oscillator to generate 3-nJ. 200-fs mode-locked pulses at 1059 m. An all-reflective grating stretcher increases pulse duration to 1.1 ns. A two-stage chirped-pulse optical parametric amplifier (OPCPA) using BBO crystals boosts pulse energy to 12 mJ. A chain using mixed silicate-phosphate Nd:glass increases pulse energy to 85 J while narrowing bandwidth to 7.4 nm (FWHM). About 50 J is split off to the laser target chamber to generate plasma while the remaining energy is directed to a roof-mirror pulse compressor, where two 21 cm x 42 cm gold gratings recompress pulses to {approx}350 fs. A 30-cm-focal-length off-axis parabolic reflector (OAP) focuses {approx}20 J onto target, producing an irradiance of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} in a 10-{micro}m-diameter spot. This paper describes planned plasma experiments, system performance requirements, the laser design, and the target area design.

Erlandson, A C; Astanovitskiy, A; Batie, S; Bauer, B; Bayramian, A; Caird, J A; Cowan, T; Ebbers, C; Fuchs, J; Faretto, H; Glassman, J; Ivanov, V; LeGalloudec, B; LeGalloudec, N; Letzring, S; Payne, S; Stuart, B

2003-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cathodic vacuum arc plasmas are known to contain multiply charged ions. 20 years after Pressure Ionization: its role in metal vapour vacuum arc plasmas and ion sources appeared in vol. 1 of Plasma Sources Science and Technology, it is a great opportunity to re-visit the issue of pressure ionization, a non-ideal plasma effect, and put it in perspective to the many other factors that influence observable charge state distributions, such as the role of the cathode material, the path in the density-temperature phase diagram, the noise in vacuum arc plasma as described by a fractal model approach, the effects of external magnetic fields and charge exchange collisions with neutrals. A much more complex image of the vacuum arc plasma emerges putting decades of experimentation and modeling in perspective.

Anders, Andre

2011-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

233

EnergyandPower Plasma Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on nanodevices and nanostructures, efficient solid-state lighting, nanoimprint lithography, improved solar cells). Organic molecular beam deposition system is used for developing devices for solar cells, high a solar light concentrator for solar cells used in the U-M Solar Car, and designing the optics for a laser

Kamat, Vineet R.

234

X-ray emission from the plasma is used as a proxy for the amount  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray emission from the plasma is used as a proxy for the amount X-ray emission from the plasma is used as a proxy for the amount of driven current. The solid line indicates the amount of x-ray emission predicted by a computer simulation if edge losses are not included, while the dashed line represents the computer simulation including edge losses. The colored points are experimental data from Alcator C-Mod. Contact: Gregory Wallace MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center 175 Albany St. Cambridge, MA 02139 wallaceg@mit.edu Post deadline invited talk: Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regime A post-deadline invited talk explains how experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center are making important steps towards learning how to keep future fusion power plants running 24/7.

235

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: ... Description: Group focus in materials science (inkjet metrology, micro-macro, advanced characterizations). ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences © Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg distribution and its relationship with soil water and salt under mulched drip irrigation in Xinjiang of China of Hydroscience and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China Received July 8, 2010; accepted

Ahmad, Sajjad

237

Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program  

SciTech Connect

OAK B188 Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program. The purpose of the Travel Grant Program is to increase the awareness of plasma research. The new results and techniques of plasma research in fusion plasmas, plasma processing space plasmas, basic plasma science, etc, have broad applicability throughout science. The benefits of these results are limited by the relatively low awareness and appreciation of plasma research in the larger scientific community. Whereas spontaneous interactions between plasma scientists and other scientists are useful, a focused effort in education and outreach to other scientists is efficient and is needed. The academic scientific community is the initial focus of this effort, since that permits access to a broad cross-section of scientists and future scientists including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and research staff.

Hazeltine, R.D.

1998-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

FESAC Agenda - January 2009 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

January 2009 January 2009 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) FESAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (140KB) FES Committees of Visitors FES Home Meetings FESAC Agenda - January 2009 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting Gaithersburg Hilton 620 Perry Parkway 301-977-8900 January 13, 2009 Time Duration Topic Speaker 8:00 5 Meeting Agenda and Logistics Professor Riccardo Betti, University of Rochester, FESAC Vice-Chair 8:05 40 Office of Science Perspectives Dr. Patricia Dehmer, Deputy Director for Science Programs, DOE 8:45 45 OFES Perspectives Steve Eckstrand, Acting Associate Director for Fusion Energy Sciences, DOE 9:30 15 Break 9:45 90 Final Report: Panel on High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

239

DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire ... Electronic Materials Science Challenges in Renewable Energy.

240

Nano-plasma Interactions in Optical and Meta-nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Optical Nanomaterials for Photonics/Biophotonics. Presentation Title, Plasma...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Plasma Erosion Resistance of High Purity Silicon Carbide under ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Advanced Materials for Harsh Environments. Presentation Title, Plasma...

242

NEWTON's Material Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Archive: Materials Science Archive: Loading Most Recent Materials Science Questions: Hydrogen Compounds and Heat Conduction Weaving Carbon Nanotubes Metal as Electrical Conductor, Not Thermal Steel Changes with Age PETE, Ultraviolet Light, Benefits Strength of Yarn by Spinning Each Substance Unique Density Alloy versus Constituent Density Knowing When Material is Melted Crystalline Metal Versus Metallic Glass and Conduction Super Glue, Surgery, and Skin Silica Gel Teflon Non-Stick Property Salt Crystal Formation Lubricating Rubber Bands and Elasticity Materials for Venus Probe Crystalline Solids and Lowest Energy Sodium Polycarbonate and Salt Water Early Adhesives Surface Energy and Temperature Separating Polypropylene, Polyester, and Nylon Factors Effecting Polymer Flexibility

243

Science Showcase | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Showcase Science Showcase 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 December DOE Science Showcase - Light-emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Research November DOE Science Showcase - Gamma-Ray Bursts October DOE Science Showcase - Bayesian Inference September DOE Science Showcase - Understanding High-Temperature Superconductors August DOE Science Showcase - Exciting Higgs Boson Research July DOE Science Showcase - DOE's Smart Grid Research June DOE Science Showcase - DOE Plasma Research May DOE Science Showcase - Oil Shale Research April DOE Science Showcase - Fission Theory March DOE Science Showcase - Free-Electron Lasers February DOE Science Showcase - Heat Pump Research January DOE Science Showcase - Monte Carlo Methods December DOE Science Showcase - Quantum Computer Hardware November DOE Science Showcase - Metamaterials

244

Science satellites seek Santa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science satellites seek Santa Science satellites seek Santa Science satellites seek Santa Los Alamos scientists will use two advanced science satellites to mark the course taken by the elfin traveler. December 16, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office

245

Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by...

246

Anomalous evolution of Ar metastable density with electron density in high density Ar discharge  

SciTech Connect

Recently, an anomalous evolution of argon metastable density with plasma discharge power (electron density) was reported [A. M. Daltrini, S. A. Moshkalev, T. J. Morgan, R. B. Piejak, and W. G. Graham, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Although the importance of the metastable atom and its density has been reported in a lot of literature, however, a basic physics behind the anomalous evolution of metastable density has not been clearly understood yet. In this study, we investigated a simple global model to elucidate the underlying physics of the anomalous evolution of argon metastable density with the electron density. On the basis of the proposed simple model, we reproduced the anomalous evolution of the metastable density and disclosed the detailed physics for the anomalous result. Drastic changes of dominant mechanisms for the population and depopulation processes of Ar metastable atoms with electron density, which take place even in relatively low electron density regime, is the clue to understand the result.

Park, Min; Chang, Hong-Young [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon, 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong-Hyeon

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

131Cognitive Science COGNITIVE SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

131Cognitive Science COGNITIVE SCIENCE PROFESSOR ELMES* MAJOR A major in cognitive science leading courses: Cognitive Science 110, 395, 403, 473; Computer Science 111, 211; Philosophy 106, 313; Psychology Science: Com- puter Science 295 (LISP, PROLOG or C), 313, 315; Psychology 207 b. Philosophical Foundations

Marsh, David

248

Laser light absorption with density profile modifications  

SciTech Connect

Two-dimensional computer simulations studied plasma heating by electron plasma waves. The results emphasize the importance of nonlinear steepening of the density profile near the critical density. A typical simulation result is presented in order to illustrate these profile modifications. It is shown that large dc magnetic field generation is an inherent property of the absorption of obliquely-incident light. (MOW)

Kruer, W.; Valeo, E.; Estabrook, K.; Langdon, B.; Lasinski, B.

1974-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A new electron temperature diagnostic of critical surface based on the ion acoustic decay instability in hot, high density plasma relevant to laser fusion. Semiannual report, April 1--September 29, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors made analysis of the IADI experiments previously made using OMEGA laser system. They obtained two important new results: the first direct observation of the epw excited by the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability, and the first study of the IADI in a plasma that approaches laser-fusion conditions, in the sense of having a density scale length of order 1 mm and an electron temperature, T{sub e}, in excess of 1 keV. Previous observations of the epw`s have been based on the second harmonic emission, from which little can be inferred because the emission is produced by unknown pairs of epw`s, integrated in a complicated way over wavenumber space and real space. In contrast, they have directly observed the epw by using the 90{degree}, collective Thomson scattering (CTS) of a UV laser (at the third harmonic of the pump) from the epw`s. Because the ratio of probe frequency to electron plasma frequency is only about three, the scattering is collective (i.e. k{sub epw}{lambda}{sub De} is small, where k{sub epw} is the epw wave number and {lambda}{sub De} is the Debye length),m even though the scattering angle is large. The electron temperature can then be deduced from the ion sound velocity, obtained from the measurement of the frequency at which growth is maximum at the scattering wavenumber.

Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Galleries | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Events Research Education Science Education About Blog Programs Galleries Upcoming Events Lab Outreach Efforts Graduate Programs Off Site University Research (OSUR) Organization Contact Us Science Education About Blog Programs Galleries Upcoming Events Lab Outreach Efforts Graduate Programs Off Site University Research (OSUR) Galleries Subscribe to RSS - Galleries 2013 Young Women's Conference 2013 Young Women's Conference63 images 2013 Plasma Camp 2013 Plasma Camp7 images 2013 Science on Saturday Lecture Series 2013 Science on Saturday Lecture Series7 images 2013 Summer's End Poster Session 2013 Summer's End Poster Session19 images 2013 Science Bowl 2013 Science Bowl12 images 2013 Pathways to Science Summit 2013 Pathways to Science Summit17 images 2012-2013 PathSci Kick-Off Event

251

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Inertial confinement fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

inertial-confinement-fusion An inertial-confinement-fusion An experimental process that uses lasers to compress plasma to sufficiently high temperatures and densities for fusion to occur. Such experiments are carried out in places such as the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. en Fusion through the eyes of a veteran science journalist http://www.pppl.gov/news/2013/07/fusion-through-eyes-veteran-science-journalist-1

Author Daniel Clery recently published "A Piece of the Sun," a 320-page narrative of the history of fusion research and the

252

Faculty of Science General Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science General Science The General Science program gives you maximum flexibility to explore the sciences, plus the core requirements you need for on-going, specialized studies. www.uwindsor.ca/science Rigorous, Enriching Programs The BSc General Science program is a great way to explore your many interests

253

Wine Science Wine Sciencee Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wine Science Wine Sciencee Science Thomas Henick-Kling Professor of Enology Director of Viticulture & Enology Program #12;Wine Science Wine Science Growth of Washington Wine Industry #12;Wine Science Wine Science Wine Grapes utilized 2007 2008 2009 2010 WA 127,000 145,000 156,000 160,000 NY 24,000 26,000 30

254

Plasma sweeper to control lower hybrid wave coupling  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests of an anti E x anti B plasma sweeper, designed to control the plasma density near the mouth of a phased waveguide array, are described.

Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Review: engineering particles using the aerosol-through-plasma method  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For decades, plasma processing of materials on the nanoscale has been an underlying enabling technology for many 'planar' technologies, particularly virtually every aspect of modern electronics from integrated-circuit fabrication with nanoscale elements to the newest generation of photovoltaics. However, it is only recent developments that suggest that plasma processing can be used to make 'particulate' structures of value in fields, including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, higher energy density batteries, and other forms of energy storage. In this paper, the development of the science and technology of one class of plasma production of particulates, namely, aerosol-through-plasma (A-T-P), is reviewed. Various plasma systems, particularly RF and microwave, have been used to create nanoparticles of metals and ceramics, as well as supported metal catalysts. Gradually, the complexity of the nanoparticles, and concomitantly their potential value, has increased. First, unique two-layer particles were generated. These were postprocessed to create unique three-layer nanoscale particles. Also, the technique has been successfully employed to make other high-value materials, including carbon nanotubes, unsupported graphene, and spherical boron nitride. Some interesting plasma science has also emerged from efforts to characterize and map aerosol-containing plasmas. For example, it is clear that even a very low concentration of particles dramatically changes plasma characteristics. Some have also argued that the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium approach is inappropriate to these systems. Instead, it has been suggested that charged- and neutral-species models must be independently developed and allowed to 'interact' only in generation terms.

Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia C [UNM; Richard, Monique [TEMA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 33, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2005 2035 Synthesis of Pt=ZrO2 Catalyst on Fecralloy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The instru- ment used was a Sciex Elan model 250 ICP-MS equipped with a Babington nebulizer, water cooled dioxide in a water gas shift (WGS) reactor in the temperature range 400 C­500 C. Index Terms- cursor materials, substrate, plasma-processing, and calcining. The analysis section describes results

Pedrow, Patrick D.

257

Science Conference Proceedings : About  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Conference Proceedings - Home Science Conference Proceedings - Home Science Conference Proceedings - About Science Conference Proceedings - Advanced Search Science...

258

Current Drive in Recombining Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Current drive in recombining plasma  

SciTech Connect

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the influence of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero ''residual'' current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

Schmit, P. F.; Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Absolute intensity calibration of flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectrometer using radial profiles of visible and extreme ultraviolet bremsstrahlung continuum emitted from high-density plasmas in Large Helical Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A precise absolute intensity calibration of a flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in wavelength range of 60-400 A is carried out using a new calibration technique based on radial profile measurement of the bremsstrahlung continuum in Large Helical Device. A peaked vertical profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum has been successfully observed in high-density plasmas (n{sub e}{>=} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) with hydrogen ice pellet injection. The absolute calibration can be done by comparing the EUV bremsstrahlung profile with the visible bremsstrahlung profile of which the absolute value has been already calibrated using a standard lamp. The line-integrated profile of measured visible bremsstrahlung continuum is firstly converted into the local emissivity profile by considering a magnetic surface distortion due to the plasma pressure, and the local emissivity profile of EUV bremsstrahlung is secondly calculated by taking into account the electron temperature profile and free-free gaunt factor. The line-integrated profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum is finally calculated from the local emissivity profile in order to compare with measured EUV bremsstrahlung profile. The absolute intensity calibration can be done by comparing measured and calculated EUV bremsstrahlung profiles. The calibration factor is thus obtained as a function of wavelength with excellent accuracy. It is also found in the profile analysis that the grating reflectivity of EUV emissions is constant along the direction perpendicular to the wavelength dispersion. Uncertainties on the calibration factor determined with the present method are discussed including charge-coupled device operation modes.

Dong Chunfeng; Wang Erhui [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fusion). ARIES Group #12;Advanced Toroidal Physics Fusion Plasma Conditions Burning Plasma Physics 1.0 0.5 Alpha Energy #12;Magnetic Fusion Science Issues - Strongly Coupled in a Fusion (Burning) Plasma Improved

262

Information Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Science Information Science1354608000000Information ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.NoQuestions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov...

263

Science | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Science Neutron Science Neutron Scattering Science Neutrons are one of the fundamental particles that make up matter and have properties that make them ideal for certain types of research. In the universe, neutrons are abundant, making up more than half of all visible matter. Neutron scattering provides information about the positions, motions, and magnetic properties of solids. When a beam of neutrons is aimed at a sample, many neutrons will pass through the material. But some will interact directly with atomic nuclei and "bounce" away at an angle, like colliding balls in a game of pool. This behavior is called neutron diffraction, or neutron scattering. Using detectors, scientists can count scattered neutrons, measure their energies and the angles at which they scatter, and map their final position

264

Is sustainability science really a science?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is sustainability science really a science? Is sustainability science really a science? The team's work shows that although sustainability science has been growing explosively...

265

Magnetoacoustic solitons in quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in collisionless homogenous, magnetized quantum plasma is studied. Two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic model (QMHD) is employed and reductive perturbation method is used to derive Korteweg de Vries (KdV) equation for magnetoacoustic waves. The effects of plasma density and magnetic field intensity are investigated on magnetoacoustic solitary structures in quantum plasma. The numerical results are also presented, which are applicable to explain some aspects of the propagation of nonlinear magnetoacosutic wave in dense astrophysical plasma situations.

Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics (DPAM), PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and...

267

Science & Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Faces of Science Science & Engineering Capabilities...

268

Science Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

269

Science Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Requirements About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network...

270

Computer Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance and Statistics Cite Seer Department of Energy provided open access science research citations...

271

Science Education ProgramScience Education Program TEACH SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Education ProgramScience Education Program TEACH SCIENCE IMPACT THE FUTURE #12;Science Education ProgramScience Education Program Why Teach Science? #12;Science Education Program SCIENCE, a middle school science teacher. He teaches several grades and covers many science topics, covering

de Lijser, Peter

272

Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Popov, High Density Plasma Sources, Park Ridge, N.J. :et al. , IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26 (1998) J. Pelletier, R. Winter, and J. Engemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. I.

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

274

Reactive Plasma-Aided Fabrication of ZnO for Solar Cells Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Multifunctional Oxide. Presentation Title, Reactive Plasma-Aided Fabrication of...

275

Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

1973-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

276

Faculty of Science Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science Computer Science Computer software engineering, network and system analysis.uwindsor.ca/computerscience The University of Windsor offers a variety of computer science programs to prepare students for a career in the technology industry or in research and academia. A computer science degree provides an in-depth understanding

277

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

278

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science Materials Science1354608000000Materials ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Materials Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Data Sources Reference Organizations Journals Key Resources CINDAS Materials Property Databases video icon Thermophysical Properties of Matter Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys Handbook (SAH) Proquest Technology Collection Includes the Materials Science collection MRS Online Proceedings Library Papers presented at meetings of the Materials Research Society Data Sources

279

FESAC Agenda - July 2003 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

3 3 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) FESAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (140KB) FES Committees of Visitors FES Home Meetings FESAC Agenda - July 2003 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda July 31 - August 1, 2003 Gaitherburg, Maryland Date/Time Topic Speaker July 31 0900 Welcome/Logistics Richard Hazeltine 0905 OFES Perspective Anne Davies .pdf file (602KB) 945 Break 1000 Final Report from the Non-Electric Application Panel Kathy McCarthy .pdf file (1.6MB) 1100 Discussion FESAC 1200 Lunch 1300 Science Presentation on Inertial Fusion Energy, Fast Ignition, and High Energy Density Physics Mike Campbell 1400 Burning Plasma Physics Program Ned Sauthoff .pdf file (2.6MB)

280

Plasma beat-wave accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform an analytic study of some quantities relevant to the plasma beat-wave accelerator (PBWA) concept. We obtain analytic expressions for the plasma frequency, longitudinal electron velocity, plasma density and longitudinal plasma electric field of a nonlinear longitudinal electron plasma oscillation with amplitude less than the wave-breaking limit and phase velocity approaching the speed of light. We also estimate the luminosity of a single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear PBWA collider assuming the energy and collision beamstrahlung are fixed parameters.

Noble, R.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Closed inductively coupled plasma cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

1990-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

283

EMSL: Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMSL's Science and Science Themes EMSL's Science and Science Themes EMSL's unique and state-of-the-art capabilities along with staff expertise can help scientists gain a predictive understanding of the molecular-to-mesoscale processes in climate, biological, environmental and energy systems. These advancements are critical to development of sustainable solutions to the nation's energy and environmental challenges. Four Science Themes help EMSL define and direct the research investments and establish a portfolio of user projects to accelerate scientific innovation and discovery in the areas of environmental molecular science critical to DOE and the nation. EMSL's annual call for proposals solicits proposals on specific topics within these Science Themes. Over the next 10 years, EMSL will focus its science toward developing

284

Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Advanced Materials Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Biology and Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Computational Chemistry Nuclear Sciences More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Chemistry | Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC)

285

Chemical simulation of hydrogen generation in a plasma fuel reformer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for a plasma fuel reformer or plasmatron has been developed. The model was based in a series of experiments realized at the Plasma Science and Fusion Center with such a plasmatron. The device is set up to produce ...

