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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Techno-economic analysis of biomass to fuel conversion via the MixAlco process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 2 depicts biomass-to-hydrocarbon fuels conversion via the MixAlco process. To make hydrocarbon ... -efficiency vapor-compression evaporator, (4) thermal conversion of salts to ketones, (5) hydrogenation...

Viet Pham; Mark Holtzapple…

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Conversion of MixAlco Process Sludge to Liquid Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alco process, a method was developed to efficiently separate H2 using pressure swing adsorption (PSA) from the synthesis gas, with activated carbon and molecular sieve 5A as adsorbents. The H2 can be used to hydrogenate ketones generated from the Mix...

Teiseh, Eliasu 1973-

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

The conversion of corn stover and pig manure to carboxylic acids with the MixAlco process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MixAlco process, developed by Dr. Mark T. Holtzapple, uses anaerobic fermentation to convert waste biomass into carboxylate salts which can then be manipulated into carboxylic acids, ketones and alcohols. This project focuses on the application...

Black, Amanda Spring

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

4

Evidence of Aliphatics in Nascent Soot Particles in Premixed...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Aliphatics in Nascent Soot Particles in Premixed Ethylene Flames. Evidence of Aliphatics in Nascent Soot Particles in Premixed Ethylene Flames. Abstract: Chemical composition of...

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic dicarboxylate ligands Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with increasing n. However, the frequencies of aliphatic dicarboxylate dianions in bulk... . Identification of C3-C10 Aliphatic Dicarboxylic-Acids in Airborne Particulate...

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic primary amines Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: aliphatic primary amines Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ELSEVIER Marine Chemistry 51 (1995) 45-54 Aliphatic amines in Chesapeake Bay sediments Summary: ELSEVIER...

7

Aliphatic Polyester Block Polymers: Renewable, Degradable, and Sustainable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aliphatic Polyester Block Polymers: Renewable, Degradable, and Sustainable ... Yet, such polymers are “challenged” with respect to sustainability. ... The Earth harbors finite carbon-based feedstocks that are being rapidly depleted by our increasing energy demand. ...

Marc A. Hillmyer; William B. Tolman

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic alcohols studies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alcohols studies Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aliphatic alcohols studies Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Electron...

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic amines extraction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 37 Exploratory Studies on Fast Pyrolysis Oil Upgrading Summary: using Aliphatic Tertiary Amines... -1 Acetic Acid Recovery from Fast...

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic chains affects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C-O-S, carbonyl C... aliphatic C-C-H groups was nearly constant at each sampling platform, with the Twin Otter samples having... phase oxidation of volatile compounds. The...

12

Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Fe(ii) in degradative solidification/stabilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation examines the applicability of the iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization (DS/S-Fe(II)) to various chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) that are common chemicals of concern at contaminated sites. The research...

Jung, Bahng Mi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Occurrence of Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in Water, Suspended Particulate Matter and Sediments of Daliao River System, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In August of 2005 a study was carried out to evaluate contamination of aliphatic hydrocarbons(AHc) in water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments...?1 in surface water, from 22.68 to 5,725.36...?1 in ...

W. Guo; M. C. He; Z. F. Yang; C. Y. Lin…

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A DATA-DRIVEN, SYSTEMATIC SEARCH ALGORITHM FOR STRUCTURE DETERMINATION OF DENATURED OR DISORDERED PROTEINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

laboratory-denatured and natively-disordered proteins, the number of restraints measured by the current NMR denatured and disordered proteins, we formulate the structure determination problem as the computation proteins are disordered or partially- disordered in their native state in solution. Such natively

Richardson, David

16

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series 68. Halogenated Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Compounds C3C14 With Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series 68. Halogenated Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Compounds C3­C14 With Water 16, 1999 This volume covers the solubilities of halogenated aliphatic C3­C14 compounds with water, heavy water, and electrolyte solutions. All data were critically examined for their reliability and best

Magee, Joseph W.

18

EN MIKROKALORIMETRISK UNDERSØGELSE AF SOLUTTERS EFFEKT PÅ DEN TERMISK INDUCEREDE, IRREVERSIBLE DENATURERING AF BACILLUS HALMAPALUS ?-AMYLASE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I dette studie er den termisk inducerede irreversible denaturering af rekombinant Bacillus halmapalus ?-amylase (BHA) under tilstedeværelsen af varierende koncentrationer af sorbitol, glycerol, betain, (NH4)2SO4,… (more)

Lund, Henrik

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Single-molecule denaturation and degradation of proteins by the AAA+ ClpXP protease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ClpXP is an ATP-fueled molecular machine that unfolds and degrades target proteins. ClpX, an AAA+ enzyme, recognizes specific proteins, and then uses cycles of ATP hydrolysis to denature any native structure and to translocate ...

Shin, Yongdae

20

Aliphatic thioether polymers as novel cathode active materials for rechargeable lithium battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two aliphatic thioether polymers, poly[methanetetryl-tetra(thiomethylene)] (PMTTM) and poly(2,4-dithiopentanylene) (PDTP) were designed, synthesized, characterized and tested as cathode active materials. The chemical structure of polymers was confirmed by FT-IR, FT-Raman, and XPS spectral analysis. Both polymers were found to have electrochemical activity as cathode materials for rechargeable lithium battery by the electrochemical tests. The specific capacity of PMTTM was 504 mA h g?1 at the third cycle and faded to 200 mA h g?1 after 10 cycles; PDTP showed low and stable specific capacity around 100 mA h g?1 even after 50 cycles. The specific capacity of fully saturated aliphatic thioether polymers demonstrated that thioether bonds offered energy storage. It was proposed that thioether bond was oxidized to form thioether cations with the help of ether solvents.

Jingyu Zhang; Lingbo Kong; Lizhi Zhan; Jing Tang; Hui Zhan; Yunhong Zhou; Caimao Zhan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Scope for denaturizing weapons-grade plutonium in a subcritical heavy-water blanket of candu type  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The following features occur in denaturing weapons plutonium by irradiating a mixture of plutonium and neptunium as oxides in a neutron flux: 1) ...

G. V. Kiselev; L. A. Myrtsymova

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Observation of Solvent Penetration during Cold Denaturation of E. coli Phosphofructokinase-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observation of Solvent Penetration during Cold Denaturation of E. coli Phosphofructokinase-2 Ce; unexpectedly, amide exchange increased throughout the protein over time at 3 C. The rate of increase in amide exchange over time at 3 C was the same for each region and equaled the rate of dimer dissociation measured

Komives, Elizabeth A.

23

The thermal denaturation of DNA studied with neutron scattering Andrew Wildes,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermal denaturation of DNA studied with neutron scattering Andrew Wildes,1 Nikos characterized using neutron scattering. A Bragg peak from B-form fibre DNA has been measured as a function techniques have proved to be excellent probes8 . We have used neutron scattering to measure the tem- perature

Boyer, Edmond

24

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Uranium-plutonium-neptunium fuel cycle to produce isotopically denatured plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In view of the considerable amount of /sup 237/ Np produced as a by-product in nuclear power reactors, possible utilization of this nuclide in the nuclear fuel cycle has been studied. In particular, the performance of a gas-cooled fast breeder reactor as a neptunium burner was assessed. A strategy was developed and mass flows were computed for a denatured plutonium LWR strategy using uranium, plutonium and neptunium recycling. 10 refs.

Wydler, P.; Heer, W.; Stiller, P.; Wenger, H.U.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Novel Ionophores with 2n-Crown-n Topology: Anion Sensing via Pure Aliphatic C–H···Anion Hydrogen Bonding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of novel coronands having a 2n-crown-n topology based on trioxane (6-crown-3) derivatives are designed and characterized. These neutral hosts can sense anions through pure aliphatic C–H hydrogen bonding (HB) in condensed phases due to the unusual ...

Genggongwo Shi; Changdev G. Gadhe; Sung-Woo Park; Kwang S. Kim; Jongmin Kang; Humaira Seema; N. Jiten Singh; Seung Joo Cho

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Spatial variations and chronologies of aliphatic hydrocarbons in Lake Michigan sediments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four sediment cores were collected in fine-grained depositional areas of the southern basin of Lake Michigan. Spatial variations of aliphatic hydrocarbons in surficial sediments were consistent with a lakeward movement of riverine sediments in a series of resuspension-settling cycles in which an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of hydrocarbons associated with dense sediments is deposited in nearshore areas, fine-grained sediments of terrestrial origin accumulate in the deep basin, and planktonic hydrocarbons are depleted by microbial degradation during transport to the deep basin. The rate of accumulation of the UCM (a marker of petroleum residues) in deep basin sediments has increased by more than an order of magnitude since 1880, from 60 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1} to approximately 960 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1} in 1980. Crude estimates of the atmospheric loading of the UCM (1100 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1}) indicate that accumulations in deep-basin sediments might be supported by atmospheric deposition. Agreement was poor between the atmospheric flux of the terrestrial n-alkanes ({Sigma}C{sub 25}, C{sub 27}, C{sub 29}, C{sub 31}) to the deep basin (3200 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1}) and the sediment accumulation rate (660 {mu}g m{sup -2}{center_dot}a{sup -1}). Understanding of atmospheric fluxes, estimated from the very few available data, would be improved by more frequent measurement of the levels of aliphatic hydrocarbons in air and precipitation and a better knowledge of the particle deposition velocities and precipitation scavenging coefficients.

Doskey, P. V.; Environmental Research

2001-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

A comparison of the urea and guanidinium chloride denaturation of four proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-lactoglobulin was lyophilized and stored below 0 C. until used' 0 2. Ribonuclease. Ribonuclease (Lot No. 99B-8020) lghs obtained in the form of a lyophilized powder (Type III A) from Sigma Chemical Company. Bradbury and King (19) found that sulfate ions are bound to Sigma... significant error. Bradbury and King ( 39, 40) have studied the urea denaturation of lysozyme using NMR and found evidence for the presence of an intermediate state. They pro- posed that a hydrophobic core unfolds only after a more hydrophilic exterior...

Greene, Raymond Franklin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

The unusual hydrocarbon emission from the early carbon star HD 100764: The connection between aromatics and aliphatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope to obtain spectra of HD 100764, an apparently single carbon star with a circumstellar disk. The spectrum shows emission features from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are shifted to longer wavelengths than normally seen, as characteristic of ``class C'' systems in the classification scheme of Peeters et al. All seven of the known class C PAH sources are illuminated by radiation fields that are cooler than those which typically excite PAH emission features. The observed wavelength shifts are consistent with hydrocarbon mixtures containing both aromatic and aliphatic bonds. We propose that the class C PAH spectra are distinctive because the carbonaceous material has not been subjected to a strong ultraviolet radiation field, allowing relatively fragile aliphatic materials to survive.

G. C. Sloan; M. Jura; W. W. Duley; K. E. Kraemer; J. Bernard-Salas; W. J. Forrest; B. Sargent; A. Li; D. J. Barry; C. J. Bohac; D. M. Watson; J. R. Houck

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Quantitative structure–activity relationships for toxicity and genotoxicity of halogenated aliphatic compounds: Wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Halogenated aliphatic compounds were evaluated for toxic and genotoxic effects in the somatic mutation and recombination test employing Drosophila melanogaster. The tested chemicals included chlorinated, brominated and iodinated; mono-, di- and tri-substituted; saturated and unsaturated alkanes: 1,2-dibromoethane, 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1-iodopropane, 2,3-dichloropropene, 3-bromo-1-propene, epibromohydrin, 2-iodobutane, 3-chloro-2-methylpropene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichlorobutane, 1-chloro-2-methylpropane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2-chloroethymethylether, 1-bromo-2-methylpropane and 1-chloropentane. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea served as the positive and distilled water as the negative control. The set of chemicals for the toxicological testing was selected by the use of statistical experiment design. Group of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally more toxic than saturated analogues. The genotoxic effect was observed with 14 compounds in the wing spot test, while 3 substances did not show any genotoxicity by using the wing spot test at 50% lethal concentration. The highest number of wing spots was observed in genotoxicity assay with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1-iodopropane. Nucleophilic superdelocalizability calculated by quantum mechanics appears to be a good parameter for prediction of both toxicity and genotoxicity effects of halogenated aliphatic compounds.

Karel Chroust; Martina Pavlová; Zbyn?k Prokop; Jan Mendel; Kate?ina Božková; Zden?k Kubát; Veronika Zaj?´?ková; Ji??´ Damborský

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Plant observation report and evaluation, Pennwalt Corporation, secondary and tertiary aliphatic monoamines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A site visit was made to the amine manufacturing facility of the Pennwalt Corporation, Wyandotte, Michigan, to evaluate the facility in regard to the Secondary and Tertiary Aliphatic Monoamines Criteria Document. A total of 21 people were directly in contact with the amine production process. Two to four of the maintenance personnel may also come in contact with the process. Maintenance workers ran the risk of exposure not only to primary, secondary and tertiary amine compounds, but also to several other chemicals being used in the process. The processes used to unload raw materials are described, along with reactor operations, decanter and recycling operations, distillation operations, product storage and shipping. Medical monitoring at the facility included chest x-ray, respiratory function tests, sight screening, urinalysis, and back x-rays. Restricted and potentially hazardous area signs were clearly posted. Employees wore hard hats and safety glasses on the job as well as gloves, rubber boots, face shields, goggles, and respirators as necessary. Emergency procedures are described, including fire protection. Sanitation and personal hygiene are discussed, along with monitoring of the workplace conditions.

