Sample records for dene suline choctaw

  1. Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. Sections I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, R.G. (ed.)

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report comprises two sections: Bayou Choctaw cavern stability issues, and geological site characterization of Bayou Choctaw. (DLC)

  2. The Bayou Choctaw Oil Shipment Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, S.J.; Ballard, S.; Barker, G.T.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early October of 1993, an oil shipment of about 1 million barrels was made from the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility to St. James Terminal. During the shipment, oil temperatures and soil temperatures along the pipeline were recorded. The field data were used to make estimations of soil thermal properties, thermal conductivity and specific heat. These data were also used to validate and calibrate a heat transfer code, OILPIP, which has been used to calculate pipeline cooling of oil during a drawdown.

  3. EECBG Success Story: New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center Posts Quick Results March 8, 2011 - 5:08pm Addthis The Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma used approximately 800,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding...

  4. Choctaw County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower International New EnergyChippewaChocolateChoctaw

  5. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  6. Three dimensional simulation for bayou choctaw strategic petroleum reserve (SPR).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon; Lee, Moo Yul

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three dimensional finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the caverns located at the Bayou Choctaw (BC) site which is considered a candidate for expansion. Fifteen active and nine abandoned caverns exist at BC, with a total cavern volume of some 164 MMB. A 3D model allowing control of each cavern individually was constructed because the location and depth of caverns and the date of excavation are irregular. The total cavern volume has practical interest, as this void space affects total creep closure in the BC salt mass. Operations including both cavern workover, where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric, and cavern enlargement due to leaching during oil drawdowns that use water to displace the oil from the caverns, were modeled to account for as many as the five future oil drawdowns in the six SPR caverns. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified.

  7. Conversion of the Bayou Choctaw geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic model implicit in the original site characterization report for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been converted to a numerical, computer-based three-dimensional model. The original site characterization model was successfully converted with minimal modifications and use of new information. The geometries of the salt diapir, selected adjacent sedimentary horizons, and a number of faults have been modeled. Models of a partial set of the several storage caverns that have been solution-mined within the salt mass are also included. Collectively, the converted model appears to be a relatively realistic representation of the geology of the Bayou Choctaw site as known from existing data. A small number of geometric inconsistencies and other problems inherent in 2-D vs. 3-D modeling have been noted. Most of the major inconsistencies involve faults inferred from drill hole data only. Modem computer software allows visualization of the resulting site model and its component submodels with a degree of detail and flexibility that was not possible with conventional, two-dimensional and paper-based geologic maps and cross sections. The enhanced visualizations may be of particular value in conveying geologic concepts involved in the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site to a lay audience. A Microsoft WindowsTM PC-based viewer and user-manipulable model files illustrating selected features of the converted model are included in this report.

  8. Genetic Evidence for the Phylogenetic Relationship between Na-Dene and Yeniseian Speakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubicz, Rohina; Melvin, Kristin L.; Crawford, Michael H.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    *O, MN*M, RH*R1, RH*R2, GM*AG, GM*AXG, KM*]) from three blood group systems and immunoglobulins. The first principal component accounts for 55.8% of the total variation and separates the Na-Dene (AP, DG, HA, and NV) from the Siberian populations (AE, CC..., EK, FN, KT, and 748 / RUBICZ ET AL. 0.3 NG FN '-. 0.2 - C..' 0 0.1 DG a) c HA *L) 0.0 -. ,---- ,---,,,,,---- ,,,,---- ,-- ,,,-,,,,,---,,,,,,,----............ AE NV CC -0.1 -EK * AP A~KT -0.2 -0.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 Eigenvector 1 - 55.8% Figure 2...

  9. Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

  10. Expansion analyses of strategic petroleum reserve in Bayou Choctaw : revised locations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a series of three-dimensional simulations for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The U.S. Department of Energy plans to leach two new caverns and convert one of the existing caverns within the Bayou Choctaw salt dome to expand its petroleum reserve storage capacity. An existing finite element mesh from previous analyses is modified by changing the locations of two caverns. The structural integrity of the three expansion caverns and the interaction between all the caverns in the dome are investigated. The impacts of the expansion on underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity are quantified. Two scenarios were used for the duration and timing of workover conditions where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric pressure. The three expansion caverns are predicted to be structurally stable against tensile failure for both scenarios. Dilatant failure is not expected within the vicinity of the expansion caverns. Damage to surface structures is not predicted and there is not a marked increase in surface strains due to the presence of the three expansion caverns. The wells into the caverns should not undergo yield. The results show that from a structural viewpoint, the locations of the two newly proposed expansion caverns are acceptable, and all three expansion caverns can be safely constructed and operated.

  11. A validation test for Adagio through replication of Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw JAS3D models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung Yoon

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JAS3D, a three dimensional iterative solid mechanics code, has been used for structural analyses for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve system since the 1990s. JAS3D is no longer supported by Sandia National Laboratories, and has been replaced by Adagio. To validate the transition from JAS3D to Adagio, the existing JAS3D input decks and user subroutines for Bayou Choctaw and Big Hill models were converted for use with Adagio. The calculation results from the Adagio runs are compared to the JAS3D. Since the Adagio results are very similar to the JAS3D results, Adagio is judged to be performing satisfactorily.

  12. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  13. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 1, Bayou Choctaw site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 1 focuses on the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, located in southern Louisiana. Volumes 2, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  14. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

  15. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  16. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  17. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  18. Choctaw, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower International NewOklahoma: Energy Resources Jump

  19. Choctaw Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport | Open EnergyChippewa Valley

  20. EECBG Success Story: New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah River SiteDepartment ofDepartment ofDepartment

  1. Choctaw County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower International New

  2. Choctaw County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower International NewOklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to:

  3. New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverview | Department of1-93Energy Carlsbad Field Office

  4. HOME IN THE CHOCTAW DIASPORA: SURVIVAL AND REMEMBRANCE AWAY FROM NANIH WAIYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Jason Brightstar

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    this writing at earlier stages including Ralph De Unamuno, Nicole Sieminski, and Kirsten Kinegak-Friday, Nicole Johnson. To the South Bay Slackers, my closest friends and study partners: Robin Bueno, Eric Sanchez, Angelina Ponce De Leon, Cathy Bueno, Jojo Leon... for always being present for those of us coming up. And the following for your important work in LA: Elton Naswood, Willie Sandoval, Tzenni Bah Garcia, Janine Trejo, Brenda George, Sandra Sanchez, the Pulskamps, Jennifer Varenchik, Phil Hale, Ben Hale, Rev...

