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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Home > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas...

2

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Program | National Nuclear Security Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Home > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Steady advances in increasing the energy, power, and brightness of lasers and particle beams and advances in pulsed power systems have made possible

3

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog HEDLP High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > University Partnerships / Academic Alliances > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

4

Characterization of low-frequency density fluctuations in dipole-confined laboratory plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-frequency fluctuations of plasma density, floating potential, ion saturation current, visible light intensity, and edge magnetic field are routinely observed in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). For the purposes ...

Ellsworth, Jennifer L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Plasma digital density determining device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

Sprott, Julien C. (Madison, WI); Lovell, Thomas W. (Madison, WI); Holly, Donald J. (Madison, WI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. TRIDENT target chamber Sasi Palaniyappan, right, and Rahul Shah left inside a target chamber where the TRIDENT short pulse laser is aimed at a very thin diamond- foil target, a fraction of a micrometer thick. The laser delivers a power on target of 150 Terawatts focused into a 7 micrometer spot, yielding laser brilliance over 100 times more intense than needed to make the target electrons fully relativistic. These experiments test novel methods of producing intense

8

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faciliBes 1st users of MECI in FY13 Recognize common interests NNSA/FES Compliment NNSA investments Stability ­ investments in HEDLP: people, departments

9

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Technology Marketing ...  

... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries - Energy Innovation Portal on ...

10

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas Robert Rosner The University of Chicago Dec. 12, 2000 Austin, TX (http://flash.uchicago.edu) #12;Burning Plasma Science Workshop Austin ¥ Plasma conditions ¥ Overview of plasma physics issues for astrophysics ¥ Specific examples #12;Burning

11

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is plasma research using small-scale laboratory experiments, where low-density plasmas are generated

Haviland, David

12

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Technologies Available for ...  

The DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory works with collaborators across the globe to develop fusion as an energy source for the world, ...

13

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas K. Tathe resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore bepro?le, the betatron radiation emitted by theses electrons

Ta Phuoc, Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Exploiting Laboratory and Heliophysics Plasma Synergies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in space-based heliospheric observations, laboratory experimentation, and plasma simulation codes are creating an exciting new cross-disciplinary opportunity for understanding fast energy release and transport ...

Dahlburg, Jill

15

Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

16

Plasma wave propagation with a plasma density gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma waves with the plasma diffusion velocity u{sub n} due to a plasma density gradient are described in a positive column plasma. The ion wave is generated by the perturbation of the operating frequency 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and it propagates with the group velocity u{sub g{approx}}c{sub s}{sup 2}/u{sub n{approx}}(10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}) m/s, where c{sub s} is the acoustic velocity in a fine tube fluorescent lamp, while the electron wave cannot be generated with a turbulence of low frequency less than the electron oscillation frequency {omega}{sub pe}. The propagation of the lighting signal observed in long tube fluorescent lamps is well understood with the propagation of ion waves occurring along the plasma density gradient.

Cho, Guangsup; Choi, Eun-Ha; Uhm, Han Sup [Department of Electrophysics, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Nowon Wallgye, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Interferometric measurements of plasma density in high-. beta. plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The coupled-cavity laser interferometer technique is particularly applicable to the measurement of pulsed plasma densities. This technique is based on the fact that if a small fraction of a gas laser's output radiation is reflected into the laser with an external mirror, the intensity of the laser output is modulated. These amplitude or intensity modulations are produced by changes in the laser gain. A rotating corner mirror or an oscillating mirror can be used to produce a continuous feedback modulation of the interferometer which produces a continuous background fringe pattern. The presence of plasma in the outer cavity causes an additional change which results in a phase shift of the regular period of the background fringe pattern. The integral of the plasma density along the line of sight can be evaluated by comparison of the time history of the fringes obtained with and without plasma.

Quinn, W.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Interferometer for the measurement of plasma density  

SciTech Connect

An interferometer which combines the advantages of a coupled cavity interferometer requiring alignment of only one light beam, and a quadrature interferometer which has the ability to track multi-fringe phase excursions unambiguously. The device utilizes a Bragg cell for generating a signal which is electronically analyzed to unambiguously determine phase modulation which is proportional to the path integral of the plasma density.

Jacobson, Abram R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Wave localization and density bunching in pair ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

By investigating the nonlinear propagation of high intensity electromagnetic (EM) waves in a pair ion plasma, whose symmetry is broken via contamination by a small fraction of high mass immobile ions, it is shown that this new and interesting state of (laboratory created) matter is capable of supporting structures that strongly localize and bunch the EM radiation with density excess in the region of localization. Testing of this prediction in controlled laboratory experiments can lend credence, inter alia, to conjectures on structure formation (via the same mechanism) in the MEV era of the early universe.

Mahajan, Swadesh M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Shatashvili, Nana L. [Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi 0128 (Georgia) and Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi 0177, Georgia (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Turbulent Density Spectrum in Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density fluctuation spectrum in the solar wind reveals a Kolmogorov-like scaling with a spectral slope of -5/3 in wavenumber space. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind, characterized typically by MHD turbulence, over extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories, raising the question of how a compressible magnetofluid exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma fluid. It is shown that a Kolmogorov-like density spectrum can develop by plasma motions that are dominated by Alfv\\'enic cascades whereas compressive modes are dissipated.

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Density Spectrum in the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density fluctuation spectrum in the solar wind reveals a Kolmogorov-like scaling with a spectral slope of -5/3 in wavenumber space. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind, characterized typically by MHD turbulence, over extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories, raising the question of how a compressible magnetofluid exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma fluid. It is shown that a Kolmogorov-like density spectrum can develop by plasma motions that are dominated by Alfv\\'enic cascades whereas compressive modes are dissipated.

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Reserch Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Frédéric J. G. Cuisinier Optics and Plasma Research Department, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde and Henrik C. Pedersen Optics and Plasma Research Department, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde

23

Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Reserch Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Anders Bjarklev, Peter E. Andersen Risø National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma Research Department, DK amplifier Frederik D. Nielsen and Lars Thrane Risø National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma Research. Lyngby, Denmark Peter E. Andersen (corresponding author) Risø National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma

24

Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Reserch Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Plasma Research Department, Risø National Laboratory, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark S. Sørensena Optics and Plasma Research Department, Risø National Laboratory, Frederiksborgvej 399 and Plasma Research Department, Risø National Laboratory, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark

25

Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Reserch Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Plasma Research, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde,Denmark;2Coherentia CNR-INFM and Dipartimento statement Copyright 2007 Springer Doi 1Department of Optics and Plasma Research, Risø National Laboratory , Salvatore Amoruso2 and James G. Lunney3 1 Department of Optics and Plasma Research, Risø National Laboratory

26

Telephone costs at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a fusion energy research laboratory located on the Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro, New Jersey. Princeton University operates the laboratory under contact with the US Department of Energy (DOE). PPPL researches nuclear fusion and plasma physics and investigates the potential of a commercial fusion reactor. The objective of the audit was to determine whether PPPL was monitoring telephone use and costs in order to prevent personal toll costs from being charged to the DOE contract. Our audit disclosed that 5 out of the 10 PPPL cost centers we reviewed were not following established policies and procedures for monitoring telephone toll charges. This condition resulted because PPPL's management did not adequately review telephone use and costs. As a result, PPPL charged personal toll calls to DOE. Therefore, we recommend that the Manager, DOE Field Office, Chicago, (CH) direct PPPL to enforce its telephone policies and procedures to ensure that personal toll calls are not charged to DOE. The Acting Manager, CH, concurred with our recommendations and agreed to implement corrective actions.

1991-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Kinetics driving high-density chlorine plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple fluid model was developed in order to investigate the driving kinetics of neutral and charged species in high-density chlorine plasmas. It was found that the dissociation degree of Cl{sub 2} molecules is directly linked to the power balance of the discharge which controls the electron density. The model was also used to identify those reactions that could be neglected in the particle balance of charged species and those that must be included. Our results further indicate that diffusion losses need to be considered up to a pressure that depends on magnetic-field intensity and reactor aspect ratio. Finally, it is shown that the dominant charged carriers are linked to the dissociation level of Cl{sub 2} molecules.

Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Vidal, F.; Chaker, M.; Giroux, K.; Poirier, J.-S.; Quintal-Leonard, A.; Saussac, J. [Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø National Laboratory Postprint Optics and Plasma Research Department Year: 2006 Paper: www and Plasma Research, OPL-128 Risø DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark Required publisher statement Copyright (2005 Association EURATOM-Risø National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Research, OPL-128 Risø DK-4000 Roskilde

29

Ris National Laboratory DTU Optics and Plasma Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø National Laboratory DTU Postprint Optics and Plasma Research Department 2007 Paper: www (MAPLE) K Rodrigo1,2, J Schou1#, B Toftmann1 and R Pedrys2 1 Department of Optics and Plasma Research Department of Optics and Plasma Research, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark 2 Institute

30

Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Reserch Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optics and Plasma Research Department, Risø National Laboratory Required publisher statement Copyright: Optics and Plasma Research Department Division: Risoe National National Laboratory Address: P.O. Box 49Name: R. Suffix: Organization: Optics and Plasma Research Department Division: Risoe National National

31

Density effect on relativistic electron beams in a plasma fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense short-petawatt-laser driven relativistic electron beams in a hollow high-Z plasma fiber embedded in low-Z plasmas of different densities are studied. When the plasma is of lower density than the hollow fiber, resistive filamentation of the electron beam is observed. It is found that the electron motion and the magnetic field are highly correlated with tens of terahertz oscillation frequency. Depending on the material property around the hollow fiber and the plasma density, the beam electrons can be focused or defocused as it propagates in the plasma. Relativistic electron transport and target heating are also investigated.

Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang, X. G. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu, S. Z. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Cai, H. B. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, F. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Amplifying Magnetic Fields in High Energy Density Plasmas | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Amplifying Magnetic Fields in High Energy Density Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities...

33

Labs at-a-Glance: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Princeton Plasma Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Logo Visit the Princeton Plasma Physics

34

Management Alert - Extended Assignments at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extended Assignments at Princeton Extended Assignments at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory DOE/IG-0864 May 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 17, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert on "Extended Assignments at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory" BACKGROUND Princeton University operates the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (Princeton) under a contract with the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Princeton works with partners around the world to develop fusion as an energy source. The Laboratory's annual operating costs

35

Feasibility of measuring density and temperature of laser produced plasmas using spectroscopic techniques.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wide variety of experiments on the Z-Beamlet laser involve the creation of laser produced plasmas. Having a direct measurement of the density and temperature of these plasma would an extremely useful tool, as understanding how these quantities evolve in space and time gives insight into the causes of changes in other physical processes, such as x-ray generation and opacity. We propose to investigate the possibility of diagnosing the density and temperature of laser-produced plasma using temporally and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques that are similar to ones that have been successfully fielded on other systems. Various researchers have measured the density and temperature of laboratory plasmas by looking at the width and intensity ratio of various characteristic lines in gases such as nitrogen and hydrogen, as well as in plasmas produced off of solid targets such as zinc. The plasma conditions produce two major measurable effects on the characteristic spectral lines of that plasma. The 1st is the Stark broadening of an individual line, which depends on the electron density of the plasma, with higher densities leading to broader lines. The second effect is a change in the ratio of various lines in the plasma corresponding to different ionization states. By looking at the ratio of these lines, we can gain some understanding of the plasma ionization state and consequently its temperature (and ion density when coupled with the broadening measurement). The hotter a plasma is, the higher greater the intensity of lines corresponding to higher ionization states. We would like to investigate fielding a system on the Z-Beamlet laser chamber to spectroscopically study laser produced plasmas from different material targets.

Edens, Aaron D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients  

SciTech Connect

Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

Houshmandyar, Saeid [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Honors Three Researchers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kenneth Hill received the Kaul Prize for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research and Technology Development. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Kenneth...

39

COLLOQUIUM: "Laboratory Dynamos" | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

40

Effects of flow on density profiles in laser irradiated plasmas  

SciTech Connect

When the plasma outflow velocity relative to the critical surface is supersonic, compressional density profiles can form in the critical region. These compressions involve dissipative processes like those in collisionless shocks; associated plasma instabilities and reflected ions may inhibit energy transport and enhance laser light absorption.

Max, C.E.; McKee, C.F.

1977-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Laboratory testing of high energy density capacitors for electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory tests of advanced, high energy density capacitors in the Battery Test Laboratory of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been performed to investigate their suitability for load-leveling the battery in an electric vehicle. Two types of devices were tested -- 3 V, 70 Farad, spiral wound, carbon-based, single cell devices and 20 V, 3. 5 Farad, mixed-oxide, multi-cell bipolar devices. The energy density of the devices, based on energy stored during charge to the rated voltage, was found to be 1--2 Wh/kg, which agreed well with that claimed by the manufacturers. Constant power discharge tests were performed at power densities up to 1500 W/kg. Discharges at higher power densities could have been performed had equipment been available to maintain constant power during discharges of less than one second. It was found that the capacitance of the devices were rate dependent with the rate dependency of the carbon-based devices being higher than that of the mixed-oxide devices. The resistance of both types of devices were relatively low being 20--30 milliohms. Testing done in the study showed that the advanced high energy density capacitors can be charged and discharged over cycles (PSFUDS) which approximate the duty cycle that would be encountered if the devices are used to load-level the battery in an electric vehicle. Thermal tests of the advanced capacitors in an insulated environment using the PSFUDS cycle showed the devices do not overheat with their temperatures increasing only 4--5{degrees}C for tests that lasted 5--7 hours. 7 refs., 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Burke, A.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Magnetohydrodynamics in Tokamak Reactors and its Effect on Plasma Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The worlds energy consumption is at a crossroads. While petroleum coffers continuously yield enough petroleum to meet the current state of energy consumption, increases in energy consumption and advancements in technology bear significant weight on our ability to maintain current standards. Looking ahead, plasma fusion is a means of yielding vast amounts of clean, renewable and virtually limitless amounts of energy. With many advancements taking place since the 1950s, the current Tokamak reactor claims to be able to produce more energy than it consumes, realizing a dream over 60 years in the making. Many characteristics, including plasma density, have to be tuned to maintain optimal conditions. By using finite element method embodied in COMSOL and first principles, one attempts to show how the plasma density evolves through a Tokomaks modes of operation and to quantify the density against a known standard.

Morelli, Franco

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Mini-conference and Related Sessions on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a summary of some major physics issues and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2003 Annual Meeting (October 27-31, 2003). Also included are brief summaries of selected talks on the same topic presented at two invited paper sessions (including a tutorial) and two contributed focus oral sessions, which were organized in coordination with the Mini-Conference by the same organizers.

Hantao Ji

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma  

SciTech Connect

Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Helicon Plasma Source Configuration Analysis by Means of Density Measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial results have been obtained from operation of a helicon plasma source built to conduct optimization studies for space propulsion applications. The source features an easily reconfigurable antenna to test different geometries. Operating with He as the source gas, peak densities >= 1.6X10{sup 19} m{sup -3} have been achieved. Radial and axial plasma profiles have been obtained using a microwave interferometer that can be scanned axially and a Langmuir probe. The source will be used to investigate operation at high magnetic field, frequency, and input power.

Angrilli, F.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.; Maggiora, R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D.O.

1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

47

Secretary Steven Chu Visits Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Yesterday, Secretary Chu had the opportunity to visit the Departments Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in New Jersey a facility he said has been at the center of the intellectual birth and coming of age of plasma and fusion science. Discussing our need for scientists to address our countrys energy issues, climate change and how nuclear energy both fission and fusion could be solutions to our energy challenges, the Secretary made two predictions, but first quoted Yogi Berra: Its tough to make predictions, especially about the future.

48

Plasma density gradient injection of low absolute momentum spread electron bunches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Esarey et al. , IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 24, 252 (1996). [3]G. R. Geddes et al. , Phys. Plasmas 12, 056709 (2005). [13]laser (A, red) drives a plasma density wake (grey) in the

Geddes, C.G.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

P24 Plasma Physics Summer School 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory Summer lecture series for students  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the 2012 LANL summer lecture series for students. The lectures were: (1) Tom Intrator, P24 LANL: Kick off, Introduction - What is a plasma; (2) Bruno Bauer, Univ. Nevada-Reno: Derivation of plasma fluid equations; (3) Juan Fernandez, P24 LANL Overview of research being done in p-24; (4) Tom Intrator, P24 LANL: Intro to dynamo, reconnection, shocks; (5) Bill Daughton X-CP6 LANL: Intro to computational particle in cell methods; (6) Kirk Flippo, P24 LANL: High energy density plasmas; (7) Thom Weber, P24 LANL: Energy crisis, fission, fusion, non carbon fuel cycles; (8) Tom Awe, Sandia National Laboratory: Magneto Inertial Fusion; and (9) Yongho Kim, P24 LANL: Industrial technologies.

Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Bruno [Univ Nevada, Reno; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, William S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weber, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Awe, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yong Ho [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION NOTIFICATION FORM Grantee/Contractor Laboratory: Princeton University/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EVALUATION NOTIFICATION FORM EVALUATION NOTIFICATION FORM Grantee/Contractor Laboratory: Princeton University/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) Project! Activity Title: STS-100 Test Stand Experiment NEPA Tracking No.: Type of Funding _ _ --=S=C'---_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ B&R Code: Total Estimated Cost _ _ ---"'$=2=-OO"'-',=OO=O"--_ _ _ _ _ _ _ DOE Cognizant Secretarial Officer (CSO):--'W~il=lia=m~F'-'-.-"=B=r=in=km=a=n'__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Contractor Project Manager: ____ -_-_--_--_-_--_-_-_ _ _ _ _ Signature: ------------- Contractor NEPA Reviewer: Jerry D. Levine Date: ( S--Q--------f-- /:/1 Signature: "~ ~ ~ Date: I ~lJO I * I. Description of Proposed Action: The proposed action would consist of operation of a 100

51

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

Colloquia Videos from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a collaborative national center for plasma and fusion science. Its primary mission is to develop the scientific understanding and the key innovations which will lead to an attractive fusion energy source. Associated missions include conducting world-class research along the broad frontier of plasma science and technology, and providing the highest quality of scientific education. [Copied from PPPL - An Overview at http://www.pppl.gov/polDoc.cfm?Doc_Id=49] It is the home of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and is a key player in many plasma and fusion energy research projects. These include the National Spherical Torus Experiment, the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, and the international ITER project that will use the largest Tokamak in the world to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial power from fusion energy. The talks and the guests giving them at the Colloquia sessions held weekly at PPPL are as high-powered and complex as PPPL's science. To access the latest videos from the colloquia, select Events from the menu, then select either Upcoming Events or Event Calendar. Choose Colloquia from the dropdown list and then select each month's calendar page to select videos to view.

53

Activities of the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-4, 2008 Livermore, CA on behalf of the HEDLP FESAC subpanel #12;"joint HEDLP program [OFES+NNSA and 28 contributed talks M. Donovan (NNSA) NNSA perspective G. Nardella (OFES) OFES perspective HEDLP #12;IFE HEDLP science: conventional and alternative concepts · Conventional ICF (NNSA funded

54

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

55

Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatron oscillations, and beam steering in a plasma wakefield experiment at 30 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gearhart,Construction of a Cerenkov light source, Rev.Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatroncal considerations in the use of Cerenkov radiation as an

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Basic Research Needs for High Energy Density Laboratory Physics  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

On the cover: On the cover: Invisible infrared light from the 200-trillion watt Trident Laser enters from the bottom to interact with a one-micrometer thick foil target in the center of the photo. The laser pulse produces a plasma - an ionized gas - many times hotter than the center of the sun, which lasts for a trillionth of a second. During this time some electrons from the foil are accelerated to virtually the speed of

57

Plasma source ion implantation research and applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma Source Ion Implantation research at Los Alamos Laboratory includes direct investigation of the plasma and materials science involved in target surface modification, numerical simulations of the implantation process, and supporting hardware engineering. Target materials of Al, Cr, Cu-Zn, Mg, Ni, Si, Ti, W, and various Fe alloys have been processed using plasmas produced from Ar, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gases. Individual targets with surface areas as large as {approximately}4 m{sup 2}, or weighing up to 1200 kg, have been treated in the large LANL facility. In collaboration with General Motors and the University of Wisconsin, a process has been developed for application of hard, low friction, diamond-like-carbon layers on assemblies of automotive pistons. Numerical simulations have been performed using a 2{1/2}-D particle- in-cell code, which yields time-dependent implantation energy, dose, and angle of arrival for ions at the target surface for realistic geometries. Plasma source development activities include the investigation of pulsed, inductively coupled sources capable of generating highly dissociated N{sup +} with ion densities n{sub i} {approximately} 10{sup 11}/cm{sup 3}, at {approximately}100 W average input power. Cathodic arc sources have also been used to produce filtered metallic and C plasmas for implantation and deposition either in vacuum, or in conjunction with a background gas for production of highly adherent ceramic coatings.

Munson, C.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Henins, I. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

SAND2011-6616A Page 1 Session 2: High Energy Density, Plasmas, Magnetic Fields  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

616A 616A Page 1 Session 2: High Energy Density, Plasmas, Magnetic Fields Dynamical Materials Experiments on Sandia's Z Machine: Obtaining Data with High Precision at HED Conditions Thomas R. Mattsson and Seth Root Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM USA Summary: The Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories has successfully been used to study a wide range of materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, we will discuss the methodology resulting in high-pressure measurements at multi-Mbar pressures as well as present experimental data for shock compression of poly methyl-pentene, a hydrocarbon plastic. Introduction During the last few years, there has been a notable increase in the interest of high-pressure science. The increase in interest has been driven by the remarkable capabilities of new and improved platforms like

59

CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Three-dimensional, Impulsive Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma  

SciTech Connect

Impulsive, local, 3-D reconnection is identified for the first time in a laboratory current sheet. The events observed in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) are characterized by large local gradients in the third direction and cannot be explained by 2-D models. Detailed measurements show that the ejection of flux rope structures from the current sheet plays a key role in these events. By contrast, even though electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range are also observed concurrently with the impulsive behavior, they are not the key physics responsible. A qualitative, 3-D, two-fluid model is proposed to explain the observations. The experimental results may be particularly applicable to space and astrophysical plasmas where impulsive reconnection occurs.

S Dorfman, et al

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

4D-HD for high energy density plasmas: shedding light into rapidly...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D-HD for high energy density plasmas: shedding light into rapidly changing, opaque plasmas Wednesday, July 24, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Marta Fajardo,...

62

Towards laboratory-produced relativistic electron-positron pair-plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the last few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} and 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, respectively. With the advent of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a charge-neutral, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter. This talk will present some details of the laser-produced pair-plasma experiments.

Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Beiersdorfer, P; Cauble, R; Dollar, F; Falk, K; Hazi, A; Murphy, C D; Park, J; Seely, J; Szabo, C I; Shepherd, R; Tommasini, R; Zulick, K

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Production of high-density high-temperature plasma by collapsing small solid-density plasma shell with two ultra-intense laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the anisotropic collapse of a plasma microshell by impact of two oppositely directed intense laser pulses can create at the center of the shell cavity a submicron-sized plasma of high density and temperature suitable for generating fusion neutrons.

Xu, H. [National Laboratory for Parallel and Distributed Processing, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yu Wei [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, Bochum D-44780 (Germany); Wong, A. Y. [Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

Electronic Structure Measurement of Solid Density Plasmas using X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Landen, O L; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R

2003-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Solid Density Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Forest, F J; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Faussurier, G; Blancard, C; Renaudin, P; Landen, O L

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Plasma impedance and electron density in a pulsed laser channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of plasma impedance of gas laserdischarge and spark gap channels by an inductancecapacitance (L p ?C p ) tank circuit has been useful in describing the frequency response of a pulsed superradiant laser charging circuit. The impedance matching of these plasma channels can lead to resonant narrowing of the laser pulsewidth in superradiant nitrogen lasers. Using fluid equations to model the electron and ion plasmas

K. H. Tsui; G. H. Cavalcanti; A. S. Farias; M. D. S. Marinha; L. M. Soares; C. A. Massone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Center at plasma laboratory wins $12 million grant for fusion research |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center at plasma laboratory wins $12 million grant for fusion research Center at plasma laboratory wins $12 million grant for fusion research By John Greenwald October 10, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One C.S. Chang, who heads the Center for Edge Physics Simulation at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, stands by a high-performance computer cluster at the laboratory. With a $12.25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, Chang and other researchers will develop computer codes to simulate a key component of the plasma that fuels fusion energy. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) C.S. Chang, who heads the Center for Edge Physics Simulation at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, stands by a high-performance computer cluster at the laboratory. With a $12.25 million grant from the U.S. Department of

68

Mini Pulsed Plasma Source - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

The mini-pulsed plasma source will find use in ion source applications including heavy ion fusion, particle accelerators, and Electron Beam Ion Source ...

69

Energetic particle production, cavition formation, and nonlinear development at a plasma density maximum  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated several phenomena of importance to laser-plasma interactions. In our studies, these are modeled by microwave and rf-plasma interactions. Our focus has been on resonant absorption of intense electromagnetic radiation at the plasma critical layer. Electron plasma wave (EPW) growth and caviton formation have been shown to be most efficient for shallow density gradients at the critical layer, where EPW convection losses are minimized. EPW electric field energies of 5000 times the plasma thermal energy, and energetic electron tails out to 5000T{sub e}, have been observed at the top of an inverse parabolic density profile. Ions receive delta-function-like impulses from localized electron plasma waves and wave-breaking electron ejection; the disruption of the ion fluid can only partially be described by the ponderomotive force. Our attempt is to test and illuminate some of the fundamental concepts of strong turbulence and EM wave-plasma interaction. 7 refs.