Margarit Bel, Nuria, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Science. Summary: Key metrologies/systems: In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, linear and non-linear spectroscopies ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

DOE and Fusion Links | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Sites General Atomics (GA) MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center U.S. ITER National Ignition Facility (NIF) American Fusion News International Sites Australian...

288

Simulation of a Burning Plasma C. Kessel, PPPL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of a Burning Plasma Experiment C. Kessel, PPPL UFA Workshop on Burning Plasma Science, December 11-13, 2000 #12;FIRE Burning Plasma Discharge Simulation with TSC ELMy H-mode, N, R=2.0 m, Ip=6.5 MA #12;Burning Plasma Experiment Simultaneously Needs · L-H mode transition · Non

289

Plasma Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect

Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

Greenwald, Martin

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

PLASMA GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

Foster, J.S. Jr.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

ComputationalComputational ScienceScience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ComputationalComputational ScienceScience KenKen HawickHawick k.a.k.a.hawickhawick@massey.ac.nz@massey.ac.nz Massey UniversityMassey University #12;Computational Science / eScienceComputational Science / eScience Computational Science concerns the application of computer science to physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology

Hawick, Ken

292

Positivity Preservation in the Simulation of Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With standard schemes, the plasma density in the hydrodynamic model for relativistic laser-plasma interaction can become negative. Therefore, we present a new scheme that preserves (more)

Wortmann, Anke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Investigating science teachers' beliefs about science and science teaching.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purposes of this quantitative, descriptive study were to investigate Saudi science teachers' beliefs about science and science teaching, and to determine how do Saudi (more)

AL-Abdulkareem, Saleh A. M., 1965-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

2XIIB plasma confinement experiments  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports results of 2XIIB neutral-beam injection experiments with plasma-stream stabilization. The plasma stream is provided either by a pulsed plasma generator located on the field lines outside the plasma region or by ionization of neutral gas introduced at the mirror throat. In the latter case, the gas is ionized by the normal particle flux through the magnetic mirror. A method of plasma startup and sustenance in a steady-state magnetic field is reported in which the plasma stream from the pulsed plasma generator serves as the initial target for the neutral beams. After an energetic plasma of sufficient density is established, the plasma generator stream is replaced by the gas-fed stream. Lifetimes of the stabilized plasma increase with plasma temperature in agreement with the plasma stabilization of the drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode. The following plasma parameters are attained using the pulsed plasma generator for stabilization: n approximately 5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, anti W/sub i/ approximately 13 keV, T/sub e/ = 140 eV, and ntau/sub p/ approximately 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s. With the gas feed, the mean deuterium ion energy is 9 keV and the peak density n approximately 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. In the latter case, the energy confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub E/ = 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s, and the particle confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub p/ = 1 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/.s.

Coensgen, F.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Correll, D.L.

1976-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

295

Science Cinema  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cinema Science Experiments and Demonstrations Frostbite Theater - A collection of short, fun videos that you can use to explore liquid nitrogen, radioactivity, electricity and even...

296

Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Science Highlights Operations Events Abstracts Publications Credits Cover images legend Disclaimer National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report For the period...

297

Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such these photon-science facilities are uniquely...

298

Surface plasma wave excitation via laser irradiated overdense plasma foil  

SciTech Connect

A laser irradiated overdense plasma foil is seen to be susceptible to parametric excitation of surface plasma wave (SPW) and ion acoustic wave (IAW) on the ion plasma period time scale. The SPW is localised near the front surface of the foil while IAW extends upto the rear. The evanescent laser field and the SPW exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the IAW. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the laser induced oscillatory electron velocity to drive the SPW. At relativistic laser intensity, the growth rate is of the order of ion plasma frequency.

Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

299

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

300

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT www.esr.pdx.edu Undergraduate Program: Environmental Science an emphasis on natural sciences and mathematics (Environmental Science) or emphasis on policy, geography and social sciences (Environmental Studies). Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Environmental Science Bachelor

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301

STUDY OF PLASMA PHENOMENA AT HIGH ELECTRIC FIELDS IN APPLICATIONS FOR ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL AND ULTRA-SHORT PULSE LASER DRILLING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Plasma engineering is one of the most actively growing research areas in modern science. Over the past decade, plasma engineering became a significant part of (more)

Likhanskii, Alexandre

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Life Sciences Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Life Sciences Portal. Life Sciences Portal. Programs ... more. >> see all Life Sciences programs and projects ... ...

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

304

The ion acoustic decay instability, and anomalous laser light absorption for the OMEGA upgrade, large scale hot plasma application to a critical surface diagnostic, and instability at the quarter critical density. Final report  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that laser light can be anomalously absorbed with a moderate intensity laster (I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}-{mu}m{sup 2}) in a large scale, laser produced plasma. The heating regime, which is characterized by a relatively weak instability in a large region, is different from the regime studied previously, which is characterized by a strong instability in a narrow region. The two dimensional geometrical effect (lateral heating) has an important consequence on the anomalous electron heating. The characteristics of the IADI, and the anomalous absorption of the laser light were studied in a large scale, hot plasma applicable to OMEGA upgrade plasma. These results are important for the diagnostic application of the IADI.

Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Seka, W. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Life sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

Day, L. (ed.)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Furth Plasma Physics Libary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Hours Online Access Directions Contacts Hours Online Access Directions QuickFind Main Catalog Databases PPPL Publications & Reports/PPLcat Plasma Physics E-Journals clear Click arrows to scroll for more clear Plasma Physics Colloquia The Global Carbon Cycle and Earth's Climate - January 15, 2014 Addressing Big Data Challenges in Simulation-based Science - January 22, 2014 "The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge?: The History of the Institute for Advanced Study - January 29, 2014 PM-S-1 PDF PM-S-2 PDF PM-S-3 PDF PM-S-4 PDF PM-S-5 PDF PM-S-6 PDF See All Library History Intro 950 1960-1970 1980 1990 2000 Quick Order Article Express Borrow Direct Interlibrary Loan PPL Book Request More Resources and Services Search & Find Articles & Databases - Plasma Physics, Physics, Engineering & Technology,

307

NREL: Energy Sciences - Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermodynamics of hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide Electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance X-ray diffraction Inductively coupled plasma analysis...

308

Science Accelerator : User Account  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Office of Science Office of Scientific and Technical Information Website PoliciesImportant Links Science Accelerator science.gov WorldWideScience.org Deep Web Technologies...

309

NEWTON's Computer Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Science Videos Do you have a great computer science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: Computer Science Videos from Purdue Computer Science Videos from...

310

BER Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advancedthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedResearch, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Research, DOE Office of Science Energy SciencesDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advancedthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Biological Science | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Science Biological Science Biological Science The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a mosquito, its primary host. Although five different species of Plasmodium can cause malaria, Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe disease. | Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons. Read more The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum gliding through a cell in the gut of a mosquito, its primary host. Although five different species of Plasmodium can cause malaria, Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe disease. | Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons. Read more Featured Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad Cholesterol

313

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Gorbatkin, Steven M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Berry, Lee A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

2013 Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bowl View larger image 13 PR 0222 189 View larger image 13 PR 0222 194 View larger image 13 PR 0222 189 View larger image 13 PR 0222 195 View larger image 13 PR 0222 200 View...

316

Nuclear Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Science Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of matter. This includes discovering the origins of nuclei and identifying the forces that transform matter. Specific topics include: Nuclear astrophysics and the synthesis of nuclei in stars and elsewhere in the cosmos; Nuclear forces and quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field

317

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

education The PPPL function that education The PPPL function that reaches out to students, teachers and the general public through programs ranging from student internships to weekly talks on scientific topics from January through April. en Science on Saturday starts Jan. 11 http://www.pppl.gov/news/2014/01/science-saturday-starts-jan-11

Science fans of all ages can explore a rich variety of science and technology topics at the popular Science on Saturday lecture series hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The series marks its 30-year anniversary when it begins on Saturday, Jan.

318

Towards laboratory-produced relativistic electron-positron pair-plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the last few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} and 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, respectively. With the advent of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a charge-neutral, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter. This talk will present some details of the laser-produced pair-plasma experiments.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Beiersdorfer, P; Cauble, R; Dollar, F; Falk, K; Hazi, A; Murphy, C D; Park, J; Seely, J; Szabo, C I; Shepherd, R; Tommasini, R; Zulick, K

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

carleton.ca/science FACULTY OF SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carleton.ca/science FACULTY OF SCIENCE ANYTHING BUT TEXTBOOK #12;Areas of study Bachelor of Computer Science* Algorithms Biomedical Computing Computer Game Development Computer and Internet Security Mathematics Computer Science and Mathematics Concentrations in Computing Theory and Numerical Methods

Carleton University

320

Bachelor of Science & Bachelor of Science (Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bachelor of Science & Bachelor of Science (Technology) SpecialiSationS Environmental Microbiology environment. This specialisation can be attached to the Environmental Sciences major. Environmental Modelling Sciences major. Land and Freshwater Environments This specialisation is for students interested

Waikato, University of

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Parametric effects in interaction of an electron beam with a plasma  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between perturbations of the plasma density and the modulational instability of Langmuir waves is discussed.

Al' terkop, B.A.; Volokitin, A.S.; Tarakanov, V.P.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Security Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Treaty Verification Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery |...

323

Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets: Interaction with plasmid DNA and tailored electron heating using dual-frequency excitation  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in plasma science and technology has enabled the development of a new generation of stable cold non-equilibrium plasmas operating at ambient atmospheric pressure. This opens horizons for new plasma technologies, in particular in the emerging field of plasma medicine. These non-equilibrium plasmas are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. The effect of a cold radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks. Plasma manipulation techniques for controlled energy delivery are highly desirable. Numerical simulations are employed for detailed investigations of the electron dynamics, which determines the generation of reactive species. New concepts based on nonlinear power dissipation promise superior strategies to control energy transport for tailored technological exploitations.

Niemi, K.; O'Neill, C.; Cox, L. J.; Waskoenig, J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Currell, F. J.; Graham, W. G.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

325

Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Science Energy Science Energy Science Print Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities-the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbon-neutral energy technologies. To establish the scientific foundations for the kind of transformative breakthroughs needed to build a 21st-century energy economy, we must address fundamental questions involving matter and energy. Below is a sampling of such questions that can be addressed by light-source facilities:

326

Science Museum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 1 - Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum July 22, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 22, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury...