  5. Integrated petrographic and petrophysical study of the Smackover formation, Womack Hill field, Clarke and Choctaw counties, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Tiffany Lynn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permeability $ = porosity as a fraction or percent = phi ~Rk T ds = dolostone gs = grainstone ms =- mudstonc ps = packstone ws = wackestone ~GT alg = algal bio = bioclastic onc = oncoidal oo = oolitic pel = peloidal F~tT ap = intraparticle ch... of vvell names. permit and API numbers, aml depth intervals. Welt Name Scru?88 Parker & Norton Unit 9-14 ?1 Turner Unit 13-5 ?1 'I'urner Unit 13-6 ? I Counselniaii Uml 18-12 ?I Turner ?13-25 Womack Hill Field Unit 14-5 ?2 Permit ? 1591 1760 1781...

  6. Integrated petrographic and petrophysical study of the Smackover formation, Womack Hill field, Clarke and Choctaw counties, Alabama 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Tiffany Lynn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aperture (throat) median sizes measured by mercury capillary pressures were tested for correspondence with porosity, pore type, permeability, and saturation in order to establish quality rankings for the reservoir units.This study aims to bridge the gap...

  7. CX-005372: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Repair Bayou Choctaw Timber Pipe SupportsCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/22/2011Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, LouisianaOffice(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  8. CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe SupportsCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 08/24/2010Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, LouisianaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  9. CX-001001: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayou Choctaw Replacement Vacuum TruckCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/22/2010Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, LouisianaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  10. CX-004170: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Refurbish Bayou Choctaw Static Mixer Government Furnished EquipmentCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 09/17/2010Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, LouisianaOffice(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  11. EIS-0024: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Capline Group Salt Domes, Iberia, Napoleonville, Weeks Island Expansion, Bayou Choctaw Expansion, Chacahoula- Iberia, Iberville, and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserves developed this EIS to analyze the environmental impacts which would occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of five proposed candidate sites in the Capline Group of salt domes.

  12. Self-weakening in lithiated graphene electrodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weakening in lithiated graphene electrodes Hui Yang a , Xu Huang a , Wentao Liang a , Adri C.T. van Duin b, , Muralikrishna Raju b , Sulin Zhang a, a Department of...

  13. Excerpt from The Red Land to the South: American Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, James H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Writers and Indigenous Mexico (Minneapolis: University ofLiterature and Indigenous Mexico T he publication of Choctaws detective novels set in Mexico could read Philip Ainsworth

  14. EIS-0024: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Capline Group Salt Domes, Iberia, Napoleonville, Weeks Island Expansion, Bayou Choctaw Expansion, Chacahoula - Iberia, Iberville, and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana

  15. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest, A.; Crate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

    2002-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objectives of the project were: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs.

  16. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Cate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

    2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objectives of this project was to: increase the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. Efforts for Year 1 of this project has been reservoir characterization, which has included three (3) primary tasks: geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, and microbial characterization.

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Todd

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research (in press). EG-Battaglia LB08028 Advanced SiliconX-ray Sources M . Battaglia, P. Denes et al; "Radiation2010). S. Mattiazzo, M . Battaglia, P. Denes, et al; "Total

  18. University of Florence Dipartimento di Sistemi e Informatica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firenze, Università degli Studi di

    the Service-Oriented Prole is extended by dening new characteristics for the non-functional service-contracts

  19. CX-006250: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blast and Paint Bayou Choctaw Brine Pump Pad and Associate PipingCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 06/20/2011Location(s): Iberville Parish, LouisianaOffice(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  20. CX-008345: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Remove Abandoned Bayou Choctaw Timber Bridge Over North/South Canal CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 05/03/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  1. DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Richton, DOE also proposes to expand capacity at three existing SPR sites: Big Hill in Texas, and Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry in Louisiana. Selection of sites is the first...

  2. CX-007813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayou Choctaw Building 401 Air Handling Unit-3 Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.4 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  3. Compact Graph Representations and Parallel Connectivity Algorithms for Massive Dynamic Network Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madduri, Kamesh

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vol. 411, pp. 41– [17] D. Kempe, J. Kleinberg, and A.net- works as de?ned by Kempe et al. [17]: a temporal

  4. NP Early Career Opportunities Archives | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    baryonic-to-mesonic resonance ratios to study possible gluon splitting in partonic media. 2010 Denes Molnar Purdue University Develop and apply theoretical approaches and...

  5. Current Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHYS 630, Advanced Theory Of Electricity And Magnetism, Denes Molnar. PHYS 661, Quantum Mechanics II, Sherwin T. Love. PHYS 663, Quantum Field ...

  6. In reply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wikis have been de?ned as Web sites that can be openlywere simply too many great Web sites to list them all in our

  7. Transitive closure and metric inequality of weighted graphs: detecting protein interaction modules using cliques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Xiong, Hui; Peng, Hanchuan; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closure and Metric Inequality of Weighted Graphs – Detectingleads to a transitivity inequality which is equivalentto ultra-metric inequality. This can be used to de?ne

  8. Connected to the Land: Nature and Spirit in the Novels of Louis Owens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierotti, Raymond

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these individuals predispose them to working in art forms that do not arise from tribal cultural traditions. Louis Owens, a Choctaw-Cherokee and Irish writer and scholar was especially effective in presenting clear images of what it means to be of mixed blood. Owens...

  9. Identifying structural damage from images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, ZhiQiang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level set functions, the signed distance functions (SDF).A SDF, denoted by ?(x), de?nes the distance values from (x)’The construction of an SDF is usually used as an auxiliary

  10. Direct electron detection in transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Liang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Duttweiler, J. Bouwer, S. Peltier, M. Ellisman, P. Denes, F.J. C. Bouwer, S. T. Peltier, M. Ellisman and N. -H. Xuong (J. C. Bouwer, S. T. Peltier, M. H. Ellisman and N. H.