Wong, A.Y.; Bauer, B.S. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Experimental simulation of a gaseous divertor: Measurements of neutral density inside the plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct measurements of the neutral density in the core of hydrogen plasma with a density of 3--4{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} and electron temperature of 15--20 eV in a magnetic field of 0.2 T, injected into hydrogen neutral gas at a pressure of 0.1--2 Torr are performed with plasma emission spectroscopy. The data are in agreement with the results of measured plasma decay (Phys. Fluids B {bold 2}, 837 (1990)) and can be explained by radial pressure balance between fast neutrals inside the plasma and cold background gas.

Fiksel, G.; Kishinevsky, M.; Hershkowitz, N. (Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1687 (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Excitation of surface plasma waves by a density modulated electron beam at a conductor-dusty plasma interface  

SciTech Connect

A density modulated electron beam propagating through a conductor-dusty plasma interface drives electromagnetic surface plasma waves (SPWs) to instability via Cerenkov and cyclotron interaction. The SPWs propagate across an external magnetic field parallel to the interface. Numerical calculations of the growth rate and unstable mode frequencies have been carried out for the typical parameters of the SPWs. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave instability increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains {delta} (= n{sub io}/n{sub eo}, where n{sub io} is the ion plasma density and n{sub eo} is the electron plasma density). The phase velocity of the unstable waves also increases with {delta}. In addition, the growth rate of the instability increases with the beam density and scales as one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and square root of beam density in fast cyclotron interaction. Moreover, the dispersion relation of SPWs has been retrieved in the absence of the modulated beam and without dust grains.

Gupta, Ruby [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi-110036 (India); Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, Rohini, Delhi-110086 (India); Prakash, Ved [India Meteorological Department, Ministry of Earth Science, Lodi Road, New Delhi-110003 (India)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile  

SciTech Connect

By using a transient density profile, we have demonstrated stationary self-focusing of an electromagnetic Gaussian beam in cold quantum plasma. The paper is devoted to the prospects of using upward increasing ramp density profile of an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium with quantum effects in self-focusing mechanism of high intense laser beam. We have found that the upward ramp density profile in addition to quantum effects causes much higher oscillation and better focusing of laser beam in cold quantum plasma in comparison to that in the classical relativistic case. Our computational results reveal the importance and influence of formation of electron density profiles in enhancing laser self-focusing.

Habibi, M. [Department of Physics, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Department of Physics, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

The discharge condition to enhance electron density of capacitively coupled plasma with multi-holed electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multi-holed electrode that has been reported to enhance the electron density of the capacitively coupled plasma is now being adopted to speed up the processes. However, the discharge condition when the multi-holed electrode enhances the electron density of the discharge at fixed power is not studied. At low pressure, the multi-holed electrode increased the electron density of the plasma at fixed power. However, the multi-holed electrode is experimentally revealed to lower the electron density at high pressure. In this paper, the different roles of the multi-holed electrode are experimentally studied.

Lee, Hun Su [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Eunha-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do, 565-902 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Seong; Chang, Hong Young [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Density profiles of plasmas confined by the field of a Levitating Dipole Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 4-channel microwave interferometer (center frequency: 60 GHz) has been constructed to measure the density profiles of plasmas confined within the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). LDX is the first and only experiment ...

Boxer, Alexander C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Secretary Steven Chu Visits Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

said has been at the center of the intellectual birth and coming of age of plasma and fusion science. Discussing our need for scientists to address our country's energy issues,...

76

Parallel resistivity and ohmic heating of laboratory dipole plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The parallel resistivity is calculated in the long-mean-free-path regime for the dipole plasma geometry; this is shown to be a neoclassical transport problem in the limit of a small number of circulating electrons. In this regime, the resistivity is substantially higher than the Spitzer resistivity due to the magnetic trapping of a majority of the electrons. This suggests that heating the outer flux surfaces of the plasma with low-frequency parallel electric fields can be substantially more efficient than might be naively estimated. Such a skin-current heating scheme is analyzed by deriving an equation for diffusion of skin currents into the plasma, from which quantities such as the resistive skin-depth, lumped-circuit impedance, and power deposited in the plasma can be estimated. Numerical estimates indicate that this may be a simple and efficient way to couple power into experiments in this geometry.

Fox, W. [Center for Integrated Computation and Analysis of Reconnection and Turbulence, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Plasma-materials interaction results at Sandia National Laboratories.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Overview of Plasma Materials Interaction (PMI) activities are: (1) Hydrogen diffusion and trapping in metals - (a) Growth of hydrogen precipitates in tungsten PFCs, (b) Temperature dependence of deuterium retention at displacement damage, (c) D retention in W at elevated temperatures; (2) Permeation - (a) Gas driven permeation results for W/Mo/SiC, (b) Plasma-driven permeation test stand for TPE; and (3) Surface studies - (a) H-sensor development, (b) Adsorption of oxygen and hydrogen on beryllium surfaces.

Causey, Rion A.; Wampler, William R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Whaley, Josh A.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Tomographic reconstruction of high energy density plasmas with picosecond temporal resolution  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional reconstruction of the electron density in a plasma can be obtained by passing multiple beams at different field angles simultaneously through a plasma and performing a tomographic reconstruction of the measured field-dependent phase profiles. In this letter, a relatively simple experimental setup is proposed and simulations are carried out to verify the technique. The plasma distribution is modeled as a discreet number of phase screens and a Zernike polynomial representation of the phase screens is used to reconstruct the plasma profile. Using a subpicosecond laser, the complete three-dimensional electron density of the plasma can be obtained with a time resolution limited only by the transit time of the probe through the plasma.

Baker, K L

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Two-dimensional modeling of high plasma density inductively coupled sources for materials processing  

SciTech Connect

Inductively coupled plasma sources are being developed to address the need for high plasma density (10[sup 11]--10[sup 12] cm[sup [minus]3]), low pressure (a few to 10--20 mTorr) etching of semiconductor materials. One such device uses a flat spiral coil of rectangular cross section to generate radio-frequency (rf) electric fields in a cylindrical plasma chamber, and capacitive rf biasing on the substrate to independently control ion energies incident on the wafer. To investigate these devices we have developed a two-dimensional hybrid model consisting of electromagnetic, electron Monte Carlo, and hydrodynamic modules; and an off line plasma chemistry Monte Carlo simulation. The results from the model for plasma densities, plasma potentials, and ion fluxes for Ar, O[sub 2], Ar/CF[sub 4]/O[sub 2] gas mixtures will be presented.

Ventzek, P.L.G.; Hoekstra, R.J.; Kushner, M.J. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Plasma density measurements using FM-CW millimeter wave radar techniques  

SciTech Connect

Modified FM-CW radar techniques using swept millimeter-wave oscillators are useful for determining when a particular density has been reached in a plasma. Narrowband measurements on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) demonstrate the suitability of these techniques for controlling high-power auxiliary plasma heating systems. Broadband measurements using these same techniques are proposed, by which the density profile could be determined.

Doane, J.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Schmidt, G.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electron density and temperature profile diagnostics for C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The 9-point Thomson scattering diagnostic system for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas is improved and the measured electron temperature profiles are consistent with theoretical expectations. Rayleigh scattering revealed a finite line width of the ruby laser emission, which complicates density calibration. Taking advantage of the plasma wobble motion, density profile reconstruction accuracy from the 6-chord two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe interferometer data is improved.

Deng, B. H.; Kinley, J. S.; Schroeder, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth's Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recent- ly, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density...

83

"Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth's Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recent- ly, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density...

84

Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shan Zhang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Shijiazhuang Tiedao University, Shijiazhuang 050043 (China); Hong Xueren [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Hongyu [Department of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Shanghai Bright-Tech Information Technology Co. Ltd, Shanghai 200136 (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Lower hybrid current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Driving current in high-density plasmas is essential for the progress of thermonuclear fusion energy research based on the tokamak concept. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, is potentially the most suitable tool for driving current at large plasma radii, consistent with the needs of ITER steady state scenario. Unfortunately, experiments at reactor grade high plasma densities with kinetic profiles approaching those required for ITER, have shown problems in penetration of the LH power into the core plasma. These plasmas represent a basic reference for designing possible methods useful for assessing the LHCD concept in ITER. On the basis of the phenomenology observed during LHCD experiments carried out in different machines, and model of the spectral broadening effect due to parametric instability, an interpretation and possible solution of the related important problem is presented.

Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Amicucci, L. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

86

Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Calculation of emission from hydrogenic ions in super liquid density plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous calculations of line emission were extended to higher density, lower temperature plasmas, typical of those expected in early ablative compression experiments. Emission from Ne-seeded fuel was analyzed in order to diagnose the density and temperature of the compressed core. The Stark/Doppler broadened emission profile is calculated for the H-like Ne resonance line. The observable lineshape is then obtained by time-averaging over expected density and temperature profiles and by including the effects of radiative transfer.

Bailey, D.S.; Valeo, E.J.

1976-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

On the breaking of a plasma wave in a thermal plasma. I. The structure of the density singularity  

SciTech Connect

The structure of the singularity that is formed in a relativistically large amplitude plasma wave close to the wave breaking limit is found by using a simple waterbag electron distribution function. The electron density distribution in the breaking wave has a typical 'peakon' form. The maximum value of the electric field in a thermal breaking plasma is obtained and compared to the cold plasma limit. The results of computer simulations for different initial electron distribution functions are in agreement with the theoretical conclusions. The after-wavebreak regime is then examined, and a semi-analytical model of the density evolution is constructed. Finally the results of two dimensional particle in cell simulations for different initial electron distribution functions are compared, and the role of thermal effects in enhancing particle injection is noted.

Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Nakamura, Tatsufumi [QuBS, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1-8-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Bulanov, Stepan S. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Califano, Francesco; Pegoraro, Francesco [Physics Department, University of Pisa, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

At Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, buying small is a big win |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

At Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, buying small is a big win At Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, buying small is a big win By Gale Scott May 23, 2011 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One When scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) needed metal flanges for a specialized piece of equipment, Principal Buyer Arlene White could have ordered them from a range of major manufacturers. Instead, the $150,000 order went to Zenex Precision Products, a small, family-owned machine shop in Paterson, N.J. The company's price was competitive and the quality of the product was excellent. For White, equally important was the fact that the company has only a dozen or so employees and is located in an economically depressed community. "We've bypassed major large companies to buy from them," White said.

92

Observation of Ion Acceleration and Heating during Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory PPPL- 4835 PPPL- 4835 Observation of Ion Acceleration and Heating during Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma December, 2012 Jongsoo Yoo, Masaaki Yamada, HantaoJi and Clayton E. Myers Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Report Disclaimers Full Legal Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any

93

Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel  

SciTech Connect

Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic simulations of density evolution in Tore Supra sawtoothing plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The plasma density evolution in sawtooth regime on the Tore Supra tokamak is analyzed. The density is measured using fast-sweeping X-mode reflectometry which allows tomographic reconstructions. There is evidence that density is governed by the perpendicular electric flows, while temperature evolution is dominated by parallel diffusion. Postcursor oscillations sometimes lead to the formation of a density plateau, which is explained in terms of convection cells associated with the kink mode. A crescent-shaped density structure located inside q = 1 is often visible just after the crash and indicates that some part of the density withstands the crash. 3D full MHD nonlinear simulations with the code XTOR-2F recover this structure and show that it arises from the perpendicular flows emerging from the reconnection layer. The proportion of density reinjected inside the q = 1 surface is determined, and the implications in terms of helium ash transport are discussed.

Nicolas, T.; Sabot, R.; Garbet, X.; Decker, J.; Merle, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Luetjens, H.; Luciani, J.-F. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Guimaraes-Filho, Z. [Aix-Marseille University, IIFS-PIIM, UMR 7345, F-13397 Marseille (France); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Plasma density measurements and the behavior of transport coefficients during adiabatic compression in the Tuman-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Data on the electon density obtained during experiments on the compression of toroidal plasmas is analysed, and the transport coefficients are evaluated and discussed. (AIP)

Ipatov, V.A.; Kalmykov, S.G.; Lipin, B.M.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Efficiency of caviton formation as a function of plasma density gradient  

SciTech Connect

The effect of a zeroth-order density gradient on the development of cavitons has been investigated experimentally and numerically. The cavitons were produced via excitation of electron plasma waves (EPW) with a modest ({ital E}{sup 2}/4{pi}{ital nT}{sub {ital e}}{much lt}1) resonant radio-frequency pump. The location of the resonance, on an inverse-parabolic density profile, was varied, with all other parameters being held constant. The depth of the caviton, and the strength of its associated trapped electric fields, are found to depend strongly on the density gradient scale length at the critical layer, with a maximum occurring when this length is infinite, at the flat top of the density profile. The results are accounted for by the dependence on the density gradient of the EPW convection rate and wave-breaking time. The study helps illuminate recent large-scale ionospheric density modification experiments.

Bauer, B.S.; Wong, A.Y.; Scurry, L.; Decyk, V.K. (Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

TIME-DEPENDENT DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF SOLAR FLARE PLASMAS USING SDO/EVE  

SciTech Connect

Temporally resolved electron density measurements of solar flare plasmas are presented using data from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The EVE spectral range contains emission lines formed between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 7} K, including transitions from highly ionized iron ({approx}>10 MK). Using three density-sensitive Fe XXI ratios, peak electron densities of 10{sup 11.2}-10{sup 12.1} cm{sup -3} were found during four X-class flares. While previous measurements of densities at such high temperatures were made at only one point during a flaring event, EVE now allows the temporal evolution of these high-temperature densities to be determined at 10 s cadence. A comparison with GOES data revealed that the peak of the density time profiles for each line ratio correlated well with that of the emission measure time profile for each of the events studied.

Milligan, Ryan O.; Kennedy, Michael B.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) seismic hazard analysis  

SciTech Connect

New design and evaluation guidelines for department of energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazard, are being finalized. Although still in draft form at this time, the document describing those guidelines should be considered to be an update of previously available guidelines. The recommendations in the guidelines document mentioned above, and simply referred to as the guidelines'' thereafter, are based on the best information at the time of its development. In particular, the seismic hazard model for the Princeton site was based on a study performed in 1981 for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), which relied heavily on the results of the NRC's Systematic Evaluation Program and was based on a methodology and data sets developed in 1977 and 1978. Considerable advances have been made in the last ten years in the domain of seismic hazard modeling. Thus, it is recommended to update the estimate of the seismic hazard at the DOE sites whenever possible. The major differences between previous estimates and the ones proposed in this study for the PPPL are in the modeling of the strong ground motion at the site, and the treatment of the total uncertainty in the estimates to include knowledge uncertainty, random uncertainty, and expert opinion diversity as well. 28 refs.

Savy, J.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effect of electron density profile on power absorption of high frequency electromagnetic waves in plasma  

SciTech Connect

Considering different typical electron density profiles, a multi slab approximation model is built up to study the power absorption of broadband (0.75-30 GHz) electromagnetic waves in a partially ionized nonuniform magnetized plasma layer. Based on the model, the power absorption spectra for six cases are numerically calculated and analyzed. It is shown that the absorption strongly depends on the electron density fluctuant profile, the background electron number density, and the collision frequency. A potential optimum profile is also analyzed and studied with some particular parameters.

Xi Yanbin; Liu Yue [MOE Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Excitation of surface plasma waves by a density-modulated electron beam in a magnetized plasma cylinder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A density-modulated electron beam propagating through a plasma cylinder excites surface plasma waves (SPWs) via Cerenkov and fast cyclotron interaction. A nonlocal theory of this process has been developed. Numerical calculations of the growth rate and unstable mode frequencies have been carried out for the typical parameters of the SPWs. The growth rate {gamma} (in rad/s) of the unstable wave instability increases with the modulation index {Delta} and has the largest value for {Delta}{approx}1 in addition to when the frequency and wave number of the modulation are comparable to that of the unstable wave. For {Delta}=0, {gamma} turns out to be {approx}6.06x10{sup 9} rad/s for Cerenkov interaction and {approx}5.47x10{sup 9} rad/s for fast cyclotron interaction. The growth rate of the instability increases with the beam density and scales as one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in fast cyclotron interaction. The real part of the frequency of the unstable wave increases as almost the square root of the beam voltage. The results of the theory are applied to explain some of the experimental observations.

Gupta, Ruby [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi, Alipur, Delhi 110036 (India); Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, PSP Area Plot No.-1, Sector-22, Rohini, Delhi 110086 (India); Prakash, Ved [India Meteorological Department, Ministry of Earth Science, Lodi Road, New Delhi 110003 (India)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Collisionless absorption of light waves incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisionless absorption of laser light incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients is studied analytically and numerically. For the normal incidence case, it is shown that both sheath inverse bremsstrahlung and the anomalous skin effect are limiting cases of the same collisionless absorption mechanism. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, the effects of finite sheath-transit time and finite density gradient are investigated. The analyses are extended to oblique incident cases. For p-polarized obliquely incident light, the results are significantly different from those for the normal incidence case. Most noticeable is the absorption enhancement for the p-polarized light due to the interaction of the electrons with the normal (parallel to the density gradient) component of the laser electric field in the sheath region.

Yang, T.Y.B.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Shock waves in a Z-pinch and the formation of high energy density plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Z-pinch liner, imploding onto a target plasma, evolves in a step-wise manner, producing a stable, magneto-inertial, high-energy-density plasma compression. The typical configuration is a cylindrical, high-atomic-number liner imploding onto a low-atomic-number target. The parameters for a terawatt-class machine (e.g., Zebra at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada Terawatt Facility) have been simulated. The 2-1/2 D MHD code, MACH2, was used to study this configuration. The requirements are for an initial radius of a few mm for stable implosion; the material densities properly distributed, so that the target is effectively heated initially by shock heating and finally by adiabatic compression; and the liner's thickness adjusted to promote radial current transport and subsequent current amplification in the target. Since the shock velocity is smaller in the liner, than in the target, a stable-shock forms at the interface, allowing the central load to accelerate magnetically and inertially, producing a magneto-inertial implosion and high-energy density plasma. Comparing the implosion dynamics of a low-Z target with those of a high-Z target demonstrates the role of shock waves in terms of compression and heating. In the case of a high-Z target, the shock wave does not play a significant heating role. The shock waves carry current and transport the magnetic field, producing a high density on-axis, at relatively low temperature. Whereas, in the case of a low-Z target, the fast moving shock wave preheats the target during the initial implosion phase, and the later adiabatic compression further heats the target to very high energy density. As a result, the compression ratio required for heating the low-Z plasma to very high energy densities is greatly reduced.

Rahman, H. U. [Magneto-Inertial Fusion Technologies Inc. (MIFTI), Irvine, California 92612 (United States) and Department of Physics, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Irvine, Irvine California 92697 (United States); Ney, P. [Mount San Jacinto College, Menifee, California 92584 (United States); Presura, R. [University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, Nevada 89557-0208 (United States); Ellahi, Rahmat [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, FBAS, IIU, Islamabad (Pakistan) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Shukla, P. K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

Marquez, Ariel [CNEA and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche (Argentina); Gonzalez, Jose [INVAP-CONICET and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche, Argentina. (Argentina); Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [CCHEN, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Atomic hydrogen density measurements in an ion source plasma using a vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectrometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system to determine the density and temperature of ground state hydrogen atoms in a plasma by vacuum ultraviolet laser absorption spectroscopy is described. The continuous tunability of the spectrometer allows for analysis at any of the Lyman transitions. The narrow bandwidth of the laser system allows for the accurate determination of the absorption lineshape and hence the translational temperature. The utility of the system is exemplified by data obtained on an ion-source plasma. The measurements demonstrate the quality of the data as well as illustrating the behavior of this ion source under varying discharge conditions. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Stutzin, G.C.; Young, A.T.; Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B.; Worth, G.T.; Stevens, R.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

ANTHEM simulation of the early time magnetic field penetration of the plasma surrounding a high density Z-pinch  

SciTech Connect

The early time penetration of magnetic field into the low density coronal plasma of a Z-pinch fiber is studied with the implicit plasma simulation code ANTHEM. Calculations show the emission of electrons from the cathode, pinching of the electron flow, magnetic insulation of the electrons near the anode, and low density ion blow off. PIC-particle ion calculations show a late time clumping of the ion density not seen with a fluid ion treatment. 4 refs., 4 figs.

Mason, R.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The National Compact Stellarator Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed National Compact Stellarator Experiment Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, New Jersey AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1437, evaluating the environmental effects of the proposed fabrication, assembly and operation of a National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) within the existing C- Stellarator (CS) Building at C-Site of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, New Jersey. The purpose of the NCSX is to provide an experimental device to investigate the attractiveness of a compact stellarator as the basis for a fusion power reactor. Fusion energy has the potential to help compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels, the

108

Behavior of a plasma in a high-density gas-embedded Z-pinch configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theoretical analysis of a high density Z-pinch (HDZP) begins with an examination of the steady state energy balance between ohmic heating and bremsstrahlung radiation losses for a plasma column in pressure equilibrium. The model is then expanded to include the time-varying internal energy and results in a quasi-equilibrium prescription for the load current through a constant radius plasma channel. This set of current waveforms is useful in the design of experimental systems. The behavior of a plasma for physically realizable conditions is first examined by allowing adiabatic changes in the column radius. A more complete model is then developed by incorporating inertial effects into the momentum equation, and the resultant global MHD computational model is compared with more sophisticated, and costly, one- and two-dimensional computer simulations. These comparisons demonstrate the advantages of the global MHD description over previously developed zero-dimensional models.

Shlachter, J.S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the 1999 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1999. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--an alternative energy source. 1999 marked the first year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. The 1999 performance of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was rated ''outstanding'' by the U.S. Department of Energy in the Laboratory Appraisal report issued early in 2000. The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements, its successful management practices, and included high marks in a host of other areas including environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of non-radiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the presence of low levels of volatile organic compounds in an area adjacent to PPPL. Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the TFTR stack; the data are presented in this report.

Virginia Finley

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1996  

SciTech Connect

The results of the 1996 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the US Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1996, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) continued to conduct fusion experiments. Having set a world record on November 2, 1994, by achieving approximately 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power during the deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, researchers turned their attention to studying plasma science experiments, which included ''enhanced reverse shear techniques.'' Since November 1993, more than 700 tritium-fueled experiments were conducted, which generated more than 4 x 10(superscript 20) neutrons and 1.4 gigajoules of fusion energy. In 1996, the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was rated ''excellent'' by the US Department of Energy in the Laboratory Appraisal report issued in early 1997. The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents) and petroleum hydrocarbons (past leaks of releases of diesel fuel from underground storage tanks). Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the TFTR stack; the data are presented in this report. During 1996, PPPL completed the removal of contaminated soil from two locations that were identified through the monitoring program: petroleum hydrocarbons along a drainage swale and chromium adjacent to the cooling tower.

J.D. Levine; V.L. Finley

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A new method for determining the plasma electron density using three-color interferometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for determining the plasma electron density using the fractional fringes on three-color interferometer is proposed. Integrated phase shift on each interferometer is derived without using the temporal history of the fractional fringes. The dependence on the fringe resolution and the electrical noise are simulated on the wavelengths of CO{sub 2} laser. Short-time integrations of the fractional fringes enhance the reliability of this method.

Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Three-dimensional simulations of anomalous absorption of laser radiation by plasma with supercritical density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional (3D) model of the interaction of laser radiation with plasma in the framework of Maxwell-Vlasov equations has been used to calculate the anomalous optical absorption in plasma of supercritical density. The results of calculations confirmed the development of anomalous absorption that was previously revealed by 2D models, which were insufficient for comparison to the experiment. Calculations were performed for a system containing about 10{sup 6} macroparticles that allowed the absorption coefficient and other characteristics of anomalous absorption in plasma with an inhomogeneous surface to be determined as functions of various parameters of the incident radiation and plasma target. Results are analyzed and estimations are obtained for the contributions of ionization processes and pair collisions of electrons, which show that these factors were quite reasonably ignored in the model. All quantitative results are obtained for the third harmonic of neodymium laser ({lambda} = 0.351 {mu}m) at a tenfold excess of the substance density over a critical value for this radiation.