Not Available

1980-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

The hydrophobic effect and its role in cold denaturation q Cristiano L. Dias a,*, Tapio Ala-Nissila b,c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called `intrinsi- cally disordered proteins' are known to be resistant against heat denaturation and experiments denaturation Proteins a b s t r a c t The hydrophobic effect is considered the main driving force for protein the native state of the protein loses its stability upon cooling, is also attributed to this effect

Grant, Martin

33

Chemical and morphological characterization of soot and soot precursors generated in an inverse diffusion flame with aromatic and aliphatic fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the chemical and physical structure of young soot and its precursors is very useful in understanding the paths leading to soot particle inception. This paper presents chemical and morphological characterization of the products generated in ethylene and benzene inverse diffusion flames (IDF) using different analytical techniques. The trend in the data indicates that the soot precursor material and soot particles generated in the benzene IDF have a higher degree of complexity than the samples obtained in the ethylene IDF, which is reflected by an increase in the aromaticity of the chloroform extracts observed by {sup 1}H NMR and FT-IR, and shape and size of soot particles obtained by TEM and HR-TEM. It is important to highlight that the soot precursor material obtained at the lower positions in the ethylene IDF has a significant contribution of aliphatic groups, which play an important role in the particle inception and mass growth processes during the early stages of soot formation. However, these groups progressively disappear in the samples taken at higher positions in the flame, due to thermal decomposition processes. (author)

Santamaria, Alexander; Mondragon, Fanor [Institute of Chemistry, University of Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Yang, Nancy [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Eddings, Eric [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Sake City, UT 84112 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Size exclusion chromatography for the unambiguous detection of aliphatics in fractions from petroleum vacuum residues, coal liquids, and standard materials, in the presence of aromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) in heptane eluent that can detect aliphatics unambiguously without fractionation to remove aromatics. Spherical molecules such as colloidal silicas elute at the exclusion limit, while alkanes up to C{sub 50} elute through the porosity of the column. Detection of aliphatics was defined by use of an evaporative light scattering (ELS) detector with the simultaneous absence of UV absorbance at 300 nm. Alkanes smaller than C{sub 12} were not detected because the conditions of operation of the ELS caused their evaporation. All aromatics eluted after the permeation limit of about 25 min and were not detected until well after 45 min by their UV absorbance. The SEC method was applied to petroleum vacuum residues and coal liquids, and their fractions were soluble in pentane or heptane. High-temperature (HT) GC-MS confirmed the presence of alkanes in the pentane- and heptane-soluble fractions of petroleum vacuum residues, but did not elute any of the aromatics known to be present from SEC. Alkanes were examined in pentane-soluble fractions of a coal digest and a low-temperature coal tar; alkanes up to C{sub 40} were detected in the low-temperature tar and, although present in the digest, were masked by aromatics. No alkanes were detected by either SEC or HT GC-MS in fractions from a coal tar pitch. Aromatics in coal liquids and one petroleum residue were also examined by SEC using NMP as eluent and by UV fluorescence spectroscopy. The SEC method will find application to pentane- and heptane-soluble fractions of petroleum liquids and coal liquids where the alkanes are concentrated relative to the more abundant aromatics. 43 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Eiman M. Al-Muhareb; Fatma Karaca; Trevor J. Morgan; Alan A. Herod; Ian D. Bull; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Effect of the type of carrier on the properties of cobalt catalysts in the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of catalysts used in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ are determined to a significant degree by the carriers used in their preparation. This paper deals with a study of the effect of the type of carrier on the properties of cobalt-based catalysts in the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/. Co catalysts that are active in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ are those on which the adsorption of H/sub 2/ exceeds 3.10/sup -2/ mmole/g Co and the adsorptin of carbon monoxide exceeds 7.10/sup -2/ mmole/g Co. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen are adsorbed on active catalysts in weakly bound forms. A mechanism is proposed for the formatin of an active center and the adsorption of carbon monoxide on Co-catalysts which includes the appearance of a partial positive charge on the cobalt atom.

Lapidus, A.L.; Jem, H.C.; Krylova, A.Y.

1983-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

36

Carboxylate Platform: The MixAlco Process Part 1: Comparison of Three Biomass Conversion Platforms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To form products, polysaccharides can be processed thermochemically or biologically under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, lignin is not biologically reactive under anaerobic conditions and can only be processe...

Mark T. Holtzapple; Cesar B. Granda

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Analysis of low-cost building material for the MixAlco process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basis as the papercrete for structural and economic analysis, which provided acceptable results. The results indicate that a papercrete-concrete structure is a viable alternative structurally and economically within a range of sizes for the structure... ...................................................................................... 22 5.5.1 Procedure ...................................................................................... 22 5.5.2 Analysis.......................................................................................... 24 5.6 Flexural Strength...

Titzman, L. Clinton

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Flash photolysis resonance fluorescence investigation of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with a series of aliphatic ketones over the temperature range 240-440 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute rate constants have been determined for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with a series of aliphatic ketones by the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence measurement technique. Experiments were performed over the temperature range 240-440 K at total pressures (using Ar diluent gas) between 25 and 50 Torr. The rate constant data for acetone (k/sub 1/), 2-butanone (k/sub 2/), and 3-pentanone (k/sub 3/) were used to derive the Arrhenius expressions k/sub 1/ = (1.7 +/- 0.4) x 10/sup -12/ exp(-(600 +/- 75)/T) cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, k/sub 2/ = (2.3 +/- 1.1) x 10/sup -12/ exp(-170 +/- 120)/T) cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, and k/sub 3/ = (2.8 +/- 0.3) x 10/sup -12/ exp(10 +/- 35)/T) cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. At 296 K, the measured rate constants (in units of 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/) were k/sub 1/ = 2.16 +/- 0.16, k/sub 2/ = 11.5 +/- 1.0, and k/sub 3/ = 27.4 +/- 1.3. Room temperature rate constants for the reaction of OH radicals with a number of other 2-ketones were also determined. These were (in the above units) 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanone (12.1 +/- 0.5), 2-pentanone (40.0 +/- 2.9), 2-hexanone (66.4 +/- 5.6), 2-heptanone (86.7 +/- 8.4reverse arrow, 2-octanone (110 +/- 9), 2-nonanone (122 +/- 13), and 2-decanone (132 +/- 12). The error limits represent 2 standard deviations (from the least-squares analysis); the authors estimate that an additional 5% uncertainty should be added to account for possible systematic error in the measurements. These results are discussed in terms of reactivity trends for C-H bonds located in the ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and ..gamma.. positions with respect to the carbonyl group.

Wallington, T.J.; Kurylo, M.J.

1987-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, Synthesis of nano-sized spherical Mg3AlCO3 layered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-spheres can be prepared, and this material showed a H1 type hysteresis loop in the N2 BET analysis of the WGS reaction and CO2 adsorption, has been widely identified as a promising pre- combustion CO2 capture charge compensating anions and solvation molecules.13,14 Because the chemical composition of both

Guo, John Zhanhu

40

Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from Ethanol/Gasoline Fuels; Phase 3: Effects of Winter Gasoline Volatility and Ethanol Content on Blend Flammability; Flammability Limits of Denatured Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assessed differences in headspace flammability for summertime gasolines and new high-ethanol content fuel blends. The results apply to vehicle fuel tanks and underground storage tanks. Ambient temperature and fuel formulation effects on headspace vapor flammability of ethanol/gasoline blends were evaluated. Depending on the degree of tank filling, fuel type, and ambient temperature, fuel vapors in a tank can be flammable or non-flammable. Pure gasoline vapors in tanks generally are too rich to be flammable unless ambient temperatures are extremely low. High percentages of ethanol blended with gasoline can be less volatile than pure gasoline and can produce flammable headspace vapors at common ambient temperatures. The study supports refinements of fuel ethanol volatility specifications and shows potential consequences of using noncompliant fuels. E85 is flammable at low temperatures; denatured ethanol is flammable at warmer temperatures. If both are stored at the same location, one or both of the tanks' headspace vapors will be flammable over a wide range of ambient temperatures. This is relevant to allowing consumers to splash -blend ethanol and gasoline at fueling stations. Fuels compliant with ASTM volatility specifications are relatively safe, but the E85 samples tested indicate that some ethanol fuels may produce flammable vapors.

Gardiner, D. P.; Bardon, M. F.; Clark, W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Introduction Aliphatic polyesters derived from renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these polyesters are already commercially produced in bacteria under nutrient-limited conditions; however a mixture of the polymer in methanol (approximately 100 ppm) to which was added 10 % of methanol saturated

42

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

chemical compounds composed of chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group: CH 3 -(CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., metha- nol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). See Fuel Ethanol. Alternative Fuel: Alternative fuels, for transportation applications, include the following: methanol; denatured ethanol, and other alcohols; fuel mixtures contain- ing 85 percent or more by volume of methanol, denatured ethanol, and other alco- hols with motor gasoline or other fuels; natural gas; liquefied petroleum gas (propane); hydrogen; coal-derived liquid fuels; fuels (other than alcohol) derived from biological materials (biofuels such as soy diesel fuel); electricity (including electricity from solar energy); and "... any other fuel the Secretary determines, by

43

Are denatured proteins ever random coils?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exponential function. The study by Pappu et al. shows that the number of states...will require more studies like that of Pappu et al. and doubtless will require an...Macromolecules 9 : 41 – 47 , 1249990 . 4 Pappu R V Srinivasan R Rose G D ( 2000 ) Proc Natl Acad...

Robert L. Baldwin; Bruno H. Zimm

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic biodegradable photoluminescent...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biodegradable photoluminescent Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 216 Recent Patents on Biomedical Engineering 2009, 2, 216-227 1874-764709 100.00+.00 2009 Bentham Science...

45

Formation of membranes from aliphatic polyamide-polyvinylpyrrolidone blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of polyacrylic acid of various molecular weights and of its ... Na2EDTA as inhibitors of deposit formation and as dispersants was examined.

O. V. Suberlyak; Yu. Ya. Mel’nik; N. M. Baran

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Modeling the oxyethylation of primary aliphatic alcohols by ethylene oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the point of view of safety and the production of the narrowest distribution of oxyethyl groups it is advantageous to use an idealdisplacement tube reactor for continuous oxyethylation under pressure. For the process under consideration here, a high-capacity, ideal-displacement reactor has the difficulty of removing the reaction heat, so that a precise choice of tube diameter is required. Based on kinetic data obtained at the D.I. Mendeleev Moscow Chemical Technology Institute for the oxyethylation of PAA by ethylene oxide, a mathematical model has been developed and is presented here of an ideal-displacement ethoxylation reactor, the suitability of which has been tested on an oxyethylation pilot plant.

Panaev, Y.D.; Latyshev, I.E.; Ternovskii, S.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Quantitative relationships between structure and reactivity of aliphatic esters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bnglneering -xpcrtuent station and fron the Robert A. belch IIosearoh Foundation. Introduat ion . ' ethos of ~lysis ~ 0 Quleul-. tion of;1~to Oonst nt, s : iste riel s ~ o ~ I. 'iyters ~ ~ ~ 16 lC 11, . i~::' . ' Crt ~d*iP' 1~&'" :~ppsrstus z&& rl...-tt'rdor Rotc Cansta, ts for . :. oetntas IIIc. Ceoond- rder ". :;te Const tots ". tr Identicr lly Jis tbstt ttttod stars 't 0 IV. Ct, t" an "ct. 'tyl stere V. . )c' o~ cot otcs z2 'tl, . &oto on fde. otic. . t ly Cisubctitttted . . coors . 1. mymificction...

Yager, Billy Joe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200311 Low-Temperature Chemoselective Gold-Surface-Mediated Hydrogenation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.[9] Claus found that, in the production of allyl alco- hol from the hydrogenation of acrolein, gold

Henkelman, Graeme

49

Location of an agribusiness enterprise with respect to economic viability: a risk analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................... 1 Background ................................................................................................. 1 MixAlco Process Overview ............................................................ 3 Location Science... substantial impact on oxygenate, oil, corn, and gasoline markets in the U.S and become a direct competitor or replacement to corn-based ethanol. MixAlco Process Overview MixAlco converts cellulose biomass such as agriculture feedstocks, weed clippings...

Lau, Michael H.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Substrate denaturation and translocation by a proteolytic machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many AAA+ molecular machines generate power and drive cellular processes by harnessing energy from cycles of ATP hydrolysis. ClpX is a relatively simple AAA+ ATPase that powers regulated protein degradation by binding ...

Kenniston, Jon Anders

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Substrate stabilization of lysozyme to thermal and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. , and Mayer, R ~ J ~ (1976) Biochemic J. 154, 359-370 Schimke, T T. ('1964) J Biol Chem 239, 3808-3817 Goldberg, A. L. and St. John, A. C. (1976) Annu. Rev. Biochem, 45, 748-803 Dice, J ~ F. , Dehlinger, P ~ J ~, and Schimke, R ~ T. (1973) JB Biol Chem... 248, 4220-4228 Dehlinger, P. J ~ and Schimke, R ~ T ~ (1972) J ~ Biol. Chem 246, 2574-2583 Dice, J F. and Goldberg, A L, (1975) Proc. Natl. Acad Scil U ~ ST A. 72, 3893-3897 Bohley, P ~, Kirschke, H, Langner, J ~, Niederanders, 8 ~, Ansorge...

McGrath, Timothy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

Denaturant-Induced Conformational Transitions in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) differ from ordered proteins at several levels: structural, functional, and...

Paolo Neyroz; Stefano Ciurli…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A microfluidic device for DNA sequencing by denaturation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stage insert Thermoelectric modules for heating/cooling PEEKThermoelectric (TE) modules are incorporated to provide heating and coolingCooling and heating capabilities are provided by thermoelectric modules,

Walsh, Matthew Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Barnase as a model for the denatured state of proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedure for Barnase purification. Without him we would still be stuck with the old method of purification. I need to thank David Schell and Saul Trevino for their support and advise on all practical matters of laboratory work as well the rest... of the Pace/Sholtz lab for their support. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT . . nl ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. . . TABLE OF CONTENTS. V1 LIST OF FIGURES. . V11 INTRODUCTION. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. . Expression and Purification Scheme I. Expression and Purification...

Hoffart, Lee Michael

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

Characterization of Anti-Irradiation-Denatured Ovalbumin Monoclonal Antibodies. Immunochemical and Structural Analysis of Irradiation-Denatured Ovalbumin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five monoclonal antibodies (OVA-01, -02, -03, -04, -06) produced against irradiated ovalbumin were investigated in relation to the conformational change in the ovalbumin molecule induced by irradiation with Cobalt-60 ?-rays. Four antibodies (OVA-01, -02, -...

Tetsuya Masuda; Sakiyo-Yamaoka Koseki; Kyoden Yasumoto; Naofumi Kitabatake

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Predictably Selective Aliphatic C–H Oxidation Reaction for Complex Molecule Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...selective. We report an iron (Fe)–based small molecule...herein report an electrophilic iron catalyst, 4, with a...O-i-Pr) 2 . acac, acetylacetonate; DET, diethyl tartrate. Several nonheme iron complexes have shown promising...

Mark S. Chen; M. Christina White

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gas Chromatographic—Mass Spectrometric Investigation of Aliphatic Glycols in Environmental Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......mL for the determination of diol method...containing boron was facilitated...characteristic isotope ratio of boron (1 0 B...characteristic isotope ratio distribution of boron. Quantitative...laboratory for the determination of glycols......