  11. Living Technology and Development: Agricultural Biotechnology and Civil Society in Kenya 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harsh, Matthew

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines relationships between science and technology and development, as dened and manifested by non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in Kenya whose work involves agricultural biotechnologies. Non-governmental ...

  12. [1995, 36pp]---The notion of norm and the representation theory of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of endoscopy [1, 19, 20, 21, 23,24, 37, 46] which relates them to self-dual ...... the standard splitting of GL,, de?ned by standard root vectors of T6 in B5. Here we ...

  13. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    de?ne as all heavy and distillate fuel oil plants. Theirengines burning heavy fuel oil, whereas prior to that, theit is available and heavy fuel oil for supplying power to

  14. Molybdenum and Tungsten Monoalkoxide Pyrrolide (MAP) Alkylidene Complexes That Contain a 2,6-Dimesitylphenylimido

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Peter

    Molybdenum and Tungsten Monoalkoxide Pyrrolide (MAP) Alkylidene Complexes That Contain a 2 ABSTRACT: Molybdenum and tungsten bispyrrolide alkyli- dene complexes that contain a 2 those that contain 2,5-dimethylpyrro- lide are pyridine free. Molybdenum and tungsten MAP 2

  15. Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CamScanner

    Let fbe a real function de?ned on (a, b). Prove that the set of points at which f has a simple discontinuity is at most countable. Hint: Let E be the set on which.

  16. On Fibre Spaces and the Evaluation Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 5, 2003 ... Also f : S n —-> X is any map and it“ and are the natural liftings of ac and f. Let c: B” ——+B" >Fbe de?ned by c(b) : (b, *). Then fate lifts fa.

  17. Loss mechanisms in turbine tip clearance flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Arthur (Arthur C.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of tip clearance ow have been carried out to dene the loss generation mechanisms associated with tip leakage in unshrouded axial turbines. Mix- ing loss between the leakage, which takes the form of a ...

  18. Diagnostics for Gaussian Process Emulators Leonardo S. Bastos and Anthony O'Hagan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    in the 1940s at Los Alamos National Laboratory to study the behaviour of nuclear weapons. Since then, the use test data, known as validation data, dened by a sample of simulator runs not used to build the emulator

  19. [1998] Review of `Canonical desingularization in characteristic zero ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madrid, 1977; MR 80h:32027] is an outstanding achievement of twentieth-century ... dinate system such that each local component of g—1 V is de?ned.

  20. Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniewski, Anna Monro

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    output” means the power output of the solar cell with theof a solar cell is de?ned by [46]: max power output sunlightsolar cell for various values of an applied voltage. This is equivalent to measuring the power output

  1. Systems analysis of genomes: Towards a "topobiology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Timothy Eric

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    density cross-correlation (PDC) “strength,” de?ned as thebetween two data sets, a PDC “landscape” is obtained. Usingto the local maxima in each PDC landscape (Figure 8.4c). The

  2. Contests for Status Benny Moldovanu, Aner Sela and Xianwen Shi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Sven Oliver

    Abstract We study the optimal design of organizations under the assumption that agents in a contest care with a sliding scale of status determined by precisely de...ned ranges of measured output (fruit, grain, oil, etc

  3. Analysis of Strategic Petroleum Reserve bubble point pressure data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, S.E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical models are presented to predict the bubble pressure for 481 cavern oil samples withdrawn from the Bryan Mound, West Hackberry, Big Hill, and Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites. The predicted bubble point pressure is compared to experimentally measured bubble point pressure to resolve potential sources of error introduced to the experimental analysis. In order to gain a higher level of confidence in the measurement of the bubble point pressure, a stochastic analysis of the data is recommended in the future.

  4. A new southern high-latitude index P. Ballatore1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -aligned currents at the poleward auroral rim both in¯uence geomagnetic perturbations at polar latitudes and feed a new regional geomagnetic index AES-80, de®ned similarly to the classical auroral electrojet AE index, using data from ®ve Antarctic stations located at corrected geomagnetic latitudes about 80 °S. Because

  5. Modeling of elasto-capillary phenomena David L. Henann*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy, driving a uid body to minimize its surface area in an effort to minimize free energy.1 However, and surface area A. Surface energy will scale as gA, while volumetric strain energy scales as GV. DeningModeling of elasto-capillary phenomena David L. Henann*a and Katia Bertoldi*bc Surface energy

  6. Thermophoresis at a charged surface: the role of hydrodynamic slip Julien Morthomas and Alois Wrger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the thermophoretic mobility of charged particles as a function of the Navier slip length b. A moderate value of b at a particle-uid interface. The thermophoretic mobility is de...ned through the drift velocity of the solute]. In the present work, we derive the thermophoretic mo- bility as a function of the particle size a, the Debye

  7. Emerging challenges in cognitive ergonomics: managing swarms of self-organizing agent-based automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, John D.

    Emerging challenges in cognitive ergonomics: managing swarms of self-organizing agent safety and e ciency. Addressing these problems will require the ®eld of cognitive ergonomics to consider-based description of well- de®ned scenarios. Cognitive ergonomics must develop an understanding of the basic

  8. HIGH RANK ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION GROUP OVER QUADRATIC FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujella, Andrej

    HIGH RANK ELLIPTIC CURVES WITH PRESCRIBED TORSION GROUP OVER QUADRATIC FIELDS JULIÁN AGUIRRE for the torsion group of elliptic curves dened over quadratic number elds. We present examples of high rank elliptic curves with given torsion group which give the current records for most of the torsion groups

  9. Rethinking Newton's Principia Simon Saunders1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Simon

    That is not the strategy taken here. My objective is to give a consistent reading of Newton's Principia ­ discarding of mass of the solar system), wrongly identi...ed by Newton as inertial, is exemplary: it is a local total energy and angular momentum zero can be de...ned. No such constraint ­ and no such prediction

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 58, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2010 3621 On the Diversity-Multiplexing Tradeoff of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motani, Mehul

    the multiple-input single-output (MISO) upper bound. The analysis also demonstrates that, with a careful choice signal-to-noise (SNR) regime. It is a tool to characterize the tradeoff between the reliability and the number of degrees of freedom of a communication system. Reliability is measured by diversity gain, dened

  11. Design techniques for graph-based error-correcting codes and their applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Ching Fu

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In ShannonÂ?s seminal paper, Â?A Mathematical Theory of CommunicationÂ?, he de?ned Â?Channel CapacityÂ? which predicted the ultimate performance that transmission systems can achieve and suggested that capacity is ...