Ginzburg, S. L.; Dyachenko, V. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute for Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Imshennik, V. S. [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Paleychik, V. V.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, electron temperature Almost-Equal-To 1.4 eV, velocity Almost-Equal-To 30 km/s, M Almost-Equal-To 14, ionization fraction Almost-Equal-To 0.96, diameter Almost-Equal-To 5 cm, and length Almost-Equal-To 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment, which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is at the very low end of the 8-160 times drop predicted by ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Awe, T. J.; Davis, J. S.; Dunn, J. P. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Brockington, S. J. E.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Cassibry, J. T. [Propulsion Research Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Gilmore, M. A.; Lynn, A. G. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Phase diagram for magnetic reconnection in heliophysical, astrophysical, and laboratory plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress in understanding the physics of magnetic reconnection is conveniently summarized in terms of a phase diagram which organizes the essential dynamics for a wide variety of applications in heliophysics, laboratory, and astrophysics. The two key dimensionless parameters are the Lundquist number and the macrosopic system size in units of the ion sound gyroradius. In addition to the conventional single X-line collisional and collisionless phases, multiple X-line reconnection phases arise due to the presence of the plasmoid instability either in collisional and collisionless current sheets. In particular, there exists a unique phase termed ''multiple X-line hybrid phase'' where a hierarchy of collisional islands or plasmoids is terminated by a collisionless current sheet, resulting in a rapid coupling between the macroscopic and kinetic scales and a mixture of collisional and collisionless dynamics. The new phases involving multiple X-lines and collisionless physics may be important for the emerging applications of magnetic reconnection to accelerate charged particles beyond their thermal speeds. A large number of heliophysical and astrophysical plasmas are surveyed and grouped in the phase diagram: Earth's magnetosphere, solar plasmas (chromosphere, corona, wind, and tachocline), galactic plasmas (molecular clouds, interstellar media, accretion disks and their coronae, Crab nebula, Sgr A*, gamma ray bursts, and magnetars), and extragalactic plasmas (active galactic nuclei disks and their coronae, galaxy clusters, radio lobes, and extragalactic jets). Significance of laboratory experiments, including a next generation reconnection experiment, is also discussed.

Ji Hantao [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Daughton, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Development of critical surface diagnostic based on the ion acoustic decay instability in laser produced high density plasma  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a large angle, UV collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic for high density, hot plasma relevant to laser fusion. The CTS measured the basic parameters of the plasma waves (frequency, wave number), or the spectral density function for selected wave vectors of plasma waves, which were excited by the IADI (ion acoustic parametric decay instability). It is a good diagnostic tool for a local electron temperature measurement. The electron temperature was estimated by measuring either ion acoustic wave or electron plasma wave in the laser intensity window of 1plasma waves in laser produced high density plasma.

Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Gold charge state distributions in highly ionized, low-density beam plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of Au charge state distributions (CSDs) from low density, nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas created in the Livermore electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and EBIT-II). X-ray emission from Ni-like to Kr-like Au ions has been recorded from monoenergetic electron beam plasmas having E{sub beam}=2.66, 2.92, 3.53, and 4.54 keV, and the CSDs of the beam plasmas have been inferred by fitting the collisionally excited line transitions and radiative recombination emission features with synthetic spectra. We have modeled the beam plasmas using a collisional-radiative code with various treatments of the atomic structure for the complex M- and N-shell ions and find that only models with extensive doubly excited states can properly account for the dielectronic recombination (DR) channels that control the CSDs. This finding would be unremarkable for plasmas with thermal electron distributions, where many such states are sampled, and the importance of DR is well established. But in an EBIT source, the beam is resonant with only a subset of such states having spectator electrons in orbitals with high principal quantum number n (8{<=}n{<=}20). The inclusion of such states in the model was also necessary to obtain agreement with observed stabilizing transitions in the x-ray spectra.

May, M. J.; Scofield, J.; Schneider, M.; Wong, K.; Beiersdorfer, P. [PO Box 808 L260, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94551 (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, ICF Target Design, Albuquerque New Mexico, 87185-1186 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I.R. Jones, Flinders for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji

119

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I.R. Jones, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr

120

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997  

SciTech Connect

The results of the 1997 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1997, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) completed fifteen years of fusion experiments begun in 1982. Over the course of three and half years of deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, PPPL set a world record of 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power, more than 700 tritium shots pulsed into the reactor vessel generating more than 5.6 x 1020 neutron and 1.6 gigajoules of fusion energy and researchers studied plasma science experimental data, which included "enhanced reverse shear techniques." As TFTR was completing its historic operations, PPPL participated with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Columbia University, and the University of Washington (Seattle) in a collaboration effort to design the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This next device, NSTX, is located in the former TFTR Hot Cell on D site, and it is designed to be a smaller and more economical torus fusion reactor. Construction of this device began in late 1997, and first plasma in scheduled for early 1999. For 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy in its Laboratory Appraisal report rated the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as "excellent." The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored the presence of non-radiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the presence of low levels of volatile organic compounds in an adjacent area to PPPL. Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the TFTR stack; the data are presented in this report.

Finley, V.L. and Levine, J.D.

1999-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the 1997 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1997, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) completed fifteen years of fusion experiments begun in 1982. Over the course of three and half years of deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, PPPL set a world record of 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power, more than 700 tritium shots pulsed into the reactor vessel generating more than 5.6 x 1020 neutron and 1.6 gigajoules of fusion energy and researchers studied plasma science experimental data, which included "enhanced reverse shear techniques." As TFTR was completing its historic operations, PPPL participated with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Columbia University, and the University of Washington (Seattle) in a collaboration effort to design the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This next device, NSTX, is located in the former TFTR Hot Cell on D site, and it is designed to be a smaller and more economical torus fusion reactor. Construction of this device began in late 1997, and first plasma in scheduled for early 1999. For 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy in its Laboratory Appraisal report rated the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as "excellent." The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored the presence of non-radiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the presence of low levels of volatile organic compounds in an adjacent area to PPPL. Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the TFTR stack; the data are presented in this report.

Finley, V.L. and Levine, J.D.

1999-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

Investigation of non-stationary self-focusing of intense laser pulse in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile  

SciTech Connect

The authors have investigated the non-stationary self-focusing of Gaussian laser pulse in cold quantum plasma. In case of high dense plasma, the nonlinearity in the dielectric constant is mainly due to relativistic high intense interactions and quantum effects. In this paper, we have introduced a ramp density profile for plasma and presented graphically the behavior of spot size oscillations of pulse at rear and front portions of the pulse. It is observed that the ramp density profile and quantum effects play a vital role in stronger and better focusing at the rear of the pulse than at the front in cold quantum plasmas.

Habibi, M. [Department of Physics, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Department of Physics, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Analysis of pulsed high-density HBr and Cl{sub 2} plasmas: Impact of the pulsing parameters on the radical densities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic of charged particles in pulsed plasma is relatively well known since the 1990s. In contrast, works reporting on the impact of the plasma modulation frequency and duty cycle on the radicals' densities are scarce. In this work, we analyze the impact of these modulation parameters on the radicals' composition in Cl{sub 2} and HBr plasmas. The radicals' densities are measured by broad-band UV and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy and modulated-beam mass spectrometry. We show that pulsing the rf power allows controlling the plasma chemistry and gives access to the plasma conditions that cannot be reached in continuous wave plasmas. In particular, we show that above 500 Hz, the pulsing frequency has no influence on the plasma chemistry, whereas in contrast the duty cycle is an excellent knob to control the fragmentation of the parent gas, thus the chemical reactivity of the discharge. At low duty cycle, a reduced gas fragmentation combined with a large ion flux leads to new etching conditions, compared to cw plasmas and the expected consequences on pulsed-etching processes are discussed.

Bodart, P.; Brihoum, M.; Cunge, G.; Joubert, O.; Sadeghi, N. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS-LTM, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38054 (France)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Real-time control of electron density in a capacitively coupled plasma  

SciTech Connect

Reactive ion etching (RIE) is sensitive to changes in chamber conditions, such as wall seasoning, which have a deleterious effect on process reproducibility. The application of real time, closed loop control to RIE may reduce this sensitivity and facilitate production with tighter tolerances. The real-time, closed loop control of plasma density with RF power in a capacitively coupled argon plasma using a hairpin resonance probe as a sensor is described. Elementary control analysis shows that an integral controller provides stable and effective set point tracking and disturbance attenuation. The trade off between performance and robustness may be quantified in terms of one parameter, namely the position of the closed loop pole. Experimental results are presented, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis.

Keville, Bernard; Gaman, Cezar; Turner, Miles M. [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Research and Engineering Building, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland) and School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Zhang Yang; Daniels, Stephen [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Research and Engineering Building, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland) and School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Holohan, Anthony M. [School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY91. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

Finley, V.L.; Stencel, J.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the 1998 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the US Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1998. One significant initiative is the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) program that embraces environment, safety, and health principles as one.

V. Finley

2000-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

H sup 0 temperature and density measurements in a Penning surface-plasma H sup minus ion source. I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using vacuum ultraviolet laser-absorption spectroscopy, the H{sup 0} density and temperature are measured as a function of discharge current and H{sub 2}-gas flow in both the plasma column and the drift region between the plasma column and the emitter in the 4X source. For typical source operating parameters, the atom temperature is 1.5 eV in the plasma column and 0.6 eV in the drift region; the atom density 7{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} in the plasma column and 4{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} in the drift region. Separate measurements give 2% for the ratio of H{sub 2} molecules in the first vibrational level to the total H{sub 2} density.

Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Pitcher, E.J.; Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Worth, G.T. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (US)); Stutzin, G.C.; Young, A.T.; Schlachter, A.S.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Relations between light emission and electron density and temperature fluctuations in a helium plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relations between three atomic lines, He I 667.8 nm (3{sup 1}D{yields} 2{sup 1}P), 706.5 nm (3{sup 3}S{yields} 2{sup 3}P), and 728.1 nm (3{sup 1}S{yields} 2{sup 1}P), and the underlying fluctuations in a helium plasma are investigated for the quantitative interpretation of optical observations in plasma fluctuation measurements. Frequency dependent fluctuation amplitude ratios and phase delays between the line emission fluctuation and the electron density and temperature fluctuations are calculated based on a quasi-static collisional-radiative model and a linear approximation technique. For frequencies up to the upper limit of practical interest (<1 MHz), the fluctuation amplitude ratios and phase delays are similar to those directly evaluated by the quasi-static model. It is found that the difference between the results from the linear approximation technique and from the quasi-static model is due to the absence of metastable fluctuations. Contributions of the 2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S metastable fluctuations to the three helium line emission fluctuations are analyzed. The linearity between fluctuations in the line emission and in the electron density and temperature is valid for fluctuation levels higher than 10%.

Ma Shuiliang; Howard, John; Thapar, Nandika [Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

DEGAS 2 Neutral Transport Modeling of High Density, Low Temperature Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutral transport in the high density, low temperature plasma regime is examined using the degas 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. Degas 2 is shown to agree with an analytic fluid neutral model valid in this regime as long as the grid cell spacing is less than twice the neutral mean-free path. Using new atomic physics data provided by the collisional radiative code cramd, degas 2 is applied to a detached Alcator C-Mod discharge. A model plasma with electron temperature # 1 eV along detached flux tubes, between the target and the ionization front, is used to demonstrate that recombination is essential to matching the experimental data. With the cramd data, # 20% of the total recombination is due to molecular activated recombination. # Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Plasma Fusion Center, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA + Also at I. V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098, Russia # Presently at McKinsey & Company, Inc., London...

D. P. Stotler; A. Yu. Pigarov; C. F. F. Karney; S. I. Krasheninnikov; B. LaBombard; B. Lipschultz; G. M. McCracken; A. Niemczewski; J. A. Snipes; J. L. Terry; R. A. Vesey

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DENSITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 2: Principal mineral phases found in the granite rock. Mineral phase. ... Table 4. Average density of 12 granite rocks by Archimedes and CT. ...

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

132

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the 2000 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2000. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality -- an alternative energy source. The year 2000 marked the second year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion power plants. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. In 2000, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on-site and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations with limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are precipitation, surface, ground, a nd waste water monitoring. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the presence of low levels of volatile organic compounds in an area adjacent to PPPL. Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report.

Virginia L. Finley

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

133

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY93. The report is prepared to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1993. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1993, PPPL had both of its two large tokamak devices in operation; the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M). PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991. TFTR began the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in December 1993 and set new records by producing over six million watts of energy. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In 1993, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFRR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was prepared for submittal to the regulatory agencies.

Finley, V.L.; Wiezcorek, M.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Electronically swept millimetre-wave interferometer for spatially resolved measurement of plasma electron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electron density John Howard and David Oliver Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical, located in the Plasma Research Laboratory at the Australian National University, is a flexible, medium

Howard, John

135

Origin of electrical signals for plasma etching end point detection: Comparison of end point signals and electron density  

SciTech Connect

Electrical signals are used for end point detection in plasma etching, but the origin of the electrical changes observed at end point is not well understood. As an etch breaks through one layer and exposes an underlayer, the fluxes and densities of etch products and reactants in the gas phase will change. The resulting perturbation in gas composition may alter the plasma electron density, which in turn may affect the electrical signals. Alternatively, changes in substrate electrical properties or surface properties, such as work function or emitted electron yield, may be involved. To investigate these effects, experiments were performed in a radio-frequency (rf)-biased, inductively coupled reactor, during CF{sub 4}/Ar plasma etching of silicon dioxide films on silicon substrates. A complete set of electrical parameters, for the bias as well as the inductive source, was measured and compared. The most useful end point signal was found to be the fundamental rf bias impedance, which decreases when the oxide is removed. A simultaneous increase in plasma electron density was measured by a wave cutoff probe. Analytical sheath models indicate that the measured change in electron density accounts for nearly all of the impedance decrease. The change in electron density can in turn be explained by the effects of etch products or reactants on gas composition. In contrast, electrons emitted from the wafer surface play at most a minor role in the changes in electron density and impedance observed at end point.

Sobolewski, Mark A.; Lahr, David L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8364 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I.R. Jones, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr Physics Division, Insitute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbekistan Institute for Plasma Research, University

137

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I.R. Jones, Flinders for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Division, Insitute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbekistan Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland

138

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Institute, South Korea Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, USA Librarian, Fusion Energy

139

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pletzer, Phys. Plasmas 6 (1999) 4693. #12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro

140

FY93 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the annual report from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for the period October 1, 1992 to September 30, 1993. The report describes work done on TFTR during the year, as well as preparatory to beginning of D-T operations. Design work is ongoing on the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) which is to test very long pulse operations of tokamak type devices. PBX has come back on line with additional ion-Bernstein power and lower-hybrid current drive. The theoretical program is also described, as well as other small scale programs, and the growing effort in collaboration on international design projects on ITER and future collaborations at a larger scale.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measurements of electron density and temperature in the H-1 heliac plasma by helium line intensity ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron density and temperature distributions in the H-1 heliac plasma are measured using the helium line intensity ratio technique based on a collisional-radiative model. An inversion approach with minimum Fisher regularization is developed to reconstruct the ratios of the local emission radiances from detected line-integrated intensities. The electron density and temperature inferred from the He I 667.8/728.1 and He I 728.1/706.5 nm line ratios are in good agreement with those from other diagnostic techniques in the inner region of the plasma. The electron density and temperature values appear to be a little high in the outer region of the plasma. Some possible causes of the discrepancy in the outer region are discussed.

Ma Shuiliang; Howard, John; Blackwell, Boyd D.; Thapar, Nandika [Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Recently, novel experiments on magnetic reconnection have been conducted in laser-produced plasmas in a high-energy-density regime. Individual plasma bubbles self-generate toroidal, mega-gauss-scale magnetic fields through the Biermann battery effect. When multiple bubbles are created at small separation, they expand into one another, driving reconnection of this field. Reconnection in the experiments was reported to be much faster than allowed by both Sweet-Parker, and even Hall-MHD theories, when normalized to the nominal magnetic fields self-generated by single bubbles. Through particle-in-cell simulations (both with and without a binary collision operator), we model the bubble interaction at parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments. This paper discusses in detail the reconnection regime of the laser-driven experiments and reports the qualitative features of simulations. We find substantial flux-pileup effects, which boost the relevant magnetic field for reconnection in the current sheet. When this is accounted for, the normalized reconnection rates are much more in line with standard two-fluid theory of reconnection. At the largest system sizes, we additionally find that the current sheet is prone to breakup into plasmoids.

Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K. [Center for Integrated Computation and Analysis of Reconnection and Turbulence, and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO{sub 2} interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

Gupta, Deepak K.; Deng, B. H.; Knapp, K.; Sun, X.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2001 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2001. PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The vision of the Laboratory is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--a clean, alternative energy source. The Year 2001 marked the third year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. In 2001, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on- and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations; also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are water monitoring--precipitation, ground-, surface-, and waste-waters. PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report. Groundwater monitoring continue d under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents). Monitoring revealed the low levels of volatile organic compounds in an area adjacent to PPPL. In 2001, PPPL was in compliance with its permit limits for surface and sanitary discharges and had no reportable releases. Additionally, as part of DOE's program for the purchase of recycled content and other environmentally preferred products, PPPL has ranked in the excellent category of 80 to 90% of the goal.

Virginia L. Finley

2004-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Neutral beam shine-through power and its dependence on the line density of the DIII-D plasma  

SciTech Connect

Neutral beams are the primary source of auxiliary plasma heating in the DIII-D Tokamak. Part of the beam power passes through the plasma and is deposited on the wall of the tokamak (shine-through power) and does not contribute to plasma heating. It is therefore crucial to know the shine-through power in order to give an accurate account of the total power deposited in the plasma. The authors have recently remeasured the shine-through power using data taken from thermocouples embedded in the beam target tiles of the tokamak vessel. The tile temperature rise was correlated to the injected beam power. A dependence of the tile temperature rise don the initial tile temperature has been empirically measured and accounted for in order to obtain a more accurate determination of the shine-through beam power. Measurements of the shine-through beam power as a function of plasma density and beam energy confirm that shine-through power decreases exponentially with plasma density, and increases linearly with beam energy.

Riggs, S.; Hong, R.; Kessler, D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Vertical Stability in a Current-carrying Stellarator Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the perturbed magnetic field, J is the equilibrium plasma current, is the plasma displacement. We have also respectively. The equilibrium flux = c +v is a sum of internally generated flux c due to current are the flux values at the plasma edge due to helical coils and plasma current respectively. The corresponding

148

A study of fast electron energy transport in relativistically intense laser-plasma interactions with large density scalelengths  

SciTech Connect

A systematic experimental and computational investigation of the effects of three well characterized density scalelengths on fast electron energy transport in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions has been performed. Experimental evidence is presented which shows that, when the density scalelength is sufficiently large, the fast electron beam entering the solid-density plasma is best described by two distinct populations: those accelerated within the coronal plasma (the fast electron pre-beam) and those accelerated near or at the critical density surface (the fast electron main-beam). The former has considerably lower divergence and higher temperature than that of the main-beam with a half-angle of {approx}20 Degree-Sign . It contains up to 30% of the total fast electron energy absorbed into the target. The number, kinetic energy, and total energy of the fast electrons in the pre-beam are increased by an increase in density scalelength. With larger density scalelengths, the fast electrons heat a smaller cross sectional area of the target, causing the thinnest targets to reach significantly higher rear surface temperatures. Modelling indicates that the enhanced fast electron pre-beam associated with the large density scalelength interaction generates a magnetic field within the target of sufficient magnitude to partially collimate the subsequent, more divergent, fast electron main-beam.

Scott, R. H. H.; Norreys, P. A. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Perez, F.; Baton, S. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7605, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Santos, J. J.; Nicolai, Ph.; Hulin, S. [Univ. Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Ridgers, C. P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davies, J. R. [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, A. R.; Tzoufras, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Rose, S. J. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Professor Sami

150

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@adonis.osti.gov #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro

151

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Professor Sami

152

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Australia Professor I, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Professor Sami

153

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reports, 211, 1 (1992). #12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro

154

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, private communication, 2002. #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, Italy Dr. G

155

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the modular coil sub-assemblies. #12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro

156

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Professor

157

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Electron Temperature and Density Measurement of Cylindrical Parallel MCS Discharge Plasma in Atmosphericpressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a cylindrical parallel microhollow cathode sustained (MCS) discharge plasma as a new large-area plasma source at atmospheric pressure. We measured the electron temperature and the density of this plasma source by using a Langmuir probe method and spectroscopy. The electron temperature at r=R/2 was measured to be 0.18 eV by using the Boltzmann plot method under the conditions that the inner radius of cylinder was R = 6.3 mm; MHCD supply voltage, 600 V at 50?s and 1 kHz; MHCD current, 10 mA for each electrode; the voltage of the third electrode, 1.5 kV; and pressure, 10 kPa. Furthermore, this temperature remained approximately constant irrespective of the pressure and the MHCD current.

M. Maeyama; Y. Akashi; K. Nagano

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Laboratory studies of waves and instabilities in dusty plasmas* R. L. Merlino,,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma research has been driven largely by discoveries of the role of dust in quite different settings

Merlino, Robert L.

159

Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Interaction between a high density-low temperature plasma and a frozen hydrogen pellet in a railgun injector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model has been developed which describes the ablation process of frozen hydrogen pellets in an electromagnetic railgun. The model incorporates the neutral gas shielding model in which the pellet surface is heated by incident electrons from the plasma arc. The heated surface then ablates, forming a neutral cloud which attenuates the incoming electrons. The energy lost in the cloud by the electrons heats the ablatant material as it flows into the plasma arc. Under steady-state conditions, a scaling law for the ablation rate was derived as a function of plasma-arc temperature and density. In addition, flow conditions and the criteria for the existence of a steady-state solution were formulated and subsequently examined under simplifying assumptions. Comparison with experimentally observed ablation rates shows good qualitative agreement.

Grapperhaus, M.J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

First results from plasma density measurements in the FTU tokamak by means of a two-frequency pulsed time-of-flight refractometer  

SciTech Connect

A pulsed time-of-flight refractometer was developed and tested to determine the mean plasma density in the T-11M tokamak by measuring the propagation time of nanosecond microwave pulses in plasma. Later, it was also proposed to use such an instrument to measure and control the mean plasma density in the ITER tokamak by probing the plasma with an extraordinary wave, the electric field of which is perpendicular to the magnetic field in plasma, in the transparency window at frequencies of 50-100 GHz. To avoid the effect of the density profile shape on the measurement results in the nonlinear mode of refractometer operation (near the cutoff), a system operating at two different probing frequencies was developed and tested. Such a system provides two values of the time delay, which can be used to estimate the peaking factor of the density distribution {alpha} and correctly determine the linear density Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Nl Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket , regardless of the density profile (assuming a smooth density profile of the form of N({rho}) = N(0)(1 - {rho}{sup 2}){sup {alpha}}, where N(0) is the central plasma density and {rho} = r/a is the normalized plasma radius). The first experiments on density measurements in the FTU tokamak performed with this refractometer are described, and results from these experiments are presented. The formation of a thin dense plasma layer in the zone of a strong magnetic field (the so-called MARFE layer) at a relatively low (for FTU) plasma density of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} was detected. The thickness of this layer, determined from the refractometry data, agrees well with the data obtained using a digital camera.

Petrov, V. G.; Malyshev, A. Yu.; Markov, V. K.; Petrov, A. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Avino, F.; Angelis, R. de; Tudisco, O. [ENEA-UT Fusione Centro Ricerche Frascati (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Estimation of electron temperature and density of the decay plasma in a laser-assisted discharge plasma extreme ultraviolet source by using a modified Stark broadening method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the plasma expansion behaviors and the electrical recovery process after the maximum implosion in our tin fueled laser-assisted discharge plasma (LDP) 13.5 nm EUV source, we developed and evaluated a cost-efficient spectroscopic method to determine the electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} simultaneously, by using Stark broadenings of two Sn II isolated lines (5s{sup 2}4f{sup 2}F{sup o}{sub 5/2} - 5s{sup 2}5d{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} 558.9 nm and 5s{sup 2}6d{sup 2}D{sub 5/2} - 5s{sup 2}6p{sup 2}P{sup o}{sub 3/2} 556.2 nm) spontaneously emitted from the plasma. The spatial-resolved evolutions of T{sub e} and n{sub e} of the expansion plasma over 50 to 900 ns after the maximum implosion were obtained using this modified Stark broadening method. According to the different n{sub e} decay characteristics along the Z-pinch axis, the expansion velocity of the electrons was estimated as {approx}1.2 x 10{sup 4} ms{sup -1} from the plasma shell between the electrodes towards the cathode and the anode. The decay time constant of n{sub e} was measured as 183 {+-} 24 ns. Based on the theories of plasma adiabatic expansion and electron-impact ionization, the minimum time-span that electrical recovery between the electrodes needs in order to guarantee the next succeeding regular EUV-emitting discharge was estimated to be 70.5 {mu}s. Therefore, the maximum repetition rate of our LDP EUV source is {approx}14 kHz, which enables the output to reach 125 W/(2{pi}sr).

Zhu Qiushi; Muto, Takahiro; Yamada, Junzaburo; Kishi, Nozomu; Watanabe, Masato; Okino, Akitoshi; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Hotta, Eiki [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

SAND2011-6616A Page 1 Session 2: High Energy Density, Plasmas...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on Sandia's Z Machine: Obtaining Data with High Precision at HED Conditions Thomas R. Mattsson and Seth Root Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM USA Summary: The Z...

164

Study of density fluctuations and particle transport at the edge of I-mode plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wide range of plasma parameters available on Alcator C-Mod has led to the accessibility of many regimes of operation. Since its commissioning, C-Mod has accessed the Linear ohmic confinement, Saturated ohmic confinement, ...