A. Raksit; S. Punani

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of aliphatic biodegradable photoluminescent polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

established that the new ILMs provided good spottospot reproducibility and high ionization efficiency compared/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDIMS). The polymers, formed by a condensation reaction of three components

Yang, Jian

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic friedel-crafts alkylations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 28 A process for the rapid removal of dialkylamino-substituents from aromatic rings. Application to the expedient...

60

A quantitative study of the effect of structure on the saponification rates of aliphatic esters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(calibrated by the U ~ So National Bureau of Standards) in conjunction with a Wheatstone bridge. 30a 31 Electric timers were used to time the reactionsi The timers were found to be dependable by cheching their accuracy over a period of several days...' The resistance of the reaction mixture was determined by a Wheatstone bridge consisting of three decade resistance boxes' 30b Either a cathode ray oscilloscope or a null detector was used 30c to obtain the null pointi This was done visually, either...

Gonzalez, Federico P

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Quantitative Determination of Aliphatic Sulfur-Containing Additives by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......pyrolysis (7), infrared (8), combustion to SO4 = with subsequent determination...Drushel. The Analytical Chemistry of Sulfur and Its Compounds...London, p. 358. Sulfur in Coal and Coke by the Bomb Washing...organic materials by oxygen bomb combustion. Anal. Chem. 33:1760......

J.W. Sinclair; L. Schall; N.T. Crabb

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic halogenase syrb2 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Technologies and Information Sciences ; Engineering 63 Unique gas and hydrocarbon adsorption in a highly porous metal-organic framework made of extended...

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic alkyl quaternaries Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to almost... (e.g. Ar-Cl, tertiary amine, quaternary amine) NuH R'R"NH 11CCarbon Monoxide - In ring closure... is a nucleophilic subsitition of bisulfite by 11Ccyanide ion...

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic primary diamines Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Davis Collection: Biotechnology 56 Production of 11C-Labeled Summary: Carbon Monoxide - For preparation of 11C-labeled primary amides or hydrazides The method is...

65

Calorimetric study of adsorption of aliphatic hydrocarbons on reduced cobalt catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of the heats of adsorption and the adsorption isotherms of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons on Co at 298/sup 0/K; the content of organic matter in the catalyst has been determined after use in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. It is concluded that the Fischer-Tropsch process includes stages of diffusion of the original reactants and the products through a liquid film of hydrocarbons coating the catalyst; the hydrocarbon molecules are adsorbed on the surface in the ''lying down'' position; the adsorption of paraffins is reversible and is described by the BET theory; olefins form an irreversibly chemisorbed monolayer, above which reversible adsorption takes place; the ease of desorption of the paraffins explains their preferential formation in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

Ostrovskii, V.E.; Medvedkova, E.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Hyperbranched Aliphatic Polyesters and Reactive Diluents in Thermally Cured Coil Coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactive diluents (35-38) act as solvents in liquid paint, lowering the viscosity, and then chemically react into the film during cure. ... DSC studies were performed using a Mettler Toledo DSC820 equipped with a Mettler Toledo Sample Robot TSO801RO calibrated using standard procedures. ... Air-drying high solids alkyd paints for decorative coatings ...

Katarina Johansson; Tina Bergman; Mats Johansson

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

DEOTERIUM MAGNETIC RESONANCE OF SOME POLYMORPHIC LIQUID CRYSTALS: THE CONFORMATION OF THE ALIPHATIC END CHAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in "Magnetic Resonance in Colloid and Interface Science"in "Magnetic Resonance in Colloid and Interface Science"

Hsi, Shan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Synthesis Gas Conversion to Aliphatic Alcohols: Study of MoS2 catalytic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by sulfidation of ammonium thiomolybate and acetate salts of co-promoters. Several catalyst formulations were prepared by calcination, followed by doping with alkali promoters. Solid state modifications were made in some cases to dilute the active MoS2 material...

Baksh, Faisal

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Phenolic and Short-Chained Aliphatic Organic Acid Constituents of Wild Oat (Avena fatua L.) Seeds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following this after-ripening period, seeds were sown in Sun-Gro Sunshine Mix #1 (SunGro Horticulture, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) in pots measuring 10 × 10 × 35 cm (Stuewe & Sons, Inc., Tangent, OR). ... Repeated measurements of the temperature and light conditions associated with each population cluster indicated that there were no significant differences in growth conditions among the clusters (data not shown). ... Natural lighting was supplemented with two 400 W high pressure sodium lamps set to a 16 h photoperiod. ...

R. S. Gallagher; R. Ananth; K. Granger; B. Bradley; J.V. Anderson; E. P. Fuerst

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alteration and release of aliphatic compounds by the polychaete Nereis virens (Sars) experimentally fed with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fed with hydrocarbons a , a b b *Franck Gilbert , Georges Stora , Gaston Desrosiers , Bruno Deflandre-491-826-548. E-mail address: gilbert@mailhost.com.univ-mrs.fr (F. Gilbert). #12;included under the term; Gilbert et al., 1994, 1996; Kure and Forbes, 1997). During the mixing of sediments, bioturbating

Mailhes, Corinne

71

Alteration and release of aliphatic compounds by the polychaete Nereis virens (Sars) experimentally fed with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fed with hydrocarbons a , a b b *Franck Gilbert , Georges Stora , Gaston Desrosiers , Bruno Deflandre-491-826-548. E-mail address: gilbert@mailhost.com.univ-mrs.fr (F. Gilbert). hal-00763824,version1-11Dec2012 adsorbed onto the sediment (Gardner et al., 1979; Karickhoff and Morris, 1985; Reynoldson, 1987; Gilbert et

Boyer, Edmond

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic carbon-centered radicals Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

preprintsreprints & other Collection: Physics 15 Acetone-Photosensitized Reduction of Carbon Tetrachloride by Summary: ) Ross, A. B.; Neta, P. Rate constants for reactions of...

73

Nanotube Confinement Denatures Protein Helices Eric J. Sorin and Vijay S. Pande*,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Simulations were performed on the Folding@Home distributed computing network as described previously11 using

Sorin, Eric J.

74

Probing structural heterogeneities and fluctuations of nucleic acids and denatured proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polyelec- trolytes and protein folding in particular, standsdynamics ? protein folding ? single-molecule ?uorescencestructure and dynamics. Protein folding is the most spec-

Laurence, T A; Kong, X X; Jager, M; Weiss, S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Mechanisms of bioprosthetic heart valve failure: Fatigue causes collagen denaturation and glycosaminoglycan loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

caused progressive damage to the molecular structure of type I collagen as assessed by Fourier transform aortic valve cusps were 65.2 ± 8.66 g uronic acid/10 mg of dry weight for control and 7.91 ± 1.1 g uronic acid/10 mg of dry weight for 10­300 million cycled cusps. Together, these molecular changes contribute

Zand, Robert

76

Effect of the Protein Denaturants Urea and Guanidinium on Water Structure: A Structural and Thermodynamic Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the hydrogen bond network of water in the first hydration shell of urea and guanidinium were analyzed in terms of the random network model using Monte Carlo simulations. Bulk water consists of two populations of hydrogen and more bent hydrogen bonds. In the first shell of urea, hydrogen bonds between waters solvating the amino

Sharp, Kim

77

J. Mol. Biol. (1995) 252, 672708 Acid and Thermal Denaturation of Barnase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. on tyrosine and tryptophan sidechains. The hydrogen-bonding propensity of the water molecules tends structural elements, where water molecules compete with the interstrand and intrahelical hydrogen bonds state to a partially unfoldedDepartment of Chemistry conformation has been studied by molecular dynamics

Caflisch, Amedeo

78

Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Seagrass Bed Sediments by Double-Gradient Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial Ecology Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Seagrass Bed Sediments by Double, including the presence or absence of vegetation, depth into sediment, and season. Double- gradient of these similarity coefficients were used to group banding patterns by depth into sediment, presence or absence

Sherman, Tim

79

Evaluation of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to differentiate Escherichia coli populations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be an effective tool to differentiate unique E. coli popu- lations and should be useful to characterize E. coli, 1977; USEPA, 1986a). Second, several strains of E. coli are toxic to humans and are infectious via) to differentiate mixed assemblages of E. coli in the natural environment. After confirming the identity of 184

Sigler, Von

80

Toward a Taxonomy of the Denatured State: Small Angle Scattering Studies of Unfolded Proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the critical role the unfolded state plays in defining protein folding kinetics and thermodynamics (Berg et al., 2002; Dunker, 2002; Shortle, 2002; Wright and Dyson, 2002), our understanding of its detailed structure remains rather rudimentary; the heterogeneity of the unfolded ensemble renders difficult or impossible its study by traditional, atomic-level structural methods. Consequently, recent years have seen a significant expansion of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS, respectively) techniques that provide direct, albeit rotationally and time-averaged, measures of the geometric properties of the unfolded ensemble. These studies have reached a critical mass, allowing us for the first time to define general observations regarding the nature of the geometry - and possibly the chemistry and physics - of unfolded proteins.

Millett, I.S.; Doniach, S.; Plaxco, K.W. (Stanford); (UCSB)

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated constant denaturant Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 21 Single-molecule protein folding: Diffusion fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies Summary: are fairly...

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-denatured acbp controlled Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Biology and Medicine 5 Rapid mixing methods for exploring the kinetics of protein folding Heinrich Roder,a,b,* Kosuke Maki,a,1 Summary: events, such as cis-trans...

83

Drinking Drivers in Sweden Who Consume Denatured Alcohol Preparations: An Analytical-Toxicological Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of analyzing alcohol increases with the concentrationof...100-500 mg/L in red wine, whisky, and fruit...in the blood therefore increases under these conditions...system, and strong beer, wines, and spirits can only...Economic Control of Quality of the Manufac- tured......

A.W. Jones; Monica Lund; Eva Andersson

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer study of protein dynamics under denaturing conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Biochemistry 30, 10436 -10443. 1931968 45 Shastry, M. C. R., Agashe, V. R. & Udgaonkar, J. B. ( 1994 ) Protein Sci. 3, 1409 -1417...2004 ) Protein Sci. 13, 633 -639. 14767081 48 Pappu, R. V., Srinivasan, R. & Rose, G. D. ( 2000...

Elza V. Kuzmenkina; Colin D. Heyes; G. Ulrich Nienhaus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ketone Production from the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylate Salts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MixAlco process uses an anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentation to convert lignocellulosic biomass to carboxylate salts. The fermentation broth must be clarified so that only carboxylate salts, water, and minimal impurities remain. Carboxylate...

Landoll, Michael 1984-

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Investigations of Biomass Pretreatment and Submerged Fixed-bed Fermentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To improve the MixAlco process and biomass pretreatment, five studies were conducted. Three studies related to fermentation, whereas the other two investigated the effectiveness of shock tube pretreatment (STP) coupled with oxidative lime...

Meysing, Daniel

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

Effects of physical and chemical pretreatments on the crystallinity of bagasse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass conversion technologies are receiving increasing attention due to global climate change and most recently plans from the President of the United States to reduce fossil fuel consumption. The MixAlco process converts a variety of feedstocks...

Jones, Maxine Janette

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Pilot-scale fermentation of office paper and chicken manure to carboxylic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nitrogen, carbon, phosphorus, potassium, and sulfur are necessary for the microorganisms to thrive. High-nutrient biomass such as sewage sludge, chicken manure, and pig manure is important for successful fermentation (Chan, 2002). Additional nutrients.... Successful research has been conducted at Texas A&M University for the past 15 years to optimize the MixAlco process. THE MIXALCO PROCESS The MixAlco process can convert a variety of biomass sources including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge...

Moody, Andrew Garret

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from the gasification products of oil shale from the Leningrad and Kashpir deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experimental results of the gasification of oil shale from the Leningrad and Kashpir deposits and...

T. A. Avakyan; Yu. A. Strizhakova; A. S. Malinovskii; A. L. Lapidus

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Asbestiform sepiolite coated by aliphatic hydrocarbons from Perletoa, Aosta Valley Region (Western Alps, Italy): characterization, genesis and possible hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...spectra collected on composite films between xylan-type hemicelluloses (polysaccharides...and probably interacts with the fibre surfaces via specific bonds. These interactions...hydrocarbon coating and the sepiolite fibres surface slowly but inexorably opened new interstices...

R. Giustetto; K. Seenivasan; E. Belluso

91

Use of Aliphatic n-Alkynes To Discriminate Soil Nitrification Activities of Ammonia-Oxidizing Thaumarchaea and Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MC, Madras cropped; KC, Klamath cropped; and CC, Corvallis...of a functionally distinct group of AOA that differs from the groups responding to organic N mineralization...Agricultural Research Center, the Klamath Basin Research and Extension...

Anne E. Taylor; Neeraja Vajrala; Andrew T. Giguere; Alix I. Gitelman; Daniel J. Arp; David D. Myrold; Luis Sayavedra-Soto; Peter J. Bottomley

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

bus, a Bushy Arabidopsis CYP79F1 Knockout Mutant with Abolished Synthesis of Short-Chain Aliphatic Glucosinolates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...methyl donor in trans-methylation reactions, and the hormone ethylene (). In addition, methionine is an immediate progenitor of...metabolism in plants Reintanz B. Rodman J.E. Karol K.G. Price R.A. Sytsma K.J. Molecules, morphology, and Dahlgrens...

Birgit Reintanz; Michaela Lehnen; Michael Reichelt; Jonathan Gershenzon; Marius Kowalczyk; Goran Sandberg; Matthias Godde; Rainer Uhl; Klaus Palme

93

CHANGES IN ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBON TRACER COMPOSITION DURING THE DIGESTIVE PROCESS OF THE MARINE WORM NEREIS VIRENS. PRELIMINARY RESULTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEREIS VIRENS. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. F. GILBERT a,b, G. STORA b, G. DESROSIERS a, J-P. GAGNE a, B hydrocarbons to a harsh chemical and active microbiological environment11. If the metabolization of polycyclic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Application of organolithium compounds for the preparation of some aliphatic and alicyclic phosphines, phosphine oxides and phosphine sulfides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-a-pr?wylphssyhiae) to 6)t? (triaethyl- phosphiae)i Those yielgs esasot bo eoasi4ore4 to bo the sssiasa possible ~ siaeo so stagy of tho osao resotioa vss ?agertsbss sa4er vsrioss eoagitioaa. Sae a44itioa of sa ether selatios of phosphorus espehlsrigo te ss eseoos ef...Lpllithiuw& 20, 7 gi(0&19 sole) of yhosyhorus trichloride ia $0 al of anhydrous other was a44od dropwioo at a toaperature between 20' and -10" ~ . 'ftor the o44itioa of the phosphor?s triohloride the cooling bath?as resowed snd the reostioa aixturo...