  12. Impurity enrichment and radiative enhancement using induced SOL ow in DIII-D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Impurity enrichment and radiative enhancement using induced SOL ¯ow in DIII-D M.R. Wade *,1 , W on DIII-D have demonstrated the ecacy of using induced scrape-o-layer (SOL) ¯ow to preferentially enrich at the midplane and divertor exhaust. Using this SOL ¯ow, an improvement in enrichment (de®ned as the ratio of im

  13. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

  14. Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

  15. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

  16. Crustal structure of the Ouachita Mountains region from lithosphere seismic profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkoros, George Fotios

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implies, this is a region of numerous large scale, north verging, thrust faults cutting east-west trending folds. The Choctaw thrust I'ault is commonly taken to be the boundary between the Arkoma basin and the Frontal thrust zone of the Ouachitas.... At this boundary the basement dips steeply southward to depths of 10, 000 m (Flawn et al. , 1961). It is believed (Viele, 1973) that the basement is not involved in the thrusting, but acts as a ramp for the thrust faulting of deep-water Paleozoic deposits...

  17. COMPUTING MAXIMAL CHAINS ALBERTO MARCONE, ANTONIO MONTALBN, AND RICHARD A. SHORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shore, Richard A.

    -founded partial order then every chain in P is a well-order and we de...ne the height of P, ht(P), to be the supremum of all ordinals which are order types of chains in P. For x 2 P, let htP (x) be the supremum that ht(P) = supf htP (x) + 1 j x 2 P g and that htP (x) = supf htP (y) + 1 j y

  18. The Hairpin Ribozyme Substrate Binding-domain: A Highly Constrained D-shaped Conformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Nils G.

    .g. NMR or X-ray crystallography, is their inability to de®ne ¯exible regions. This problem is especially, 1998). There is no X-ray crystal or complete NMR structure for the hairpin ribozyme (Cai & Tinoco JrÂal MontreÂal, QueÂbec, H3C 3J7 Canada 3 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA 4

  19. Investigation of combustive flows and dynamic meshing in computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Steven B.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 74 XII Temperature values at axial locations using chemical model B. Experimental value at 0.836 m is 1478K : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 75 XIII Sandia velocity inlet boundary conditions speci?cation : : : : : : : : 90 XIV Sandia pressure outlet... monoxide mass fraction contour plots with re- versible reaction de?ned. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 79 25 Temperature contour plot of turbine in situ reheat simulation. : : : : 80 26 Experimental setup of Sandia combustion ?ame...

  20. On Assessing Robustness in Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaroliagis, Christos D.

    that commodity. Also, for each commodity i, a weight wti : E R+ 0 is dened that quanties the provided quality of service (QoS), when this com- modity is routed along an edge e or a path p, where wti(p) = ep wti(e). Smaller weight means better QoS. When a commodity is not routed along its shortest w.r.t. wti (optimal w

  1. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve crude oil storage development program for 750 million barrels was completed this quarter. The final 2.3 million barrels of new gross cavern volume was developed at Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw during the quarter. The Department's competitive Invitation for Bids (IFB) for the sale of the Sulphur Mines facility as an operating petroleum storage site elicited no bids. The IFB was received by 85 firms. Discussions with the General Services Administration (GSA) regarding the transfer of the property to GSA will be initiated in the next quarter. There were no crude oil deliveries to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during the calendar quarter ending September 30, 1991. Acquisition of crude oil for the Reserve has been suspended since August 2, 1990, following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq. As of September 30, 1991, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory was 568.5 million barrels. (VC)

  2. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve crude oil storage development program for 750 million barrels was completed this quarter. The final 2.3 million barrels of new gross cavern volume was developed at Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw during the quarter. The Department`s competitive Invitation for Bids (IFB) for the sale of the Sulphur Mines facility as an operating petroleum storage site elicited no bids. The IFB was received by 85 firms. Discussions with the General Services Administration (GSA) regarding the transfer of the property to GSA will be initiated in the next quarter. There were no crude oil deliveries to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during the calendar quarter ending September 30, 1991. Acquisition of crude oil for the Reserve has been suspended since August 2, 1990, following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq. As of September 30, 1991, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory was 568.5 million barrels. (VC)

  3. Tests of time-invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busetti, Fabio; Harvey, Andrew C

    as an alternative - or complement - to quan- tiles; see, for example, Newey and Powell (1987), Efron (1991) and, in a time series context, De Rossi and Harvey (2006b). We then de?ne residuals based on expectiles and show that they can be used to construct... based on absolute values, (5), are very close to those of the #17;#28; (DQ) tests in (3). The earlier theoretical analysis indicated that the statistics are identical for known quan- tiles and it appears that enforcing the symmetry restriction when...

  4. Understanding Interactions in Social Networks and Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Holly, Sean

    ? for ? = 1? ???? Here, e is a ? £ 1 unit vector and S? is de…ned as the matrix: S? = 2 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 ?2?11 ??12 ? ? ??1? ??21 ? 2 ?22 ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ???1 ? ? ? 2 ??? 3 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 ? for ? = 1? ???? The weights that members attach to the estimate... for the subset who remain on the Committee for the whole of the period. 4 likemindedness. We extend the work in Bhattacharjee and Holly (2009) by considering heterogeneity in the beliefs about the e¤ects of interest rates on output and in‡ation, in the private...

  5. On the cohomology of joins of operator algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husain, Ali-Amir

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    (A) is a Hilbert Ccurrency1-module over A C1n. Ccurrency1-modules were originally de¯ned and studied by Kaplansky and we outline the foundations of the theory and particular properties of Mn(A). Furthermore, we prove a structure theorem for ultraweakly... closed submodules of Mn(A), using techniques from the theory of type I ¯nite von Neumann algebras. By analogy with the classical join in topology, the join Acurrency1B for operator algebras A and B acting on Hilbert spaces H and K, respectively, was de...