Dominguez, Arturo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the Saturn accelerator to study current flow initiation. In these first experiments

M. S. Derzon; T. J. Nash; G. O. Allshouse; A. J. Antolak; M. Hurst; J. S. McGurn; D. J. Muron; J. F. Seaman; J. MacFarlane; T. Demiris; L. Hrubesh; H. Lewis; D. Ryutov; T. Barber; T. Gilliland; D. Jobe; S. Lazier

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Alfven Wave Collisions, The Fundamental Building Block of Plasma Turbulence IV: Laboratory Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence is a phenomenon found throughout space and astrophysical plasmas. It plays an important role in solar coronal heating, acceleration of the solar wind, and heating of the interstellar medium. Turbulence in these regimes is dominated by Alfven waves. Most turbulence theories have been established using ideal plasma models, such as incompressible MHD. However, there has been no experimental evidence to support the use of such models for weakly to moderately collisional plasmas which are relevant to various space and astrophysical plasma environments. We present the first experiment to measure the nonlinear interaction between two counterpropagating Alfven waves, which is the building block for astrophysical turbulence theories. We present here four distinct tests that demonstrate conclusively that we have indeed measured the daughter Alfven wave generated nonlinearly by a collision between counterpropagating Alfven waves.

Drake, D J; Howes, G G; Kletzing, C A; Skiff, F; Carter, T A; Auerbach, D W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Recent laser-plasma interaction experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent Livermore experiments are aimed at investigating laser-plasma interaction issues which are relevant to ablatively driven fusion processes. We report the data obtained from using longer pulses and shorter laser wavelengths.

Lee, P.H.Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters achieved in experimental devices for fiscal year 1992; tokamak fusion test reactor; princeton beta experiment-modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; tokamak physics experiment/steady-state advanced tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; plasma processing: Deposition and etching of thin films; pure electron plasma experiments; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; high-field magnet project; engineering department; environment, safety, and health and quality assurance; technology transfer; office of human resources and administration; PPPL invention disclosures for fiscal year 1992; office of resource management; graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: program in plasma science and technology; and science education program.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

5. Kodama, R. et al. Fast heating of ultrahigh-density plasma as a step towards laser fusion ignition. Nature 412, 798802 (2001).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Kodama, R. et al. Fast heating of ultrahigh-density plasma as a step towards laser fusion. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 23567­23581 (1995). 13. Hirahara, M. et al. Acceleration and heating of cold

Davis, James C.

170

Hydrogenation and surface density changes in hydrocarbon films during erosion using Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas  

SciTech Connect

We report interactions of low pressure Ar, H{sub 2}, and Ar/H{sub 2} mixture plasmas with a-C:H films. Surface evolution and erosion of a-C:H films were examined for ion energies up to 200 eV by rf biasing the substrates. Film surfaces were characterized using in situ ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Multilayer models for steady-state modified surface layers are constructed using ellipsometric data and compared with results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and transport of ions in matter (TRIM) calculations. We find that Ar plasma causes a modified layer at the surface that is depleted of H atoms. The depth and degree of this modification is strongly depending on Ar ion energies. This depletion saturates quickly during plasma exposure (<1 s) and persists during steady-state erosion. We find that the thickness and density of the H-depleted layer are in good agreement with MD and TRIM simulations. The degree of surface densification decreases when small amounts of H{sub 2} are added to Ar plasmas. When more than 5% H{sub 2} is added to the plasma, long term loss in surface density is observed, indicating rehydrogenation and saturation of H in the film. As the H{sub 2} fraction increases, the near-surface atomic H increases and the ion composition bombarding the surface changes. This causes incorporation of H deeper into the a-C:H film. For a-C:H films exposed to pure H{sub 2} plasmas, H is introduced into the near-surface region to a depth of up to {approx}8 nm from the surface. As the rf bias is increased the ion energy transitions from solely chemical sputtering to one involving physical sputtering, causing the yield of C atoms from the surface to greatly increase. The increasing yield suppresses H incorporation/saturation and decreases the magnitude of the modified surface layer.

Fox-Lyon, N.; Oehrlein, G. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Ning, N.; Graves, D. B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

meeting of the NSTX Program Advisory Committee Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lithium divertor (LLD) for particle pumping, higher-power fast-wave heating for current ramp-up studies to inform the design of a demonstration #12;fusion power plant." The ST physics issues identified to "Tame the plasma material interface" (such as NHTX), for an ST-based demonstration power plant (ST- Demo

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

172

In situ density and temperature measurements of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in ion source plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role of highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules has been postulated to be of great importance in H{sup {minus}} ion sources. However the the difficulty of making {ital in} {ital situ} measurements has led to a paucity of direct determinations of these species within the plasmas of these sources. Recently, vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure the H{sub 2} rovibrational populations up to {ital v}{double prime}=5 and {ital J}{double prime}=8 in a medium-power hydrogen plasma. This work extends those measurements to {ital v}{double prime}=8 and to {ital J}{double prime}=13. The populations of the vibrational levels still appear to be almost Boltzmann. The theoretically predicted plateau is not observed up to the detection limit. The dependence of several vibrational levels on discharge current and filling pressure is shown.

Stutzin, G.C.; Young, A.T.; Doebele, H.F.; Schlachter, A.S.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Measurement of density, temperature, and electrical conductivity of a shock-compressed nonideal nitrogen plasma in the megabar pressure range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinematic and thermodynamic parameters of shock-compressed liquid nitrogen are measured behind the front of a plane shock wave using plane wave and hemispherical shock wave generators. In these experiments, high values of compression parameters (shock-compressed hydrogen density {approx} 3.25 g/cm{sup 3} and temperature T{approx} 56000 K at a pressure of P {approx} 265 GPa) are attained. The density, pressure, temperature, and electrical conductivity of the nonideal plasma of shock-compressed liquid nitrogen are measured. A nearly isochoric behavior of the nitrogen shock adiabat is observed in the pressure range P = 100-300 GPa. The thermodynamics of shock-compressed nitrogen is an alyzed using the model of the equation of state in the quasi-chemical representation (SAHA code) as well as the semiempirical wide-range equation of state developed at the Institute of Experimental Physics. Experimental results are interpreted on the basis of calculations as the fixation of the boundary of transition of shock-compressed nitrogen from the polymer phase to the state of a strongly nonideal plasma at P {approx} 100 GPa, {approx} 3.4 g/cm{sup 3}.

Mochalov, M. A.; Zhernokletov, M. V.; Il'kaev, R. I.; Mikhailov, A. L. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences (IVTAN), Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Gryaznov, V. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation); Iosilevskiy, I. L., E-mail: ilios@orc.r [Russian Academy of Sciences (IVTAN), Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Mezhevov, A. B.; Kovalev, A. E.; Kirshanov, S. I.; Grigor'eva, Yu. A.; Novikov, M. G.; Shuikin, A. N. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-4 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561, Shizuoka (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

DESTRUCTION OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES IN A DEVICE FOR PRODUCING A HIGH DENSITY PLASMA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for burning out neutral particles in an evacuated region and within a strong magnetic field. The method comprises injecting energetic molecular ions into the region perpendicular to the magnetic field and into the path of a dissociating, energetic arc discharge, the atomic ions formed in the dissociating process being trapped by the magnetic field, and then increasing the value of the trapped atomic ion current to such a value that the neutral particles are destroyed faster than they are formed, thereby causing a dense, energetic plasma to be built up and sustained by the magnetic field. (AEC)

Simon, A.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Brookhaven National Laboratory - Long Island Regional Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and...

177

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Regional Science Bowl ...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and...

178

THERMAL ANNEALING OF ZNO FILMS USING HIGH-DENSITY PLASMA ARC LAMPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanostructured materials are rarely synthesized with appropriate phase and/or morphology. In this study, critical additional of as-synthesized nanostructured materials, such as annealing and/or activation of dopants, are addressed using infrared plasma arc lamps (PAL) over areas as large as 1,000 cm2. The broad spectral range of the PAL and the spectral variation of light absorption in nanostructured materials make the selection of processing parameters extremely difficult, posing a major technological barrier. In this study, the measurement of the surface temperature using various techniques for ZnO films on crystalline silicon wafers is discussed. An energy transport model for the simulation of rapid thermal processing using PAL is presented. The experimental and computational results show that the surface temperature cannot be measured directly and that computer simulation results are an effective tool for obtaining accurate data on processing temperatures.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Xu, Jun [ORNL; Angelini, Joseph Attilio [ORNL; Harper, David C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Imaging spectroscopy diagnosis of internal electron temperature and density distributions of plasma cloud surrounding hydrogen pellet in the Large Helical Device  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the behavior of hydrogen pellet ablation, a novel method of high-speed imaging spectroscopy has been used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for identifying the internal distribution of the electron density and temperature of the plasma cloud surrounding the pellet. This spectroscopic system consists of a five-branch fiberscope and a fast camera, with each objective lens having a different narrow-band optical filter for the hydrogen Balmer lines and the background continuum radiation. The electron density and temperature in the plasma cloud are obtained, with a spatial resolution of about 6 mm and a temporal resolution of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s, from the intensity ratio measured through these filters. To verify the imaging, the average electron density and temperature also have been measured from the total emission by using a photodiode, showing that both density and temperature increase with time during the pellet ablation. The electron density distribution ranging from 10{sup 22} to 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and the temperature distribution around 1 eV have been observed via imaging. The electron density and temperature of a 0.1 m plasma cloud are distributed along the magnetic field lines and a significant electron pressure forms in the plasma cloud for typical experimental conditions of the LHD.

Motojima, G.; Sakamoto, R.; Goto, M.; Matsuyama, A.; Yamada, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho, Toki-City, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Mishra, J. S. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 322-6, Oroshi-cho, Toki-City, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LITHIUM BEAM EDGE PLASMA CURRENT DENSITY DIAGNOSTIC ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 An edge plasma current density diagnostic employing a neutralized lithium ion beam system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The lithium beam control system is designed around a GE Fanuc 90-30 series PLC and Cimplicity{reg_sign} HMI (Human Machine Interface) software. The control system operates and supervises a collection of commercial and in-house designed high voltage power supplies for beam acceleration and focusing, filament and bias power supplies for ion creation, neutralization, vacuum, triggering, and safety interlocks. This paper provides an overview of the control system, while highlighting innovative aspects including its remote operation, pulsed source heating and pulsed neutralizer heating, optimizing beam regulation, and beam ramping, ending with a discussion of its performance.

PEAVY,J.J; CARY,W.P; THOMAS,D.M; KELLMAN,D.H; HOYT,D.M; DELAWARE,S.W; PRONKO,S.G.E; HARRIS,T.E

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1993-- September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project is well into the experimental phase of its deuterium-tritium (D-T) program, with the objective to derive the maximum amount of experimental data on the behavior of tokamak plasmas containing a significant population of energetic alpha particles. Since the initial D-T experiments in December 1993, the operational performance of the TFTR, as well as the required tritium-handling and machine maintenance procedures in an activated environment, have improved markedly, so that D-T operation has now become essentially routine, while fully conforming with all of the safety and environmental requirements. During the D-T phase, the machine and auxiliary-systems parameters have also been increased, most notably the toroidal field (to 5.6 T) and the neutral-beam power (to 40 MW). The radio-frequency power in the ion-cyclotron-range of frequencies (ICRF) has been increased to 11 MW.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Final Report: Laboratory Studies of Spontaneous Reconnection and Intermittent Plasma Objects  

SciTech Connect

The study of the collisionless magnetic reconnection constituted the primary work carried out under this grant. The investigations utilized two magnetic configurations with distinct boundary conditions. Both configurations were based upon the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and the MIT Physics Department. The NSF/DOE award No. 0613734, supported two graduate students (now Drs. W. Fox and N. Katz) and material expenses. The grant enabled these students to operate the VTF basic plasma physics experiment on magnetic reconnection. The first configuration was characterized by open boundary conditions where the magnetic field lines interface directly with the vacuum vessel walls. The reconnection dynamics for this configuration has been methodically characterized and it has been shown that kinetic effects related to trapped electron trajectories are responsible for the high rates of reconnection observed. This type of reconnection has not been investigated before. Nevertheless, the results are directly relevant to observations by the Wind spacecraft of fast reconnection deep in the Earth magnetotail. The second configuration was developed to be relevant to specifically to numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, allowing the magnetic field-lines to be contained inside the device. The configuration is compatible with the presence of large current sheets in the reconnection region and reconnection is observed in fast powerful bursts. These reconnection events facilitate the first experimental investigations of the physics governing the spontaneous onset of fast reconnection. In the Report we review the general motivation of this work and provide an overview of our experimental and theoretical results enabled by the support through the awards.

Egedal-Pedersen, Jan [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Porkolab, Miklos [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Measurements of the parametric decay of CO/sub 2/ laser radiation into plasma waves at quarter critical density using ruby laser Thomson scattering  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of small-angle ruby laser Thomson scattering measurements of the parametric excitation of plasma waves by CO/sub 2/ laser radiation at quarter-critical density in a laser-heated gas target plasma. From supplementary data obtained from interferometry and large-angle ruby laser scattering we infer that the threshold conditions for a convective decay are satisfied.

Schuss, J.J.; Chu, T.K.; Johnson, L.C.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Numerical simulations of collisionless drift instabilities for low-density plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear behavior of the collisionless drift instabilities are studied for the universal and current driven modes by means of electrostatic particle simulations in two-and-a-half dimensions. Realistic mass ratios of the electrons to the ions are used in the simulations, where the guiding-center approximation for the electrons and the exact dynamics for the ions are employed. Several nonlinear effects including the quasilinear diffusion of the particle density, the frequency shift due to the ambipolar field, the mode competition among the unstable waves, and the quasilinear diffusion in the velocity space are found to be the dominant mechanisms for the saturation. The stabilization of the collisionless drift instabilities by the magnetic shear has also been studied.

Lee, W.W.; Yau, Y.Y.K.; Okuda, H.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Establishment of very uniform gas-flow pattern in the process chamber for microwave-excited high-density plasma by ceramic shower plate  

SciTech Connect

The authors developed a ceramic upper shower plate used in the microwave-excited high-density plasma process equipment incorporating a dual shower-plate structure to establish a very uniform gas-flow pattern in the process chamber. Thousands of very fine gas-injection holes are implemented on this Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} upper shower plate with optimized allocation to establish a uniform gas-flow pattern of plasma-excitation gases and radical-generation gases for generating intended radicals in the plasma-excitation region. The size of these fine holes must be 50 {mu}m or less in diameter and 8 mm or more in length because these holes perform an essential role: They completely avoid the plasma excitation in these fine holes and upper gas-supply regions resulting from the plasma penetration into these regions from excited high-density plasma, even if very high-density plasma greater than 1x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} is excited just under the ceramic upper shower plate by microwaves supplied from the radial line slot antenna. On the other hand, various process gases, such as material gases for film formations and etching gases, are supplied from the lower shower plate installed in the diffusion plasma region to this very uniform gas-flow pattern region of plasma-excitation gases and radical-generation gases. As a result, the process gases are supplied to the wafer surface in a very effective manner without excess decomposition of those process gas molecules and undesired reaction-product deposition on the inner surface of the process chamber. The process results are improved drastically by introducing the newly developed ceramic upper shower plate. But also, process uniformity on the entire wafer is improved with drastically reducing reaction-product deposition on the inner surface of the process chamber.

Goto, Tetsuya; Inokuchi, Atsutoshi; Ishibashi, Kiyotaka; Yasuda, Seij; Nakanishi, Toshio; Kohno, Masayuki; Okesaku, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masaru; Nozawa, Toshihisa; Hirayama, Masaki; Ohmi, Tadahiro [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Ltd., Tokyo 107-6325 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Technology Development Institute, Inc., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tokyo Electron AT Ltd., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); Hokuriku Seikei Industrial, Co., Ltd., Ishikawa 923-0157 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Technology Development Institute, Inc., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Utilizing upper hybrid resonance for high density plasma production and negative ion generation in a downstream region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized wave-induced resonances are created by microwaves launched directly into a multicusp (MC) plasma device in the k Up-Tack B mode, where k is the wave vector and B is the static magnetic field. The resonance zone is identified as upper hybrid resonance (UHR), and lies r = {approx}22 mm away from the MC boundary. Measurement of radial wave electric field intensity confirms the right hand cutoff of the wave (r = 22.5-32.1 mm) located near the UHR zone. A sharp rise in the corresponding electron temperature in the resonance region by {approx}13 eV from its value away from resonance at r = 0, is favorable for the generation of vibrationally excited molecules of hydrogen. A transverse magnetic filter allows cold electrons ({approx}1-2 eV) to pass into the downstream region where they generate negative ions by dissociative attachment. Measurements of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) support the viewpoint. H{sup -} current density of {approx}0.26 mA/cm{sup 2} is obtained at a wave power density of {approx}3 W/cm{sup 2} at 2.0 mTorr pressure, which agrees reasonably well with results obtained from a steady state model using particle balance equations.

Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Double-Pulsar System - A Rare Laboratory for Relativistic Gravity and Plasma Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The clock-like properties of pulsars moving in the gravitational fields of their unseen neutron-star companions have allowed unique tests of general relativity and provided evidence for gravitational radiation. We report here the detection of the 2.8-sec pulsar J0737-3039B as the companion to the 23-ms pulsar J0737-3039A in a highly-relativistic double-neutron-star system, allowing unprecedented tests of fundamental gravitational physics. We observe a short eclipse of J0737-3039A by J0737-3039B and orbital modulation of the flux density and pulse shape of J0737-3039B, probably due to the influence of J0737-3039A's energy flux upon its magnetosphere. These effects will allow us to probe magneto-ionic properties of a pulsar magnetosphere.

A. G. Lyne; M. Burgay; M. Kramer; A. Possenti; R. N. Manchester; F. Camilo; M. A. McLaughlin; D. R. Lorimer; N. D'Amico; B. C. Joshi; J. Reynolds; P. C. C. Freire

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Studies of plasma transport  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the charge-coupled device camera and other plasma diagnostic equipment used to measure plasma density and other plasma properties. (LSP)

Malmberg, J.H.; O' Neil, T.M.; Driscoll, C.F.

1991-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Assessment of an ORION-based experimental platform for measuring the opacity of high-temperature and high-density plasma  

SciTech Connect

The following provides an assessment of an experimental platform based on the ORION laser at AWE Aldermasten, England, for measuring the opacity of high-temperature and high-density LTE plasmas. The specific points addressed are (1) the range of electron density and temperature that can be achieved with short-pulse beams alone, as well as (2) by means of compression with a long-pulse beam; (3) the accuracy with which electron density, electron temperature, and absolute emissivity can be measured; (4) the use of pulse shaping to increase the sample density to above solid density; (5) the effect that target materials and target design have on maintaining spatial uniformity of the sample, and (6) the need for additional diagnostics to produce and characterize samples for decisive measurements.

Beiersdorfer, P; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Behaviour and stability of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in non-neutral plasma containing small density fraction of background gas ions  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the frequencies of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes in non-neutral plasma can get into the low-frequency range due to the Doppler shift caused by plasma rotation in crossed fields. TG modes interact with the ion modes that leads to plasma instability. In paper the frequency spectrum of 'cold' electron plasma completely filling a waveguide and containing small density fraction of ions of background gas is determined numerically. For ions the kinetic description is used. Oscillations having azimuthal number m= 2 are considered. In this case both low- and upper-hybrid TG modes get into the low-frequency range. The spectrum consists of families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes and electron TG modes with the frequencies equal to hybrid frequencies with the Doppler shift. The growth rates of upper-hybrid modes are much faster than the growth rates of low-hybrid and MIC modes.

Yeliseyev, Y. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Akademicheskaya St., 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

191

Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements  

SciTech Connect

Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L. [Synchrotron Soleil, l'Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Booth, J. P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing number of open hole horizontal well completions in low-pressure and depleted reservoirs requires the use of non-damaging low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) to avoid formation damage and realize optimum well productivity. To address this need we have formulated new LDDIFS with specific density lower than 1.0 sg (8.34 ppg) specifically to drill and complete low pressure and depleted reservoirs with minimum formation damage and maximum production. These materials exhibit typical drilling fluid characteristics, allowing the well to be safely drilled (0 required well depth but also perform as completion fluids, lessening formation damage to a greater extent than fluids with greater density and higher wellbore pressures. The new LDDIF incorporates low-density hollow glass spheres (HGS) to allow near-balanced drilling in low pressure and depleted reservoirs. The LDDIF uses potassium chloride (KCI) brine as the base fluid because of its low density and inhibition of clay hydration and employs low concentrations of the HGS so that fluid rheology is not altered. We have conducted extensive laboratory testing to compare performance of the HGS LDDIF with that of conventional horizontal well DIFs. Experiments consisted of permeability regain tests on unconsolidated sands with sand control screens. Test variables included temperature, concentration of drill solids cleanup technique and HGS concentration. Test results have shown that the new fluids are up to 50% easier to remove from the wellbore formation faces and provide higher productivity than higher density fluids. Such results indicate that higher well productivity from wells with less impairment would offset any added costs of HGS additives in the fluids.

Chen, Guoqiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium in cutting arc plasmas derived from electron and gas density measurements using a two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique  

SciTech Connect

A two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique that allows inferring the electron and gas densities of axisymmetric arc plasmas without imposing any assumption regarding statistical equilibrium models is reported. This technique was applied to the study of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) departures within the core of a 30 A high-energy density cutting arc. In order to derive the electron and heavy particle temperatures from the inferred density profiles, a generalized two-temperature Saha equation together with the plasma equation of state and the quasineutrality condition were employed. Factors such as arc fluctuations that influence the accuracy of the measurements and the validity of the assumptions used to derive the plasma species temperature were considered. Significant deviations from chemical equilibrium as well as kinetic equilibrium were found at elevated electron temperatures and gas densities toward the arc core edge. An electron temperature profile nearly constant through the arc core with a value of about 14000-15000 K, well decoupled from the heavy particle temperature of about 1500 K at the arc core edge, was inferred.

Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto 2600, Santa Fe (Argentina); Artana, G. [Laboratorio de Fluidodinamica, Departamento Ing. Mecanica, Facultad de Ingenieria (UBA), Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto 2600, Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA), Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

LDRD ER Final Report: Recreating Planetary Cores in the Laboratory: New Techniques to Extremely High Density States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An accurate equation of state (EOS) for planetary constituents at extreme conditions is the key to any credible model of planets or low mass stars. However, very few materials have their high pressure (>few Mbar) EOS experimentally validated, and even then, only on the principal Hugoniot. For planetary and stellar interiors, compression occurs from gravitational force so that material states follow a line of isotropic compression (ignoring phase separation) to ultra-high densities. An example of the hydrogen phase space composing Jupiter and one particular Brown Dwarf is shown. At extreme densities, material states are predicted to have quite unearthly properties such as high temperature superconductivity and low temperature fusion. High density experiments on Earth are achieved with either static compression techniques (i.e. diamond anvil cells) or dynamic compression techniques using large laser facilities, gas guns, or explosives. The ultimate goal of this multi-directorate and multi-institutional proposal was to develop techniques that will enable us to understand material states that previously only existed at the core of giant planets, stars, or speculative theories. Our effort was a complete success, meeting all of the objectives set out in our proposals. First we focused on developing accurate Hugoniot techniques to be used for constraining the equation of state at high pressure/temperature. We mapped out an accurate water EOS and measured that the ionic->electronic conduction transition occurs at lower pressures than models predict. These data and their impact are fully described in the first enclosed paper ''The Equation of State and Optical Properties of Water Compressed by Strong Shock Waves.'' Currently models used to construct planetary isentropes are constrained by only the planet radius, outer atmospheric spectroscopy, and space probe gravitational moment and magnetic field data. Thus these data, which provide rigid constraints to these models, will have a significant impact on a broad community of planetary and condensed matter scientists, as well as our fundamental understanding of the giant planets. We then developed and tested precompressed and multiple shock techniques on water. Scientists around the world have teamed with us to conduct these complex and seminal high density experiments which allow access to the extreme core states of giant plants. Double shock experiments using a variety of anvils to compress water to densities higher and temperatures lower than accessible by single shock Hugoniot techniques. First a clear determination of the EOS and optical properties of the anvils needed to be measured. These properties for LiF and A1203 are written up in the second attached article, ''Shock-Induced Transformation of Sapphire and Lithium Fluoride into Semiconducting Liquids.'' An example double shock data record for water is shown. This data is being written up for publication.

Collins, G; Celliers, P; Hicks, D; Cauble, R; Bradley, D; MacKinnon, A; Moon, S; Young, D; Chau, R; Eggert, J; Willi, P; Pasley, J; Jeanloz, R; Lee, K; Bennedetti, R; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Batani, D; Loubeyre, P; Hubbard, W

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information from Being Detected? A. Glaser, Warhead Verification, May 2012 Zero-Knowledge Protocols 24 Zero-Knowledge Proofs: Peggy (P) proves to Victor (V) that she knows a secret...

196

Sandia National Laboratories - Las Positas Regional Science Bowl...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and...

197

Sandia National Laboratories/Las Positas College Regional Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and...

198

Brookhaven National Laboratory - Long Island | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and...