327

Science Museum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lecture December 12, 2013 Last in year-long series of public talks at Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 12, 2013-The role Los Alamos National Laboratory plays...

328

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science EXAFS and XANES of plutonium and uranium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposition J.A. Fortner, A.J. Kropf, R.J. Finch, M.C. Hash, S.B. Aase,...

329

ARM - Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Read about the 20 years of accomplishments (PDF, 696KB) from the ARM Program and user facility. Performance Metrics ASR Metrics 2009 2008 2007 2006 Science New C-band...

330

INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Set Parser r = Input [r ? Input] #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 13) :: [ ] #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 13 Applicative interface fail : {r Parser r Parser r (p q) inp = p inp ++ q inp #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences

Löh, Andres

332

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 7 Regular functors Combinators for regular functors: data I r r #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 8 Converting between datatype[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic programming with the multirec

Löh, Andres

333

Faculty of Science Computer Science Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Science Computer Science Handbook 2013 #12;Welcome to Computer Science Welcome from the Head of Department 2 What is Computer Science? 2 Careers in Computer Science 3 What can you do with a Computer Science degree? 4 Meet our students 5 Academic information Important dates 7 Admission

Sun, Jing

334

Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrodynamics Bioscience, Biosecurity, Health Chemical Science Earth, Space Sciences Energy Engineering High Energy Density Plasmas, Fluids Information Science, Computing,...

335

October  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrodynamics Bioscience, Biosecurity, Health Chemical Science Earth, Space Sciences Energy Engineering High Energy Density Plasmas, Fluids Information Science, Computing,...

336

Smashing science: Livermore scientists discover how explosives respond to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 For immediate release: 12/12/2013 | NR-13-12-03 High Resolution Image A schematic representation of the shock experiment. The resulting energy release pushed the shock front to the left. Image by Liam Krauss/LLNL. Smashing science: Livermore scientists discover how explosives respond to shockwaves Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Watch Video A laser pulse impinging on an aluminum ablation layer (which is coated on a glass substrate to the right), which generates a rapidly expanding plasma. This small explosion pushes the ablator to the left and drives a shock wave in the sample. The experiment simultaneously measures the speed of the shock wave in the sample, and the speed of the ablator expansion, which allows Livermore researchers to estimate the pressure and density of the

337

Materials Science Evaluation Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Materials Science Evaluation Portal. Materials Science Evaluation Portal. Subject Areas. Modeling; Nondestructive; ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Bioanalytical Science Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioanalytical Science Group. Welcome. We provide the measurement science, standards, technology, and data required ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

Argonne TDC: Physical Sciences  

Emergency Response. Engineering. Environmental Research. Fuel Cells. Imaging Technology. Material Science. Nanotechnology. Physical Sciences. Sensor ...

340

Expert Topics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AC power Education Emergency planning Engineering Fusion energy Fusion reactor design Fusion roadmapping ITER Inertial confinement fusion International collaborations Laser diagnostics Lithium Magnetic reconnection Nuclear energy Nuclear safety Particle beam dynamics Plasma astrophysics Plasma diagnostics Plasma physics Power system design Power systems Quality assurance STEM Science literacy Stellarators Surface science Sustainability Tokamaks Visiting PPPL History Fusion Basics DOE and Fusion Links Contract Documents Speakers Bureau Tours News Events Research Education Organization Contact Us Overview Learn More AC power Education Emergency planning Engineering Fusion energy Fusion reactor design Fusion roadmapping ITER Inertial confinement fusion International collaborations Laser diagnostics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Science and technology in the stockpile stewardship program, S & TR reprints  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on these topics: Computer Simulations in Support of National Security; Enhanced Surveillance of Aging Weapons; A New Precision Cutting Tool: The Femtosecond Laser; Superlasers as a Tool of Stockpile Stewardship; Nova Laser Experiments and Stockpile Stewardship; Transforming Explosive Art into Science; Better Flash Radiography Using the FXR; Preserving Nuclear Weapons Information; Site 300s New Contained Firing Facility; The Linear Electric Motor: Instability at 1,000 gs; A Powerful New Tool to Detect Clandestine Nuclear Tests; High Explosives in Stockpile Surveillance Indicate Constancy; Addressing a Cold War Legacy with a New Way to Produce TATB; Jumpin Jupiter! Metallic Hydrogen; Keeping the Nuclear Stockpile Safe, Secure, and Reliable; The Multibeam FabryPerot Velocimeter: Efficient Measurements of High Velocities; Theory and Modeling in Material Science; The Diamond Anvil Cell; Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometry; X-Ray Lasers and High-Density Plasma

Storm, E

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

342

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedBasic Energy Sciences, DOE Office of Science Energy SciencesDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

COMPUTER SCIENCE EECS Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPUTER SCIENCE EECS Department The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at WSU offers undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science. The EECS Department offers master of science degrees in computer science, electrical engineering

344

Computer Science UNDERGRADUATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

447 Computer Science UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS The Department of Computer Science provides undergraduate instruction leading to the bachelor's degree in computer science. This program in computer science is accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized accrediting body recognized

Suzuki, Masatsugu

345

Propagation of ion beams through a tenuous magnetized plasma  

SciTech Connect

When an ion beam is propagated through a plasma, the question of charge neutralization is critical to its propagation. We consider such a problem where the plasma is magnetized with magnetic field perpendicular to the beam. The plasma-number density and beam-number density are assumed comparable. We reduce the problem to a two-dimensional model, which we solve. The solution suggests that it should be possible to attain charge neutralization if the beam density is properly varied along itself.

Chrien, E.F.; Valeo, E.J.; Kulsrud, R.M.; Oberman, C.R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Burning Plasma Physics -The Next Frontier Three Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Physics - The Next Frontier Three Options (same scale) ITER-FEATFIRE IGNITOR US in Magnetic Fusion · Burning Plasma Performance Considerations · Compact High Field Approach - General for strengthening the base fusion sciences program 2. Directs DOE to submit a plan for a U.S. Burning Plasma

347

Neutron Science | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the 1994 Nobel Prize in Physics for this groundbreaking work. Today, the laboratory is home to two of the most powerful neutron science facilities in the world-the Spallation...

348

Contacts | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Points of Contact Science Points of Contact Name Research Area Doug Abernathy Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer (ARCS). Atomic-scale dynamics at thermal and epithermal energies Ke An Engineering Materials Diffractometer (VULCAN). Residual stress, deformation mechanism of materials, phase transitions/transformation, and in situ/operando neutron diffraction in material systems (e.g., working batteries). John Ankner Liquids Reflectometer (LR). Density profiles normal to the surface at liquid surfaces and liquid interfaces Bryan Chakoumakos Nuclear and magnetic crystal structure systematics and structure-property relationships among inorganic materials, powder and single-crystal neutron and x-ray diffraction methods Leighton Coates Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi). Protein crystallography, biological structure and function

349

Redshift of photons penetrating a hot plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new interaction, plasma redshift, is derived, which is important only when photons penetrate a hot, sparse electron plasma. The derivation of plasma redshift is based entirely on conventional axioms of physics, without any new assumptions. The calculations are only more exact than those usually found in the literature. When photons penetrate a cold and dense electron plasma, they lose energy through ionization and excitation, through Compton scattering on the individual electrons, and through Raman scattering on the plasma frequency. But when the plasma is very hot and has low density, such as in the solar corona, the photons lose energy also in plasma redshift, which is an interaction with the electron plasma. The energy loss of a photon per electron in the plasma redshift is about equal to the product of the photons energy and one half of the Compton cross-section per electron. This energy loss (plasma redshift of the photons) consists of very small quanta, which are absorbed by the plasma and cause a significant heating. In quiescent solar corona, this heating starts in the transition zone to the solar corona and is a major fraction of the coronal heating. Plasma redshift contributes also to the heating of the interstellar plasma, the galactic corona, and the intergalactic plasma. Plasma redshift explains

Ari Brynjolfsson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

SCIENCE Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

351

Nonlinear Plasma Waves Excitation by Intense Ion Beams in Background Plasma  

SciTech Connect

Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma.

Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Three-Body Recombination and Rydberg Atoms in Ultracold Plasmas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ultracold neutral plasmas, created by photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms, have well-controlled initial density and temperature parameters. With initial particle peak densities of ~1015 m-3, (more)

Fletcher, Robert S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Programs » FES Home Programs » FES Home Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » Fusion Energy Sciences Plasma science forms the basis for research that is needed to establish our ability to harness the power of the stars in order to generate fusion energy on earth. The research required for fusion energy's success is intimately tied to rich scientific questions about some of nature's most extreme environments, inside and outside of stars, and has practical

354

Resonant Excitation of Plasma Wakefields  

SciTech Connect

We describe characteristics of the bunch train and plasma source used in a resonant plasma wakefield experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. The bunch train has the proper correlated spread to unambiguously observe the expected energy gain by the witness bunch at resonance. The plasma density in the capillary discharge is sufficiently high to reach the resonance with the typical bunch train spacing of this experiment. It is also uniform over more than 3/4 of the 2 cm-long capillary.

Muggli, P.; Allen, B. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Yakimenko, V.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Babzien, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

Stellar science unveiled at space conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stellar science unveiled at space conference Stellar science unveiled at space conference Stellar science unveiled at space conference The Laboratory will be represented in more than 20 papers to be given at the 42nd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Houston. March 8, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

356

Robert Kaita | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kaita Kaita Principal Research Physicist, P.I., LTX Robert (Bob) Kaita is the head of plasma diagnostic operations and acting head of boundary physics operations for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Kaita is also a co-principal investigator of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX). He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and a recipient of the Kaul Foundation Prize for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research. He has supervised the research of many students in the PPPL Program in Plasma Physics in the Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University. Interests Neutral beam and radiofrequency plasma heating Plasma diagnostics Plasma-surface interactions Solid and liquid plasma-facing components Contact Information Phone: 609-243-3275

357

Materials Science & Engineering | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Clean Energy Materials Theory and Simulation Neutron Science Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Science Supercomputing Theory, Modeling and Simulation Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Materials Science and Engineering SHARE Materials Science and Engineering ORNL's core capability in applied materials science and engineering directly supports missions in clean energy, national security, and industrial competitiveness. A key strength of ORNL's materials science program is the close coupling of basic and applied R&D. Programs building on this core capability are focused on (1) innovations and improvements in materials synthesis, processing, and design; (2) determination and manipulation of critical structure-property relationships, and (3)

358

Scattering Length Density Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For energy dependent cross sections please go to ... The neutron scattering length density is defined ... To calculate scattering length densities enter a ...