  6. Feasibility Study for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Hendrix, Project Director; Charles Weir, Project Manager; Dr. John Plodinec, Technology Advisor; Dr. Steve Murray, Economic Advisor

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted a study of the feasibility of siting a renewable energy biomass-based installation on tribal lands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether such an installation can be economically sustainable, as well as consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the Tribe. Scope: To achieve the goal of the feasibility study, the following tasks were carried out: (1) Resource availability assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the availability of both poultry litter and wood residues for use in the proposed facility. (2) Power utilization assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the potential market size for power produced, the existing infrastructure for delivering power to that market, and the costs and economic returns for doing so. (3) Technology review--The objective of this review was to identify one, or more, technical options for detailed economic and technical assessment. The study considered a range of feedstock and product mixtures of poultry litter; wood residues as feedstock; and electrical power and other ancillary products as outputs. Distributed power sources was also examined. Technologies ranging from gasification to systems that produce both power and value-added chemicals were considered. Technologies selected for detailed review were those that can be sized to process the amount of available feed (poultry litter, or poultry litter and wood residues), and that also appear to make economic sense in terms of the value of their inputs. The technology review leaned heavily on the experience from similar prior DOE projects, particularly those conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL was involved in a consultative role, so that the project team could leverage their experience. (4) Systems Design(s)--Based on the technology review, a pre-conceptual design for an installation was developed. This included identification of unit operations and equipment, maintenance, manpower, feedstock requirements, and output (power and any other ancillary products). Energy and mass flows were identified. (5) Manpower development assessment--The objectives of this assessment was to identify training needs for the selected option(s), and determine how they can best be met. Using the manpower estimates from the pre-conceptual system design, skills and training needs were to be identified. A plan for providing the needed manpower was to be developed, and any associated costs determined. (6) Economic assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the economic viability and sustainability of the technology option(s) identified through the technical review option. The costs of bringing the feedstock to the proposed facility were combined with nominal operation costs and potential production distribution costs to identify total costs. Revenue from power distribution (and, possibly, from sale of ancillary products) were combined with any possible government credits or payments to identify gross revenue. Economic viability was determined by net revenue and return on investment. A business plan for the selected option was to be produced that would consider long-term sustainability of the project. (7) MBCI compatibility assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine whether the renewable energy technology was compatible with the MBCI's cultural, social and economic values. As part of this assessment, the environmental impacts and benefits were to be determined (Environmental stewardship is an important part of the Choctaw culture.). The effects of a project on employment were projected. The compatibility of the renewable energy project with MBCI cultural and social values were determined. Most importantly, the compatibility of the renewable energy installation with the MBCIs economic development goals and directions were determined. A project team led by the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted the feasibility study. The team included th

  7. Petrology and hydrocarbon reservoir potential of subsurface Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, Black Warrior basin, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, R.H.; Maylan, M.A.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of Mississippi and Alabama is a Paleozoic foreland basin developed between the North American craton and the Appalachian and Ouachita orogenic belts. The basin fill consists of a middle Mississippian to Lower Pennsylvanian clastic wedge, transitional in character, between Appalachian molasse and Ouachita flysch. Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, shales, coals, and thin conglomerates make up the greater part of the wedge, thickening to 11,000 ft in northeast Mississippi. Although the outcropping and near-surface Pottsville is economically importance as a source of coal in Alabama, only minor amounts of gas have been derived from the subsurface Pottsville of Mississippi (Clay and Monroe Counties). Production from the Black Warrior basin, mostly gas, is chiefly from Chesterian (Mississippian) sands and limestones in the shallower part of the basin, principally in Monroe County. Cores of Pottsville sandstones from four wells in the deeper part of the Black Warrior basin (Calhoun and Choctaw Counties) have been examined to determine their petrography, diagenetic history, and reservoir quality. This part of the basin is relatively unexplored, and the primary objective of the study was to determine if suitable hydrocarbon reservoirs are present.

  8. Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation: new frontier for hydrocarbon prospecting in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of oil in 1967 from the Smackover Formation at Toxey field, Choctaw County, Alabama, and of condensate in 1968 from the Norphlet Formation at Flomaton field, Escambia County, Alabama, the Upper Jurassic has become the primary exploration target in southwestern Alabama. Norphlet petroleum traps in the region are principally combination traps involving favorable stratigraphy and salt anticlines (Copeland field), extensional fault traps associated with salt movement (Flomaton field), and faulted salt anticlines (Hatter's Pond and Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann fields). Reservoir rocks include marine, dune, and fluvial sandstone lithofacies. Sandstone porosity involves both primary intergranular and secondary dissolution and fracture. Smackover algal carbonate mudstone is probably the source for much of the Norphlet hydrocarbon, but downdip Norphlet marine shales may also be source rocks. The central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions should continue to be excellent areas to explore for hydrocarbons in the years ahead. Successful Norphlet petroleum prospecting in the area has involved the identification of favorable sandstone lithofacies and structural hydrocarbon traps by using geologic and geophysical methods. Future Norphlet discoveries will require the delineation of stratigraphic and structural/stratigraphic combination hydrocarbon traps using seismic-stratigraphic techniques.

  9. Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation: new frontier for hydrocarbon prospecting in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of oil in 1967 from the Smackover Formation at Toxey field, Choctaw County, Alabama, and of condensate in 1968 from the Norphlet Formation at Flomaton field, Escambia County, Alabama, the Upper Jurassic has become the primary exploration target in southwestern Alabama. Norphlet petroleum traps in the region are principally combination traps involving favorable stratigraphy and salt anticlines (Copeland field), exensional fault traps associated with salt movement (Flomaton field), and faulted salt anticlines (Hatter's Pond and Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann fields). Reservoir rocks include marine, dune, and fluvial sandstone lithofacies. Sandstone porosity involves both primary intergranular and secondary dissolution and fracture. Smackover algal carbonate mudstone is probably the source for much of the Norphlet hydrocarbon, but downdip Norphlet marine shales may also be source rocks. The central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions should continue to be excellent areas to explore for hydrocarbons in the years ahead. Successful Norphlet petroleum prospecting in the area has involved the identification of favorable sandstone lithofacies and structural hydrocarbon traps by using geologic and geophysical methods. Future Norphlet discoveries will require the delineation of stratigraphic and structural/stratigraphic combination hydrocarbon traps using seismic-stratigraphic techniques.