199

Expansion of a plasma layer near a barrier irradiated by a laser in high-density gases  

SciTech Connect

The time dependence of shock waves in a laser-produced plasma are studied for a Nd laser with an energy of 80 J. (AIP)

Nemchinov, I.V.; Petrukhin, A.I.; Pleshanov, Y.E.; Rybakov, V.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Final Technical Report, DOE Grant DE-FG02-98ER54496, Physics of High-Energy-Density X Pinch Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Abstract for the Final Technical Report, DOE Grant DE-FG02-98ER54496 An X-pinch plasma is produced by driving a high current (100-500 kiloamperes) through two or more fine wires that cross and touch at a point, forming an X in the case of two wires. The wires explode because of the high current, and then the resulting plasma is imploded radially inward by the magnetic field from the current. When the imploding material briefly stagnates at very small radius and high density, an intense burst of x-rays is produced and the plasma disassembles as rapidly as it imploded. When this project began, we could confidently state that at its minimum radius, X pinch plasmas made from such materials as titanium and molybdenum might be as hot as 10,000,000 K and had densities almost as high as the solid wire density, but their X-ray pulse durations were below one billionth of a second. We could also say that the X pinch was useful for point-projection imaging of rapidly changing objects, such as exploding wires, with high resolution, indicative of a very small X-ray source spot size. We can now confidently say that X-pinch plasma temperatures at the moment of the X-ray burst are 10-25 million K in titanium, molybdenum and several other wire X-pinches based upon the spectrum of emitted X-rays in the radiation burst. By the same means, as well as from the penetration of X-rays through the dense plasma, we know that ion densities are close to or higher than one-tenth of the density of the original (solid) wire material in molybdenum and a few other X-pinch plasmas. Furthermore, using the diffraction of X-rays radiated by the X-pinch when it reaches minimum radius, we have determined that the x-ray source size is about 1 thousandth of a millimeter for such wire materials as molybdenum and niobium, while it is 2-10 times larger for tungsten, titanium and aluminum wires. Finally, using a very high speed X-ray imaging streak camera, we have determined that X pinch X-ray pulses can be as short as 30 trillionths of a second. Additional experiments have demonstrated that a spherical shell of plasma expands away from the cross point region after the x-ray burst. It reaches millimeter scale in a few billionths of a second, leaving a small (less than 0.1 millimeter) gap in the middle that enables energetic electrons to be accelerated to 10 or a few 10s of kilovolts of energy. In addition to gaining an understanding of the physics of the X pinch plasmas, we have had to develop several new X-ray diagnostic devices in order to obtain and verify the above results. On the non-technical side, 4 students have completed Ph.D.s working under the auspices of this project, including one woman, and another woman has begun her Ph.D. research under this project. In addition, several undergraduate students have worked with us on the X-pinch experiments, including one who is now a graduate student in plasma physics at Princeton University.

David Hammer

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reconstruction of the equilibrium of the plasma in a Tokamak and identification of the current density profile in real time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reconstruction of the equilibrium of a plasma in a Tokamak is a free boundary problem described by the Grad-Shafranov equation in axisymmetric configuration. The right-hand side of this equation is a nonlinear source, which represents the toroidal ... Keywords: Finite elements method, Fusion plasma, Grad-Shafranov equation, Inverse problem, Real-time

J. Blum; C. Boulbe; B. Faugeras

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Investigations on loop antenna excited whistler waves in a cylindrical plasma based on laboratory experiments and simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental investigations and simulations of loop antenna excited whistler waves in a cylindrical low temperature plasma are presented. Experiments are performed in the VINETA [Franck et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 14, 226 (2005)] device and simulations are generated using IPF-FD3D [C. Lechte, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 37, 1099 (2009)], an implementation of the Yee-algorithm. A good agreement of the experiment and the simulation is found. The simulation is used to predict the spatial structure of the wave, the dominant source of the electric field, the relative contribution of electron, and displacement current as well as parallel and perpendicular currents to the magnetic field of the wave.

Pfannmoeller, J. P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Greifswald (Germany); Lechte, C. [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Grulke, O.; Klinger, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Greifswald (Germany); Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Resonant Excitation of Plasma Wakefields  

SciTech Connect

We describe characteristics of the bunch train and plasma source used in a resonant plasma wakefield experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. The bunch train has the proper correlated spread to unambiguously observe the expected energy gain by the witness bunch at resonance. The plasma density in the capillary discharge is sufficiently high to reach the resonance with the typical bunch train spacing of this experiment. It is also uniform over more than 3/4 of the 2 cm-long capillary.

Muggli, P.; Allen, B. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Yakimenko, V.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Babzien, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

204

Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER54706 "Support for the 7th Workshop on The Interrelationship between Plasma Experiment in Laboratory and Space"  

SciTech Connect

We describe the support given to support the 7th IPELS meeting which brings together space and laboratory based physicists. The meeting was a great success with more than 80 attendees and a significant number of young scientists. The major topics of discussion were magnetic reconnection, plasma turbulence, and waves in plasmas.

C. Kletzing

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 39, NO. 6, JUNE 2011 1507 Microfabricated Flexible Electrodes for Multiaxis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--As conventional sensors are scaled down in size for proper usage in high-density laboratory plasmas, they become in multiple axis. MEMS electric-field probes have been successfully used to detect electron solitary-density space plasmas. Index Terms--B-dot microcoil, electric-field (E-field) measure- ments

California at Los Angles, University of

206

LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

Gyrokinetic simulations of the nonlinear upshift of the critical density gradient for TEM turbulence in tokamak fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of collisionality on a new nonlinear upshift of the critical density gradient for onset of Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) turbulence is investigated in detail. Both linear and nonlinear, high resolution simulations ...

Zeller, Kyle M. (Kyle Montgomery)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Estimation of the electron density and radiative energy losses in a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance discharge  

SciTech Connect

The parameters of a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge were calculated. The analysis was performed as applied to an ion cyclotron resonance system designed for separation of calcium isotopes. The plasma electrons in the source were heated by gyrotron microwave radiation in the zone of the inhomogeneous magnetic field. It was assumed that, in such a combined trap, the energy of the extraordinary microwave propagating from the high-field side was initially transferred to a small group of resonance electrons. As a result, two electron components with different transverse temperatures-the hot resonance component and the cold nonresonance component-were created in the plasma. The longitudinal temperatures of both components were assumed to be equal. The entire discharge space was divided into a narrow ECR zone, where resonance electrons acquired transverse energy, and the region of the discharge itself, where the gas was ionized. The transverse energy of resonance electrons was calculated by solving the equations for electron motion in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Using the law of energy conservation and the balance condition for the number of hot electrons entering the discharge zone and cooled due to ionization and elastic collisions, the density of hot electrons was estimated and the dependence of the longitudinal temperature T{sub e Parallel-To} of the main (cold) electron component on the energy fraction {beta} lost for radiation was obtained.

Potanin, E. P., E-mail: potanin@imp.kiae.ru; Ustinov, A. L. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Instabilities and pattern formation in lowtemperature plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the plasma region is approximately 20cm. (Produced by the Plasma Research Laboratory, Dublin City University

211

"Using Magnetic Fields to Create and Control High Energy Density...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. All rights reserved. U.S. Department of Energy Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy national...

212

Laboratory high-energy astrophysics on lasers  

SciTech Connect

The tremendous range of temperatures and densities spanned by astrophysical plasmas has significant overlap with conditions attainable using high-power laser facilities. These facilities provide an opportunity to create, control, and characterize plasmas in the laboratory that mirror conditions in some of the most important cosmological systems. Moreover, laboratory experiments can enhance astrophysical understanding by focusing on and isolating important physical processes, without necessarily reproducing the exact conditions of the integral system. Basic study of radiative properties, transport phenomena, thermodynamic response and hydrodynamic evolution in plasmas under properly scaled conditions leads both directly and indirectly to improved models of complex astrophysical systems. In this paper, we will discuss opportunities for current and planned highpower lasers to contribute to the study of high-energy astrophysics.

Goldstein, W.H.; Liedahl, D.A.; Walling, R.S.; Foord, M.E.; Osterheld, A.L.; Wilson, B.G.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Science Education Lab | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Lab Science Education Laboratory Overview Gallery: (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by DC Glow Discharges for Undergraduate Laboratories) (Photo by Atmospheric Plasma Laboratory) (Photo by 3D Printing Laboratory) (Photo by Remote Control Glow Discharge) (Photo by Plasma Speaker with 200 Hz input) (Photo by Dusty Plasma Laboratory) The Science Education Laboratory is a fusion (pun intended) of research between education and plasma science. This unique facility includes a teaching laboratory/classroom, two research labs, and student offices/storage/prep room. The research performed in the Science Education Laboratory is currently centered upon dusty plasmas, plasma speakers, remote control of plasmas for educational purposes, atmospheric plasmas and

214

Effect of plasma density scale length on the properties of bremsstrahlung x-ray sources created by picosecond laser pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of an experimental study of multi-MeV bremsstrahlung x-ray sources created by picosecond laser pulses are presented. The x-ray source is created by focusing the short pulse in an expanding plasma obtained by heating a solid target with a time-delayed nanosecond laser beam. The high-energy part of the x-ray spectrum and emission lobe are inferred from photonuclear activation techniques. The x-ray dose is measured with silicon diodes. Two-dimensional images of the source are reconstructed from a penumbral imaging technique. These results indicate the creation of a relatively small source, below 200 {mu}m diameter, delivering doses up to 12 mrad in air at 1 m with x-ray temperature up to 2.8 MeV. The diagnostics used give access to a whole set of coherent experimental results on the x-ray source properties which are compared to extensive numerical simulations. X-ray intensity and temperature are found to increase with the size of the preplasma.

Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Landoas, O.; Lidove, G.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.; Nuter, R.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Boscheron, A.; Grenier, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33114 Le Barp (France); Aleonard, M. M.; Gerbaux, M.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Malka, G.; Scheurer, J. N.; Tarisien, M. [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan F-33175 (France)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications *only first authors listed 2013 Author Title Journal Volume RE Falcon An experimental platform for creating white dwarf photospheres in the laboratory High Energy Density Physics 9 TA Haill Mesoscale simulation of mixed equations of state with application to shocked platinum-doped PMP foams Procedia Engineering 58 SB Hansen Testing the reliability of Non-LTE Spectroscopic Models for Complex Ions High Energy Density Physics 9 B Jones Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis Review of Scientific Instruments 84 PF Knapp Diagnosing suprathermal ion populations in Z-pinch plasmas using fusion neutron spectra Physics of Plasmas 20 MD Knudson Shock response of low-density silica aerogel in the multi-Mbar regime Journal of Applied Physics

216

Plasma-Density Determination from X-Ray Radiography of Laser-Driven Spherical Implosions F. J. Marshall, P. W. McKenty, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, J. P. Knauer, and V. A. Smalyuk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to sampling the areal density at the time of fusion particle production. In non-igniting capsules, the cold, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Se´guin Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute confinement fusion (ICF) relies on the com- pression of spherical targets by means of a high power driver

217

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by circulating energetic ions", Phys. Plasmas 11 (2004) 1803. #12;07/07/03 External Distribution Plasma Research of Sciences, Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. Clelia De Palo, Associazione

218

Integration of Microsoft Windows Applications with MDSplus Data Acquisition on the National Spherical Torus Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Data acquisition on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has increasingly involved the use of Personal Computers (PC's) and specially developed ''turn-key'' hardware and software systems to control diagnostics. Interaction with these proprietary software packages is accomplished through use of Visual Basic, or Visual C++ and COM (Component Object Model) technology. COM is a software architecture that allows the components made by different software vendors to be combined into a variety of applications. This technology is particularly well suited to these systems because of its programming language independence, standards for function calling between components, and ability to transparently reference remote processes. COM objects make possible the creation of acquisition software that can control the experimental parameters of both the hardware and software. Synchronization of these applications for diagnostics, such as CCD camer as and residual gas analyzers, with the rest of the experiment event cycle at PPPL has been made possible by utilization of the MDSplus libraries for Windows. Instead of transferring large data files to remote disk space, Windows MDSplus events and I/O functions allow us to put raw data into MDSplus directly from IDL for Windows and Visual Basic. The combination of COM technology and the MDSplus libraries for Windows provide the tools for many new possibilities in versatile acquisition applications and future diagnostics.

Dana M. Mastrovito

2002-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Laboratories | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Laboratories Laboratories Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Ames Laboratory Ames Laboratory Argonne Argonne National Laboratory BNL NSLS II Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermilab Wilson Hall Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

220

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;External Distribution 05/16/05 Plasma Research of Sciences, Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungary Dr. P. Kaw, Institute for Plasma Research, India Ms. P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Institute for Plasma Research, India Dr. Pandji Triadyaksa, Fakultas MIPA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is one of 17 National Laboratories in the United States and is one of the two located in New Mexico. The Laboratory has...

222

Critical behaviour in toroidal plasma confinement Mathew McGann1, Robert Dewar1, Stuart Hudson2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical Physics / Plasma Research Laboratory (PRL), RSPE, ANU 2Theoretical Physics, Princeton Plasma, Stuart Hudson2 1Theoretical Physics / Plasma Research Laboratory (PRL), RSPE, ANU 2Theoretical Physics

Hudson, Stuart

223

Particle beam dynamics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle beam dynamics Particle beam dynamics Subscribe to RSS - Particle beam dynamics The study of the physics of charged particle beams and the accelerators that produce them. This cross-disciplinary area intersects with fields such as plasma physics, high-energy density science, and ultra-fast lasers. Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science Quest Magazine Summer 2013 Welcome to the premiere issue of Quest, the annual magazine of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Read more about Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science Ronald C Davidson Ronald Davidson heads PPPL research on charged particle beam dynamics and

224

Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

Geddes, Cameron G.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

LANL | Physics | Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inertial confinement and high density Inertial confinement and high density plasma physics Using the world's most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The experimental research of the Physics Division's Inertial Confinement Fusion program is conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester, and the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos. Within inertial confinement fusion and the high energy density area, Los Alamos specializes in hohlraum energetics, symmetry tuning, warm dense matter physics, and hydrodynamics in ultra-extreme conditions. When complete, this research will enable the exploitation of fusion as an energy resource and will enable advanced research in stockpile stewardship

226

Laser-fluorescence measurements of hydrogen and metal densities in the Doublet III tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general overview of the Doublet III laser-spectroscopy program is presented. This program includes tokamak diagnostic experiments and laboratory development work. Measurements of titanium and deuterium in Doublet III are presented along with recent laboratory results. Sputtering of the vacuum walls by energetic charge-exchange neutrals from the plasma center appears to be responsible for the observed Ti impurities in Doublet III. Resonance-fluorescence scattering from deuterium atoms near the plasma center has been observed using a broadband dye laser and a narrow-band detector. The feasibility of determining ion temperatures using this technique is discussed. Using the measured deuterium densities we have calculated a local-electron particle-confinement time. Laboratory measurements of carbon and oxygen densities using two-photon laser excitation and of FeI speed distributions (temperatures) using a laser double-pulse excitation technique are shown to be applicable to the tokamak conditions of Doublet III.

Muller, C.H. III; Eames, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Autumn College on Plasma Physics, ICTP 2005 Generation and dynamics of large scale flows in magnetized plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EURATOM -- Risø National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Research Department, OPL-128 DK-4000 Roskilde

228

Prospects of High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have been observed but their sources and production mechanisms are yet to be understood. We envision a laboratory astrophysics program that will contribute to the understanding of cosmic accelerators with efforts to: (1) test and calibrate UHECR observational techniques, and (2) elucidate the underlying physics of cosmic acceleration through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Innovative experiments belonging to the first category have already been done at the SLAC FFTB. Results on air fluorescence yields from the FLASH experiment are reviewed. Proposed future accelerator facilities can provided unprecedented high-energy-densities in a regime relevant to cosmic acceleration studies and accessible in a terrestrial environment for the first time. We review recent simulation studies of nonlinear plasma dynamics that could give rise to cosmic acceleration, and discuss prospects for experimental investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

Ng, J.S.T.; Chen, P.; /SLAC

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Research | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Education Organization Contact Us Overview Experimental Fusion Research Theoretical Fusion Research Basic Plasma Science Plasma Astrophysics Other Physics and Engineering Research PPPL Technical Reports Research The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is dedicated to developing fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy and to advancing the frontiers of plasma science. The Laboratory pursues these goals through experiments and computer simulations of the behavior of plasma, the hot electrically charged gas that fuels fusion reactions and has a wide range of practical applications.

230

Design of a 50 TW/20 J chirped-Pulse Amplification Laser for High-Energy-Density Plasma Physics Experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a conceptual design for a 50 TW/20 J short-pulse laser for performing high-energy-density plasma physics experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada, Reno. The purpose of the laser is to develop proton and x-ray radiography techniques, to use these techniques to study z-pinch plasmas, and to study deposition of intense laser energy into both magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas. Our design uses a commercial diode-pumped Nd:glass oscillator to generate 3-nJ. 200-fs mode-locked pulses at 1059 m. An all-reflective grating stretcher increases pulse duration to 1.1 ns. A two-stage chirped-pulse optical parametric amplifier (OPCPA) using BBO crystals boosts pulse energy to 12 mJ. A chain using mixed silicate-phosphate Nd:glass increases pulse energy to 85 J while narrowing bandwidth to 7.4 nm (FWHM). About 50 J is split off to the laser target chamber to generate plasma while the remaining energy is directed to a roof-mirror pulse compressor, where two 21 cm x 42 cm gold gratings recompress pulses to {approx}350 fs. A 30-cm-focal-length off-axis parabolic reflector (OAP) focuses {approx}20 J onto target, producing an irradiance of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} in a 10-{micro}m-diameter spot. This paper describes planned plasma experiments, system performance requirements, the laser design, and the target area design.

Erlandson, A C; Astanovitskiy, A; Batie, S; Bauer, B; Bayramian, A; Caird, J A; Cowan, T; Ebbers, C; Fuchs, J; Faretto, H; Glassman, J; Ivanov, V; LeGalloudec, B; LeGalloudec, N; Letzring, S; Payne, S; Stuart, B

2003-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Methane Conversion by Plasma Assisted Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Helge Egsgaard2 1Optics and Plasma Research Department 2Biosystems Department Risø National Laboratory

232

A plasma source for system for microwave plasma experiments (SYMPLE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system "SYMPLE" is being developed at our laboratory to investigate the interaction of high power microwave and plasma. A brief account on the development of a plasma source that satisfies the prerequisites required for SYMPLE is discussed.

V. P. Anitha; Renu Bahl; Priyavandna J. Rathod; Jayesh Raval; Y. C. Saxena

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pulsed Power Technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are some specific sites on Pulsed Power MAGPIE Pulsed Power Facility, Imperial College NIF Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division Reviews of U.S. Fusion Policy UKAEA...

234

Mitsuru Uesaka Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory ,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plasma cathode by 12 TW, 50 fs laser and its application to radiation chemistry Mitsuru Uesaka Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory , University of Tokyo June 26, 2004...

235

Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source Hollow-Anode Plasma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36240 36240 Plasma Sources Science and Technology 4 (1995) 571-575. Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source André Anders and Simone Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge. It is shown that a drastically reduced anode area is responsible for a positive anode voltage drop of 30-40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness. This leads to an ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Langmuir probe measurements inside a specially designed hollow anode plasma source give an electron density and temperature of n e = 10 9 -10 11 cm -3 and T e = 1 - 3 eV, respectively (nitrogen, current 100 mA, flow rate 5-50 scc/min). Driven by a pressure gradient, the "anode" plasma is blown through the anode hole and forms a bright plasma jet streaming with supersonic velocity (Mach number 1.2). The plasma stream can be used, for instance, in plasma-assisted deposition of thin films

236

Studies of the ablated plasma from experimental plasma gun disruption simulations  

SciTech Connect

Extensive simulations of Tokamak disruptions have provided a picture of material erosion that is limited by the transfer of energy from the incident plasma to the armor solid surface through a dense vapor shield. Radiation spectra were recorded in the VUV and in the visible at the Efremov Laboratories on VIKA using graphite targets. The VUV data were recorded with a Sandia Labs transmission grating spectrograph, covering 1--40 nm. Plasma parameters were evaluated with incident plasma energy densities varying from 1--10 kJ/cm{sup 2}. A second transmission grating spectrograph was taken to 2MK-200 at TRINITI to study the plasma-material interface in magnetic cusp plasma. Target materials included POCO graphite, ATJ graphite, boron nitride, and plasma-sprayed tungsten. Detailed spectra were recorded with a spatial resolution of {approximately}1 mm resolution. Time-resolved data with 40--200 ns resolution was also recorded. The data from both plasma gun facilities demonstrated that the hottest plasma region was sitting several millimeters above the armor tile surface.

Rockett, P.D.; Hunter, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bradley, J.T. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Laboratory Dynamos Professor Cary Forest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamos Professor Cary Forest University of Wisconsin - Madison Wednesday, June 5, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a...

238

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generated by #12;4 plasma turbulence and the Hall effect of two-fluid theory16 . We note that there can theory for electrons and ions. The two-fluid dynamics can be described by the "generalized" Ohm's law-fluid dynamics in the reconnection region, although the dissipation mechanisms at the center

239

Instabilities in a dusty plasma with ion drag and ionization D. Samsonov* and J. Goree*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- thesize cosmic dust in the laboratory 14,15 . In the field of basic plasma physics, dusty plasma research

Goree, John

240

Laboratory disputes citizens' lawsuit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab disputes ctizens' lawsuit Lab disputes ctizens' lawsuit Laboratory disputes citizens' lawsuit Lab officials expressed surprise to a lawsuit alleging noncompliance with the federal Clean Water Act filed today by citizens groups. February 7, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Langmuir Probe Diagnostic for Use in Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Plasmas Produced by High-Energy Laser Ablation  

SciTech Connect

Langmuir probes (LP) are used extensively to characterize plasma environments produced by radio frequency, pulsed plasma thrusters, and laser ablation. We discuss here the development of a LP diagnostic to examine high-density, high-temperature inhomogeneous plasmas such as those that can be created at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility. We have configured our diagnostic to examine the velocity of the plasma expanding from the target. We observe velocities of approximately 16-17 cm/{micro}s, with individual LP currents displaying complex structures, perhaps due to the multiple atomic species and ionization states that exist.

Patterson, J R; Emig, J A; Fournier, K B; Jenkins, P P; Trautz, K M; Seiler, S W; Davis, J F

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." From left, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz and Rich Hawryluk. Princeton University Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box...

243

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics Laboratory A Solar Cycle Dependence of Nonlinearity in Magnetospheric Activity Jay R. Johnson in J. Geophys. Res.. Copyright 2004 American Geophsyical Union. A Solar Cycle Dependence in the discriminating statistics a few years prior to solar minima, while no differences are apparent at the time

244

Laboratory Reagents  

SciTech Connect

Replaced by WMH-310, Section 4.17. This document outlined the basic methodology for preparing laboratory reagents used in the 222-S Standards Laboratory. Included were general guidelines for drying, weighing, transferring, dissolving, and diluting techniques common when preparing laboratory reagents and standards. Appendix A contained some of the reagents prepared by the laboratory.

CARLSON, D.D.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

245

Vertical stability in a current-carrying stellarator Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stellarator with uniform current density profile. The effects of vacuum magnetic field generated by helical by helical coils. The external poloidal magnetic field enhances the field line energy relative to the current to current and externally generated flux v due to helical coils. To make further analytic progress, we assume

Fu, Guoyong

246

Plasma Screen Floating Mount  

Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have invented a new mounting system for flat panel video technology. The plasma screen floating mount is a mounting system proven to eliminate vibration and dampen shock for mobile uses of ...

247

Anomalous evolution of Ar metastable density with electron density in high density Ar discharge  

SciTech Connect

Recently, an anomalous evolution of argon metastable density with plasma discharge power (electron density) was reported [A. M. Daltrini, S. A. Moshkalev, T. J. Morgan, R. B. Piejak, and W. G. Graham, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Although the importance of the metastable atom and its density has been reported in a lot of literature, however, a basic physics behind the anomalous evolution of metastable density has not been clearly understood yet. In this study, we investigated a simple global model to elucidate the underlying physics of the anomalous evolution of argon metastable density with the electron density. On the basis of the proposed simple model, we reproduced the anomalous evolution of the metastable density and disclosed the detailed physics for the anomalous result. Drastic changes of dominant mechanisms for the population and depopulation processes of Ar metastable atoms with electron density, which take place even in relatively low electron density regime, is the clue to understand the result.

Park, Min; Chang, Hong-Young [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon, 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong-Hyeon

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Laser light absorption with density profile modifications  

SciTech Connect

Two-dimensional computer simulations studied plasma heating by electron plasma waves. The results emphasize the importance of nonlinear steepening of the density profile near the critical density. A typical simulation result is presented in order to illustrate these profile modifications. It is shown that large dc magnetic field generation is an inherent property of the absorption of obliquely-incident light. (MOW)

Kruer, W.; Valeo, E.; Estabrook, K.; Langdon, B.; Lasinski, B.