359

Plasma Wakefield Acceleration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rpwa rpwa Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content Department of Energy Page Content Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

360

Plasma source ion implantation research and applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma Source Ion Implantation research at Los Alamos Laboratory includes direct investigation of the plasma and materials science involved in target surface modification, numerical simulations of the implantation process, and supporting hardware engineering. Target materials of Al, Cr, Cu-Zn, Mg, Ni, Si, Ti, W, and various Fe alloys have been processed using plasmas produced from Ar, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gases. Individual targets with surface areas as large as {approximately}4 m{sup 2}, or weighing up to 1200 kg, have been treated in the large LANL facility. In collaboration with General Motors and the University of Wisconsin, a process has been developed for application of hard, low friction, diamond-like-carbon layers on assemblies of automotive pistons. Numerical simulations have been performed using a 2{1/2}-D particle- in-cell code, which yields time-dependent implantation energy, dose, and angle of arrival for ions at the target surface for realistic geometries. Plasma source development activities include the investigation of pulsed, inductively coupled sources capable of generating highly dissociated N{sup +} with ion densities n{sub i} {approximately} 10{sup 11}/cm{sup 3}, at {approximately}100 W average input power. Cathodic arc sources have also been used to produce filtered metallic and C plasmas for implantation and deposition either in vacuum, or in conjunction with a background gas for production of highly adherent ceramic coatings.

Munson, C.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Henins, I. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

History of Science 157 Sociology of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 History of Science 157 Sociology of Science Fall 2009 Steven Shapin Science Center 469 Tuesdays to thinking about science, its historical development, its relations to society and other forms of culture: Science Center 451 Office hours: Mondays 8:30 -> 10.15, or by arrangement #12;2 E-mail: shapin

Shapin, Steven

362

www.ucd.ie/science UCD SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* D N 200 SC IEN C E 4 N ew Pathw ays to Teaching M athem atics and Science www.ucd.ie/science UCD SCIENCE 2013 Discover. Experience. Choose. #12;2 www.ucd.ie/science Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 6 DN & Biomolecular Sciences Pharmacology 12 DN200 Neuroscience 11 DN200 Plant Biology 14 DN200 Physiology 13 DN200

363

Excitation of surface plasma waves by an electron beam in a magnetized dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electron beam drives surface plasma waves to instability on a vacuum magnetized dusty plasma interface and in a magnetized dusty plasma cylinder via Cerenkov and fast cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of a surface plasma wave has been derived and it has been shown that the phase velocity of waves increases with increase in relative density {delta}(=n{sub i0}/n{sub e0}), where n{sub i0} is the ion plasma density and n{sub e0} is the electron plasma density of negatively charged dust grains. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave instability also increases with {delta}. The growth rate of the instability increases with beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in fast cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of surface plasma waves has been retrieved from the derived dispersion relation by considering that the beam is absent and there is no dust in the plasma cylinder.

Prakash, Ved; Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, PSP Area Plot No. 1, Sector 22, Rohini, Delhi 110086 (India)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Ac#vi#es of the US Burning Plasma Organiza#on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

=ons · USBPO ­ Coordinates US burning plasma research, to advance scien=fic understanding USBPO organizes the US Fusion Energy Science community to support burning plasma research 5 Charles Greenfield (Director) Amanda Hubbard (Deputy Director) Nermin

365

NERSC Science Gateways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analytics & Visualization Science Gateways Demos Database services OpenDAP User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Home For Users Science Gateways Science...

366

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASCR Science Network Requirements Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research, DOE Office of ScienceEnergy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD April 15 and 16,

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

BER Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientificthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced5 Simulation Data Key Remote Science Drivers Instruments and

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Contact ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences Organization Charts Neutron Sciences Directorate Associate Laboratory Director for Neutron Sciences, Kelly Beierschmitt Biology and Soft Matter Division Director, Paul...

369

More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology Chemistry Engineering Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics ORNL wins six R&D 100s R&D Magazine recognizes...

370

Investigation of asymmetric plasma blob dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of asymmetric blobs is investigated in the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT. Blobs are local regions of enhanced plasma density. Blobs are relevant to several areas of physics research, including fusion ...

Soane, Alexander (Alexander Visotsky)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

EMSL: Science: Cross-Cutting Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cross-Cutting Science Areas Cross-cutting science EMSL's integrated approach supports science that doesn't fit easily into single categories. Here we capture EMSL's areas of...

373

Plasma valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma valve includes a confinement channel and primary anode and cathode disposed therein. An ignition cathode is disposed adjacent the primary cathode. Power supplies are joined to the cathodes and anode for rapidly igniting and maintaining a plasma in the channel for preventing leakage of atmospheric pressure through the channel.

Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY); Sharma, Sushil (Hinsdale, IL); Noonan, John (Naperville, IL); Rotela, Elbio (Clarendon Hills, IL); Khounsary, Ali (Hinsdale, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

PLASMA ENERGIZATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

PLASMA DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

Baker, W.R.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Adventures in Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics IQ Test Previous Video (Physics IQ Test) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (Polymers, Foams and Gels) Polymers, Foams and Gels Adventures in Science Professor Cynthia...

377

Understanding Materials Science History, Science, Applications - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... CITATION: Hummel, R.E. Understanding Materials Science History, Science, Applications, 2nd Edition, New York: Springer, 2004.

378

Scrambled Science Words  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scrambled Science Words Welcome to Scrambled Science Words Welcome to Scrambled Science Words The computer will pick a science word or term and then scramble its letters. Once you...

379

Anthropology Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anthropology Bachelor of Science 201213 Degree Map First Year Fall Winter Spring Notes ANTH 1031 4 Lab Science Elective 4 Lab Science Elective 4 Science Elective 4 Total Credits

Bertini, Robert L.

380

Science in the News  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science in the News Now you can get science news from many U.S. science agencies via a new feed at Science.gov. From aftershock assessment of earthquakes to food recalls to U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sciences Geological Sciences Atomic-scale structure of the orthoclase (001)-water interface measured with high-resolution x-ray reflectivity P. Fenter, H. Teng, P. Geissbühler, J.M. Hanchar, K.L. Nagy, and N.C. Sturchio Chemical analysis of individual interplanetary dust particles G.J. Flynn, S.R. Sutton, M. Rivers, P. Eng, and M. Newville Diffusion-limited biotransformation of metal contaminants in soils/sediments: chromium T. Tokunaga, J. Wan, D. Joyner, T. Hazen, M. Firestone, E. Schwartz, S. Sutton, and M. Newville Investigation of meteorite porosity by computed microtomography G.J. Flynn, M. Rivers, and S.R. Sutton Microscale imaging of pore structure in hydrothermal sulfide chimneys using synchrotron x-ray computed tomography P. O'Day, J. Muccino, S. Thompson, M.Jew, and J. Holloway

382

Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Science Highlights Science highlights feature research conducted by staff and users at the ALS. If a Power Point summary slide or a PDF handout of the highlight is available, you will find it linked beneath the highlight listing and on the highlight's page. You may also print a version of a highlight by clicking the print icon associated with each highlight. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Monday, 25 November 2013 12:06 ALS research has shown how the scales of a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin can literally re-orient themselves in real time to resist force, in essence creating an adaptable body armor. Read more... New Research on Jamming Behavior Expands Understanding Print Tuesday, 22 October 2013 00:00 Recent ALS research has revealed that even magnetic domains behave very much like other granular material systems, and their dynamical behavior mimics the universal characteristics of several jammed systems.

383

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science Applied Science Correlation of predicted and measured iron oxidation states in mixed iron oxides H. D. Rosenfeld and W. L. Holstein Development of a quantitative measurement of a diesel spray core using synchrotron x-rays C.F. Powell, Y. Yue, S. Gupta, A. McPherson, R. Poola, and J. Wang Localized phase transformations by x-ray-induced heating R.A. Rosenberg, Q. Ma, W. Farrell, E.D. Crozier, G.J. Soerensen, R.A. Gordon, and D.-T. Jiang Resonant x-ray scattering at the Se edge in ferroelectric liquid crystal materials L. Matkin, H. Gleeson, R. Pindak, P. Mach, C. Huang, G. Srajer, and J. Pollmann Synchrotron-radiation-induced anisotropic wet etching of GaAs Q. Ma, D.C. Mancini, and R.A. Rosenberg Synchrotron-radiation-induced, selective-area deposition of gold on

384

NIST Forensic Science Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. NIST Forensic Science Research. NIST has conducted and supported forensic science research for many decades. ...

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

385

NETL: Science Bowl Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Initiatives > Science Bowl Information Educational Initiatives Science Bowl Information Regional Sites Southwestern PA Regional Site West Virginia Regional Site...

386

NIST Forensic Science Newsroom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... three publication covers See our latest publications! NIST Forensic Science Newsroom. ... News Archive. NIST Forensic Science News newsletter. ...

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Biology | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioinformatics Nuclear Medicine Climate and Environment Systems Biology Computational Biology Chemistry Engineering Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials...

388

Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration  

SciTech Connect

The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Neutral transport in a plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solution procedure for the neutral transport equation in plasma slab geometry is developed. Half-angle scalar fluxes, currents and averaged cross sections are introduced to provide a convenient and simple method of calculating the neutral energy distribution as an adjunct to the neutral density calculation. A forward-backward sweep numerical solution procedure, which avoids matrix inversion, is outlined.

Stacey, W.M. Jr.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Microwave-generated plasma thruster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A concept for high power density and efficiency plasma thruster based on electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) is described. Initial estimates are made of the parameters, leading to a conceptual design. An effort for detail physics design and proof-of-principal tests is also proposed. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Hooper, E.B.

1991-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

Zanibbi, Richard

392

FES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

393

Dielectric covered hairpin probe for its application in reactive plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hairpin probe is a well known technique for measuring local electron density in low temperature plasmas. In reactive plasmas, the probe characteristics are affected by surface sputtering, contamination, and secondary electron emission. At higher densities, the plasma absorbs the entire electromagnetic energy of hairpin and hence limits the density measurements. These issues can be resolved by covering the hairpin surface with a thin layer of dielectric. In this letter, the dielectric contribution to the probe characteristics is incorporated in a theory which is experimentally verified. The dielectric covering improves the performance of probe and also allows the hairpin tip to survive in reactive plasma where classical electrical probes are easily damaged.

Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M. [NCPST, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Karkari, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Center, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Life sciences and environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Life sciences and environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Computing Sciences] 7 Combinators data I r = I r data K a r = K a data U r = U -- for constructors) Fix f r fold alg (In f) = alg (fmap (fold alg) f) #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] 17 Representing a family data ExprF (r :: ) (ix

Löh, Andres

397

POLITICAL SCIENCE Political science is the study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLITICAL SCIENCE Political science is the study of governments, public policies, and political behavior. Political science uses both humanistic perspectives and scientific skills to examine the United States and all countries and regions of the world. Students enrolled in Political Science courses explore

398

Past Science Advisors Early Science Advisors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NSTC NNSA with R&D agencies Science and Technology in the U.S. GovernmentScience and Technology Transportation Defense Energy NSF-36 NIH USGS NOAA NIST Homeland Security DARPA, ONR, AFOSR NSTC NNSA Science NIST Homeland Security DARPA, ONR, AFOSR NSTC NNSA Science and Technology are important to most Federal

Colorado at Boulder, University of

399

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[Faculty of Science Information and Computing Sciences] Generic diff Andres Löh joint work with Eelco Lempsink and Sean Leather Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University IFIP WG 2.1 meeting #64, Weltenburg, April 2, 2009 #12;[Faculty of Science Information and Computing

Löh, Andres

400

Electronic Structure of Dense Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Pollaine, S M; Froula, D H; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Landen, O L

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Generating electron cyclotron resonance plasma using distributed scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study employs a distributed microwave input system and permanent magnets to generate large-area electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma. ECR plasmas were generated with nitrogen gas, and the plasma density was measured by Langmuir probe. A uniform ECR plasma with the electron density fluctuation of {+-}9.8% over 500 mm Multiplication-Sign 500 mm was reported. The proposed idea of generating uniform ECR plasma can be scaled to a much larger area by using n Multiplication-Sign n microwave input array system together with well-designed permanent magnets.

Huang, C. C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Lung-Tan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, T. H.; Chen, N. C.; Chao, H. W. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, C. C. [Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Lung-Tan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chou, S. F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

Plasma Nitrocarburizing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...heat pollution Reduced processing times Reduced energy consumption Reduced treatment gas consumption Industrial plasma nitrocarburizing processing modules contain: Vacuum furnace Vacuum system Gas supply with gas mixing and pressure control system Electric power supply unit Microprocessor control unit...

403

Labs at-a-Glance: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Princeton Plasma Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Logo Visit the Princeton Plasma Physics

404

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 (2004) 471487 PII: S0741-3335(04)69034-8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion the cold plasma dispersion relation, the ion­ion hybrid cutoff frequency is uniquely determined and tritium density equilibrium (nD nT), maximizing fusion reactions in a burning plasma experiment. A number

Heidbrink, William W.

405

Atomic hydrogen density measurements in the Tara tandem mirror experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Neutral and plasma density have been measured in the north well of the central cell of the Tara tandem mirror (Nucl. Fusion {bold 22}, 549 (1982)). The electron plasma density and temperature on the magnetic axis were measured by Thomson scattering to be about 3{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} and 70 eV, respectively. The corresponding axial neutral hydrogen density was found to be 1 {times}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}3}, while near the plasma edge at {ital r}=15 cm it reached 1{times}10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}3}. The fill gas density at {ital r}{ge}22.5 cm was {approx}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3}. Additional information from secondary electron detectors was used to estimate the radial ion temperature distribution, which was found to have about the same width, 12 cm, as the plasma density. The resulting ion pressure profile is peaked compared to the electron pressure profile. Charge exchange losses in the well are found to have a maximum at a radius equal to half the {ital e}-folding distance of the plasma density and ion temperature distributions.

Guss, W.C.; Yao, X.Z.; Pocs, L.; Mahon, R.; Casey, J.; Horne, S.; Lane, B.; Post, R.S.; Torti, R.P. (Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wilks, Scott C. (Santa Monica, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fusion energy science: Clean, safe, and abundant energy through innovative science and technology  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy science combines the study of the behavior of plasmas--the state of matter that forms 99% of the visible universe--with a vision of using fusion--the energy source of the stars--to create an affordable, plentiful, and environmentally benign energy source for humankind. The dual nature of fusion energy science provides an unfolding panorama of exciting intellectual challenge and a promise of an attractive energy source for generations to come. The goal of this report is a comprehensive understanding of plasma behavior leading to an affordable and attractive fusion energy source.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Secretary Steven Chu Visits Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

said has been at the center of the intellectual birth and coming of age of plasma and fusion science. Discussing our need for scientists to address our country's energy issues,...

409

Enhanced laser beam coupling to a plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Density perturbations are induced in a heated plasma by means of a pair of oppositely directed, polarized laser beams of the same frequency. The wavelength of the density perturbations is equal to one half the wavelength of the laser beams. A third laser beam is linearly polarized and directed at the perturbed plasma along a line that is perpendicular to the direction of the two opposed beams. The electric field of the third beam is oriented to lie in the plane containing the three beams. The frequency of the third beam is chosen to cause it to interact resonantly with the plasma density perturbations, thereby efficiently coupling the energy of the third beam to the plasma.

Steiger, Arno D. (Pleasanton, CA); Woods, Cornelius H. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium coatings on the graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX are being investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower Single Null Ohmic Helium Discharges were used to coat graphite surfaces that had been pre-conditioned with Ohmic Helium Discharges of the same shape to reduce their contribution to hydrogen isotope recycling. The following deuterium NBI reference discharges exhibited a reduction in density by a factor of about 3 for limited and 2 for diverted plasmas respectively, and peaked density profiles. Recently, a lithium evaporator has been used to apply thin coatings on conditioned and unconditioned PFCs. Effects on the plasma density and the impurities were obtained by pre-conditioning the PFCs with ohmic helium discharges, and performing the first deuterium NBI discharge as soon as possible after applying the lithium coating.

Kugel, H W; Bell, M G; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Zakharov, L

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hunting the Quark Gluon Plasma ASSESSMENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hunting the Quark Gluon Plasma Hunting the Quark Gluon Plasma ASSESSMENTS BY THE EXPERIMENTAL COLLABORATIONS Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) * Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11974-5000 RESULTS FROM THE FIRST 3 YEARS AT RHIC managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle April 18, 2005 BNL -73847-2005 Formal Report

412

Chemical Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

413

Biological Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Science Biological Science A unique zinc-binding site revealed by the high-resolution x-ray structure of homotrimeric Apo2L/TRAIL S.G. Hymowitz, M.P. O'Connell, M.H. Ultsch, A. Hurst, K. Totpal, A. Ashkenazi, R.F. Kelley, and A.M. de Vos b-carbonic anhydrase active site architecture is a mirror image of a-carbonic anhydrases E.F. Pai and M.S. Kimber Binding of Cd ions to the cell wall of B. Subtilis - an EXAFS study M. Boyanov, D. Fowle, K. Kemner, B. Bunker, and J. Fein Crystallographic evidence for Try157 functioning as the active site base in human UDP-galactose 4-epimerase J.B. Thoden, T.M. Wohlers, J.L. Fridovich-Keil, and H.M. Holden Crystallographic studies of dsDNA phage HK97 structure and maturation W.R. Wikoff, Z. Che, W. Schildkamp, L. Liljas, R.L. Duda, R.W. Hendrix, and

414

Los Alamos researchers create 'map of science'  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map of science Map of science Los Alamos researchers create 'Map of Science' A high-resolution graphic depiction of the virtual trails scientists leave behind when they retrieve information from online services. March 11, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman

415

Plasma wall charge-exchange interactions in the 2XIIB magnetic mirror experiment  

SciTech Connect

Plasma-wall interactions by charge-exchange wall bombardment in the 2XIIB magnetic mirror experiment are discussed. Experimental measurements are modeled with a time-dependent, radial density buildup calculation. A low-density plasma sufficient to help shield the hot interior plasma from cold-gas erosion, as required by the model, is measured.

Stallard, B.W.; Coensgen, F.H.; Cummins, W.F.; Gormezano, C.; Logan, B.G.; Molvik, A.W.; Nexsen, W.E.; Simonen, T.C.; Turner, W.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor  

SciTech Connect

NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

418

Turbulent Spectra in the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of interstellar scintillations at radio wavelengths reveal a Kolmogorov-like scaling of the electron density spectrum with a spectral slope of -5/3 over six decades in wavenumber space. A similar turbulent density spectrum in the solar wind plasma has been reported. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind plasma over such extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories raising the especially intriguing question of how a compressible magnetized solar wind exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is a characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma. It is shown that the observed Kolmogorov-like (-5/3) spectrum can develop in the solar wind plasma by supersonic plasma motions that dissipate into highly subsonic motion that passively ...

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Web of Science Welcome to the Web of Science................................................................................................ 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web of Science #12; Welcome to the Web of Science................................................................................................ 2 Web of Science.................................................................................................................. 4 ISI Web of Knowledge

Huang, Su-Yun

420

User Science Images  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PorousMedia3medres.png PorousMedia3medres.png ASCR: Carbon Dioxide Sequestration September 14, 2009 | Author(s): G. S. H. Pau, J. B. Bell, K. Pruess, A. S. Almgren, M. J. Lijewski, and K. Zhang | Category: Environmental Science | URL: http://esd.lbl.gov/research/projects/tough/documentation/proceedings/ Download Image: PorousMedia3medres.png | png | 159 KB Simulation of density-driven flow for CO2 storage in saline aquifers. Shown is a snapshot of the CO2 concentration after onset of convection overlayed on the AMR grid. Image courtesy of George Pau and John Bell (LBNL). Repo mp111 marcdayhydrogenflame.jpg ASCR: Lab-scale Flame Simulation September 1, 2009 | Author(s): M.S.Day, J.B. Bell, R.K. Cheng, S. Tachibana, V.E. Beckner and M.J. Lijewski (LBNL) | Category: Combustion | URL: https://apdec.org/APDEC_Progress_Fall09.shtml

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421

Supercomputing | Computer Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resilience Engineering of Scientific Software Translation Quantum Computing Machine Learning Information Retrieval Content Tagging Visual Analytics Data Earth Sciences Energy Science Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems Modeling Engineering Analysis Behavioral Sciences Geographic Information Science and Technology Quantum Information Science Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Research Areas | Computer Science SHARE Computer Science Computer Science at ORNL involves extreme scale scientific simulations through research and engineering efforts advancing the state of the art in algorithms, programming environments, tools, and system software. ORNL's work is strongly motivated by, and often carried out in direct

422

Experimental study of filamentation in laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect

The filamentation instability can lead to regions of increased laser intensity when a spatially nonuniform laser beam interacts with a plasma. An experimental technique will be described which identifies the density perturbation produced by filaments. The growth of filaments has been investigated and, when the laser intensity is large enough, the transverse density profile of the filament can be measured. Evidence of filament growth influenced by plasma flow and density gradients is presented. 19 refs., 4 figs.