  10. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 3, Bryan Mound Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 3 focuses on the Bryan Mound SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 2, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  11. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 4, West Hackberry site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 4 focuses on the West Hackberry SPR site, located in southwestern Louisiana. Volumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  12. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2, Big Hill Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 2 focuses on the Big Hill SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  13. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Annual/quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) facilities development for the authorized 750 million barrel program was completed in 1991. Expansion of the SPR`s offsite commercial distribution capacity to 4.3 million barrels per day is in progress. During calendar year 1991, the SPR`s crude oil storage capacity increased by 61 million barrels with the completion of caverns at the Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw sites. On January 16, 1991, in conjunction with the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, President Bush ordered a drawdown and distribution of Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil as part of a coordinated contingency plan agreed to by member countries of the International Energy Agency. The Department successfully conducted the drawdown during the period January 17 through March 31 and delivered a total of 17.2 million barrels of crude oil to 13 purchasers. There were no crude oil deliveries to the SPR during the year ending December 31, 1991. Acquisition of crude oil for the Reserve has been suspended since August 2, 1990, following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq. As of December 31, 1991, the SPR inventory was 568.5 million barrels.

  14. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This August 15, 1991, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report describes activities related to the site development, oil acquisition, budget and cost of the Reserve during the period April 1, 1991, through June 30, 1991. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facilities development program is proceeding on schedule. The Reserve's capacity is currently 726 million barrels. A total of 5.5 million barrels of new gross cavern volume was developed at Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw during the quarter. There were no crude oil deliveries to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during the calendar quarter ending June 30, 1991. Acquisition of crude oil for the Reserve has been suspended since August 2, 1990, following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq. As of June 30, 1991, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory was 568.5 million barrels. The reorganization of the Office of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve became effective June 28, 1991. Under the new organization, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Project Management Office in Louisiana will report to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program Office in Washington rather than the Oak Ridge Field Office in Tennessee. 2 tabs.

  15. Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) facilities development for the authorized 750 million barrel program was completed in 1991. Expansion of the SPR's offsite commercial distribution capacity to 4.3 million barrels per day is in progress. During calendar year 1991, the SPR's crude oil storage capacity increased by 61 million barrels with the completion of caverns at the Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw sites. On January 16, 1991, in conjunction with the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, President Bush ordered a drawdown and distribution of Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil as part of a coordinated contingency plan agreed to by member countries of the International Energy Agency. The Department successfully conducted the drawdown during the period January 17 through March 31 and delivered a total of 17.2 million barrels of crude oil to 13 purchasers. There were no crude oil deliveries to the SPR during the year ending December 31, 1991. Acquisition of crude oil for the Reserve has been suspended since August 2, 1990, following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq. As of December 31, 1991, the SPR inventory was 568.5 million barrels.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Diffusion of House Prices in the UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holly, Sean; Pesaran, M Hashem; Yamagata, Takashi

    = 0; 1; :::; H (3.11) where ei is an (N + 1) #2; 1 vector of zeros with the exception of its ith element which is unity, #6; = 0 BBBBBBB@ #27;00 0 0 #1; #1; #1; 0 0 0 #27;11 #27;12 #1; #1; #1; #27;1;N#0;1 #27;1N 0 #27;21 #27;22 #1; #1; #1; #27;2;N#0... , gi(h) = #27; #0;1=2 ii hR #6;ei = g0(h) for i = 0: So the generalized impulse response function (GIRF) de?ned by (3.11) with #6; given by (3.12) is applicable to the analysis of shocks to the dominant and non-dominant regions alike. The distinction...

  17. An Example of a Non-Markovian Stochastic Two-Point Boundary Value Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrante, Marco; Nualart, David

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    version of Theorem 2.1 of Alabert et al. (1995), which characterizes the conditional independence in terms of a factorization property. Let (Ù, F , P) be a probability space and for any sub-ó-®eld G of F and B 2 F let us denote by G jB the trace of G on B... de®ned by G jB ? fA \\ B, A 2 G g. Note that, if G is generated by a random variable X, then G jB ? ófX jB g, where X jB is the restriction of X to the set B. We shall give the following de®nition of local independence of ó-®elds. 372 M. Ferrante and D...

  18. Dynamic distributions and changing copulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andrew C

    #0; !): (12) If #25;t were ?xed the same MSE would be obtained with a sample size of approximately (2#0; !)=(1#0; !): When ! is close to one, MSE(e#25;t) ' e#25;t(1#0; e#25;t)(1 #0; !): Thus for ! = :99; the RMSEs for #25; = 0:5; 0:25 and 0:1 are approximately... ; may need to be re- de?ned and this requires some judgement. One possibility is to set #24;0 = ymin and #24;N = ymax, but a more stable choice is the 1% and 99% quantiles. By construction, e#28; k#0;1;t < e#28; k;t so the time series of b#24;t(#28;)0s...

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saurwein, John

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

  20. Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine site.

  1. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. The SER, provided annually in accordance with Department of Energy DOE Order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts the environment. This report (SER) provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1994. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island facility (disposition of 73 million barrels of crude oil inventory) as well as the degasification of up to 144 million barrels of crude oil inventory at the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry facilities. The decision to decommission the Weeks Island facility is a result of diminishing mine integrity from ground water intrusion. Degasifying the crude oil is required to reduce potentially harmful emissions that would occur during oil movements. With regard to still another major environmental action, 43 of the original 84 environmental findings from the 1992 DOE Tiger Team Assessment were closed by the end of 1994. Spills to the environment, another major topic, indicates a positive trend. Total volume of oil spilled in 1994 was only 39 barrels, down from 232 barrels in 1993, and the total volume of brine spilled was only 90 barrels, down from 370 barrels in 1993. The longer term trend for oil and brine spills has declined substantially from 27 in 1990 down to nine in 1994.