1974-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Labs at-a-Glance: Ames Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ames Laboratory Ames Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Ames Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Ames Laboratory Logo Visit the Ames Laboratory website External link Ames Laboratory Quick Facts

250

A new electron temperature diagnostic of critical surface based on the ion acoustic decay instability in hot, high density plasma relevant to laser fusion. Semiannual report, April 1--September 29, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors made analysis of the IADI experiments previously made using OMEGA laser system. They obtained two important new results: the first direct observation of the epw excited by the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability, and the first study of the IADI in a plasma that approaches laser-fusion conditions, in the sense of having a density scale length of order 1 mm and an electron temperature, T{sub e}, in excess of 1 keV. Previous observations of the epw`s have been based on the second harmonic emission, from which little can be inferred because the emission is produced by unknown pairs of epw`s, integrated in a complicated way over wavenumber space and real space. In contrast, they have directly observed the epw by using the 90{degree}, collective Thomson scattering (CTS) of a UV laser (at the third harmonic of the pump) from the epw`s. Because the ratio of probe frequency to electron plasma frequency is only about three, the scattering is collective (i.e. k{sub epw}{lambda}{sub De} is small, where k{sub epw} is the epw wave number and {lambda}{sub De} is the Debye length),m even though the scattering angle is large. The electron temperature can then be deduced from the ion sound velocity, obtained from the measurement of the frequency at which growth is maximum at the scattering wavenumber.

Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Plasma technology directory  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Shock creation and particle acceleration driven by plasma expansion into a rarefied medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expansion of a dense plasma through a more rarefied ionized medium is a phenomenon of interest in various physics environments ranging from astrophysics to high energy density laser-matter laboratory experiments. Here this situation is modeled via a one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation; a jump in the plasma density of a factor of 100 is introduced in the middle of an otherwise equally dense electron-proton plasma with an uniform proton and electron temperature of 10 eV and 1 keV, respectively. The diffusion of the dense plasma, through the rarefied one, triggers the onset of different nonlinear phenomena such as a strong ion-acoustic shock wave and a rarefaction wave. Secondary structures are detected, some of which are driven by a drift instability of the rarefaction wave. Efficient proton acceleration occurs ahead of the shock, bringing the maximum proton velocity up to 60 times the initial ion thermal speed.

Sarri, G.; Kourakis, I.; Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Dieckmann, M. E. [VITA ITN, Linkoping University, 60174 Norrkoping (Sweden)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Modeling the propagation of whistler-mode waves in the presence of field-aligned density irregularities  

SciTech Connect

We present a numerical study of propagation of VLF whistler-mode waves in a laboratory plasma. Our goal is to understand whistler propagation in magnetic field-aligned irregularities (also called channels or ducts). Two cases are examined, that of a high-frequency ({omega}>{Omega}{sub ce}/2) whistler in a density depletion duct and that of a low-frequency ({omega}<{Omega}{sub ce}/2) whistler in a density enhancement. Results from a numerical simulation of whistler wave propagation are compared to data from the UCLA Los Angeles Physics Teachers Alliance Group plasma device and whistler propagation in pre-existing density depletion and density enhancement ducts is demonstrated.

Streltsov, A. V.; Woodroffe, J. [Department of Physical Sciences, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida 32114 (United States); Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electro-optically modulated polarizing Fourier-transform spectrometer for plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-integrated emis- The author is with the Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra

Howard, John

255

Plasma sweeper to control lower hybrid wave coupling  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests of an anti E x anti B plasma sweeper, designed to control the plasma density near the mouth of a phased waveguide array, are described.

Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)...

257

Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Current Drive in Recombining Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Current drive in recombining plasma  

SciTech Connect

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the influence of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero ''residual'' current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

Schmit, P. F.; Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Absolute intensity calibration of flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectrometer using radial profiles of visible and extreme ultraviolet bremsstrahlung continuum emitted from high-density plasmas in Large Helical Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A precise absolute intensity calibration of a flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in wavelength range of 60-400 A is carried out using a new calibration technique based on radial profile measurement of the bremsstrahlung continuum in Large Helical Device. A peaked vertical profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum has been successfully observed in high-density plasmas (n{sub e}{>=} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) with hydrogen ice pellet injection. The absolute calibration can be done by comparing the EUV bremsstrahlung profile with the visible bremsstrahlung profile of which the absolute value has been already calibrated using a standard lamp. The line-integrated profile of measured visible bremsstrahlung continuum is firstly converted into the local emissivity profile by considering a magnetic surface distortion due to the plasma pressure, and the local emissivity profile of EUV bremsstrahlung is secondly calculated by taking into account the electron temperature profile and free-free gaunt factor. The line-integrated profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum is finally calculated from the local emissivity profile in order to compare with measured EUV bremsstrahlung profile. The absolute intensity calibration can be done by comparing measured and calculated EUV bremsstrahlung profiles. The calibration factor is thus obtained as a function of wavelength with excellent accuracy. It is also found in the profile analysis that the grating reflectivity of EUV emissions is constant along the direction perpendicular to the wavelength dispersion. Uncertainties on the calibration factor determined with the present method are discussed including charge-coupled device operation modes.

Dong Chunfeng; Wang Erhui [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source André Anders and Simone Anders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source André Anders and Simone Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge. It is shown that a drastically reduced anode area is responsible for a positive anode voltage drop of 30-40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness. This leads to an ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Langmuir probe measurements inside a specially designed hollow anode plasma source give an electron density and temperature of n e = 10 9 - 10 11 cm -3 and T e = 1 - 3 eV, respectively (nitrogen, current 100 mA, flow rate 5-50 scc/min). Driven by a pressure gradient, the "anode" plasma is blown through

262

Labs at-a-Glance: Oak Ridge National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oak Ridge Oak Ridge National Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Oak Ridge National Laboratory Logo Visit the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

263

Labs at-a-Glance: Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Brookhaven National Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Brookhaven National Laboratory Logo Visit the Brookhaven National Laboratory

264

Labs at-a-Glance: Argonne National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Argonne National Argonne National Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Argonne National Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Argonne National Laboratory Logo Visit the Argonne National Laboratory

265

Laboratory program helps small businesses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory program helps small businesses Laboratory program helps small businesses Laboratory program helps small businesses The NMSBA allows for-profit small businesses to request technical assistance that capitalizes on the unique expertise and capabilities of Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories. June 23, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

266

Characterization of a low-energy constricted-plasma source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40374 (text only) 40374 (text only) Review. Sci. Instruments 69 (1998) 1340-1343. Characterization of a low-energy constricted-plasma source André Anders 1 and Michael Kühn 2 1 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Institute of Physics, Technical University of Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz, Germany ABSTRACT The construction and principle of operation of the Constricted-Plasma Source are described. A supersonic plasma stream is produced by a special form of a dc-glow discharge, the constricted glow discharge. The discharge current and gas flow pass through an orifice of small diameter (constriction) which causes a space charge double layer but also serves as a nozzle to gasdynamically accelerate the plasma flow. Plasma parameters have been measured using Langmuir probes, optical emission spectroscopy, and a plasma monitor for mass-resolved energy measurements. Experiments have been done with nitrogen as the discharge gas. It was found that the energy distribution of both atomic and molecular ions have two peaks at about 5 eV and 15 eV, and the energy of almost all ions is less than 20 eV. The ionization efficiency decreases with increasing gas flow. The downstream plasma density is relatively low but activated species such as excited molecules and radicals contribute to film growth when the source is used for reactive film deposition

267

Magnetoacoustic solitons in quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in collisionless homogenous, magnetized quantum plasma is studied. Two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic model (QMHD) is employed and reductive perturbation method is used to derive Korteweg de Vries (KdV) equation for magnetoacoustic waves. The effects of plasma density and magnetic field intensity are investigated on magnetoacoustic solitary structures in quantum plasma. The numerical results are also presented, which are applicable to explain some aspects of the propagation of nonlinear magnetoacosutic wave in dense astrophysical plasma situations.

Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics (DPAM), PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Density | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Density Density Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

269

Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET  

SciTech Connect

We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches. With these new instruments and desired beam parameters in place next year, we will be able to complete the studies of plasma wakefield acceleration in the next few years.

Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Muggli, P.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; /UCLA; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

Measurements of long-wavelength density fluctuations in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

Several experiments have been devised to measure plasma fluctuations in an effort to help elucidate a possible connection between plasma microturbulence and anomalous transport. Results from microwave scattering on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (Nucl. Fusion {bold 18}, 1089 (1978)) show that the level of plasma fluctuations increases toward the long-wavelength region ({ital k}{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub {ital s}}{le}0.2), at which point the fluctuations cannot be spatially resolved. The desire to measure long-wavelength fluctuations has motivated the development of two fluctuation diagnostics, beam emission spectroscopy (BES), and microwave reflectometry on TFTR. BES measures long-wavelength density fluctuations ({ital k}{sub {perpendicular}}{le}2 cm{sup {minus}1}) by observing the fluorescence emitted from collisionally excited atoms in a TFTR heating beam. In L-mode discharges with relatively flat density profiles, the fluctuations measured with BES are concentrated in the low-frequency region ({le}30 kHz). In the laboratory frame, the fluctuations have a poloidal propagation velocity that is approximately equal to that of the plasma rotation, and the frequency spectra are broadened by Doppler effects. Measured fluctuation levels are 5%--10% at the edge of the plasma. In the core, the level falls to less than 1%, which is comparable to observations made with microwave reflectometry and scattering. The fluctuation level in the core ({ital r}/{ital a}=0.7) is seen to increase with injected beam power, as is observed with microwave scattering at shorter wavelengths ({ital k}{sub {perpendicular}}{approx}2--10 cm{sup {minus}1}). In contrast, the fluctuation level in the edge region does not change significantly with neutral beam power.

Paul, S.F.; Bretz, N.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Labs at-a-Glance: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Pacific Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Logo Visit the Pacific Northwest National

272

Labs at-a-Glance: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fermi National Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Logo Visit the Fermi National Accelerator

273

Labs at-a-Glance: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SLAC National SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Logo Visit the SLAC National Accelerator

274

Labs at-a-Glance: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Lawrence Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Logo Visit the Lawrence Berkeley National

275

Development and application of diagnostic instrumentation for measurement of electron density and conductivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this contract was to assemble and demonstrate in the laboratory a Faraday rotation system for measurement of electron density and conductivity, with the intent to produce a system suitable for diagnostic support of the development of pulsed, space-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power systems. Two system configurations were tested: (1) a rotating polarizer and (2) a beam splitting polarizer. Due to the short path length plasma produced in the laboratory flame, the long wavelength 496 {mu}m methyl fluoride laser line was used and only the more sensitive rotating polarizer configuration was used for the demonstration experiments. Electron number densities from 2 {times} 10{sup 19} to 9 {times} 10{sup 19} were measured with good agreement to statistical equilibrium (Saha) calculations using emission absorption-measured flame temperatures and neutral seed atom number seed atom nuclear densities. The electron collision frequencies were measured by transmission measurements. Combining these two measurements gave measured electron conductivities of between 4 and 12 mohs/m. These results compared reasonably well with those found with an electron collision frequency model combined with chemical equilibrium calculations and the emission absorption measurements. Ellipticity measurements of electron collision frequency were not possible due to the short path length of the laboratory plasma. 46 refs., 25 figs., 9 tabs.

Bauman, L.E.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stuart R Hudson | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approach for optimizing currents in H-1NF stellarator in operation in the Plasma Research Laboratory at the ANU to control vacuum magnetic islands was introduced. After...

277

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MSLA-ICP-AES) subsystems of the Analytical Hot Cell Laboratory System (AHL), which provide the analytical equipment systems for the...

278

Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Popov, High Density Plasma Sources, Park Ridge, N.J. :et al. , IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26 (1998) J. Pelletier, R. Winter, and J. Engemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. I.

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 38 (1996) 18051816. Printed in the UK A new scheme for heterodyne polarimetry with high  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Association Euratom-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein, The Netherlands Plasma Research Laboratory

Howard, John

280

Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

1973-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory achieves milestone, completing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the upgrade that will make the device the most advanced fusion facility of its kind on earth. Completion of the first quadrant entailed some anxious moments. Riding on the...

282

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Machine Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedure (ENG-021) Confined Space Permit DCA/DCN (OP-AD-104) Pre-job brief (OP-AD-79) ATI Walkdown USQD (OP: reload shot 115326 #12;DIAGNOSTIC CHECKLIST OP-XMP-44 Diagnostic Need Desire Instructions Bolometer

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

283

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Machine Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedure (ENG-021) Confined Space Permit DCA/DCN (OP-AD-104) Pre-job brief (OP-AD-79) ATI Walkdown USQD (OP there is no confusion about times or values. #12;DIAGNOSTIC CHECKLIST Title Bring HHFW online and raise power to 6 MW OP

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

284

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory NSTX Machine Proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedure (ENG-021) Confined Space Permit DCA/DCN (OP-AD-104) Pre-job brief (OP-AD-79) ATI Walkdown USQD (OP and diagnostic capabilities: Physics Operations Request and Diagnostic Checklist are attached. Diagnostic;Diagnostic Checklist OP-XMP-46 Diagnostic Need Desire Instructions Bolometer ­ tangential array Bolometer

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

285

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fusion). ARIES Group #12;Advanced Toroidal Physics Fusion Plasma Conditions Burning Plasma Physics 1.0 0.5 Alpha Energy #12;Magnetic Fusion Science Issues - Strongly Coupled in a Fusion (Burning) Plasma Improved

286

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

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The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a key contributor to ITER, a huge international fusion facility...

287

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

288

A Tutorial on Basic Principles of Microwave Reflectometry Applied to Fluctuation Measurements in Fusion Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Microwave reflectometry is now routinely used for probing the structure of magnetohydrodynamic and turbulent fluctuations in fusion plasmas. Conditions specific to the core of tokamak plasmas, such as small amplitude of density irregularities and the uniformity of the background plasma, have enabled progress in the quantitative interpretation of reflectometer signals. In particular, the extent of applicability of the 1-D [one-dimensional] geometric optics description of the reflected field is investigated by direct comparison to 1-D full wave analysis. Significant advances in laboratory experiments are discussed which are paving the way towards a thorough understanding of this important measurement technique. Data is presented from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 33 (1991) 1509] identifying the validity of the geometric optics description of the scattered field and demonstrating the feasibility of imaging turbulent fluctuations in fusion scale devices.

Nazikian, R.; Kramer, G.J.; Valeo, E.

2001-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, Jan. 3, 2013-In commemoration of its 70th anniversary, Los Alamos National Laboratory kicks off a yearlong lecture series on Wednesday, Jan. 9, at 5:30 p.m. with a presentation about homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau at the Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos. - 2 - The inaugural lecture is based on a book by local writers Dorothy Hoard, Judy Machen and Ellen McGehee about the area's settlement between 1887 and 1942. On hikes across the Pajarito Plateau, Hoard envisioned the Los Alamos area before modern roads and bridges made transportation much easier. The trails she walked

290

Plasma beat-wave accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We perform an analytic study of some quantities relevant to the plasma beat-wave accelerator (PBWA) concept. We obtain analytic expressions for the plasma frequency, longitudinal electron velocity, plasma density and longitudinal plasma electric field of a nonlinear longitudinal electron plasma oscillation with amplitude less than the wave-breaking limit and phase velocity approaching the speed of light. We also estimate the luminosity of a single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear PBWA collider assuming the energy and collision beamstrahlung are fixed parameters.

Noble, R.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Closed inductively coupled plasma cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

1990-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Idaho National Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Department of Energy National Laboratories. Laboratory or Facility Website ...

294

PLASMA GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

Foster, J.S. Jr.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

GLP 10 Good Laboratory Practice for the Purity of Water Water ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... GLP 10 Good Laboratory Practice for the Purity of Water Water is used in two ways in the metrology laboratory. ... Water Density Measurements ...

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

296

Virtual Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

Piet Hut

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41 (1999) 203216. Printed in the UK PII: S0741-3335(99)05831-5 Drift waves in stellarator geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Electromagnetics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 G¨oteborg, Sweden Plasma Research Laboratory

298

Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41 (1999) 271284. Printed in the UK PII: S0741-3335(99)88859-9 Optical coherence-based techniques for motional Stark effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

John Howard Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia

Howard, John

299

Positivity Preservation in the Simulation of Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With standard schemes, the plasma density in the hydrodynamic model for relativistic laser-plasma interaction can become negative. Therefore, we present a new scheme that preserves (more)

Wortmann, Anke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

SciTech Connect: plasma  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

plasma Find plasma Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Laboratory Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

303

Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory The Las Conchas fire burning in the Jemez Mountains approximately 12 miles southwest of the boundary of LANL has not entered Lab property at this time. June 26, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

304

2XIIB plasma confinement experiments  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports results of 2XIIB neutral-beam injection experiments with plasma-stream stabilization. The plasma stream is provided either by a pulsed plasma generator located on the field lines outside the plasma region or by ionization of neutral gas introduced at the mirror throat. In the latter case, the gas is ionized by the normal particle flux through the magnetic mirror. A method of plasma startup and sustenance in a steady-state magnetic field is reported in which the plasma stream from the pulsed plasma generator serves as the initial target for the neutral beams. After an energetic plasma of sufficient density is established, the plasma generator stream is replaced by the gas-fed stream. Lifetimes of the stabilized plasma increase with plasma temperature in agreement with the plasma stabilization of the drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode. The following plasma parameters are attained using the pulsed plasma generator for stabilization: n approximately 5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, anti W/sub i/ approximately 13 keV, T/sub e/ = 140 eV, and ntau/sub p/ approximately 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s. With the gas feed, the mean deuterium ion energy is 9 keV and the peak density n approximately 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. In the latter case, the energy confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub E/ = 7 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/.s, and the particle confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub p/ = 1 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/.s.

Coensgen, F.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Correll, D.L.

1976-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

Surface plasma wave excitation via laser irradiated overdense plasma foil  

SciTech Connect

A laser irradiated overdense plasma foil is seen to be susceptible to parametric excitation of surface plasma wave (SPW) and ion acoustic wave (IAW) on the ion plasma period time scale. The SPW is localised near the front surface of the foil while IAW extends upto the rear. The evanescent laser field and the SPW exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the IAW. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the laser induced oscillatory electron velocity to drive the SPW. At relativistic laser intensity, the growth rate is of the order of ion plasma frequency.

Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

Strategic Laboratory Leadership Program | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Erik Gottschalk (F); Devin Hodge (A); Jeff Chamberlain (A); Brad Ullrick (A); Bill Rainey (J). Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Strategic Laboratory Leadership...

307

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Inertial confinement fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

inertial-confinement-fusion An inertial-confinement-fusion An experimental process that uses lasers to compress plasma to sufficiently high temperatures and densities for fusion to occur. Such experiments are carried out in places such as the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. en Fusion through the eyes of a veteran science journalist http://www.pppl.gov/news/2013/07/fusion-through-eyes-veteran-science-journalist-1

Author Daniel Clery recently published "A Piece of the Sun," a 320-page narrative of the history of fusion research and the

308

Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/ps/mm{sup 2}, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within {+-}10%.

Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

The ion acoustic decay instability, and anomalous laser light absorption for the OMEGA upgrade, large scale hot plasma application to a critical surface diagnostic, and instability at the quarter critical density. Final report  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that laser light can be anomalously absorbed with a moderate intensity laster (I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}-{mu}m{sup 2}) in a large scale, laser produced plasma. The heating regime, which is characterized by a relatively weak instability in a large region, is different from the regime studied previously, which is characterized by a strong instability in a narrow region. The two dimensional geometrical effect (lateral heating) has an important consequence on the anomalous electron heating. The characteristics of the IADI, and the anomalous absorption of the laser light were studied in a large scale, hot plasma applicable to OMEGA upgrade plasma. These results are important for the diagnostic application of the IADI.

Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Seka, W. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY is....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scattering June 12-18, 2010 - Argonne National Laboratory June 19-26, 2010 - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory...

312

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Gorbatkin, Steven M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Berry, Lee A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

State Laboratory Contacts IL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information IL. Idaho. ... State of Iowa Metrology Laboratory Ellsworth Community College 1100 College Ave. ...

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Low frequency electromagnetic oscillations in dense degenerate electron-positron pair plasma, with and without ions  

SciTech Connect

Quantum plasma oscillations are studied in a strongly magnetized, ultra-dense plasma with degenerate electrons and positrons. The dispersive role of electron and positron quantum effects on low frequency (in comparison to electron cyclotron frequency) shear electromagnetic wave is investigated by employing hydrodynamic formulation. In the presence of ions, the density balance changes, and the electromagnetic wave (with frequency lower than the ion cyclotron frequency) is shown to couple with electrostatic ion mode under certain conditions. For such low frequency waves, it is also seen that the contribution of electron and positron degeneracy pressure is dominant as compared to their diffraction effects. The results are analyzed numerically for illustrative purpose pointing out their relevance to the dense laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter interactions) and astrophysical plasmas.

Khan, S. A. [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ayub, M. K. [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyunbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ahmad, Ali [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ion-acoustic solitary waves in ultra-relativistic degenerate pair-ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The arbitrary and the small amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) have been studied. The former is studied by using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach in a plasma consisting of the degenerate ultrarelativistic electrons, positrons, and the non-relativistic classical ions. It is seen that only compressive solitary waves can propagate through such plasmas. The numerical calculations show that the region of existence of the ion-acoustic solitary waves depends upon the positron (ion) number density and the plasma thermal temperature. This study is appropriate for applications in inertial confinement fusion laboratory research as well as the study of astrophysical dense objects such as white dwarf and dense neutron stars.

Rasheed, A.; Tsintsadze, N. L. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating and anomalous diffusion of electrons 54 A.2.4 Complex plasmas 55 A.2.4.1 Dusty plasma research

Haviland, David

318

Ion energy and plasma measurements in the near field of an ICRF antenna  

SciTech Connect

Plasma properties and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an ICRF antenna to determine the effects of rf fields in a magnetized plasma sheath on the energy of ions incident on the surface of the Faraday shield. A resonant loop antenna with a two- tier Faraday shield was used on the RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The magnetic field near the antenna is /approximately/2 kG, and the plasma density is /approximately/10/sup 11/ cm/sup /minus/3/ with an electron temperature of 6-10 eV. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged electron temperature, electron density, and floating potential were measured with a Langmuir probe. Both probes were scanned poloidally in front of the antenna, parallel to the current strap. Diagnostics for measuring ion energies included a gridded energy analyzer located directly below the antenna. Measured ion energies are compared with predictions from a computational model for determining the energy and angular distribution of ions incident on a surface in a magnetized plasma sheath with a time-varying plasma potential. 7 refs., 3 figs.

Caughman, J.B.O. II; Ruzic, D.N.; Hoffman, D.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Parametric effects in interaction of an electron beam with a plasma  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between perturbations of the plasma density and the modulational instability of Langmuir waves is discussed.

Al' terkop, B.A.; Volokitin, A.S.; Tarakanov, V.P.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Roles of polarization force and nonthermal electron on dust-acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma with positively charged dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of polarization force (PF) (arises due to dust density inhomogeneity), nonthermal electrons, and dust density inhomogeneity associated with positively charged dust on linear dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an inhomogeneous unmagnetized dusty plasma are investigated. By taking the normal mode analysis, the dispersion relation in such a non-Maxwellian inhomogeneous plasma is obtained, and that the dispersion properties of the DA waves are significantly modified by the presence of PF and nonthermal electrons. The PF is increased with the increase of nonthermal electrons. It is found that the phase speed of the DA waves is significantly decreased with the presence of PF and nonthermal electrons. The potential associated with the DA waves is de-enhanced with the increase of equilibrium dust number density. The role of positive dust number density on dispersion properties is also shown. The present findings relevant to different scenarios in laboratory and space dusty plasma, such as Martian ionosphere, solar flares, TEXTOR-94 tokamak plasmas, rf excited argon magnetoplasma, etc., can be useful to understand the properties of localized electrostatic disturbances in those dusty plasma system, are also briefly addressed.

Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of plasma research and understanding their dynamics is cutting edge topic in physics Small instabilities

Haviland, David

323

Propagation of ion beams through a tenuous magnetized plasma  

SciTech Connect

When an ion beam is propagated through a plasma, the question of charge neutralization is critical to its propagation. We consider such a problem where the plasma is magnetized with magnetic field perpendicular to the beam. The plasma-number density and beam-number density are assumed comparable. We reduce the problem to a two-dimensional model, which we solve. The solution suggests that it should be possible to attain charge neutralization if the beam density is properly varied along itself.

Chrien, E.F.; Valeo, E.J.; Kulsrud, R.M.; Oberman, C.R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Redshift of photons penetrating a hot plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new interaction, plasma redshift, is derived, which is important only when photons penetrate a hot, sparse electron plasma. The derivation of plasma redshift is based entirely on conventional axioms of physics, without any new assumptions. The calculations are only more exact than those usually found in the literature. When photons penetrate a cold and dense electron plasma, they lose energy through ionization and excitation, through Compton scattering on the individual electrons, and through Raman scattering on the plasma frequency. But when the plasma is very hot and has low density, such as in the solar corona, the photons lose energy also in plasma redshift, which is an interaction with the electron plasma. The energy loss of a photon per electron in the plasma redshift is about equal to the product of the photons energy and one half of the Compton cross-section per electron. This energy loss (plasma redshift of the photons) consists of very small quanta, which are absorbed by the plasma and cause a significant heating. In quiescent solar corona, this heating starts in the transition zone to the solar corona and is a major fraction of the coronal heating. Plasma redshift contributes also to the heating of the interstellar plasma, the galactic corona, and the intergalactic plasma. Plasma redshift explains

Ari Brynjolfsson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Elena Belova | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elena Belova Elena Belova Principal Research Physicist, Plasma Physics Laboratory. Elena V. Belova is a Principal Research Physicist at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory. Her research interests include: kinetic effects on the MHD stability; interaction of energetic particles with MHD waves; global stability of the Field-Reversed Configurations; numerical simulations, and fluid/kinetic(gyro-kinetic) hybrid models of plasmas. She received a M.S. in physics from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russia), and worked at the Space Research Institute in Moscow, Russia till 1992. She received a Ph. D. in plasma physics from Dartmouth College, Hanover NH in 1997. Following a three year post doctoral position with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, she joined PPPL staff in

326

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma...