Young, P.E.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Science Education on the Road: 2013 Princeton University Community and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Education on the Road: 2013 Princeton University Community and Science Education on the Road: 2013 Princeton University Community and Staff Day October 12, 2013 Gallery: It was a beautiful autumn day in Princeton, NJ. As tailgaters got ready for the football game (Princeton vs. Lafayette) in Lot 21, others took the short walk into Jadwin Gym to take part in the University's Annual Community & Staff Day. PPPL was represented by the Science Education Department and in usual Science Ed. fashion, we did not disappoint! The table was busy all day with kids and adults equally fascinated by what they learned... Plasma! From the hair-raising Van de Graaff generator to the innovative Plasma Speaker to the surprising vacuum pump marshmallow experiment, folks were wowed by what they saw. Spreading the word about Plasma while having a great time, check!

424

Science Cafe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafés Cafés Science Cafe November 1, 2013 Print Tuesday, 24 September 2013 15:00 Friday, November 1@ 12 noon in USB 15-253 jackson Exposing the Trade Secrets of Ancient Roman Engineers: Nano-Structure and Material Properties of Al-tobermorite in 2000-Year-Old Seawater Harbor Concrete Marie Jackson, UC Berkeley, Beamlines 5.3.2, 12.2.2,12.3.2 DNA Labelled with Gold Greg Hura, Physical Biosciences Division, Beamline 12.3.1 robin Pseudo-Single-Bunch Operation with Adjustable Frequency - A New Operation Mode for the ALS Dave Robin, AFRD August 29, 2013 Print Thursday, 11 April 2013 08:37 Date-Change: Thursday, August 29 @ 12 noon in USB 15-253 beavers Under Pressure: Why Diamonds Are a Crystallographer's Best Friend! Christine Beavers, Experimental Systems Group, Beamline 11.3.1

425

Materials Science | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economy Funding Opportunities State & Local Government Science & Innovation Science & Technology Science Education Innovation Energy Sources Energy Usage Energy Efficiency...

426

Behavioral Sciences | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Computational Engineering Computer Science Data Earth Sciences Energy Science Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems...

427

NREL: Energy Sciences - Theoretical Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Materials Science Solid-State Theory Materials Science Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells Process Technology & Advanced Concepts Research Staff Computational Science Printable Version Theoretical Materials Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. Using modern computational techniques, the Theoretical Materials Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, applies quantum mechanics to complex materials, yielding quantitative predictions to guide and interact with experimental explorations. Current research focuses on the following efforts: Design new photovoltaic materials that can improve solar cell efficiency and reduce its cost. Explain the underlying physics of new

428

PLASMA DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

1962-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Nuclear Science and Engineering - Divisions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home NSED Divisions The Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate (NSED) organization is composed of ORNL's only DOE Energy Innovation Hub, a program office, and the following five divisions. Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division (FCID) FCID focuses on advancing the applications of medical, industrial, and research isotopes (developing separation processes for the processing of radioisotopes and spent nuclear fuels) and designing robotic systems and unique facilities for the safe handling of nuclear materials. Fusion Energy Division (FE) FE is developing the understanding required for an attractive fusion energy source through integrated research, and is pursuing near term applications of plasma science and technology in support of national goals. Global Nuclear Security Technology Division (GNSTD)

430

ORISE: Center for Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Science Education ORAU Center for Science Education ORAU Center for Science Education Completed in January 2009, the Center for Science Education was established to...

431

Science DMZ Implemented at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA...

432

Landau Diamagnetism of Degenerate Collisional Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the first time the kinetic description of Landau diamagnetism for degenerate collisional plasma is given. The correct expression for transverse electric conductivity of the quantum plasma, found by authors (see arXiv:1002.1017 [math-ph] 4 Feb 2010) is used. In work S. Dattagupta, A.M. Jayannavar and N. Kumar [Current science, V. 80, No. 7, 10 April, 2001] was discussed the important problem of dissipation (collisions) influence on Landau diamagnetism. The analysis of this problem is given with the use of exact expression for transverse conductivity of quantum plasma.

A. V. Latyshev; A. A. Yushkanov

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

Highly Compressed Ion Beam for High Energy Density Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discuss plans toward a user facility for target experiments.a rep-rated (>10Hz) user facility. [18] R. C. Davidson, et

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

E-Science Day  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on December 6, 2011, E-Science Day was a day-long event,regional librarians in e-science, and to expose regionalthe initiation of e-science support projects within their

Abad, Raquel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Communicating Evolution as Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thuringiensis toxins. Science. 1992;258(5087):14515. MillerRT, Ruse M. But is it science? Amherst, NY: Prometheusto the philosophy of science: theory and reality. Chicago:

Thanukos, Anastasia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Science-Driven Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science-Driven Network Requirements for ESnet Update to the 2002 Office of Science Networking Requirements Workshop Report February 21, 2006 1-1 Science-Driven Network Requirements...

438

Plasma and ion beam processing at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect

Efforts are underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to utilize plasma and intense ion beam science and technology of the processing of advanced materials. A major theme involves surface modification of materials, e.g., etching, deposition, alloying, and implantation. In this paper, we concentrate on two programs, plasma source ion implantation and high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition.

Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Henins, I. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

News Archive | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases Publications Princeton Journal Watch Blog Events Research Education Organization Contact Us News Room News Archive American Fusion News Press Releases Publications Princeton Journal Watch Blog News Archive Subscribe to News Archive January 10, 2014 Science on Saturday starts Jan. 11 By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe Joshua E. G. Peek, a Hubble Fellow at Columbia University's Department of Astronomy and son of PPPL physicist and former director Robert Goldston, discussed "Outer Space!" at a Science on Saturday lecture in 2013. Science fans of all ages can explore a rich variety of science and technology topics at the popular Science on Saturday lecture series hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The series marks its 30-year anniversary when it begins on Saturday, Jan.

440

Frontiers in Science Lectures focus on saving energy through  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontiers in Science Lectures Frontiers in Science Lectures Frontiers in Science Lectures focus on saving energy through superconductivity Dean Peterson discusses the science of high-temperature superconductivity in a series of Frontiers in Science lectures. June 12, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Burning plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Lederman Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lederman Science Center: Fermilab Science for Kids and Educators LSC Home Plan a Visit DirectionsMap Exhibits: Overview - List - Physics Playground LSC Floorplan LSC Store...

443

Science Conference Proceedings  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

energy, aeronautics and astronautics, meteorology, engineering, computer science, electric power, and fossil fuels The OSTI Science Conference Proceedings portal was devised to...

444

Science Fair Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Fair Projects NEWTON Ask A Scientist program is not designed to provide science fair ideas or deal with individual project problems. Our program is designed to answer...

445

NEWTON's General Science Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Science Videos Do you have a great general science video? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: Videos from National Geographic Kids Videos from National Geographic...

446

DOE Science Showcase - Nanotechnology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

valuable way to spotlight needs and target resources in this critical area of science and technology. Nanotechnology Research Results in DOE Databases DOepatents ScienceCinema...

447

Basic Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govbesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

448

Fusion Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govfesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

449

Life Sciences News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Life Sciences News. ... may be within reach of every doctor's office if recent ... NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology researchers Gregg ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

Science Accelerator Widget  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator Widget You can now explore multiple Science Accelerator features through the new tabbed widget. Download this tool via the 'Get Widget Options' link or by...

451

National Security Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab Proton Radiography Trident Laser Facility Research Library Faces of Science 70 Years of Innovation Science Programs Applied Energy...

452

INSTITUTE OF COMPUTER SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Computer Science, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Pod vod?renskou v 2, 182 07 Prague 8, Czech Republic. phone: (+420)266052083...

453

NEWTON's General Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Science Archive: Loading Most Recent General Science Questions: What is Equilibrium? Banana and Human Genetics Hair Examination Body Buffer Action Jellyfish : Plant or...

454

NEWTON's Computer Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Science Archive: Loading Most Recent Computer Science Questions: Preparation for Video Game Creator Most Common Programming and Web Script How Does Spell Check Work? How...

455

BNL | Computational Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Science Center Home Research Support Areas Publications Staff EBC Environmental, Biological, and Computational Sciences Directorate CSC image CSC image CSC image CSC...

456

Energy Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Artificial Photosynthesis II - EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Novel Methods for Harvesting Solar Energy Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion...

457

Time-resolved visible and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of laser-produced tin plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma: an optically thin corona and an optically thick conductionplasma heating occurs indirectly through radiative transfer and electron conduction.conduction carries energy in the laser absorption zone beyond the critical surface to heat the higher density plasma.

O'Shay, Joseph Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

An experimental study and modeling of Transformer-Coupled Toroidal Plasma processing of materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Transformer Coupled Toroidal Plasma (TCTP) source uses a high power density plasma formed in a toroidal-shaped chamber by transformer coupling using a magnetic core. The objectives of the thesis are (1) to characterize ...