Screttas, Constantinos G

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

THE CHEMISTRY OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS -CLEAVAGE OF ALIPHATIC BRIDGES BETWEEN AROMATIC NUCLEI CATALYSED BY LEWIS ACIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Background I. II. III. IV. II. Coal Liquefaction . •Coal Structure • • . Lewis Acid Catalysts. Scope andOrganic Structure of Bituminous Coal", Proceedings, Stanford

Taylor, Newell D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Generation, Observation, and Free Radical Reactivity of Aliphatic Bisketenes:? The Solution to a Long-Standing Problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Annette D. Allen , Michael H. Fenwick , Amir Jabri , Huzaifa Rangwala , Kazem Saidi , and Thomas T. Tidwell * ... (g) Allen, A. D.; Rangwala, H.; Saidi, K.; Tidwell, T. T.; Wang, J. Russ. ...

Annette D. Allen; Michael H. Fenwick; Amir Jabri; Huzaifa Rangwala; Kazem Saidi; Thomas T. Tidwell

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

97

The effect of ionizing radiation on dielectric properties of bovine achilles tendon collagen in the temperature range of thermal denaturation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of ?-irradiation, with doses from 102?2×103 kGy, on the dielectric properties of solid-state collagen was studied. The temperature dependence of the constants ?? and ??' revealed a decrease in the dena...

F. Jaroszyk; E. Marzec

1994-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Protein folding from a highly disordered denatured state: The folding pathway of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 at atomic resolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...theoretical study of polyalanine peptides by Pappu et al. (31) suggests that the Flory...F J Otzen D E Ladurner A G Fersht A R ( 1995 ) J Mol Biol 254 : 968 – 979...10.1073/ pnas.090104997) . 31 Pappu R V Srinivasan R Rose G D ( 2000 ) Proc...

Steven L. Kazmirski; Kam-Bo Wong; Stefan M. V. Freund; Yee-Joo Tan; Alan R. Fersht; Valerie Daggett

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Production Oxygenate Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Captive Refinery Oxygenate Plants Oxygenate production facilities located within or adjacent to a refinery complex. Fuel Ethanol An anhydrous denatured aliphatic alcohol intended for gasoline blending as described in Oxygenates definition. Gasohol A blend of finished motor gasoline containing alcohol (generally ethanol but sometimes methanol) at a concentration of 10 percent or less by volume. Data on gasohol that has at least 2.7 percent oxygen, by weight, and is intended for sale inside carbon monoxide nonattainment areas are included in data on oxygenated gasoline. Merchant Oxygenate Plants Oxygenate production facilities that are not associated with a petroleum refinery. Production from these facilities is sold under contract or on the spot market to refiners or other gasoline blenders.

100

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES, II. A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, IN BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The normal hydrocarbons of the rich oil shale from the Green River Formation exhibit...n-C17 alkane in the Green River oil shale is consistent with the theory that...rise to the organic material of rich oil shale. Although the Florida Mud Lake ooze...

Jerry Han; E. D. McCarthy; William Van Hoeven; Melvin Calvin; W. H. Bradley

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES, II. A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, IN BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...higher-molecular- TABLE 1. Hydrocarbons from algae. n-C, n-C1. Pristane A-C17 n-Cl? Branched C1s Phytane n-Cis, n-Ci8 n-C2u Higher mol wt hydrocarbons Major component .-Blue-Green Algae- Nostoc Anacysti8 0.42 28 0.42 3.4 4.0 100 100 19...

Jerry Han; E. D. McCarthy; William Van Hoeven; Melvin Calvin; W. H. Bradley

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A novel copper(II)-Schiff base complex containing pyrrole ring: Synthesis, characterization and its modified electrodes applied in oxidation of aliphatic alcohols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A novel copper(II)-Schiff base complex containing pyrrole ring: Synthesis, characterization 35042 Rennes Cedex, France. Abstract A new copper(II) complex Cu(II)-L containing N2O2 donor atoms has of copper acetate monohydrate. It was characterized by spectroscopic methods such as FT-IR, UV­vis, mass

Boyer, Edmond

103

Complete Detoxification of Short Chain Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds: Isolation of Halorespiring Organisms and Biochemical Studies of the Dehalogenating Enzyme Systems - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work focused on the isolation and characterization of halorespiring populations, and the initial investigation of the dechlorinating enzyme systems. In addition, tools to evaluate the presence/activity to halorespiring populations in the environment were developed. The tools developed in this work (measurements of hydrogen consumption thresholds, molecular probes) are relevant for regulatory agencies in order to facilitate decisions on which bioremediation technology (biostimulation or bioaugmentation) is most promising at a particular site. In addition, a better understanding of the physiology of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems enhances our knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

Tiedje, J.M.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Protein folding by distributed computing and the denatured state ensemble Neelan J. Marianayagam, Nicolas L. Fawzi, and Teresa Head-Gordon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July 26, 2005) The distributed computing (DC) paradigm in conjunction with the folding@home (FH) client from higher energy subpopulations in the DSE. folding mechanism folding@home two-state kinetics Poisson a particular strength of the distributed computing (DC) approach known as folding@home (FH), which compares

Head-Gordon, Teresa L.

105

Denaturation and Renaturation of a ?-1,6;1,3-Glucan, Lentinan, Associated with Expression of T-Cell-mediated Responses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4/30, in gel electrophoresis apparatus EL-4...Sweden) and electrophoresis was run at a constant...at 3'C. The electrode buffer was 0...value of 25 in water changed to 2 in...urea and DMSO by dialysis against water resulted...Dof Lentinan by Treatment with NaOH. Fig...

Yukiko Y. Maeda; Sumiyo T. Watanabe; Chie Chihara; and Makoto Rokutanda

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Cloning of the Arabidopsis RSF1 Gene by Using a Mapping Strategy Based on High-Density DNA Arrays and Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Alto, California 94304 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, La Jolla, California 92037...Associate Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Aarts M.G.M. Corzaan...genomics Nagatani A. Plant biology. Lighting up the nucleus Neff M.M. Neff J.D...

Jamie I. Spiegelman; Michael N. Mindrinos; Christian Fankhauser; Daniel Richards; Jason Lutes; Joanne Chory; Peter J. Oefner

107

Cloning of the Arabidopsis RSF1 Gene by Using a Mapping Strategy Based on High-Density DNA Arrays and Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...combined with its low operating cost, make DHPLC an effective and...organisms. Improvements (e.g., cost and more amenable markers...Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Aarts M.G.M...Nagatani A. Plant biology. Lighting up the nucleus Neff M.M...

Jamie I. Spiegelman; Michael N. Mindrinos; Christian Fankhauser; Daniel Richards; Jason Lutes; Joanne Chory; Peter J. Oefner

108

Intrinsically Disordered Proteins and Their Environment: Effects of Strong Denaturants, Temperature, pH, Counter Ions, Membranes, Binding Partners, Osmolytes, and Macromolecular Crowding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) differ from “normal” ordered proteins at several levels, structural, functional and ... is complementary to the catalytic activities of ordered proteins. Amino acid biases...

Vladimir N. Uversky

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Cloning of the Arabidopsis RSF1 Gene by Using a Mapping Strategy Based on High-Density DNA Arrays and Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...both are amenable to high-throughput automation, which is an essential prerequisite in...tairpub@ftp.arabidopsis.org/home/tair/Software">ftp://tairpub:tairpub@ftp.arabidopsis.org/home/tair/Software. Marker scores...

Jamie I. Spiegelman; Michael N. Mindrinos; Christian Fankhauser; Daniel Richards; Jason Lutes; Joanne Chory; Peter J. Oefner

110

Assessing the Potential of Natural Microbial Communities to Improve a Second-Generation Biofuels Platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Naturally occurring microbial communities from high-salt and/or high-temperature environments were collected from sites across the United States and Puerto Rico and screened for their efficacy in the MixAlco biofuel production platform. The Mix...

Hammett, Amy Jo Macbey

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

111

ELSEVIER Surface Science 303 (lYY4) 206-230 ;,,.;_:_.y y .../. .' ..`,. :> .,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by means of the Fischer- Tropsch technique, and the steam reforming of natural gas to form so-called syngas. Representative examples are the ammonia synthesis via Haber-Bosch, the synthesis of alco- hols and hydrocarbons of products, and (7) diffusion of products from the surface. One typically treats these elementary reactions

Miller, William H.

112

Oligomerization and Catalytic Ketonization in the Mixalco™ Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

–3 Depending how many steps are employed, the final product is ketones, alcohols, or hydrocarbons. Potential biomass feedstocks include municipal solid waste, animal manure, and energy crops.4–8 The MixAlco™ process is a version of the carboxylate platform...

Taco Vasquez, Sebastian

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Aluminum monocarbonyl and aluminum isocarbonyl Steve S. Wesolowski,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum monocarbonyl and aluminum isocarbonyl Steve S. Wesolowski,a) T. Daniel Crawford,b) Justin of the aluminum monocarbonyl species AlCO and AlOC have been performed to predict the geometries, fragmentation, Ogden, and Oswald6 first isolated aluminum dicarbonyls in solid krypton and identified the species

Crawford, T. Daniel

114

Regio-and Enantioselective Alkane Hydroxylation with Engineered Cytochromes P450 BM-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-alco- hols.10 This enzyme does not accept larger alkanes. Soluble methane monooxygenase from the same cytochrome P450s that have been characterized are in general faster, soluble (i.e., not membrane-bound), more hydroxylation and, in some cases, even regioselective alkane hydroxylation. For example, the particulate methane

Arnold, Frances H.

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - arbitrarily amplified dna Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

given DNA sequence millions of times. A. Denaturation: DNA is denatured. B. Annealing: Primer... acronyms associated with molecular markers AFLP Amplified Fragment Length...

116

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Input Input Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Fuel Ethanol An anhydrous denatured aliphatic alcohol intended for gasoline blending as described in Oxygenates definition. Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB) Non-certified Foreign Refinery gasoline classified by an importer as blendstock to be either blended or reclassified with respect to reformulated or conventional gasoline. GTAB was classified on EIA surveys as either reformulated or conventional based on emissions performance and the intended end use in data through the end of December 2009. Designation of GTAB as reformulated or conventional was discontinued beginning with data for January 2010. GTAB was reported as a single product beginning with data for January 2010. GTAB data for January 2010 and later months is presented as conventional motor gasoline blending components whenreported as a subset of motor gasoline blending components.

117

Comment on flash photolysis resonance fluorescence investigation of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with a series of aliphatic ketones over the temperature range 240-440 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence study of Wallington and Kurylo dealing with the kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of the OH radical with ketones has greatly expanded the literature data base concerning this class of organic compounds. For 2- and 3-pentanone and 2-hexanone the absolute room temperature rate constants determined by Wallington and Kurylo can be compared to rate constants obtained by using a relative rate technique, and significant discrepancies, outside of the combined stated experimental error limits, are evident. The relative rate constant measurements were carried out in a 60-L Teflon chamber, and problems ascribed to first-order wall losses of the ketones during the irradiations were observed.

Atkinson, R.; Aschmann, S.M.

1988-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Conversion of sugarcane bagasse to carboxylic acids under thermophilic conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?????????????. 17 1.4 Project description????????????..?... 25 II MATERIALS AND METHODS???????????? 27 2.1 Biomass feedstock??????????????. 27 2.2 Biomass pretreatment????????????? 29 2.3 Fermentation material and methods.... This is followed by introducing promising lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks and challenges in lignocellulosic biomass conversion. Subsequently, it presents the process description and recent advances of the MixAlco process, a novel and promising biomass...

Fu, Zhihong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Direct conversion of carboxylate salts to carboxylic acids via reactive extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Petroleum Processing, P. R. China Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Mark T. Holtzapple The MixAlco process, a proprietary technology owned by Texas A&M University, converts biomass (e.g., municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, paper, agricultural... residues, and energy crops) into usable chemicals (e.g., acetic acid) and fuels (e.g., ethanol). Historically, calcium carbonate has been used as the buffer. Recently, it was found that using ammonium bicarbonate as the buffering agent enhances...

Xu, Xin

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Manufacturing improvement and thermal property characterization of the frame structure of an Ultra-high Throughput Mutational Spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) is a DNA separation technique that allows the detection of mutants at a fraction of 10Ì???. CDCE uses a region of constant temperature and constant denaturant concentration ...

Lin, Jiengju J. (Jiengju James)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Insertion of Endocellulase Catalytic Domains into Thermostable Consensus Ankyrin Scaffolds: Effects on Stability and Cellulolytic Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of these microbes produce a battery of secreted cellulases with...consensus ankyrin protein, the thermal denaturation midpoint (Tm...enhancements. We determined the thermal denaturation of these constructs...averaging five wavelength scans. Thermal unfolding transitions were...

Eva S. Cunha; Christine L. Hatem; Doug Barrick

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Anaerobic fermentation of rice straw and chicken manure to carboxylic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass (Lynd et al., 2002). Carboxylic acids (C2? C7) are produced from anaerobic fermentation. Because they have a high market value, these acids can be recovered and sold. Alternatively, they can be converted to methane (biogas) or chemicals (e... conditions, both of which contribute heavily to production costs. Zhang and Zhang (1999) studied biogasification of rice straw to produce biogas (CH4 (50%)); however, methane is a low-value product. 1.6 The MixAlco Process An alternative to SSF...

Agbogbo, Frank Kwesi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by processing these crops is produced more efficiently than the ethanol produced by corn. Water hyacinth, a weed that chokes waterways if left to grow uncontrolled, is even more energy efficient as a biomass feedstock,” Holtzapple said. In the MixAlco process..., the biomass feedstock, with added mi- croorganisms from sources such as dirt, compost piles and swamps, is treated with lime and then fer- mented to form organic salts. Wa- ter is removed and then the mixture is heated to form ketones, such as acetone, which...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloplastic graft material Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ovei the level of grafting, ease of control of the final material properties... Aliphatic polyester-grafted starch composites by in situ ring opening polymerization* Abstract......