  2. Environmental assessment of oil degasification at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve facilities in Texas and Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to treat gassy oil at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage sites to lower the gas content of the stored crude oil and help ensure safe transfer of the oil during drawdown. The crude oil is stored underground in caverns created in salt domes. The degree of gassiness of the oil varies substantially among sites and among caverns within a site. This environmental assessment describes the proposed degasification operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. The need for degasification has arisen because over time, gases, principally methane and nitrogen, have migrated into and become dissolved in the stored crude oil. This influx of gas has raised the crude oil vapor pressure above limits required by safety and emission guidelines. When oil is drawn from the caverns, excess gases may come out of solution. Based on preliminary data from an ongoing sampling program, between 200 and 350 million of the 587 million barrels of crude oil stored at these four sites would require processing to remove excess gas. Degasification, a commonly used petroleum industry process, would be done at four crude oil storage facilities: Bryan Mound and Big Hill in Texas, and West Hackberry and Bayou Choctaw in Louisiana. DOE would use a turnkey services contract for engineering, procurement, fabrication, installation, operation and maintenance of two degasification plants. These would be installed initially at Bryan Mound and West Hackberry. Degasification would be complete in less than three years of continuous operations. This report summarizes the environmental impacts of this gasification process.

  3. Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play: Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration for Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic reservoirs associated with updip basement structures currently is the most active exploratory oil play in Alabama. High initial flow rates, on the order of hundreds to thousands of barrels of oil per day, are commonly encountered at depths between 8,200 and 14,500 feet. Fifty-one fields have been established and 25 million barrels of oil have been produced from these fields developed in Lower Cretaceous Hosston and Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet reservoirs. Production from Smackover carbonates began at Toxey field in 1967 and from Haynesville sandstones at Frisco City field in 1986. As of September 1994, Smackover wells averaged 88 barrels of oil per day and Haynesville wells averaged 284 barrels of oil per day. In 1994, production was established in the Norphlet at North Excel field and in the Hosston at Pleasant Home field. Reservoirs in the updip basement structure play cluster in three distinct areas; (1) a western area on the Choctaw ridge complex, (2) a central area on the Conecuh ridge complex, and (3) an eastern area in the Conecuh embayment. Reservoir lithologies include Smackover limestones and dolostones and Hosston, Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet sandstones. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps where reservoirs occur on the flanks or over the crests of basement palohighs. An understanding of the complex reservoir properties and trap relationships is the key to successful discovery and development of Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play of southwest Alabama.

  4. Compilation of gas intrusion measurements, variations, and consequence modeling for SPR caverns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkebein, Thomas E.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H2S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, is addressing limitations of the state mandated ISCST model.

  5. Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

  6. Strategic petroleum reserve: Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The August 15, 1987, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report describes activities undertaken with respect to the development of the Reserve during the period April 1, 1987 through June 30, 1987. The program background and major activities of this quarter are briefly discussed. Other topics are site development; oil acquisition; information on the budget and cost of the reserve; and other program items. During the second quarter of 1987, Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage capacity reached 570 million barrels. At Bryan Mound, final corrective leaching was completed in Cavern 5 whose conversion from sweet to sour crude oil storage is proceeding on schedule. At West Hackberry, leaching was completed for Cavern 115 and proceeded in the four remaining caverns still under development. At the Bayou Choctaw site, Cavern 17 oil fill was initiated; this 10-million-barrel cavern currently contains over five million barrels of oil. At Big Hill, construction has progressed to the point that attainment of leaching capability by the end of September is on schedule. The total inventory of crude oil stored in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve reached 527,186,515 barrels during the quarter ending June 30, 1987. The average fill rate during the quarter was 79,119 barrels per day, and the weighted average delivered price during this quarter was $19.17 per barrel. Funds available for obligation in fiscal year 1987 include $526 million in the SPR Petroleum Account for the acquisition and transportation of crude oil and $262 million in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account for activities associated with storage facilities development and the operation and management of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Approximately $23 million of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account funds will be carried over to reduce new budget authority required for the account in fiscal year 1988.

  7. Study of Power Converter Topologies with Energy Recovery and grid power flow control. Part A: 2-quadrant converter with energy storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maestri, S; Uicich, G; Benedetti, M; Le Godec, G; Papastergiou, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of a Transfer line (TT2) Consolidation Programme, a number of studies on Energy cycling have been commissioned. Part of this work involves the study of different power electronic system topologies for magnet energy recovery [1{5]. In this report, the use of a two-quadrant (2Q) regulator connected to the DC link of a 4-quadrant magnet supply is analysed. The key objective of the study is to find control strategies that result in the control of the peak power required from the power network as well as to recover the magnet energy into capacitor banks with controlled voltage fluctuation. The study comprises the modelling of the system by means of the method of state averaging and the development of regulation strategies to energy management. The proposed control strategies can be divided in two groups: in the first group, the magnet current is used to dene the reference for the control system, while in the second group this current is considered as a perturbation and some strategies are devised ...

  8. Security Informatics Research Challenges for Mitigating Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly re (FF). We dene cyber FF as intentional o*ensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission e*ectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. We describe examples of cyber FF and discuss how it ts within a general conceptual framework for cyber security failures. Because it involves human failure, cyber FF may be considered to belong to a sub-class of cyber security failures characterized as unintentional insider threats. Cyber FF is closely related to combat friendly re in that maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding unintended consequences. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and o*ensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. We describe a test bed designed to support empirical research on factors a*ecting cyber FF. Finally, we discuss mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF, including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches.

  9. A New Method for the Detection of Galaxy Clusters in X-Ray Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piacentine, J.M.; Marshall, P.J.; Peterson, J.R.; Andersson, K.E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years the power of counting clusters of galaxies as a function of their mass has been recognized as a powerful cosmological probe; however, we are only now beginning to acquire data from dedicated surveys with sufcient sky coverage and sensitivity to measure the cluster population out to distances where the dark energy came to dominate the Universe’s evolution. One such survey uses the XMM X-ray telescope to scan a large area of sky, detecting the X-ray photons from the hot plasma that lies in the deep potential wells of massive clusters of galaxies. These clusters appear as extended (not point-like) objects, each providing just a few hundred photons in a typical observation. The detection of extended sources in such a low signal-to-noise situation is an important problem in astrophysics: we attempt to solve it by using as much prior information as possible, translating our experience with wellmeasured clusters to define a “template” cluster that can be varied and matched to the features seen in the XMM images. In this work we adapt an existing Monte Carlo analysis code for this problem. Two detection templates were dened and their suitability explored using simulated data; the method was then applied to a publically avalable XMM observation of a “blank” field. Presented are the encouraging results of this series of experiments, suggesting that this approach continue to be developed for future cluster-identication endeavours.