327

Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment & Supplies Equipment & Supplies John Bargar, SSRL Scientist Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All laboratories contain the following standard laboratory equipment: pH meters with standard buffers, analytical balances, microcentrifuges, vortex mixers, ultrasonic cleaning baths, magnetic stirrers, hot plates, and glassware. Most laboratories offer ice machines and cold rooms. Specialty storage areas for samples include a -80 freezer, argon and nitrogen glove boxes, radiation contamination areas, inert atmosphere chambers, and cold rooms. For specific information please see: Equipment Inventory Checkout Equipment & Supplies To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Inventory

328

Basic Research Needs for High Energy Density Laboratory Physics  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

those of high-power lasers, pulsed-power machines and particle accelerators, and advanced energy systems. Furthermore, the program will help develop the workforce needed for future...

329

Nonlinear Plasma Waves Excitation by Intense Ion Beams in Background Plasma  

SciTech Connect

Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma.

Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Three-Body Recombination and Rydberg Atoms in Ultracold Plasmas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ultracold neutral plasmas, created by photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms, have well-controlled initial density and temperature parameters. With initial particle peak densities of ~1015 m-3, (more)

Fletcher, Robert S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Opportunities with Laboratories under the Chicago Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opportunities with Opportunities with Laboratories under the Chicago Office 1 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 1. Mechanical Engineering Services; Larry Dudek; $188,000 2. Phone system; William Bryan; $300,000 3. Engineering Support Services; Charles Neumyer; $1,417,116 4. Conceptual design of New PS&T Building; Shawn Connolly; $500,000 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) 1. Software Maintenance and support for ALS software; 9/30/2011; $556,000 (Biointuition) 2. Consulting services to conduct a hazard survey; 9/30/11; $549,000 (Alphatrac, Inc.) 3. Analytical Laboratory services; 7/31/11; $465,000 (BC Laboratories, Inc.) LBL Continued.... 4. Blanket Order to provide photo artwork; 9/30/2011; $460,000 (CMP) 5. Pick-up and delivery courier servicces for as- needed services; 5/31/2011; $250,000 (IDS

332

BATT Fabrication Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientist working in battery lab BATT Fabrication Laboratory The BATT Fab Lab (Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Fabrication Laboratory) conducts battery cell...

333

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY - Energy  

Laboratory Plan FY 2010-2019 June2,2010 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Accelerating Innovation Alane for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery June 2012

334

ARM - Laboratory Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive Data Management Facility Data Quality Program Engineering Support External Data Center Laboratory Partners Nine DOE national laboratories share the responsibility of...

335

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located...

336

EML: Environmental Measurements Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security and Privacy Notices History of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory The Manhattan ProjectAtomic Energy Commission (1942 1975) Our Laboratory traces its roots...

337

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratorys (LLNL) primary mission is research and development in support of national security. As a...

338

New Brunswick Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports New Brunswick Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the New Brunswick Laboratory, July 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the New...

339

Laboratory awards subcontracts to small businesses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcontracts awarded to small businesses Subcontracts awarded to small businesses Laboratory awards subcontracts to small businesses A company owned and operated by Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo will soon be providing custodial support services to the Lab. October 15, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Steve Sandoval

340

Los Alamos National Laboratory sponsors Hazmat Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazmat Challenge Hazmat Challenge Los Alamos National Laboratory sponsors Hazmat Challenge The challenge provides hazardous materials responders the opportunity to network and learn new techniques under realistic conditions in a safe environment. July 27, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Los Alamos National Laboratory names cleanup subcontractors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleanup subcontractors named Cleanup subcontractors named Los Alamos National Laboratory names cleanup subcontractors The three companies are Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), Portage Inc., and ARSEC Environmental, LLC (ARSEC). August 14, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Fred deSousa

342

Laboratory awards final Recovery Act demolition contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act demolition contracts Recovery Act demolition contracts Laboratory awards final Recovery Act demolition contracts The two winning bidders will each demolish a portion of the remaining unused buildings at the Lab's historic Technical Area 21. April 20, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

343

Scattering Length Density Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For energy dependent cross sections please go to ... The neutron scattering length density is defined ... To calculate scattering length densities enter a ...

344

Excitation of surface plasma waves by an electron beam in a magnetized dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electron beam drives surface plasma waves to instability on a vacuum magnetized dusty plasma interface and in a magnetized dusty plasma cylinder via Cerenkov and fast cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of a surface plasma wave has been derived and it has been shown that the phase velocity of waves increases with increase in relative density {delta}(=n{sub i0}/n{sub e0}), where n{sub i0} is the ion plasma density and n{sub e0} is the electron plasma density of negatively charged dust grains. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave instability also increases with {delta}. The growth rate of the instability increases with beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in fast cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of surface plasma waves has been retrieved from the derived dispersion relation by considering that the beam is absent and there is no dust in the plasma cylinder.

Prakash, Ved; Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, PSP Area Plot No. 1, Sector 22, Rohini, Delhi 110086 (India)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Investigation of asymmetric plasma blob dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of asymmetric blobs is investigated in the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT. Blobs are local regions of enhanced plasma density. Blobs are relevant to several areas of physics research, including fusion ...

Soane, Alexander (Alexander Visotsky)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Money Fund Overview The Seed Money Fund of the ORNL LDRD program supports innovative ideas that have the potential of enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical...

349

About Berkeley Lab: Laboratory Director, Associate Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009, replacing former laboratory Director Steve Chu, who was sworn in as U.S. Energy Secretary. Before becoming interim director, Alivisatos was the deputy director of Berkeley...

350

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging creative research to innovate solutions for our nation's greatest challenges. National laboratories have been entrusted with the role of serving as incubators for...

351

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

352

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems. NISTIR 7028 Type Evaluation Quality Manual Template. This NISTIR has been ...

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

353

State Laboratory Contacts AC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information AC. Alabama. Mailing Address, ... PDF. Alaska. Mailing Address, Contact Information. Alaska ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LABORATORY LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 ______________ ANL/APS/TB-43 ______________ A New Approach to High-Current Operation of the Advanced Photon Source by G. K. Shenoy Experimental Facilities Division Advanced Photon Source April 2002 work sponsored by U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Science i Contents Abstract .............................................................................................................................1 1. Introduction...................................................................................................................2 2. Alternative Operational Parameters..............................................................................3 3. Undulator Tunability, Brilliance, Power, and Power Densities....................................5

356

Plasma valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma valve includes a confinement channel and primary anode and cathode disposed therein. An ignition cathode is disposed adjacent the primary cathode. Power supplies are joined to the cathodes and anode for rapidly igniting and maintaining a plasma in the channel for preventing leakage of atmospheric pressure through the channel.

Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY); Sharma, Sushil (Hinsdale, IL); Noonan, John (Naperville, IL); Rotela, Elbio (Clarendon Hills, IL); Khounsary, Ali (Hinsdale, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Office of Science laboratory National Nuclear Security Administration laboratory Office of Fossil Energy laboratory Office of Energy Efficiency and ...

358

National Laboratories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Name Address City, State; Ames Laboratory: Ames Laboratory: Ames, IA: Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 S. Cass Avenue: Argonne, IL: Brookhaven ...

359

PLASMA ENERGIZATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

PLASMA DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

Baker, W.R.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

National Laboratories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Name Address City, State; Ames Laboratory: Ames Laboratory: Ames, IA: Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 S. Cass Avenue: Argonne, IL: Brookhaven National Laboratory

362

Edge Simulation Laboratory Progress and Plans  

SciTech Connect

The Edge Simulation Laboratory (ESL) is a project to develop a gyrokinetic code for MFE edge plasmas based on continuum (Eulerian) techniques. ESL is a base-program activity of OFES, with an allied algorithm research activity funded by the OASCR base math program. ESL OFES funds directly support about 0.8 FTE of career staff at LLNL, a postdoc and a small fraction of an FTE at GA, and a graduate student at UCSD. In addition the allied OASCR program funds about 1/2 FTE each in the computations directorates at LBNL and LLNL. OFES ESL funding for LLNL and UCSD began in fall 2005, while funding for GA and the math team began about a year ago. ESL's continuum approach is a complement to the PIC-based methods of the CPES Project, and was selected (1) because of concerns about noise issues associated with PIC in the high-density-contrast environment of the edge pedestal, (2) to be able to exploit advanced numerical methods developed for fluid codes, and (3) to build upon the successes of core continuum gyrokinetic codes such as GYRO, GS2 and GENE. The ESL project presently has three components: TEMPEST, a full-f, full-geometry (single-null divertor, or arbitrary-shape closed flux surfaces) code in E, {mu} (energy, magnetic-moment) coordinates; EGK, a simple-geometry rapid-prototype code, presently of; and the math component, which is developing and implementing algorithms for a next-generation code. Progress would be accelerated if we could find funding for a fourth, computer science, component, which would develop software infrastructure, provide user support, and address needs for data handing and analysis. We summarize the status and plans for the three funded activities.

Cohen, R

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

History by The Department of Energy's Other Major Laboratories and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BY THE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S Other Major Laboratories and Facilities Ames Laboratory Ames Laboratory-Shaping Science for 60 Years A History of Innovation Ames Achievements Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) History New Brunswick Lab Marks Its 50th Anniversary NBL Achievements Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) About ORISE: Message from the Director Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education ORISE Achievements Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) History of the PPPL History of the Harold P. Furth Plasma Physics Library PPPL Achievements Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)

364

COMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Data 2.1 Performance and Utilization Data 2.2 Failure Data 5 5 6 3. Preliminary Analysis 3.1 Load Profiles 3.2 Failure Profiles 7 3.3 Analysis and Discussion of Preliminary Results Some ReliabilityCOMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY I I STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES DEPARTMENT OF ElECTRiCAl

Stanford University

365

The calculation of satellite line structures in highly stripped plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Recently developed high-resolution x-ray spectrographs have made it possible to measure satellite structures from various plasma sources with great detail. These lines are weak optically thin lines caused by the decay of dielectronic states and generally accompany the resonance lines of H-like and He-like ions. The Los Alamos atomic physics and kinetics codes provide a unique capability for calculating the position and intensities of such lines. These programs have been used to interpret such highly resolved spectral measurements from pulsed power devices and laser produced plasmas. Some of these experiments were performed at the LANL Bright Source and Trident laser facilities. The satellite structures are compared with calculations to diagnose temperatures and densities. The effect of non-thermal electron distributions of electrons on calculated spectra was also considered. Collaborations with Russian scientists have added tremendous value to this research die to their vast experience in x-ray spectroscopy.

Abdallah, J. Jr.; Kilcrease, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A. [Multicharged Ion Spectra Data Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration  

SciTech Connect

The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Neutral transport in a plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solution procedure for the neutral transport equation in plasma slab geometry is developed. Half-angle scalar fluxes, currents and averaged cross sections are introduced to provide a convenient and simple method of calculating the neutral energy distribution as an adjunct to the neutral density calculation. A forward-backward sweep numerical solution procedure, which avoids matrix inversion, is outlined.

Stacey, W.M. Jr.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Microwave-generated plasma thruster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A concept for high power density and efficiency plasma thruster based on electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) is described. Initial estimates are made of the parameters, leading to a conceptual design. An effort for detail physics design and proof-of-principal tests is also proposed. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Hooper, E.B.

1991-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

Dielectric covered hairpin probe for its application in reactive plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hairpin probe is a well known technique for measuring local electron density in low temperature plasmas. In reactive plasmas, the probe characteristics are affected by surface sputtering, contamination, and secondary electron emission. At higher densities, the plasma absorbs the entire electromagnetic energy of hairpin and hence limits the density measurements. These issues can be resolved by covering the hairpin surface with a thin layer of dielectric. In this letter, the dielectric contribution to the probe characteristics is incorporated in a theory which is experimentally verified. The dielectric covering improves the performance of probe and also allows the hairpin tip to survive in reactive plasma where classical electrical probes are easily damaged.

Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M. [NCPST, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Karkari, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Center, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

371

Core Competencies Performing topical research in plasma boundary physics, fueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovation. Experimental plasma physics Plasma theory Enabling technologies High-speed hydrogen pellet injector for fueling fusion devices Fusion Nuclear Science Facility Developing plasma heating/current drive and chamber technologies to help identify and resolve fusion reactor issues, for example, high power density

372

Electronic Structure of Dense Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Pollaine, S M; Froula, D H; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Landen, O L

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Generating electron cyclotron resonance plasma using distributed scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study employs a distributed microwave input system and permanent magnets to generate large-area electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma. ECR plasmas were generated with nitrogen gas, and the plasma density was measured by Langmuir probe. A uniform ECR plasma with the electron density fluctuation of {+-}9.8% over 500 mm Multiplication-Sign 500 mm was reported. The proposed idea of generating uniform ECR plasma can be scaled to a much larger area by using n Multiplication-Sign n microwave input array system together with well-designed permanent magnets.

Huang, C. C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Lung-Tan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, T. H.; Chen, N. C.; Chao, H. W. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, C. C. [Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Lung-Tan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chou, S. F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

Plasma Nitrocarburizing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...heat pollution Reduced processing times Reduced energy consumption Reduced treatment gas consumption Industrial plasma nitrocarburizing processing modules contain: Vacuum furnace Vacuum system Gas supply with gas mixing and pressure control system Electric power supply unit Microprocessor control unit...

375

The Fluid Nature of Quark-Gluon Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collisions of heavy nuclei at very high energies offer the exciting possibility of experimentally exploring the phase transformation from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom which is predicted to occur at several times normal nuclear density and/or for temperatures in excess of $\\sim 170$ MeV. Such a state, often referred to as a quark-gluon plasma, is thought to have been the dominant form of matter in the universe in the first few microseconds after the Big Bang. Data from the first five years of heavy ion collisions of Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) clearly demonstrate that these very high temperatures and densities have been achieved. While there are strong suggestions of the role of quark degrees of freedom in determining the final-state distributions of the produced matter, there is also compelling evidence that the matter does {\\em not} behave as a quasi-ideal state of free quarks and gluons. Rather, its behavior is that of a dense fluid with very low kinematic viscosity exhibiting strong hydrodynamic flow and nearly complete absorption of high momentum probes. The current status of the RHIC experimental studies is presented, with a special emphasis on the fluid properties of the created matter, which may in fact be the most perfect fluid ever studied in the laboratory.

W. A. Zajc

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 (2004) 471487 PII: S0741-3335(04)69034-8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED FUSION Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion the cold plasma dispersion relation, the ion­ion hybrid cutoff frequency is uniquely determined and tritium density equilibrium (nD nT), maximizing fusion reactions in a burning plasma experiment. A number

Heidbrink, William W.

377

Atomic hydrogen density measurements in the Tara tandem mirror experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Neutral and plasma density have been measured in the north well of the central cell of the Tara tandem mirror (Nucl. Fusion {bold 22}, 549 (1982)). The electron plasma density and temperature on the magnetic axis were measured by Thomson scattering to be about 3{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} and 70 eV, respectively. The corresponding axial neutral hydrogen density was found to be 1 {times}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}3}, while near the plasma edge at {ital r}=15 cm it reached 1{times}10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}3}. The fill gas density at {ital r}{ge}22.5 cm was {approx}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3}. Additional information from secondary electron detectors was used to estimate the radial ion temperature distribution, which was found to have about the same width, 12 cm, as the plasma density. The resulting ion pressure profile is peaked compared to the electron pressure profile. Charge exchange losses in the well are found to have a maximum at a radius equal to half the {ital e}-folding distance of the plasma density and ion temperature distributions.

Guss, W.C.; Yao, X.Z.; Pocs, L.; Mahon, R.; Casey, J.; Horne, S.; Lane, B.; Post, R.S.; Torti, R.P. (Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Leading Testing Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fax: 86-20-6196-8925 E-Mail: york.li@ledtestlab.com Send E-Mail to Laboratory: Leading Testing Laboratories ... [22/S14] EPA Integral LED Lamps v ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS provides a Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP). Formerly the Smalley Check Sample Program LPP is a collaborative proficiency testing service for oil and fat related commodities, oilseeds, oilseed meals, and edible fats. Laboratory Proficiency Testing

380

Mound Laboratory: Analytical Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Laboratory Analytical Capability report is intended to fulfill a customer need for basic information concerning Mound Laboratory's analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Hendrickson, E. L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wilks, Scott C. (Santa Monica, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Preliminary characterization of a low-powered microwave induced flame plasma for direct organic solvent nebulization  

SciTech Connect

A low powered (<90 W) microwave-induced plasma has been generated at atmospheric pressure by using a Beenakker cavity, a laboratory constructed torch, and a gas mixture of argon (400 ml/min), hydrogen (100 ml/min), and air (130 ml/min). This plasma has an excitation temperature of 3300-3500 K, electron number density of 7 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, and easily accepts direct methanol and ethanol introduction with a 1 ml/min solution nebulization rate. Detection limits (3{sigma}) obtained from the atomic emission signals of Li, Sr, and Cr in water are 15, 120, and 290 ng/ml, respectively. Similarly, detection limits for the metals in methanol are 15, 120, and 260 ng/ml, respectively, and in ethanol they are 25, 360, and 330 ng/ml, respectively. The linear dynamic range is greater than three orders of magnitude.

Ng, Kin C.; Bucay, Phil [Department of Chemistry, California State University, 2555 East San Ramon Ave., M/S SB70, Fresno, California 93740-8034 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

A new mode and its interaction through ponderomotive force in electron-positron-ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A new mode is found in e-p-i plasma in the presence of density and temperature difference of lighter particles. The electron beam induced Cherenkov instability condition for the excitation of positron sound wave is obtained for the system under consideration. Zakharov's equation with sign modification due to negative Ponderomotive pressure is obtained. Nonlinear Schroedinger wave equation for the envelope type solitary waves is derived. Both stationary and nonstationary solutions are found and the subsonic and supersonic limits are also discussed. In the stationary case, rarefactive type solitary solution is obtained, whereas the nonstationary case yields the ion acoustic shock like structure solution which is very interesting. The importance of the study with relevance to both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is pointed out.

Haque, Q.; Masood, W. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan); Tsintsadze, N. L. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Plasma Physics, E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi (Georgia)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

State Laboratory Contacts DH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information DH. District of Columbia. ... Lab Closed See State Director's List. No Certificate. Delaware. ...

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

385

Lisheng Safety Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lisheng Safety Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200882-0. Address and Contact Information: Electronic & Lighting (Xiamen) Co. Ltd. No. ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

State Laboratory Contacts M  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Maine Department of Agriculture Metrology Laboratory Div. QA&R 28 Station House Road Augusta, ME 04333, 333 Cony Rd. ...

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

387

Price Sound Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Price Sound Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200874-0. Address and Contact Information: 638 RALEIGH STREET WINNIPEG ...

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Savannah River National Laboratory  

At a glance Remote Electrical Throw Device Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory ... sufficient manufacturing capacity, established dist ...

389

Engineering Laboratory Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and InfrastructureDisaster-Resilient Buildings, Infrastructure, and ... of the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory. ... Net-Zero Energy Residential Test ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

390

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Marine Corps Taps NREL to Help Replace Aging Steam Plant with Efficient Biomass Cogeneration

391

Laboratory Coordinating Council  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation's network of DOE Laboratories and Facilities hold an extensive store of research and development expertise and unique equipment developed for their various missions. The Laboratory Coordinating Council (LCC) gives US industry access to a ``virtual'' laboratory that can be tailored to meet the specific requirements of almost any research project. Established in 1995, the LCC responds to the major process industries' R and D needs with the capabilities of 16 DOE Laboratories and Facilities.

Chum, H.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUALNATIONAL LABORATORY 2nd QUARTER 2009 MILESTONE REPORT: Perform beam and target experiments with a new induction bunching module, extended FEPS plasma, and improved target diagnostic and positioning equipment on NDCX  

SciTech Connect

This effort contains two main components: The new induction-bunching module is expected to deliver higher fluence in the bunched beam, and the new target positioner will enable a significantly enhanced target physics repetition rate. The velocity ramp that bunches the K{sup +} beam in the neutralized drift compression section is established with a bipolar voltage ramp applied to an acceleration gap. An induction acceleration module creates this voltage waveform. The new bunching module (IBM) specially built for NDCX has approximately twice the capability (volt-seconds) as our original IBM. We reported on the beam line design for the best use of the bunching module in our FY08 Q2 report. Based on simulations and theoretical work, we chose to extend the drift compression section and use the additional volt-seconds to extend the pulse duration and keep the peak voltage swing (and velocity excursions) similar to the present module. Simulations showed that this approach, which extends the drift section, to be advantageous because it limits the chromatic aberrations in the beam spot on target. To this end, colleagues at PPPL have fabricated the meter-long extension to the ferroelectric plasma source and it was installed on the beam line with the new IBM in January 2009. Simulation results suggest a factor of two increase in energy deposition from the bunched beam. In the first WDM target run (August-November 2008) the target handling setup required opening the vacuum system to manually replace the target after each shot (which destroys the target). Because of the requirement for careful alignment of each individual target, the target shot repetition rate was no greater than 1 shot per day. Initial results of this run are reported in our FY08 4th Quarter Milestone Report. Based on the valuable experience gained in the initial run, we have designed and installed an improved target alignment and positioning system with the capability to reposition targets remotely. This capability allows us to significantly increase our shot repetition rate, and to take greater advantage of the pinhole/cone arrangement we have developed to localize the beam at final focus. In addition we have improved the capability of the optical diagnostic systems, and we have installed a new beam current transformer downstream of the target to monitor beam current transmitted through the target during an experiment. These improvements will allow us to better exploit the inherent capability of the NDCX facility for high repetition rate and thus to provide more detailed experimental data to assess WDM physics models of target behavior. This milestone has been met by demonstrating highly compressed beams with the new bunching module, which are neutralized in the longer drift compression section by the new ferro-electric plasma sources. The peak uncompressed beam intensity ({approx}600 kW/cm{sup 2}) is higher than in previous measurements, and the bunched beam current profiles are {approx}2ns. We have also demonstrated a large increase in the experimental data acquisition rate for target heating experiments. In the first test of the new remote-controlled target positioning system, we completed three successful target physics shots in less than two hours. Further improvements are expected.

Bieniosek, F.M.; Anders, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Dickinson, M.R.; Gilson, E.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.Y.; Katayanagi, T.; Logan, B.G.; Lee, C.W.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.; More, R. M.; Ni, P.; Pekedis, A.; Regis, M. J.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Enhanced laser beam coupling to a plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Density perturbations are induced in a heated plasma by means of a pair of oppositely directed, polarized laser beams of the same frequency. The wavelength of the density perturbations is equal to one half the wavelength of the laser beams. A third laser beam is linearly polarized and directed at the perturbed plasma along a line that is perpendicular to the direction of the two opposed beams. The electric field of the third beam is oriented to lie in the plane containing the three beams. The frequency of the third beam is chosen to cause it to interact resonantly with the plasma density perturbations, thereby efficiently coupling the energy of the third beam to the plasma.

Steiger, Arno D. (Pleasanton, CA); Woods, Cornelius H. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium coatings on the graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX are being investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower Single Null Ohmic Helium Discharges were used to coat graphite surfaces that had been pre-conditioned with Ohmic Helium Discharges of the same shape to reduce their contribution to hydrogen isotope recycling. The following deuterium NBI reference discharges exhibited a reduction in density by a factor of about 3 for limited and 2 for diverted plasmas respectively, and peaked density profiles. Recently, a lithium evaporator has been used to apply thin coatings on conditioned and unconditioned PFCs. Effects on the plasma density and the impurities were obtained by pre-conditioning the PFCs with ohmic helium discharges, and performing the first deuterium NBI discharge as soon as possible after applying the lithium coating.

Kugel, H W; Bell, M G; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Zakharov, L

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Blood samples are shipped at room temperature to the laboratory. White blood cells, lymphocytes, are cultured under sterile conditions in an incubator for 48 hours using a standard growth medium. Culture tubes are centrifuged, and cells are re-suspended in a weak salt solution, which allows the chromosomes to separate and spread evenly on slides.

396

Division of Laboratory Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Division of Laboratory Sciences U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Division of Laboratory Sciences Atlanta, Georgia 30341're also working in concert with state public health laboratories, providing training, proficiency testing

397

Plasma wall charge-exchange interactions in the 2XIIB magnetic mirror experiment  

SciTech Connect

Plasma-wall interactions by charge-exchange wall bombardment in the 2XIIB magnetic mirror experiment are discussed. Experimental measurements are modeled with a time-dependent, radial density buildup calculation. A low-density plasma sufficient to help shield the hot interior plasma from cold-gas erosion, as required by the model, is measured.