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous polyketone latices Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 Alternating aliphatic polyketones, produced by co-and terpolymerization of carbon monoxide and olefins (mixtures of ethylene and propylene) using palladium-based Summary:...

126

Water-soluble polyesters from long chain alkylesters of citric acid and poly(ethylene glycol) .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Long chain aliphatic alcohols have been used as model compounds to develop a preparative method for a water-soluble material, which could be a carrier for… (more)

Barroso Bujans, Fabienne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon clusters Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aliphatic chains as key intermediates for the nucleation Summary: to macromolecular building blocks (nanoparticles) that eventually turn into soot. Polycyclic aromatic...

128

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 1091910932, 2013 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/10919/2013/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examined in detail. Although a few field stud- ies have suggested that primary particulate organic carbon both black carbon and or- ganic aerosol (OA), particularly in some developing coun- tries where aliphatic bridges or loops. The aromatic bonds are very stable compared to the aliphatic bridges and loops

Meskhidze, Nicholas

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted peritoneal dialysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

review Practical considerations in refolding proteins from inclusion bodies Summary: , removal of the denaturant, and assistance of refolding by small molecule additives. We...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - albumin bsa nanoparticles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the temperature of BSA denatur... albumin and -globulin, starting from their acid-expanded, most hydrated ... Source: Bloomfield, Victor A. - Department of Biochemistry,...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium thiocyanates Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thiocyanate-phenol chloroform method (31). Briefly, pools... of microdissection medium, into 400 l of denaturing solution (4 M guanidinium thiocyanate, 25 mM sodium citrate...

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-ley igg reversal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

unfolded without the need to denature ... Source: Mochrie, Simon - Department of Applied Physics, Yale University; Regan, Lynne - Department of Molecular Biophysics and...

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - alter rna duplex Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

investigated using thermal denaturation (Tm) studies of a 12 base pair RNA ... Source: Beal, Peter A. - Department of Chemistry, University of Utah Collection: Chemistry 14 David...

134

ENVIRONME NTA L R EV  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENVIRONME ENVIRONME NTA L R EV IEW for CATEGO RI CAL EXCLUS ION DETE RM INATION Rocky Mountain Region, Western Area Power Ad ministration Alco\'3-Caspc r North I IS-kV Transm ission Line Pole Replace ments Na t ro na Co un ty, Wyo mi ng A. Brief Desc ription of Proposal: Western Area Po\.\cr Administration's (Western) Casper Field Office proposes to replace deteriorating poles on 18 wood II-frame structures along its Alcova-Casper North 115-kV transmission line. The project structures are located on the transmission line bct\.ycen Township 33 North. Range 80 West. Section 12 and Township 30 North, Range 82 West. Section 18, 6 th Principle Meridian ncar Casper. Wyoming. in Natrona County. The land ownership is primarily private with two structures located on Bureau of Land Management administered lands. Western will accomplish

135

acronyms.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HEALTH AND SAFETY ACRONYMS HEALTH AND SAFETY ACRONYMS AFRD Accelerator and Fusion Research Division ACFD Alameda County Fire Department AHD Activity Hazard Documentation ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ALCO Alameda County (Fire Department) ALS Advanced Light Sources ASD Administrative Services Department ASPCP Accidental Spill Prevention and Containment Plan AST Above ground storage tank BAAQMD Bay Area Air Quality Management District Basin Plan Water Quality Control Plan BBAP Behavior-Based Accident Prevention (peer-based safety observation program to identify and communicate at-risk work behaviors - see WOW) Berkeley Lab Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory BSO Berkeley Site Office (DOE) Bq becquerel BTEX benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene CAA Clean Air Act CARB California Air Resources Board

136

Nucleic Acid Homology in the Genus Mycobacterium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in an L2-65 Beckman ultracentrifuge. Thermal denaturation. Denaturation temperatures...with immobilized homologous DNA, the thermal stability of the duplexes formed should...different clusters. Because a selective battery of only 42 tests is used, it has been...

Wendy M. Gross; Lawrence G. Wayne

1970-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Amyloid protein SAA is an apoprotein of mouse plasma high density lipoprotein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...less cumbersome and more rapid method of thermal denaturation, which has been used to...6 M urea buffer were subjected to this thermal denaturation. Antigen solutions in the...migration (anode at bot- tom); stain, Sudan black B. plasma is illustrated in Fig...

E P Benditt; N Eriksen; R H Hanson

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Internal Porosity of Mineral Coating Supports Microbial Activity in Rapid Sand Filters for Groundwater Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...5-min denaturation at 95C, followed by 40 cycles of denaturation at 94C for 30 s and primer...physical and chemical properties. In general the mass of mineral coating decreased...H Smidt. 2013. Impact of long-term diesel contamination on soil microbial community...

Arda Gülay; Karolina Tatari; Sanin Musovic; Ramona V. Mateiu; Hans-Jørgen Albrechtsen; Barth F. Smets

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nitrification and Autotrophic Nitrifying Bacteria in a Hydrocarbon-Polluted Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...PCR mixture (). The thermal cycle included an initial denaturation...94C for 120 s, followed by 35 cycles consisting of denaturation at...elongation at 68C for 60 s. The cycle was completed by a final elongation...presence of an extra dose of diesel fuel but not in the initial...

Jamal Deni; Michel J. Penninckx

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

OZONOLYSIS OF “POLYMER-TYPE” MATERIAL IN COAL, KEROGEN AND IN THE ORGUEIL METEORITE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aggregate of aliphatic structures with some cycloalkane and mononuclear aromatic ring components; and (3) coaly-oil-shale-type, which has properties intermediate be- tween the two. The nature of the insoluble organic matter in carbonaceous...

Sister Mary Carol Bitz; Bartholomew Nagy

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol.Process. 15, 2877-2892 (2001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soil surface, and it is caused by the leaching of hydrophobic compounds, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons). These compounds can escapeinto the atmosphere, or move into the soil atmosphere and condense *Correspondence to: L). The condensation of these compounds form

MacDonald, Lee

142

Quantification of NA processes for the CAH-contamination in Karlsruhe-Ost/Killisfeld with the help of a groundwater model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactive transport of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) was simulated with a process oriented multi-species-model for a model domain of 4 km2. The objective of the calculations was the quantification of NA...

Dr.-Ing. W. Schäfer; Dr. F. Wickert; Dr. A. Tiehm

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic substitution photo-nocas Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and to structural differences in the aliphatic... (a) and HMBC (b) spectra for TCV oil as an example. The degree of substitution of the aromatic... MS and the degree of...

144

DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402244 Chemocatalytic Upgrading of Tailored Fermentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for blending with gasoline,[7­9] production of longer chain alcohols for jet and diesel blendstocks suffers reported a chemical catalysis route to generate aliphatic ketones (C5­C19) that are components of gasoline

Toste, Dean

145

Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200.degree. C. or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S).sub.y).sub.n wherein y=1 to 6; n=2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprisises one of more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associtated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon.

Dejonghe, Lutgard C. (Berkeley, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); Mailhe, Catherine C. (Berkeley, CA); Armand, Michel B. (St. Martin D'Uriage, FR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cobalt-cement catalysts for the synthesis of motor fuel components from synthesis gas obtained from oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Highly effective cobalt-cement catalysts for the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from CO and H2, which are formed upon the thermolysis or gasification of oil shale or coals, are considered. The formation of t...

A. L. Lapidus; E. Z. Golosman; Yu. A. Strizhakova

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Innovative Remediation Technology for Contaminated Military Sites: A Canadian Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel and innovative technology has been developed in Canada to clean-up soil contaminated with a wide range of organic pollutants, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated phenols, phthala...

Igor J. Marvan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nickel-catalyzed preparation of acrylamides from alpha olefins and isocyanates ; Synthetic studies toward ripostatin A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter I. In the presence of the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand IPr, the nickel(0)-catalyzed coupling reaction of a-olefins and branched aliphatic isocyanates provides c,-unsaturated amides arising from preferential C-C ...

Schleicher, Kristin D. (Kristin Diann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-2240/97/$04.00 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxidation. CF8 and P. butanovora were able to degrade other chlorinated hydrocarbons, including. Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) cause serious environmental problems through contamination of ground wa- ter, drinking water, and soil. In situ bioremediation of CAHs by aerobic cometabolism

Semprini, Lewis

150

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

0.24 per gallon. E85 is defined as an alternative fuel that is a blend of denatured ethanol and hydrocarbon and typically contains 85% ethanol by volume, but must contain at...

151

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

E85 Definition E85 motor fuel is defined as an alternative fuel that is a blend of ethanol and hydrocarbon, of which the ethanol portion is 75-85% denatured fuel ethanol by volume...

152

Cyanovirin-N: a sugar-binding antiviral protein with a new twist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, originally iso- lated from cultures of the cyanobacterium (blue-green al- gae) Nostoc ellipsosporum [3-thaw cycles, as well as after treatment with organic solvents (CH3CN, CH3OH, DMSO), denaturants (8M Gn

153

Ni(II) coordination to mixed sites modulates DNA binding of HpNikR via a long-range effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H...using a Coy inert atmospheric chamber (95% N2...Inductively coupled plasma...6-coordinate sites. Thermal/li-bration/screw...conducted using a 7% non-denaturing acrylamide...

Abby L. West; Sarah E. Evans; Javier M. González; Lester G. Carter; Hiro Tsuruta; Edwin Pozharski; Sarah L. J. Michel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Normal Operating Range of Bacterial Communities in Soil Used for Potato Cropping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...quantitative PCR, clone library, and PCR-denaturing...3 years, 12 clone libraries consisting of bacterial...rRNA gene sequence libraries from environmental...introducing myRDP space and quality controlled public data. Nucleic Acids...

Özgül ?nceo?lu; Leo Simon van Overbeek; Joana Falcão Salles; Jan Dirk van Elsas

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Systems Analysis of the Response of Photosynthesis, Metabolism, and Growth to an Increase in Irradiance in the Photosynthetic Model Organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...checked by electrophoresis on 2% denaturing agarose gels; RNA quality was assessed by determining the 260 nm/280 nm absorbance...H. (2011). Advancing our understanding and capacity to engineer natures CO2-sequestering enzyme, Rubisco. Plant Physiol...

Tabea Mettler; Timo Mühlhaus; Dorothea Hemme; Mark-Aurel Schöttler; Jens Rupprecht; Adam Idoine; Daniel Veyel; Sunil Kumar Pal; Liliya Yaneva-Roder; Flavia Vischi Winck; Frederik Sommer; Daniel Vosloh; Bettina Seiwert; Alexander Erban; Asdrubal Burgos; Samuel Arvidsson; Stephanie Schönfelder; Anne Arnold; Manuela Günther; Ursula Krause; Marc Lohse; Joachim Kopka; Zoran Nikoloski; Bernd Mueller-Roeber; Lothar Willmitzer; Ralph Bock; Michael Schroda; Mark Stitt

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

On single-molecule DNA sequencing with atomic force microscopy using functionalized carbon nanotube probes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel DNA sequencing method is proposed based on the specific binding nature of nucleotides and measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). A single molecule of DNA is denatured and immobilized on an atomically fiat ...

Burns, Daniel James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Biological Monitoring of Fire Fighters: Sister Chromatid Exchange and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-DNA Adducts in Peripheral Blood Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels...exposure to carcinogenic combustion products. Cytoge...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; CI, confidence interval...estimating exposures to combustion and pyrolysis products...into water, briefly heat denatured (100 Cfor...

Saou-Hsing Liou; David Jacobson-Kram; Miriam C. Poirier; Dung Nguyen; Paul T. Strickland; and Melvyn S. Tockman

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

There is a correlation between the DNA affinity and mutagenicity of several 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indoles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chemicals produced by incomplete combustion processes represent a significant...series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but the observation was...experiment involving addition of heat-denaturated DNA (1.52...Unlike polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the indole derivatives are...

J M Pezzuto; P P Lau; Y Luh; P D Moore; G N Wogan; S M Hecht

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Changes in Community Structure of Sediment Bacteria Along the Florida Coastal Everglades Marsh–Mangrove–Seagrass Salinity Gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Community structure of sediment bacteria in the Everglades freshwater marsh, fringing mangrove forest, and Florida Bay seagrass meadows were described based on polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel el...

Makoto Ikenaga; Rafael Guevara; Amanda L. Dean; Cristina Pisani…

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from High Ethanol Content Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Study determined the flammability of fuel tank headspace vapors as a function of ambient temperature for seven E85 fuel blends, two types of gasoline, and denatured ethanol at a low tank fill level.

Gardiner, D.; Bardon, M.; Pucher, G.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Structure and interactions in simple solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was performed on molecular ensembles containing 300 water molecules...In From semiconductors to proteins: beyond the average structure...tein denaturations. Adv. Protein Chem. 14, 163. Neilson...refinement for liquids and disordered materials. In Local structure...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Functional proteomics in Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-state of E. coli corresponding to hundreds of unique gene products. The copurification of proteins when fractionated at varying pHs could suggest the components of higher order complexes. This non-denaturing proteomic approach should provide physiological...

Champion, Matthew Maurice

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

163

Biological Monitoring of Fire Fighters: Sister Chromatid Exchange and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-DNA Adducts in Peripheral Blood Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels...to carcinogenic combustion products. Cytoge...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; CI, confidence...controlled for during data analysis. Collection...estimating exposures to combustion and pyrolysis products...water, briefly heat denatured (100...

Saou-Hsing Liou; David Jacobson-Kram; Miriam C. Poirier; Dung Nguyen; Paul T. Strickland; and Melvyn S. Tockman

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electroporation and lysis of marine microalga Karenia brevis for RNA extraction and amplification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...physical, chemical, mechanical, thermal or enzymatic means in order...agents has been shown [17]. Thermal lysis denatures proteins but...and M. A. Northrup 2000 A battery-powered notebook thermal cycler for rapid multiplex real-time...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Intermediate-Scale, Semicontinuous Solid-Phase Fermentation Process for Production of Fuel Ethanol from Sweet Sorghum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0.47/liter for 95% ethanol. The calculated energy balance (energy output...0.47/liter for 95% ethanol. The calculated energy balance (energy output...denatured 95% (vol/vol) ethanol. Energy balances for pasteurized...

William R. Gibbons; Carl A. Westby; Thomas L. Dobbs

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing forced unfolding Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in solution. In recent years, we have also seen explosive progress in the study of protein folding... the unfolding of proteins after the addition of denaturant since unfolding is...