  10. Correlation of Creep Behavior of Domal Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, D.E.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimentally determined creep responses of a number of domal salts have been reported in, the literature. Some of these creep results were obtained using standard (conventional) creep tests. However, more typically, the creep data have come from multistage creep tests, where the number of specimens available for testing was small. An incremental test uses abrupt changes in stress and temperature to produce several time increments (stages) of different creep conditions. Clearly, the ability to analyze these limited data and to correlate them with each other could be of considerable potential value in establishing the mechanical characteristics of salt domes, both generally and specifically. In any analysis, it is necessary to have a framework of rules to provide consistency. The basis for the framework is the Multimechanism-Deformation (M-D) constitutive model. This model utilizes considerable general knowledge of material creep deformation to supplement specific knowledge of the material response of salt. Because the creep of salt is controlled by just a few micromechanical mechanisms, regardless of the origin of the salt, certain of the material parameters are values that can be considered universal to salt. Actual data analysis utilizes the methodology developed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program, and the response of a bedded pure WIPP salt as the baseline for comparison of the domal salts. Creep data from Weeks Island, Bryan Mound, West Hackberry, Bayou Choctaw, and Big Hill salt domes, which are all sites of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage caverns, were analyzed, as were data from the Avery Island, Moss Bluff, and Jennings salt domes. The analysis permits the parameter value sets for the domal salts to be determined in terms of the M-D model with various degrees of completeness. In turn this permits detailed numerical calculations simulating cavern response. Where the set is incomplete because of the sparse database, reasonable assumptions permit the set to be completed. From the analysis, two distinct response groups were evident, with the salts of one group measurably more creep resistant than the other group. Interestingly, these groups correspond well with the indirectly determined creep closure of the SPR storage caverns, a correlation that probably should be expected. Certainly, the results suggest a simple laboratory determination of the creep characteristics of a salt material from a dome site can indicate the relative behavior of any potential cavern placed within that dome.

  11. Compilation of Gas Intrusion Measurements, Variations, and Consequence Modeling for SPR Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HINKEBEIN, THOMAS E.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H{sub 2}S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, is addressing limitations of the state mandated ISCST model.

  12. Tracking Provenance in ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensley, Zachary P [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provenance is dened as information about the origin of objects, a concept that applies to both physical and digital objects and often overlaps both. The use of provenance in systems designed for research is an important but forgotten feature. Provenance allows for proper and exact tracking of information, its use, its lineage, its derivations and other metadata that are important for correctly adhering to the scien- tic method. In our project's prescribed use of provenance, researchers can determine detailed information about the use of sensor data in their experiments on ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms (FRPs). Our project's provenance system, Provenance Data Management System (ProvDMS), tracks information starting with the creation of information by an FRP sensor. The system determines station information, sensor information, and sensor channel information. The system allows researchers to derive generations of experiments from the sensor data and tracks their hierarchical flow. Key points can be seen in the history of the information as part of the information's workflow. The concept of provenance and its usage in science is relatively new and while used in other cases around the world, our project's provenance diers in a key area. To keep track of provenance, most systems must be designed or redesigned around the new provenance system. Our system is designed as a cohesive but sepa- rate entity and allows for researchers to continue using their own methods of analysis without being constrained in their ways in order to track the provenance. We have designed ProvDMS using a lightweight provenance library, Core Provenance Library (CPL) v.6 In addition to keeping track of sensor data experiments and its provenance, ProvDMS also provides a web-enabled visualization of the inheritance.

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF THE RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON LARGE SCALE COMPUTATIONS IN NUCLEAR PHYSICS USING THE QCDOC, SEPTEMBER 26 - 28, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AOKI,Y.; BALTZ,A.; CREUTZ,M.; GYULASSY,M.; OHTA,S.

    2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The massively parallel computer QCDOC (QCD On a Chip) of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RI3RC) will provide ten-teraflop peak performance for lattice gauge calculations. Lattice groups from both Columbia University and RBRC, along with assistance from IBM, jointly handled the design of the QCDOC. RIKEN has provided $5 million in funding to complete the machine in 2003. Some fraction of this computer (perhaps as much as 10%) might be made available for large-scale computations in areas of theoretical nuclear physics other than lattice gauge theory. The purpose of this workshop was to investigate the feasibility and possibility of using a supercomputer such as the QCDOC for lattice, general nuclear theory, and other calculations. The lattice applications to nuclear physics that can be investigated with the QCDOC are varied: for example, the light hadron spectrum, finite temperature QCD, and kaon ({Delta}I = 1/2 and CP violation), and nucleon (the structure of the proton) matrix elements, to name a few. There are also other topics in theoretical nuclear physics that are currently limited by computer resources. Among these are ab initio calculations of nuclear structure for light nuclei (e.g. up to {approx}A = 8 nuclei), nuclear shell model calculations, nuclear hydrodynamics, heavy ion cascade and other transport calculations for RHIC, and nuclear astrophysics topics such as exploding supernovae. The physics topics were quite varied, ranging from simulations of stellar collapse by Douglas Swesty to detailed shell model calculations by David Dean, Takaharu Otsuka, and Noritaka Shimizu. Going outside traditional nuclear physics, James Davenport discussed molecular dynamics simulations and Shailesh Chandrasekharan presented a class of algorithms for simulating a wide variety of femionic problems. Four speakers addressed various aspects of theory and computational modeling for relativistic heavy ion reactions at RHIC. Scott Pratt and Steffen Bass gave general overviews of how qualitatively different types of physical processes evolve temporally in heavy ion reactions. Denes Molnar concentrated on the application of hydrodynamics, and Alex Krasnitz on a classical Yang-Mills field theory for the initial phase. We were pleasantly surprised by the excellence of the talks and the substantial interest from all parties. The diversity of the audience forced the speakers to give their talks at an understandable level, which was highly appreciated. One particular bonus of the discussions could be the application of highly developed three-dimensional astrophysics hydrodynamics codes to heavy ion reactions.