Stallard, B.W.; Coensgen, F.H.; Cummins, W.F.; Gormezano, C.; Logan, B.G.; Molvik, A.W.; Nexsen, W.E.; Simonen, T.C.; Turner, W.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor  

SciTech Connect

NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

400

Turbulent Spectra in the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of interstellar scintillations at radio wavelengths reveal a Kolmogorov-like scaling of the electron density spectrum with a spectral slope of -5/3 over six decades in wavenumber space. A similar turbulent density spectrum in the solar wind plasma has been reported. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind plasma over such extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories raising the especially intriguing question of how a compressible magnetized solar wind exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is a characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma. It is shown that the observed Kolmogorov-like (-5/3) spectrum can develop in the solar wind plasma by supersonic plasma motions that dissipate into highly subsonic motion that passively ...

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Argonne Tribology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribology Laboratory Tribology Laboratory CemeCon coating chamber CemeCon coating chamber Engineers in Argonne's Tribology Laboratory conduct research on advanced tribological systems (surface engineered materials, lubricants, fuels, and fuel/lubricant additives) for use in aggressive environments (for example, where two surfaces are rubbing together). The Laboratory is equipped with a full range of coating development, friction and wear testing, and characterization facilities. Evaluation of Coatings and Systems The Tribology Laboratory evaluates high performance coatings primarily intended to protect engine-component surfaces that undergo sliding and rolling contact in advanced transportation systems. Also tested are systems powered by diesel and gasoline engines, as well as

402

Leadership | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Board of Governors Organization Chart Argonne Distinguished Fellows Emeritus Scientists & Engineers History Discoveries Prime Contract Contact Us Leadership Argonne integrates world-class science, engineering, and user facilities to deliver innovative research and technologies. We create new knowledge that addresses the scientific and societal needs of our nation. Eric D. Isaacs Eric D. Isaacs, Director, Argonne National Laboratory Director, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Eric D. Isaacs, a prominent University of Chicago physicist, is President of UChicago Argonne, LLC, and Director of Argonne National Laboratory. Mark Peters Mark Peters, Deputy Lab Director for Programs Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs

403

Laboratory Experiments on the Merging of Nonlinear Anticyclonic Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mutual interaction of two isolated lenslike eddies is examined with the aid of a laboratory experiment on a rotating table. The isolated anticyclonic eddies are formed by withdrawing two cylinders containing a mixture of Freon (with a density ...

Doron Nof; Leslie M. Simon

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Bret Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011. December 1, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202

405

Empirical aspects of a Mini-Helicon Plasma Thruster Experiment (mHTX@MIT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A helicon plasma source experiment has been developed and then constructed in the MIT Space Propulsion Laboratory (SPL) vacuum chamber. This experiment allows study of the intrinsic advantages of efficient helicon plasma ...

Palaia, Joseph Eugene, 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Argonne National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Argonne National Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012 Review Reports 2011 Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections), November 2011 Nuclear Safety Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of UChicago Argonne, LLC at the Argonne National Laboratory, October 3, 2011 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Argonne National Laboratory, August 2011 Review Reports 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health Programs at Argonne National Laboratory, Summary Report, Vol. 1, May, 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, May 2005

407

Laboratory Computing Resource Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing DOE Logo Computing DOE Logo Search BIO ... Search Argonne Home > BIO home > Laboratory Computing Resource Center BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Argonne National Laboratory Logo Laboratory Computing Resource Center In 2002 Argonne National Laboratory established the Laboratory Computing Project to enable and promote the use of high-performance computing (HPC) across the Laboratory in support of its varied research missions. The Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) was established, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne’s first teraflops computing cluster, Jazz. In 2010 Jazz was replaced by Fusion, with a peak performance of 30 teraflops (and still growing). We just acquired Blues which will a performance of 100 teraflops.

408

Experimental study of filamentation in laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect

The filamentation instability can lead to regions of increased laser intensity when a spatially nonuniform laser beam interacts with a plasma. An experimental technique will be described which identifies the density perturbation produced by filaments. The growth of filaments has been investigated and, when the laser intensity is large enough, the transverse density profile of the filament can be measured. Evidence of filament growth influenced by plasma flow and density gradients is presented. 19 refs., 4 figs.

Young, P.E.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

* Enhance the two laboratories' ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high performance computing, high energy density science, inertial fusion energy, cyber security, hydrogen materials, antineutrino physics, biosciences, and microscopy. These...

410

PLASMA DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

1962-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

High-Energy Petawatt Project at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-energy petawatt laser, OMEGA EP, is currently under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Integrated into the existing OMEGA laser, it will support three major areas of research: (a) backlighting of high-energy-density plasmas, (b) integrated fast ignition experiments, and (c) high-intensity physics. The laser will provide two beams combined collinearly and coaxially with short pulses (~1 to 100 ps) and high energy (2.6 kJ at 10 ps). Cone-in-shell fuel-assembly experiments and simulations of short-pulse heated cryogenic targets are being performed in preparation for cryogenic integrated fast ignitor experiments on OMEGA EP.

Stoeckl, C.; Delettrez, J.A.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Maywar, D.N.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Rigatti, A.L.; Waxer, L.J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Stephens, R.B.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

Going green earns Laboratory gold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Going green earns Laboratory gold Going green earns Laboratory gold The Laboratory's newest facility is its first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design...

413

Vehicle Technologies Office: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: National Laboratories on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: National Laboratories on...

414

Laboratory program helps small businesses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab helps small businesses Laboratory program helps small businesses The free program, run jointly by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories, leverages the laboratories'...

415

The importance of EBIT data for Z-pinch plasma diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The results from the last six years of x-ray spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry of high energy density Z-pinch plasmas complemented by experiments with the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are presented. The two topics discussed are the development of M-shell x-ray W spectroscopic diagnostics and K-shell Ti spectropolarimetry of Z-pinch plasmas. The main focus is on radiation from a specific load configuration called an 'X-pinch'. X-pinches are excellent sources for testing new spectral diagnostics and for atomic modelling because of the high density and temperature of the pinch plasmas, which scale from a few {micro}m to several mm in size. They offer a variety of load configurations, which differ in wire connections, number of wires, and wire materials. In this work the study of X-pinches with tungsten wires combined with wires from other, lower-Z materials is reported. Utilizing data produced with the LLNL EBIT at different energies of the electron beam the theoretical prediction of line positions and intensity of M-shell W spectra were tested and calibrated. Polarization-sensitive X-pinch experiments at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) provide experimental evidence for the existence of strong electron beams in Ti and Mo X-pinch plasmas and motivate the development of x-ray spectropolarimetry of Z-pinch plasmas. This diagnostic is based on the measurement of spectra recorded simultaneously by two spectrometers with different sensitivity to the linear polarization of the observed lines and compared with theoretical models of polarization-dependent spectra. Polarization-dependent K-shell spectra from Ti X-pinches are presented and compared with model calculations and with spectra generated by a quasi-Maxwellian electron beam at the LLNL EBIT-II electron beam ion trap.

Safronova, A S; Kantsyrev, V L; Neill, P; Safronova, U I; Fedin, D A; Ouart, N D; Yilmaz, M F; Osborne, G; Shrestha, I; Williamson, K; Hoppe, T; Harris, C; Beiersdorfer, P; Hansen, S

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

416

Burning plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

FY 2005 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congressional Budget Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Preliminary Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropria ted as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress.

418

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

checking the document effective date on the PS Training website. Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences Directorate Subject: Photon Sciences TECH PROC LN2 Manual Fill...

419

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reminder to persons whose area will be inspected (i.e. Cognizant Space Managers) Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences Directorate Subject: ENVIRONMENTAL, SAFETY AND...

420

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

current version by checking the document effective date on the PS Training website. Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences Directorate Subject: Photon Sciences ELEC PPE -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Skip to Main Content U.S. Department of Energy Search PNNL Search PNNL Home About Research Publications Jobs News Contacts Featured Research...

422

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY In 2011, the Office of Fossil Energy evaluated the realized and estimated benefits provided by its programs. Implemented by NETL, these...

423

News | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Argo exascale architecture Click on image to enlarge. Designing a new operating system for exascale architectures Full Story Argonne National Laboratory has been awarded a...

424

Sandia National Laboratories - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Sandia National Laboratories Review Reports 2013 Review of the Sandia Site Office Quality Assurance Assessment of the Manzano Nuclear Operations, January 2013 Activity...

425

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

participants to respond to simulated hazardous materials emergencies involving a rail car, a clandestine laboratory, various modes of transportation, industrial piping...

426

Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 - Hours after a disaster declaration by Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory officials on Friday described "millions" of dollars in damage to environmental...

427

Hollings Marine Laboratory Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Hollings Marine Laboratory (HML) is a ... the Nation's coastal environmental- and health-related problems ... s National Ocean Service, the National ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory wild@mcs.anl.gov ABSTRACT Code optimization in the high-performance computing realm has traditionally focused on reducing execution time. The problem, in...

429

Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

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Oak Ridge National Laboratory Search Go Find People Contact Site Index Comments Home News News Releases Story Tips Features Contacts ORNL Review Magazine ORNL in the News...

430

Shared Intellect * Shared Laboratories...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3 NETL-RUA 2013 SPRING MEETING: Growth Through Collaboration National Energy Technology Laboratory - Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) members joined...

431

Joshua A Breslau | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joshua A Breslau Joshua A Breslau Research Physicist, Plasma Physics Laboratory. Dr. Breslau is a research physicist in the Theory department at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). He received a B.S. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) in 1995 and a Ph.D. in plasma physics from Princeton in 2001. His doctoral research, with Dr. Stephen Jardin, involved a numerical study of fast collisionless magnetic reconnection in merging spheromaks and flux tubes with an original parallel semi-implicit fluid code. For this work, he was awarded the Procter Honorific Fellowship by Princeton University. During this period, he also conducted research with Steven Hirshman at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory into compact spectral representations of magnetic flux surfaces

432

Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials An Office of Science User Facility U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Casimir force reduction Casimir Force Reduction through Nanostructuring By nanostructuring one of two interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, a new regime in the Casimir force was observed by researchers in the Center for Nanoscale Materials Nanofabrication & Devices Group working with collaborators at NIST, other national laboratories, and universities. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with <100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and,

433

1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Time-resolved visible and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of laser-produced tin plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma: an optically thin corona and an optically thick conductionplasma heating occurs indirectly through radiative transfer and electron conduction.conduction carries energy in the laser absorption zone beyond the critical surface to heat the higher density plasma.

O'Shay, Joseph Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

An experimental study and modeling of Transformer-Coupled Toroidal Plasma processing of materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Transformer Coupled Toroidal Plasma (TCTP) source uses a high power density plasma formed in a toroidal-shaped chamber by transformer coupling using a magnetic core. The objectives of the thesis are (1) to characterize ...

Bai, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

Lalazissis, G. A. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 (Greece)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fumonisin Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for B1, B2, B3,and total Fumonisin in corn meal samples. Fumonisin Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laboratories Laboratory methods

438

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Wave Packet Molecular Dynamics," Scientific-Coordination Session on "Non-ideal Plasma Research", Moscow, Russia, November 23-24, 2011, http:www.ihed.ras.runpp2011(oral...

439

Hunting the Quark Gluon Plasma ASSESSMENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hunting the Quark Gluon Plasma Hunting the Quark Gluon Plasma ASSESSMENTS BY THE EXPERIMENTAL COLLABORATIONS Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) * Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11974-5000 RESULTS FROM THE FIRST 3 YEARS AT RHIC managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle April 18, 2005 BNL -73847-2005 Formal Report

440

Material Measurement Laboratory Professional Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at the NIST, Gaithersburg Laboratories in Gaithersburg ... NIST Hollings Marine Laboratory (HML) in ... sponsoring institution of higher education and be ...

2013-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Scaling of Energy Gain with Plasma Parameters in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

We have recently demonstrating the doubling of the energy of particles of the ultra-short, ultra-relativistic electron bunches of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center [1]. This energy doubling occurred in a plasma only 85 cm-long with a density of {approx} 2.6 x 10{sup 17} e{sup -}/cm{sup -3}. This milestone is the result of systematic measurements that show the scaling of the energy gain with plasma length and density, and show the reproducibility and the stability of the acceleration process. We show that the energy gain increases linearly with plasma length from 13 to 31 cm. These are key steps toward the application of beam-driven plasma accelerators or plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA) to doubling the energy of a future linear collider without doubling its length.

Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

442

Professional Testing Laboratory, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 10-12) Rubber Cellular Cushion Used for Carpet or Rug Underlay - Weight, Thickness, and Density. [03/U02] ASTM D297 Ash Content. ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

calculations is based on the power spectral density (PSD) distribution of the sur-face height. The major problem of measurement of a PSD distribution ...

444

FY 2010 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2010 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 2:08:56PM Department Of Energy 5/4/2009 Page Number FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009 Appropriation FY 2010 Request Laboratory Table 1 1 $1,200

445

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Impacts on Sandia and the Nation 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation For further information, contact: Wendy R. Cieslak Senior Manager, Science, Technology, and Engineering Strategic Initiatives wrciesl@sandia.gov (505) 844-8633 or Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation ABOUT THE COVER: Images from some of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell membrane, a NISAC model, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of Washington, D.C. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 4 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 5 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Sandia National Laboratories' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program:

446

Laboratory Protection Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Points of Contact Points of Contact Organization Chart (pdf) Groups Emergency Services Emergency Management Security Operations BNL Site Access Main Gate Access Forms Welcome to the... Laboratory Protection Division (LP) Mission Statement: To serve and protect Brookhaven National Laboratory's staff, guests, and interests from the undesirable consequences of unwanted events by providing preparedness, assessment, engineering, and immediate response services for all types of security and non-security related emergencies. Protect DOE special nuclear materials, classified matter, sensitive information, and property against theft, diversion, or destruction; prevent the sabotage of programs that could result in significant scientific or financial impact; prevent the malevolent release of hazardous materials including radiological, chemical, and infectious agents or other criminal acts protecting people, property, and national security, providing a safe and secure environment for employees, the public, and the environment.

447

Direct measurements of the ionization profile in krypton helicon plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Helicons are efficient plasma sources, capable of producing plasma densities of 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} with only 100 s W of input rf power. There are often steep density gradients in both the neutral density and plasma density, resulting in a fully ionized core a few cm wide surrounded by a weakly ionized plasma. The ionization profile is usually not well known because the neutral density is typically inferred from indirect spectroscopic measurements or from edge pressure gauge measurements. We have developed a two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) diagnostic capable of directly measuring the neutral density profile. We use TALIF in conjunction with a Langmuir probe to measure the ionization fraction profile as a function of driving frequency, magnetic field, and input power. It is found that when the frequency of the driving wave is greater than a critical frequency, f{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 3f{sub lh}, where f{sub lh} is the lower hybrid frequency at the antenna, the ionization fraction is small (0.1%) and the plasma density low (10{sup 17} m{sup -3}). As the axial magnetic field is increased, or, equivalently, the driving frequency decreased, a transition is observed. The plasma density increases by a factor of 10 or more, the plasma density profile becomes strongly peaked, the neutral density profile becomes strongly hollow, and the ionization fraction in the core approaches 100%. Neutral depletion in the core can be caused by a number of mechanisms. We find that in these experiments the depletion is due primarily to plasma pressure and neutral pumping.

Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gulbrandsen, N. [Department of Physics and Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso (Norway)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle inspection station Lanes two through five will be open 24 hours a day and won't be staffed by a Laboratory protective force officer. September 1, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

450

Milestone reached: Waste shipment leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste shipment leaves LANL Waste shipment leaves LANL Milestone reached: Waste shipment leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory The material, known as "remote-handled transuranic waste" (RH-TRU), has been stored at the Laboratory since 1995. June 2, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

451

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Structures Formation in Inhomogeneous Plasma Excited by Thin Modulated Electron Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interaction of a thin modulated electron beam with inhomogeneous non-isothermal plasma is studied using 2D PIC electrostatic simulation. On the early stage of the interaction intensive HF oscillations of the electric field are observed in the local plasma resonance region. The ponderomotive force of these oscillations disturbs the initial profile of plasma density. On the later stage of the interaction a ring-like pulse of the plasma density propagates out of the resonance region. Velocity of this pulse depends on its intensity and exceeds the ion sound velocity. This fact demonstrates the nonlinear nature of the pulse.

Taras Eu. Litoshenko; Ihor O. Anisimov

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Study of Plasma Detachment in a Simplified 2D Geometry using UEDGE  

SciTech Connect

The location of the ionization front in a generic, detached plasma has been studied in a two-dimensional slab geometry by varying the core plasma density and input heating power. The ratio of the recombination to ionization current and the momentum losses in the computational domain have been used to quantify the degree of detachment. Contours of constant ratio of these parameter in the core plasma density--heating power parameter space show that at high input power higher momentum losses can be achieved even at low density. High fraction of recombination, however, require high core densities to sufficiently separate the plasma from the target plate.

Groth, M; Mahdavi, A M; Porter, G D; Rognlien, T D

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Pulse Thermal Processing of Functional Materials Using a Directed Plasma Arc  

Using pulses of high density infrared light from a directed plasma arc, ORNL researchersinvented a method to thermally process thin films and other ...

454

ccsd00001826, Impurity Transport in Plasma Edge Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Martin Priego Wood, and Jens Juul Rasmussen Association EURATOM ­ Risø National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Research, OPL ­ 128 DK ­ 4000 Roskilde, Denmark October 14, 2004 The turbulent transport of minority

455

Eun-Hwa Kim | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. She received her PhD from Kyung Hee University (Korea) in 2005. Since then, she has held research positions at Kyung Hee University (Korea),...

456

Achievements by The Department of Energy's Other Major Laboratories and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Major Laboratories and Facilities Other Major Laboratories and Facilities Ames Laboratory Medical Applications of Non-Medical Research Metamaterials Found to Work for Visible Light, with Science Article: Physics: Negative Refractive Index at Optical Wavelengths Points of Pride AMES History Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) Inside NBL Measurement Development NBL Information NBL History Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) ORISE at a Glance (Fact Sheet) ORISE Reestablished Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory ORISE Science Education Programs ORISE History Listing of Major Labs and Facilities Top Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) ITER and the Promise of Fusion Energy: What is ITER?

457

Quasi-equilibrium electron density along a magnetic field line  

SciTech Connect

A methodology is developed to determine the density of high-energy electrons along a magnetic field line for a low-{beta} plasma. This method avoids the expense and statistical noise of traditional particle tracking techniques commonly used for high-energy electrons in bombardment plasma generators. By preserving the magnetic mirror and assuming a mixing timescale, typically the elastic collision frequency with neutrals, a quasi-equilibrium electron distribution can be calculated. Following the transient decay, the analysis shows that both the normalized density and the reduction fraction due to collision converge to a single quasi-equilibrium solution.

Mao, Hann-Shin; Wirz, Richard [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

458

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2011 0, 2011 CX-007030: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chemistry of Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): Cambridge, Massachusetts Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 19, 2011 CX-007055: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silicon-Nanowire-Based Lithium-ion Batteries with Doubling Energy Density CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/19/2011 Location(s): Pawcatuck, Connecticut Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 19, 2011 CX-007052: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silicon-Nanowire-Based Lithium-Ion Batteries with Doubling Energy Density CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/19/2011 Location(s): Menlo Park, California

459

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 18, 2013 September 18, 2013 CX-010933: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Energy Density Lithium (Li)-ion Cells for Electric Vehicles (EV) Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/18/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 18, 2013 CX-010932: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Energy Density Lithium (Li)-ion Cells for Electric Vehicles (EV) Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/18/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2013 CX-010779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Predictive Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Modeling and Validation for High-Pressure Turbulent Flames and Flashback in Hydrogen-Enriched Gas

460

Safeguards Laboratory (SL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safeguards Laboratory Safeguards Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Safeguards Laboratory is a Department of Energy user facility equipped with a comprehensive set of field-deployable instrumentation for safeguards system development and personnel training. Mock-ups using industrial equipment and reference nuclear materials simulate real-world conditions for training, testing, and evaluations. The lab's openness and availability to the private sector enable development of new technologies that combat the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Applications Training and International Outreach Nondestructive Analysis Measurements Instrument Evaluations Integrated Safeguards Methodologies Measurement Technique Development Specifications Gamma and X-ray detection systems Handheld survey instruments

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "density laboratory plasmas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Vehicle Research Laboratory - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Research Laboratory Vehicle Research Laboratory Expertise The overall FEERC team has been developed to encompass the many disciplines necessary for world-class fuels, engines, and emissions-related research, with experimental, analytical, and modeling capabilities. Staff members specialize in areas including combustion and thermodynamics, emissions measurements, analytical chemistry, catalysis, sensors and diagnostics, dynamometer cell operations, engine controls and control theory. FEERC engineers have many years of experience in vehicle research, chassis laboratory development and operation, and have developed specialized systems and methods for vehicle R&D. Selected Vehicle Research Topics In-use investigation of Lean NOx Traps (LNTs). Vehicle fuel economy features such as lean operation GDI engines,

462

Sonication standard laboratory module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Final Report LDRD 04-ERD-019 Development of absolute spectroscopic diagnostics for non-LTE plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This project sought to further our understanding of non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) processes by providing benchmark data to validate computational models. This has been a difficult regime to study in the laboratory, where experimental scales produce strong gradients while interpretation requires well-characterized uniform plasmas. It has also been a difficult regime to simulate, as evidenced by the large discrepancies in predictions of NLTE spectra for fixed plasma properties. Not surprisingly, discrepancies between data and calculations of recombining laser-produced plasmas have been in evidence since the 1980's. The goal here was to obtain data of sufficient accuracy to help resolve these discrepancies and enable better modeling of the NLTE processes that are integral to high-energy density experiments. Advances in target fabrication, diagnostic development and simulation capabilities provided the foundations for this project. Uniform plasmas were to be achieved by using aerogel foams of low enough density ({approx}mg/cm{sup 3}) and thickness ({approx}mm) to be volumetrically heated by a laser. The foams were doped with Ti to provide K- and L-shell emission and recombination spectra during the experiments. A new absolutely calibrated transmission grating spectrometer provided absolute temporal measurements at 18 frequencies, in addition to a CCD image of the time-integrated spectrum. Finally, atomic models of varying degrees of sophistication and detail, combined with NLTE radiation transport and hydrodynamics, were used to simulate the experiments and understand the observed spectra. The first set of experiments was performed on the NIKE laser at NRL in March, 2004, with the goals of evaluating the performance of the diagnostics and the achieved plasma uniformity. By varying the laser parameters, we determined the required parameters for creating L-shell emission and were able to obtain K-shell (He-like) Ti. Pinhole x-ray images of the K-shell emission showed transverse plasma uniformity depended upon the target quality. Not all targets had acceptable quality, as it proved difficult to fabricate targets of the desired thickness (1/2 mm). Using thicker targets also adversely affected the production of uniform conditions through the plasma, as the plasma was expected to have a moderate optical thickness ({approx}few) to the laser radiation at early times during the laser pulse. Large differences in predictions of target performance by different codes were traced to the differences in the calculation of laser absorption, and this is discussed at length in the reports from UCSD. The first absolutely calibrated, time resolved L-shell emission spectra (from 4 to 26 {angstrom}) were also obtained in this series of experiments. The spectral resolution was not sufficient to match any individual spectral features. However, combined with the time resolution, it was sufficient to demonstrate that the emission shifted to lower photon energies later in time, consistent with the plasma recombining as it cooled. Simulations of these targets produced time-integrated emission in 3 different wavelength bands that matched the experimental measurements within a factor of three and provided a constraint on the average plasma temperature. The simulations also found rise times for the spectral bands similar to those actually observed. However, the highly non-uniform plasma conditions along with the poor spectral resolution did not place any detailed constraints on the NLTE modeling. The first set of experiments succeeded in mapping out the achievable plasma parameters and in identifying the major constraints and deficiencies due to target fabrication and experimental design. The second set of experiments was designed to provide increased spectral resolution, through modifications to the spectrometer, and increased plasma uniformity. Simulations predicted that illuminating the targets from two sides would provide good uniformity and still achieve the desired plasma temperatures with the decreased laser intensity achievable with th

Scott, H A

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

464

Plasma Wakefield Acceleration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rpwa rpwa Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content Department of Energy Page Content Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

465

Plasma wake field XUV radiation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

Prono, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM); Jones, Michael E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Nonextensive theory of dark matter and gas density profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pronounced core-halo patterns of dark matter and gas density profiles, observed in relaxed galaxies and clusters, were hitherto fitted by empirical power-laws. On the other hand, similar features are well known from astrophysical plasma environments, subject to long-range interactions, modeled in the context of nonextensive entropy generalization. We link nonextensive statistics to the problem of density distributions in large-scale structures and provide fundamentally derived density profiles, representing accurately the characteristics of both, dark matter and hot plasma distributions, as observed or generated in simulations. The bifurcation of the density distribution into a kinetic dark matter and thermodynamic gas branch turns out as natural consequence of the theory and is controlled by a single parameter kappa, measuring physically the degree of coupling within the system. Consequently, it is proposed to favor nonextensive distributions, derived from the fundamental physical context of entropy generali...

Leubner, M P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

FY 2006 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2005 Laboratory Tables Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2006 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 3:43:16PM Department Of Energy 1/27/2005 Page Number FY 2004 Comp/Approp FY 2005 Comp/Approp

468

Fy 2009 Laboratory Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Preliminary February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Laboratory / Facility Index FY 2009 Congressional Budget Page 1 of 3 (Dollars In Thousands) 8:59:25AM Department Of Energy 1/30/2008 Page Number FY 2007 Appropriation FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009

469