167

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

products that have been denatured. Methyl alcohol is a motor fuel that is most commonly derived from wood products. (Reference South Dakota Statutes 10-47B-3 and 10-47B-4...

168

Conversion characteristics of 10 selected oil shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion behavior of 10 oil shale from seven foreign and three domestic deposits has been studied by combining solid- and liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements with material balance Fischer assay conversion data. The extent of aromatization of aliphatic carbons was determined. Between zero and 42% of the raw shale aliphatic carbon formed aromatic carbon during Fischer assay. For three of the shales, there was more aromatic carbon in the residue after Fisher assay than in the raw shale. Between 10 and 20% of the raw shale aliphatic carbons ended up as aliphatic carbons on the spent shale. Good correlations were found between the raw shale aliphatic carbon and carbon in the oil and between the raw shale aromatic carbon and aromatic carbon on the spent shale. Simulated distillations and molecular weight determinations were performed on the shale oils. Greater than 50% of the oil consisted of the atmospheric and vacuum gas oil boiling fractions. 14 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Miknis, F.P.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Solvent- and chromatography-free amination of ?-deficient nitrogen heterocycles under microwave irradiation. A fast, efficient and green route to 9-aminoacridines, 4-aminoquinolines and 4-aminoquinazolines and its application to the synthesis of the drugs amsacrine and bistacrine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Focused microwave irradiation of equimolecular mixtures of 9-chloroacridines, 4-chloroquinolines and 4-chloroquinazolines with amines in the presence of 2 equiv of phenol allows the general, fast and high-yielding synthesis of aminated heterocycles, with a very broad scope in terms of amine structure (aromatic, linear primary aliphatic, ?-branched primary aliphatic, secondary aliphatic and diamines). Workup consisted of a simple washing with water and purification could be achieved by crystallization, avoiding the use of organic solvents in extraction and chromatographic purification steps. This protocol provides a solution to the long-standing synthetic problem of achieving a practical and efficient method for the amination of ?-deficient nitrogen heterocycles for medicinal chemistry applications.

Matteo Staderini; Nieves Cabezas; Maria Laura Bolognesi; J. Carlos Menéndez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Process analysis and optimization of biodiesel production from vegetable oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Table (2.2) (OTM, 1999). Crude oils are composed of 80 to 90% hydrogen saturated aliphatic alkanes (paraffins) and cycloalkanes (naphthenes). Aromatic hydrocarbons and alkenes (olefins) comprise 10- 20% and 1%, respectively, of crude oil composition....2 Hydrocarbon Contents in Crude Oil (ATSDR, 1995; OTM, 1999) HYDROCARBONS GENERAL FORMULA CHAIN TYPE STATE (Room temp) EXAMPLES Paraffins (Aliphatic) CnH2n+2 (n:1 to20) Linear or Branched Gas or Liquid Methane, Propane Hexane Aromatic C6H5-Y...

Myint, Lay L.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Catalytic properties of nickel activated by elements of I-VII of the periodic system in conversion of hydrocarbons with steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient recovery of benzene from pyrocondensates is considered to be one of the important problems of modern petroleum chemistry. In the paper presented, several nickel catalysts activated by elements of groups I to VII of the periodic system were synthesized and tested in steam conversion of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures. Samples of nickel catalysts activated by W and Bi had the highest selectivity in obtaining aromatic hydrocarbons from their mixtures with aliphatic hydrocarbons. Nickel catalysts activated by V/sub 2/O/sub 3/ showed the highest activity in steam conversion of hydrocarbons of both classes. (JMT)

Grinberg, D.N.; Shapiro, A.L.; Gankin, V.Yu.; Ivanova, M.L.; Yakovleva, N.V.; Moshkevich, A.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Phase formation induced by ion irradiation and electrical resistivity of aluminum–3d-transition-metal alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase formation, in particular amorphization, caused by 500-keV Xe+ ion irradiation of thin multilayered films of Al-Ti, Al-V, Al-Cr, Al-Mn, Al-Fe, Al-Co, and Al-Ni has been investigated. At a substrate temperature of 100 K during the irradiation, all these alloy systems are found to become amorphous for aluminum-rich compositions. At room temperature, the formation of structurally simple-crystalline solid solutions over extended compositional ranges, as compared to thermodynamic equilibrium, is observed. The electrical resistivity of amorphous Al83M17 alloys, where M=Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni, is found to vary systematically as a function of transition-metal element. A maximum is observed around Fe, for which the d-electron states coincide with the Fermi level. This behavior suggests that scattering of the conduction electrons by the 3d-electron states plays a dominant role. A comparison with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data from the literature suggests that the resistivity of amorphous Al83M17 alloys can be directly correlated to the position and width of the d-electron states.

N. Karpe; K. Kyllesbech Larsen; J. Bo/ttiger

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on ZSM-5 zeolites. Infrared spectroscopic study and quantum-chemical calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low temperature adsorption of CO was studied on H-ZSM-5 zeolites modified by dehydroxylation, ionic exchange with Al/sup 3 +/, and impregnation with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and on Na-ZSM-5 and CaH-ZSM-5 zeolites. It was found that interaction of CO with framework OH groups results in the formation of a hydrogen-bonded CO complex whose OH bond frequency is decreased by 310-320 cm/sup -1/ compared with that of free hydroxyls. For the less acidic framework hydroxyls in large cavities of H/sub 70/Na/sub 30/-Y zeolite the observed shift is 275 cm/sup -1/. With ZSM-5 zeolites, at least six types of electron-accepting sites are observed originating from nonframework Al species (band of CO in the interaction complex: 2132, 2222, 2202, 2195, and 2198 cm/sup -1/) and the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ microcrystalline phase (CO band at 2153 cm/sup -1/). The CO bond orders calculated by the CNDO/2 method for the CO interaction complexes with models of surface sites increase in the following order: > O-CO < > OH-CO approx. ..-->.. Al-CO approx. = Na-CO < alumina-CO approx. = Ca-CO < ..-->.. Si-CO < Al(cationic)-CO. A correlation between the calculated bond orders of CO and the observed vibrational frequencies of CO-forming interaction complexes is drawn.

Kustov, L.M.; Kazansky, V.B.; Beran, S.; Kubelkova, L.; Jiru, P.

1987-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Framework-incorporated Mn and Co analcime zeolites: Synthesis and characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The framework-substituted cobalt and manganese analcime zeolites were synthesized via a direct hydrothermal approach. The obtained samples were characterized by XRD powder, SEM-EDX, nitrogen physical adsorption, Raman microscopy, diffuse reflectance UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy which complementarily demonstrated the incorporation of cobalt and manganese into the zeolites framework. The results showed that substitution of Mn and Co could be placed in two synthesis gels with same compositions containing Al/Mn=5 and Al/Co=4 mol ratios, respectively. In addition, with replacing Al with Mn and synthesis of Mn-modified analcime, zeolite with higher surface area and pore volume could be achieved than the Co modified analcime. - Graphical abstract: The images and adsorption-desorption isotherms of N{sub 2} at 77 K for (a) Co (b) Mn modified analcime. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of Co and Mn modified analcime for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Framework-incorporation of Co and Mn using the same silicate gel composition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Applying several techniques to provide proofs for the characterization.

Azizi, Seyed Naser, E-mail: azizi@umz.ac.ir [Analytical Division, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ehsani Tilami, Salma [Analytical Division, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Analytical Division, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Diffusion in single crystals of melilite: 2. Cations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion coefficients of divalent cations, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, Ca, Sr, and Ba, in synthetic akermanite were determined by tracer-diffusion experiments. Diffusion coefficients of cation paris, Al + Al-Mg + Si, Al + Al-Co + Si, and Mg-Co in melilite solid-solution systems, were determined by coupled annealing of synthetic melilites of endmember compositions. Cobalt tracer diffuses slower along the c-crystallographic axis than along the a-axis by a factor of about three, possibly due to the anisotropic sheet-like arrangement of oxygen ions parallel to the (001) plane which is perpendicular to the c-axis in the crystal structure of melilite. In the coupled diffusion experiments, the cation pairs interdiffuse complementary, as expected for conservation of material and ionic charge balance in the substitution. The observed trend in the inter-diffusion coefficient vs. melting temperature relations is similar to those observed for alloys and consistent with an empirical rule for self-diffusion coefficient-melting temperature relation. In the diffusion coefficient vs. ionic radius diagram for divalent cation diffusion in akermanite, smooth curves were observed as in the case of olivine systems. However, the shapes of the curves were significantly different from those observed in olivine systems. The observed trend of diffusion coefficients with ionic radius can be explained on the basis of crystal structure-controlled diffusion in akermanite.

Morioka, Masana (Univ. of Tokyo Yayoi (Japan)); Nagasawa, Hiroshi (Gakushiun Univ. Mejiro, Tokyo (Japan))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Paint Thinner MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solvent {Mineral spirits; Aliphatic Petroleum Distillates; White spirits} 8052-41-3 CAS # 95.0 -100 as hazardous under OSHA regulations. OSHA Regulatory Status: Inhalation Acute Exposure Effects: May cause: Reports have associated repeated and prolonged overexposure to solvents with neurological and other

Rollins, Andrew M.

177

Molecular Characterization of Organic Content of Soot along the Centerline of a Coflow Diffusion Flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution mass spectrometry coupled with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization was used to probe chemical constituents of young soot particles sampled along the centerline of a coflow diffusion flame of a three-component Jet-A1 surrogate. In lower positions where particles are transparent to light extinction (n= 632.8 nm), peri-condensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are found to be the major components of the particle material. These particles become enriched with aliphatic components as they grow in mass and size. Before carbonization occurs, the constituent species in young soot particles are aliphatic and aromatic compounds 200-600 amu in mass, some of which are oxygenated. Particles dominated by PAHs or mixtures of PAHs and aliphatics can both exhibit liquid-like appearance observed by electron microscopy and be transparent to visible light. The variations in chemical composition observed here indicate that the molecular processes of soot formation in coflow diffusion flames may be more complex than previously thought. For example, the mass growth and enrichment of aliphatic components in an initially, mostly aromatic structure region of the flame that is absent of H atoms or other free radicals indicates that there must exist at least another mechanism of soot mass growth in addition to the hydrogen-abstraction-carbon addition mechanism currently considered in fundamental models of soot formation.

Cain, Jeremy P.; Laskin, Alexander; Kholghy, Mohammad Reza; Thomson, Murray; Wang, Hai

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Materials science aspects of coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural organic materials are arrangements of linear aliphatic units and ring-like aromatic units arranged in a polymeric pattern. We show that fossilized organic materials such as coals and oil shale retain this polymeric character. We also show the polymeric nature of jet and amber fossilized organic matter used for centuries for ornamentation.

Charles Wert; Manfred Weller

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Bibliography and Index to the Literature on Gas Chromatography: January 1, 1963 to November 1, 1963  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......THE STUDY OF RESINS IN BLACK COAL TARS, Ferrand, R., Chim...ALIPHATIC ESTERS. PART I. SLOW COMBUSTION OF ETHYL ACETATE, Fish...French) 421 USE OF CATALYTIC COMBUSTION FILA- MENTS FOR QUALITATIVE...1363-1368 (Sept. 1963) 433 THE CHEMISTRY OF SERUM LIPOPRO- TEINS......

Seaton T. Preston; Jr.; Geneva Hyder; Mignon Gill

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Bibliography and Index to the Literature on Gas Chromatography—1965 November 1, 1964 to November 1, 1965  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......German) 842 COMPOSITION OF SOFT COAL. X. CHEM ICAL COMPOSITION...R. C., NAA-SR-9731 Chemistry, OTS (Oct. 15, 1964) 912...HYDROCARBONS PRO- DUCED DURING COMBUSTION OF SIMPLE ALIPHATIC FUELS...1200 GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY IN THE CHEMISTRY OF CEREALS. NOTE I, Mun......

Seaton T. Preston; Jr.; Mignon Gill

1965-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

182

Revised version Organic Geochemistry 28, 411-415, 1998.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Abstract A resistant soil organic residue, `humin', has been analysed by solid-state 13 C-NMR and pyrolysis, carbohydrates and phenols. Keywords : 13 C of soil alkanes, NMR, resistant aliphatic biopolymer, pyrolysis biomass decomposition products as well as from root exudates, the new proposed pathway is based upon

183

A Case for Safer Building Materials: Lifecycle Concerns, Data Gaps, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; microenvironments · Heating and ventilation · Dampness and humidity · Chemicals in building materials · VOCs have;Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) · Aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and associated supplies · Adhesives · Building materials · Furnishings and clothing · Combustion appliances

Lee, Seung-Wuk

184

Understanding the chemistry and physics of coal structure (A Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons and heteroatom forms in...oxygen forms, and (iii) heat capacity and NMR studies...C2H3I as the reagent. Combustion of the C2H3I-alkylated...molecular weight products. HEAT CAPACITY AND NMR STUDIES...

Duane G. Levine; Richard H. Schlosberg; Bernard G. Silbernagel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Midterm Exam: Chemistry 223 McGill University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or ethanol. a) Write balanced equations for the combustion reactions. b) How much heat is produced by each and show how, and in what sense, it becomes the heat absorbed by the sys- tem. c) What is a Joule and to define any sym- bols. 5. (20%) Gasoline is a mixture of various aliphatic hydrocarbons, however, here we

Ronis, David M.

186

Processing of meteoritic organic materials as a possible analog of early molecular evolution in planetary environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons but also in the finding...with the more numerous hydrocarbons. However...on the production of hydrocarbons from sugars...N-enrichment. Stepwise combustion of IOMs of this and...and was altered by heat (21). That is, molecular...

Sandra Pizzarello; Stephen K. Davidowski; Gregory P. Holland; Lynda B. Williams

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Understanding the chemistry and physics of coal structure (A Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aliphatic hydrocarbons and heteroatom...and (iii) heat capacity...reagent. Combustion of the C2H3I-alkylated...2H20 in the combustion products...These data, combined...products. HEAT CAPACITY...with the heat capacity data at these...

Duane G. Levine; Richard H. Schlosberg; Bernard G. Silbernagel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Estimation of Molar Heat Capacities in Solution from Gas Chromatographic Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the solutions of hydrocarbons--the general...and the molar heat capacity Abstract...Chromatographic Data K roly H berger...measure- ments of heat capacities and...Chem. Eng. Data 20: 24346 (1975...R. Fuchs. Heat capacities of...Enthalpies of combustion of some aliphatic......