Bai, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Electronically swept millimetre-wave interferometer for spatially resolved measurement of plasma electron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electron density John Howard and David Oliver Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical, located in the Plasma Research Laboratory at the Australian National University, is a flexible, medium

Howard, John

460

Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

Lalazissis, G. A. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 (Greece)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Word - Defense Science Quarterly 05-08.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office of Defense Science May 2008 Office of Defense Science May 2008 Defense Science Quarterly Inside This Issue 1 Message from the Director 2 Advanced Certification 3 Delivering High Energy Density Physics Data on the National Ignition Facility to Validate Predictive Physics Models 5 Texas Petawatt Laser Achieves Power Milestone 6 Sandia Light Gas Gun Tests Demonstrate the Ability to Deliver an Engineered Shock Wave Using a Graded-Density Thermal Spray Coating 7 Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Symposium Highlights 9 Publication Highlights 10 Highlights and Awards Chris Deeney, Director, Office of Defense Science Greetings from a newly reorganized NNSA! As you know, the science campaign is always aiming towards the future and "Doing Tomorrow's Directed

462

Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Photon Sciences | About the Photon Sciences Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Photon Sciences Directorate About the Photon Sciences Directorate The Photon Sciences Directorate operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), both funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science. These facilities support a large community of scientists using photons (light) to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. NSLS National Synchrotron Light Source NSLS-II National Synchrotron Light Source II This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven Lab and a time of unprecedented growth for the directorate. The NSLS-II Project is progressing rapidly and smoothly through design and construction, driven by

464

Scaling of Energy Gain with Plasma Parameters in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

We have recently demonstrating the doubling of the energy of particles of the ultra-short, ultra-relativistic electron bunches of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center [1]. This energy doubling occurred in a plasma only 85 cm-long with a density of {approx} 2.6 x 10{sup 17} e{sup -}/cm{sup -3}. This milestone is the result of systematic measurements that show the scaling of the energy gain with plasma length and density, and show the reproducibility and the stability of the acceleration process. We show that the energy gain increases linearly with plasma length from 13 to 31 cm. These are key steps toward the application of beam-driven plasma accelerators or plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA) to doubling the energy of a future linear collider without doubling its length.

Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

465

Direct measurements of the ionization profile in krypton helicon plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Helicons are efficient plasma sources, capable of producing plasma densities of 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} with only 100 s W of input rf power. There are often steep density gradients in both the neutral density and plasma density, resulting in a fully ionized core a few cm wide surrounded by a weakly ionized plasma. The ionization profile is usually not well known because the neutral density is typically inferred from indirect spectroscopic measurements or from edge pressure gauge measurements. We have developed a two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) diagnostic capable of directly measuring the neutral density profile. We use TALIF in conjunction with a Langmuir probe to measure the ionization fraction profile as a function of driving frequency, magnetic field, and input power. It is found that when the frequency of the driving wave is greater than a critical frequency, f{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 3f{sub lh}, where f{sub lh} is the lower hybrid frequency at the antenna, the ionization fraction is small (0.1%) and the plasma density low (10{sup 17} m{sup -3}). As the axial magnetic field is increased, or, equivalently, the driving frequency decreased, a transition is observed. The plasma density increases by a factor of 10 or more, the plasma density profile becomes strongly peaked, the neutral density profile becomes strongly hollow, and the ionization fraction in the core approaches 100%. Neutral depletion in the core can be caused by a number of mechanisms. We find that in these experiments the depletion is due primarily to plasma pressure and neutral pumping.

Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gulbrandsen, N. [Department of Physics and Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso (Norway)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

From Swords to Plowshares: The US/Russian Collaboration in High Energy Density Physics Using Pulsed Power  

SciTech Connect

Since 1992, the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the institutes that designed the first nuclear weapons of the Soviet Union and the US, respectively, have been working together in fundamental research related to pulsed power and high energy density science. This collaboration has enabled scientists formerly engaged in weapons activities to redirect their attention to peaceful pursuits of wide benefit to the technical community. More than thirty joint experiments have been performed at Sarov and Los Alamos in areas as diverse as solid state physics in high magnetic fields, fusion plasma formation, isentropic compression of noble gases, and explosively driven-high current generation technology. Expanding on the introductory comments of the conference plenary presentation, this paper traces the origins of this collaboration and briefly reviews the scientific accomplishments. Detailed reports of the scientific accomplishments can be found in other papers in these proceedings and in other publications.

Younger, S.M.; Fowler, C.M.; Lindemuth, I.; Chernyshev, V.K.; Mokhov, V.N.; Pavlovskii, A.I.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Harold Paul Fourth, 1974 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harold Paul Fourth, 1974 Harold Paul Fourth, 1974 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov 1970's Harold Paul Fourth, 1974 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Physics: For major contributions to the theoretical understanding of physics of plasma confined in Tokamak geometries. His concept of adiabatic compression in a toridal system has overcome the limitations on density and ion temperature that has characterized conventional Tokamaks

468

Fusion roadmapping | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion roadmapping Fusion roadmapping Subscribe to RSS - Fusion roadmapping The process of mapping a path to a commercial fusion reactor by planning a sequence of future machines. Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science Quest Magazine Summer 2013 Welcome to the premiere issue of Quest, the annual magazine of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Read more about Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and design Read more about PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and design

469

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group. Welcome. The Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group conducts research in ...

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

470

Cloud Computing Forensic Science Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forensic Science Workshop. Purpose: The New Frontiers in IT and Measurement Science Rapid advances ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

471

Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

472

Critical review: Plasma-surface reactions and the spinning wall method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reviews methods for studying reactions of atoms and small molecules on substrates and chamber walls that are immersed in a plasma, a relatively unexplored, yet very important area of plasma science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the ''spinning wall'' technique. With this method, a cylindrical section of the wall of the plasma reactor is rotated, and the surface is periodically exposed to the plasma and then to a differentially pumped mass spectrometer, to an Auger electron spectrometer, and, optionally, to a beam of additional reactants or surface coatings. Reactants impinging on the surface can stick and react over time scales that are comparable to the substrate rotation period, which can be varied from {approx}0.5 to 40 ms. Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction probabilities can be derived from a measurement of the absolute desorption product yields as a function of the substrate rotation frequency. Auger electron spectroscopy allows the plasma-immersed surface to be monitored during plasma operation. This measurement is critical, since wall ''conditioning'' in the plasma changes the reaction probabilities. Mass spectrometer cracking patterns are used to identify simple desorption products such as Cl{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, ClO, and ClO{sub 2}. Desorption products also produce a measurable pressure rise in the second differentially pumped chamber that can be used to obtain absolute desorption yields. The surface can also be coated with films that can be deposited by sputtering a target in the plasma or by evaporating material from a Knudsen cell in the differentially pumped wall chamber. Here, the authors review this new spinning wall technique in detail, describing both experimental issues and data analysis methods and interpretations. The authors have used the spinning wall method to study the recombination of Cl and O on plasma-conditioned anodized aluminum and stainless steel surfaces. In oxygen or chlorine plasmas, these surfaces become coated with a layer containing Si, Al, and O, due to slow erosion of the reactor materials, in addition to Cl in chlorine plasmas. Similar, low recombination probabilities were found for Cl and O on anodized Al versus stainless steel surfaces, consistent with the similar chemical composition of the layer that forms on these surfaces after long exposure to the plasma. In chlorine plasmas, weakly adsorbed Cl{sub 2} was found to inhibit Cl recombination, hence the Cl recombination probability decreases with increasing Cl{sub 2}-to-Cl number density ratios in the plasma. In mixed Cl{sub 2}/O{sub 2} plasmas, Cl and O recombine to form Cl{sub 2} and O{sub 2} with probabilities that are similar to those in pure chlorine or oxygen plasmas, but in addition, ClO and ClO{sub 2} form on the surface and desorb from the wall. These and other results, including the catalytic enhancement of O recombination by monolayer amounts of Cu, are reviewed.

Donnelly, V. M.; Guha, J.; Stafford, L. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

NERSC-ScienceHighlightsMarch2013.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 2013 March 2013 NERSC Science Highlights --- 1 --- NERSC User Science Highlights Materials High-temp superconductivity findings net researchers the first NERSC Award for High Impact Scientific Achievement (T. Das, LANL) Fusion Simulations show for the first time intrinsic stochasticity in magnetically confined toroidal plasma edges (L. Sugiyama, MIT) Fusion Direct simulation of freely decaying turbulence in 2-D electrostatic gyrokinetics (W. Dorland, U. Maryland) Fusion NIMROD simulations explain DIII-D shot variability (V. Izzo, General Atomics) Materials Semiconductor exciton binding energy variation explained (Z. Wu, Colo. Sch. Mines) Chemistry Study points the way toward more efficient catalysts (S. Chen, PNNL) January 2 013 Origin of the Variation of Exciton Binding

474

Applied Quantum Information Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Quantum Information Science. Summary: Theory is being developed and used to devise methods for preserving ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

Graduate studies Ecosystem Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

476

Architecture Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture Bachelor of Science 201213 Degree Map First Year Fall Winter Spring Notes Freshman Inquiry 5 ARCH 100 4 ARCH 101 4 Science Elective 4 ARCH 120 4 ARCH 121 4 Math 4 ARCH 232 4 ARCH 280 6 ARCH 281 6 Lab Science Elective 4 Lab Science Elective 4

Bertini, Robert L.

477

Education research Primary Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Education research Primary Science Survey Report December 2011 #12;Primary Science Survey Report, Wellcome Trust 1 Background In May 2009 Key Stage 2 science SATs (Standard Assessment Tests) were abolished fiasco might occur, where the results were delayed and their quality questioned. The loss of science SATs

Rambaut, Andrew

478

Solar Energy Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Science Projects Curriculum: Solar Power -(thermodynamics, lightelectromagnetic, radiation, energy transformation, conductionconvection, seasons, trigonometry) Grade...

479

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Structures Formation in Inhomogeneous Plasma Excited by Thin Modulated Electron Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interaction of a thin modulated electron beam with inhomogeneous non-isothermal plasma is studied using 2D PIC electrostatic simulation. On the early stage of the interaction intensive HF oscillations of the electric field are observed in the local plasma resonance region. The ponderomotive force of these oscillations disturbs the initial profile of plasma density. On the later stage of the interaction a ring-like pulse of the plasma density propagates out of the resonance region. Velocity of this pulse depends on its intensity and exceeds the ion sound velocity. This fact demonstrates the nonlinear nature of the pulse.

Taras Eu. Litoshenko; Ihor O. Anisimov

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Study of Plasma Detachment in a Simplified 2D Geometry using UEDGE  

SciTech Connect

The location of the ionization front in a generic, detached plasma has been studied in a two-dimensional slab geometry by varying the core plasma density and input heating power. The ratio of the recombination to ionization current and the momentum losses in the computational domain have been used to quantify the degree of detachment. Contours of constant ratio of these parameter in the core plasma density--heating power parameter space show that at high input power higher momentum losses can be achieved even at low density. High fraction of recombination, however, require high core densities to sufficiently separate the plasma from the target plate.

Groth, M; Mahdavi, A M; Porter, G D; Rognlien, T D

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density plasma science" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.