Károly Héberger; Miklós Görgényi

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

PHONON DISPERSION CURVES OF ORDERED PHASES OF T.B.B.A. Abstract. --The lattice dynamics of a deuterated single crystal of T.B.B.A. have been measured  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a deuterated single crystal of T.B.B.A. have been measured by mean of inelastic neutron scattering of the molecules. Previous neutron inelastic scattering measurements have been done on non-deuterated single of a melting of the terminal aliphatic chains. So neutron coherent inelastic scattering measure- ments have

Boyer, Edmond

191

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method. 12 figs.

Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Yu, Q.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin from by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method.

Miller, Jan D. (1886 Atkin Ave., Salt Lake City, UT 84106); Yi, Ye (2875 E. Wander Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84117); Yu, Qiang (224 University Village, Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other Halogenated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other, California 94305-4020 Enhanced in-situ transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) was observed under anoxic Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs)with one or two carbon atoms are widely used as solvents, degreasing

Semprini, Lewis

194

ELSEVIER Journal of Hazardous Materials 41 (1995)205-216 HIIZIIRDOUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride with elemental iron Bradley R. Helland, Pedro J.J. Alvarez*, Jerald L-1527, USA Received 3 August 1994;accepted in revised form 15 November 1994 Abstract Carbon tetrachloride (CC aliphatics such as carbon tetrachloride (CC14) are common environ- mental contaminants due

Alvarez, Pedro J.

195

A Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Method for Analyzing Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Water and Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fuel samples, including gasoline (18,20,21), diesel...temperature of 340 C. Run times were approximately...sample containing C9C36 straight chain aliphatics and...Determination of oxygenates in gasoline by GC GC. J. High Resolut...aromatic hydrocar- bons in gasolines by flow modulated comprehensive......

Stacy K. Seeley; Steven V. Bandurski; Robert G. Brown; James D. McCurry; John V. Seeley

196

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Conventional Gasoline, Ed 55 and Lower Finished conventional motor gasoline blended with a maximum of 55 volume percent denatured fuel ethanol. Conventional Gasoline, Greater than Ed 55 Finished conventional motor gasoline blended with denatured fuel ethanol where the volume percent of denatured fuel ethanol exceeds 55%.

197

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Blender Net Production Blender Net Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Conventional Gasoline, Ed55 and Lower Finished conventional motor gasoline blended with a maximum of 55 volume percent denatured fuel ethanol. Conventional Gasoline, Greater than Ed55 Finished conventional motor gasoline blended with denatured fuel ethanol where the volume percent of denatured fuel ethanol exceeds 55%.

198

Sensitivity analysis and study of the mixing uniformity of a microfluidic mixer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a microfluidic mixer based on hydrodynamic focusing, which is used to initiate the folding process of individual proteins. The folding process is initiated by quickly diluting a local denaturant concentration, and we define mixing time as the time advecting proteins experience a specified to achieve a local drop in denaturant concentration. In previous work, we presented a minimization of mixing time which considered optimal geometry and flow conditions, and achieved a design with a predicted mixing time of 0.10 $\\mu$s. The aim of the current paper is twofold. First, we explore the sensitivity of mixing time to key geometric and flow parameters. In particular, we study the angle between inlets, the shape of the channel intersections, channel widths, mixer depth, mixer symmetry, inlet velocities, working fluid physical properties, and denaturant concentration thresholds. Second, we analyze the uniformity of mixing times as a function of inlet flow streamlines. We find the shape of the intersection,...

Ivorra, Benjamin; Ramos, Ángel M; Santiago, Juan G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Comparative studies of diverged members of the phosphotriesterase family  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

then placed in a thermal cycler for an initial 5 minute 95'C denaturation followed by 40-cycles of a I minute 95'C denaturation, I minute at 55'C, and a 2 minute 72'C elongation step. Each reaction was run on an agarose gel using electrophoresis. Pool ?2... had a band 1 kB in length, the size predicted for ponL CLONING AND SEQUENCING PON I To generate the PCR fragment for cloning, PCR was repeated with Pool ?2 and a small portion was run on a gel to verify the presence of the I kb band. The remaining...

Arriens, Cristina Gale

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

200

Proposal of Afipia gen. nov., with Afipia felis sp. nov. (formerly the cat scratch disease bacillus), Afipia clevelandensis sp. nov. (formerly the Cleveland Clinic Foundation strain), Afipia broomeae sp. nov., and three unnamed genospecies.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1 ARNOLD F. KAUFMANN,8 DOUGLAS J. WEAR,2 AND JAY D. WENGER' Meningitis and...Lymph node, patient with CSD, 1987 D. J. Wear, AFIP F6400 = G1492 = ATCC 53690 A. felis...and photo- graphed by using Polaroid 665 B/W film. The restriction fragments were denatured...

D J Brenner; D G Hollis; C W Moss; C K English; G S Hall; J Vincent; J Radosevic; K A Birkness; W F Bibb; F D Quinn

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The cobT gene of Salmonella typhimurium encodes the NaMN: 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of N1-(5-phospho-alpha-D-ribosyl)-5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, an intermediate in the synthesis of the nucleotide loop of cobalamin.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Denatured protein was pelleted at 15,850 x g for 5 min in a Marathon 13K/M microcentrifuge (Fisher Scientific, Itasca, Ill...Scientific) in 0.5 ml of 2.0 N HCl was placed in a 130 C oil bath; after 2 h of incubation the ampule was opened, 1 ml...

J R Trzebiatowski; G A O'Toole; J C Escalante-Semerena

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

High-resolution frequency-domain second-harmonic optical coherence tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the experimental studies have found that the SH responded to the structural modifications of col- lagen, such as thermal denaturation, nonenzymatic glycation, and partial enzymatic cleavage.8 These modifications injury, diabetes, aging, abnormal wound healing, and malignant transformation of dys- plastic nevi. SHG

Chen, Zhongping

203

J. Chem. Sci., Vol. 119, No. 2, March 2007, pp. 6169. Indian Academy of Sciences. *For correspondence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Chem. Sci., Vol. 119, No. 2, March 2007, pp. 61­69. © Indian Academy of Sciences. 61 *For intermediate structure. The value of a property (parameter) observed at any point on the denaturation titration of molecules at the point of observation corresponding to p1 and p2 res- pectively, with (f1 + f2) = 1

204

Two-Dimensional Continuous Extraction in Multiphase Lipid Bilayers To Separate, Enrich, and Sort Membrane-Bound Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Membrane-Bound Species Ling Chao,, Mark J. Richards, Chih-Yun Hsia, and Susan Daniel* School of Chemical yield of each species. This new procedure sorts membrane species on the basis of chemical properties denaturation. This platform could facilitate the separation and identification of lipid membrane domain

Daniel, Susan

205

Trapping of palindromic ligands within native transthyretin prevents amyloid formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...temperatures of the thermal unfolding transition...GE Healthcare). Thermal denaturation of TTR...inhibitors in blood plasma . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98 : 5566...calorimetric study of non-amyloidogenic and amyloidogenic...Research Support, Non-U.S...NH2). m/z (atmospheric pressure chemical...

Simon E. Kolstoe; Palma P. Mangione; Vittorio Bellotti; Graham W. Taylor; Glenys A. Tennent; Stéphanie Deroo; Angus J. Morrison; Alexander J. A. Cobb; Anthony Coyne; Margaret G. McCammon; Timothy D. Warner; Jane Mitchell; Raj Gill; Martin D. Smith; Steven V. Ley; Carol V. Robinson; Stephen P. Wood; Mark B. Pepys

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Trapping of palindromic ligands within native transthyretin prevents amyloid formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...protomers and large aggregates...interface in this area and the...place, the large number of...temperatures of the thermal unfolding...Healthcare). Thermal denaturation of...P ( 1983 ) Frequency and distribution...inhibitors in blood plasma . Proc Natl...calorimetric study of non-amyloidogenic and...m/z (atmospheric pressure chemical...

Simon E. Kolstoe; Palma P. Mangione; Vittorio Bellotti; Graham W. Taylor; Glenys A. Tennent; Stéphanie Deroo; Angus J. Morrison; Alexander J. A. Cobb; Anthony Coyne; Margaret G. McCammon; Timothy D. Warner; Jane Mitchell; Raj Gill; Martin D. Smith; Steven V. Ley; Carol V. Robinson; Stephen P. Wood; Mark B. Pepys

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Neoplastic transformation by a cloned human cytomegalovirus DNA fragment uniquely homologous to one of the transforming regions of herpes simplex virus type 2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...heat-denatured salmon testes DNA at 200 gg/ml. Hybridization with nick-translated (17) 32P-labeled probes (specific activity...trans- formation process induced by this specific HCMV fragment merit discussion. Nitrocellulose filter hybridization in a range...

D J Clanton; R J Jariwalla; C Kress; L J Rosenthal

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Developmental Abnormalities and Reduced Fruit Softening in Tomato Plants Expressing an Antisense Rab11 GTPase Gene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sterile distilled water. Seed were sown...sterile deionized water. An equal volume...fractionated by gel electrophoresis on a denaturing...separated by gel electrophoresis in a 1% agarose...were used for each treatment, and the experiment...supernatant was placed in dialysis tubing and then...

Chungui Lu; Zamri Zainal; Gregory A. Tucker; Grantley W. Lycett

209

ClpB1 Overproduction in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Increases Tolerance to Rapid Heat Shock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...proteins (group I) upon heat shock to be due to a loss of large, functional complexes by heat or by enzyme activity...2004. Aggregation of heat-shock-denatured, endogenous proteins and distribution of the IbpA/B and Fda...

C. Raul Gonzalez-Esquer; Wim F. J. Vermaas

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

Quantitative PCR for Determining the Infectivity of Bacteriophage MS2 upon Inactivation by Heat, UV-B Radiation, and Singlet Oxygen: Advantages and Limitations of an Enzymatic Treatment To Reduce False-Positive Results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wavelength; Sankyo Denki, Tokyo, Japan) for 1 to 4 min. The UV irradiance...described elsewhere (32). UV radiation exposures of 1 to 4 min were...of MS2 before exposure to UV radiation. Samples were taken during...denaturation, e.g., UV radiation. A further analysis into the...

Brian M. Pecson; Luisa Valério Martin; Tamar Kohn

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

Supplemental Data Directed Evolution of ATP Binding Proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplemental Data Directed Evolution of ATP Binding Proteins from a Zinc Finger Domain Using m TG 3'). Denaturing Ni-NTA was performed on the ATP-column elution for round 2, and then FLAG with the resin, but instead passed directly over the immobilized ATP. The selection was performed at room

Heller, Eric

212

Proc. Nati. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 87, pp. 6388-6392, August 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/conformational entropy) HUE SUN CHAN AND KEN A. DILL Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, the stabilities (observed in the distribution; see below) decrease with length (18-20). (ii) The most stable residues (18-20), and these are 100% helical up to nearly the denaturation temperature of the protein. (iii

Chan, Hue Sun

213

Gene Expression and Cell Proliferation in Rat Liver after 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subgroup is the halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon TCDD.1 This chemical is a highly toxic...the bleaching of paper pulp, and the combustion of chlorine- containing organic materials...were dried (Speed-Vac; Savant); heat-denatured (65 Cfor 5 min) in a 50...

Tony R. Fox; Lang L. Best; Susan M. Goldsworthy; Jeremy J. Mills; and Thomas L. Goldsworthy

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effects of Strenuous Exercise on Stallion Sperm Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

account for approximately 20% of the observed variation in fertility rate (Jasko et al., 1992). Love and Kenney (1998) determined the relationship between fertility and susceptibility of sperm DNA to denaturation in 84 actively breeding, clinically...………………………………………………………………. 46 APPENDIX A………………………………………………………………………... 51 APPENDIX B………………………………………………………………………... 52 APPENDIX C………………………………………………………………………… 53 APPENDIX D………………………………………………………………………... 54 APPENDIX E………………………………………………………………………… 57 APPENDIX F...

Rosenberg, Jennifer L.

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Different anti-aggregation and pro-degradative functions of the members of the mammalian sHSP family in neurological disorders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the cellular capacity to refold heat-denatured luciferase (a...on the ATP-dependent H+-pump [103]). Cell lysates used...expression and induction of small heat shock proteins in rat brain and...2008 Expression of the small heat shock protein family in the mouse...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Elevated Transcriptional Complexity and Decrease in Enzymatic DNA Methylation in Cells Treated with l-Ethionine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1). Nonidet P-40 (Shell Oil Co., Frankfurt, GermanFederal...reactions were terminated by heating to 65 for 5 min and the addition...DNA was thermally denatured by heating to 98 in a water bath for 15...8. Christman. J. K., Price, P., Pedrinan, L., and...

Thomas L. J. Boehm and Dusan Drahovsky

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Preface xxiii How to Use This Book xxv  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2 Determination of Denatured or Disordered Proteins 55 7.2.1 A Probabilistic Interpretation of Restraints Algorithms for Ensemble-Based Protein Design 97 12.1 Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS) Enzymes 97 12.2 K xxxi 1 Introduction to Protein Structure and NMR 1 1.1 Protein Structure 1 1.2 Structure Determination

Richardson, David

218

Part 1: Protein Dynamics Folded protein at physiologic or room temperature samples wide range of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protein molecule is likely to differ significantly from average structure - folded protein is an ensemble(unfolded state) 2 Aside 1: What disordered states are relevant to understand protein folding? compact denatured Protein Motions within Folded State Ensemble high energy costs of deformations of bond lengths, angles

Chan, Hue Sun

219

pE-DB: a database of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered and of unfolded proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pE-DB: a database of structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered and of unfolded proteins ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and of denatured proteins based on nuclear magnetic) the structural ensembles consistent with these data, provided as a set of models in a Protein Data Bank format

Sussman, Joel L.

220

Proteolytic cleavage of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein gB is not necessary for its function in BHV-1 or pseudorabies virus.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ing, 100 s at 72?C for extension, and 80 s at 95?C for denaturation, the last extension reaction was allowed to pro- ceed for 8 min at 72?C. Thereafter, samples were electropho- resed on 2% agarose gels. Immunoprecipitation. Precipitation...

A Kopp; E Blewett; V Misra; T C Mettenleiter

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Noncatalytic Ions Direct the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase of Bacterial Double-Stranded RNA Virus ?6 from De Novo Initiation to Elongation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the interaction between heparin and a battery of mutant enzymes (Fig. 4A). Mutations...like WT) has a significantly lower thermal stability than WT even in the presence...and structure refinement.) Fig. S1 (Thermal denaturation curves.) Fig. S2 (Electron...

Sam Wright; Minna M. Poranen; Dennis H. Bamford; David I. Stuart; Jonathan M. Grimes

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

A new approach to determining the rates of recruitment of circulating leukocytes into tissues: Application to the measurement of leukocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic?lesions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Reactions were performed in an Ericomp thermal cycler with heated lid. The first denaturing...intercostal artery ostia stained positively with Sudan IV. We dissected equal sized segments...obtained only from the segment that showed Sudan IV staining (lane 6). Radioassay of...

Daniel Steinberg; John C. Khoo; Christopher K. Glass; Wulf Palinski; Felicidad Almazan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Chemical Characterization of 465 Known or Suspected Carcinogens and Their Correlation with Mutagenic Activity in the Salmonella typhimurium System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ponceau MX, and FD and C Red No. 1. Only Sudan II is mutagenic; thin-layer chromatography...Lead acetate (Chemical 464) Low Azo Sudan I (Chemical 11) Orange I (Chemical...DNA by optical rotatory profile of the thermal denaturation of ONA-gibberellin complexes...

Stephen J. Rinkus and Marvin S. Legator

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Molecular evidence for an African origin of the Hawaiian endemic Hesperomannia (Asteraceae)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...10 mM of MgCl 2, and 0.2 mM of each dNTP. The first thermal cycle consisted of 3 min denaturation at 94°C, 1 min of annealing...Mexico Vernonieae/Lepidonia ndhF, ITS V. lasiopus O. Hoffm. Sudan Vernonieae/Stengelia ndhF V. mespilifolia Less. South Africa...

Hyi-Gyung Kim; Sterling C. Keeley; Peter S. Vroom; Robert K. Jansen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

In utero Exposure of Mice to Dibenzo[a,l]Pyrene Produces Lymphoma in the Offspring: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) 3-methylcholanthrene...from incomplete combustion of many organic...diesel. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR...nonspecific binding. Data were collected...water, were heat denatured and...Modeling survival data: extending the...to polycyclic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic...

Zhen Yu; Christiane V. Loehr; Kay A. Fischer; Mandy A. Louderback; Sharon K. Krueger; Roderick H. Dashwood; Nancy I. Kerkvliet; Clifford B. Pereira; Jamie E. Jennings-Gee; Stephanie T. Dance; Mark Steven Miller; George S. Bailey; and David E. Williams

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gene Expression and Cell Proliferation in Rat Liver after 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon TCDD.1 This chemical...paper pulp, and the combustion of chlorine- containing...Speed-Vac; Savant); heat-denatured (65 Cfor...of unpaired multiple data sets was used to determine...the model and actual data obtained from liquid...

Tony R. Fox; Lang L. Best; Susan M. Goldsworthy; Jeremy J. Mills; and Thomas L. Goldsworthy

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

There is a correlation between the DNA affinity and mutagenicity of several 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indoles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...produced by incomplete combustion processes represent...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but the observation...were scored and the data were expressed as...involving addition of heat-denaturated DNA...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the indole derivatives...equilibrium dialysis (data not shown), which...

J M Pezzuto; P P Lau; Y Luh; P D Moore; G N Wogan; S M Hecht

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

VOLUME 84, NUMBER 4 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 JANUARY 2000 Discrete Breathers in Nonlinear Lattices: Experimental Detection in a Josephson Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of discrete breathers in an underdamped Josephson-junction array. Breathers exist under a range of dc current denaturation [6], and the dynamics of Josephson-junction networks [7­9]. Also, they have been shown the experimental detection of discrete breathers in an underdamped Josephson-junction array. Anisotropic Josephson-junction

Orlando, Terry P.

229

Harnessing disorder: onychophorans use highly unstructured proteins, not silks, for prey capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...protein samples were separated by SDS-PAGE on 3-8% Tris-acetate gradient gels to separate high-molecular-weight proteins...protein denaturing and chaotropic reagents: urea (6 M), lithium bromide (20 mM) or SDS (2% w/v). Fourier transform-infrared...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Protein folding by zipping and assembly S. Banu Ozkan*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein folding by zipping and assembly S. Banu Ozkan* , G. Albert Wu* , John D. Chodera, CA, May 2, 2007 (received for review April 13, 2006) How do proteins fold so quickly? Some denatured proteins fold to their native structures in only microseconds, on average, implying that there is a folding

Southern California, University of

231

From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R. Nussinov Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

225 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 350: Protein Folding Protocols Edited by: Y. Bai and R in the transition state. Key Words: Protein folding; energy landscape; transition state ensemble; denatured state- sively applied to the analysis of protein folding (1­5). Although proteins are essential macromolecules

Caflisch, Amedeo

232

To link to this article: DOI:10.1109/TPS.2012.2190303 URL : http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TPS.2012.2190303  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observed toward high-temperature range of the collagen denaturation and 2) the stiffening of the chainsTo link to this article: DOI:10.1109/TPS.2012.2190303 URL : http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TPS.2012, Florian and Dandurand, Jany and Lacabanne, Colette Effect of Low-Temperature Plasma Jet on Thermal

Mailhes, Corinne

233

J. Mol. Riol. (1991) 222, 1085-1108 Complementary Recognition in Condensed DNA: Accelerated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Mol. Riol. (1991) 222, 1085-1108 Complementary Recognition in Condensed DNA: Accelerated DNA) Condensation of denatured DNA greatly accelerates the kinetics of DNA renaturation. We propose a unifying explanation for the effects of several accelerating solvents studied here including polymers, di

Church, George M.

234

Available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/watres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/v ethanol, 5% v/v hydrocarbon mixture as a denaturant) was released at the water table in an 8150-L September 2006 Available online 28 November 2006 Keywords: Fuel-grade ethanol Capillary-zone Hydrocarbons evidence that the fuel hydrocarbons phase separated from the E95 mixture as ethanol was diluted by pore

Alvarez, Pedro J.

235

Random-coil behavior and the dimensions of chemically unfolded proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Soenke Seifert P. Thiyagarajan Tobin R. Sosnick M. Zahid Hasan Vijay S. Pande...denatured-state radii of gyration (R G) and by reexamining proteins that...Chem. Soc. 122 , 12017 –12018. 48 Pappu, R. V., Srinivasan, R. & Rose, G. D. ( 2000...

Jonathan E. Kohn; Ian S. Millett; Jaby Jacob; Bojan Zagrovic; Thomas M. Dillon; Nikolina Cingel; Robin S. Dothager; Soenke Seifert; P. Thiyagarajan; Tobin R. Sosnick; M. Zahid Hasan; Vijay S. Pande; Ingo Ruczinski; Sebastian Doniach; Kevin W. Plaxco

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

In vitro protein refolding by chromatographic procedures Zhi-Guo Su,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in small-scale refolding studies because of its simplicity. However, the protein concentration has and initial purification one does not have to take the risk of denaturation of the target proteins, thus, not optimal for large-scale production as ex- tensive concentration is required after

Lebendiker, Mario

237

Biology Lab 3: Small Scale Plasmid DNA Purification (Minipreps) Plasmids are small, circular pieces of DNA (about 3-5 kilobases in length on average) that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology Lab 3: Small Scale Plasmid DNA Purification (Minipreps) Plasmids are small, circular pieces. Plasmid purification procedures selectively enrich plasmid DNA over genomic DNA, which is present the small plasmids remain intact. Thus, when denatured, the plasmids remain linked to their complementary

238

TroubleshootingGuide A. Protein Expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

binding b) Dilute an aliquot of lysate (1:10), or sonicate, and check binding on a small scale. c) Try. Apparent low · Insoluble Use denaturing extraction expression over-expressed and purification conditions sample for purification after proper buffering B. Loading/Washing Problem Possible Cause Solution 1

Lebendiker, Mario

239

For polyhistidine-tagged protein purification BD Biosciences Clontech www.clontech.com 800-662-2566  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels, or trial-level purification protocols. For small-scale single-use applications such as verifying-662-2566 TALONTM Products TALONTM Metal Affinity Resin Resin ready for loading in columns for small or medium-scale His- tagged proteins by small-scale or batch/gravity flow, under native or denaturing conditions

Lebendiker, Mario

240

Mini review Practical considerations in refolding proteins from inclusion bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, removal of the denaturant, and assistance of refolding by small molecule additives. We will review key concentration, and (3) the effect of small molecule additives on refolding and aggregation of the proteins. Ã?- nomic sequence database, on a rapid, large-scale pro- duction of recombinant proteins. The proteins thus

Lebendiker, Mario

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Prospects & Overviews Chaperone discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assist de novo protein folding and facilitate the refolding of stress-denatured proteins. The molecular in understanding how these factors support protein folding. Here, we focus on how various chaper- one proteins were first identified to play roles in protein folding. Examples are used to illustrate traditional routes

Bardwell, James

242

Copolymers useful as additives for lowering the cloud point of middle hydrocarbon distillates, and compositions of middle hydrocarbon distillates comprising them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Products useful as additives for lowering the cloud point of middle distillates have a molecular weight from 1,000 to 50,000, and are obtained by reacting a compound of the formula R-Z((CH/sub 2/) /SUB n/ NH) /SUB m/ H or HO-CH/sub 2/-R'-NH/sub 2/ where R is a monovalent saturated aliphatic radical of 1-30 carbon atoms, Z is -NH- or oxygen, n is 2 to 4, m is zero or 1 to 4 and R' is a saturated divalent aliphatic radical of 1-18 carbon atoms, with a copolymer comprising recurrent units (A) from an alkyl ester of an unsaturated monocarboxylic acid and/or a vinyl ester of a saturated monocarboxylic acid, recurrent units (B) from diisobutylene and recurrent units (C) from an unsaturated a,b-dicarboxylic compound.

Durand, J. P.; Damin, B.; Dawans, F.; Leger, R.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

A study of the structure of the hydrocarbons of primary hard-coal tar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrocarbons isolated from primary hard-coal (G/sub 6/ gas coal) tar have been investigated by a combination of physicochemical and chemical methods. It has been established that the hydrocarbons boiling up to 573 K are mainly aliphatic, hydroaromatic, and naphthenic and are aromatic only to a smaller degree. Molecular and presumable structural formulas of the oxygen compounds isolated from the 473-573 K hydrocarbon fraction have been derived.

Platonov, V.V.; Gerasimova, N.I.; Ivleva, L.N.; Klyavina, O.A.; Vishnyakov, S.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

64Cu-1,4,7-Triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetic acid-6-aminohexanoic acid-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu-Met-NH2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. recently reported that the NOTA-based 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14) NH2 conjugate (where 8-Aoc = 8 pharmacokinetic properties of the 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14)NH2 conjugate, Lane et al. synthesized a new group of conjugates with the NOTA derivative NO2A and replaced the spacer 8-Aoc with an aliphatic or aromatic linking

Levin, Judith G.

245

64Cu-1,4,7-Triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetic acid-9-aminonanoic acid-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu-Met-NH2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. recently reported that the NOTA-based 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14) NH2 conjugate (where 8-Aoc = 8 pharmacokinetic properties of the 64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7­14)NH2 conjugate, Lane et al. synthesized a new group of conjugates with the NOTA derivative NO2A and replaced the spacer 8-Aoc with an aliphatic or aromatic linking

Levin, Judith G.

246

Effects of shipment on diffusive dosimetry recovery efficiency for pentane, hexane and heptane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences College of Pharmacy Chairman of' Advisory Committee: Mr. Charles L. Gilmore The effects of' shipment on recovery was investigated for three aliphatic hydrocarbons adsorbed on the 3M Company's $3500 Organic Vapor Monitor and the Scientific Kit... of the contaminant compound of interest and the adsorptive properties of the adsorbing (3-6) medium, activated charcoal, for collection. The diffusive dosimeter is easy to use and can be placed on the worker by the first line supervisor each day at the beginning...

Read, Ronald Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Concentrating aqueous volatile fatty acid salt solutions using a tertiary amine mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and that reaction is difficult to reverse (Streitwieser and Heathcock, 1976; King and Poole, 1994). Tertiary amines (R, N) do not form amides but generally give lower K, values than secondary amines. For the extraction of undissociated carboxylic acids, aliphatic... by acidifying with carbon dioxide under pressure in the presence of a suitable solvent (Busche, 1988). Gregor has used electrodialysis to recover acetic acid from dilute (1-5 wt%) acetate solutions. With newer membranes, acid concentrations up to 30% were...

Gaskin, David J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Signalling pathway in appressorium formation in Magnaporthe grisea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this project. I thank all the friends from Plant Pathology Department, especially Dr Ebbole?s lab and Angelina Biscati, for their help during my studies. I thank Plant Pathology and Microbiology Department for the opportunity. I thank Texas A&M University... hydrophobic aliphatic compounds (Kolattukudy and Roger 1995), Gilbert et al. (1996), investigating the signal responsible for activating the appressorium formation pathway in M. grisea, tested the effects of specific cutin monomers, lipids compounds...

Filippi, Marta Cristina

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Composition of the ozonolytic degradation products of the organic matter of Barzasskii sapromyxite coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ozonization of Barzasskii sapromyxite coal in chloroform and the composition of ozonolytic degradation products were studied. Water-insoluble high-molecular-weight products were predominant among the ozonization products. A half of water-soluble substances consisted of aliphatic C{sub 5}-C{sub 12} dicarboxylic acids and benzenedicarboxylic acid derivatives. Sapromyxite has been suggested as a substitute for crude petroleum in the manufacture of motor fuels.

S.A. Semenova; Y.F.Patrakov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation). Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300 C before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil. 1 fig.

Miller, R.N.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effect of Plasticization of Epoxy Networks by Organic Modifier on Exfoliation of Nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Plasticization of Epoxy Networks by Organic Modifier on Exfoliation of Nanoclay ... Plasticization of cross-linked epoxy networks by hydrocarbon chains of quaternary ammonium ions and its effect on exfoliation behavior of nanoclay particles in mixtures of aromatic and aliphatic epoxies were investigated. ... In an aromatic epoxy?nanoclay system, values of G‘/?* in the range 2?4 1/s produced exfoliation, while those less than 1 1/s produced intercalated structures. ...

Jonghyun Park; Sadhan C. Jana

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

252

Correlated Microanalysis of Cometary Organic Grains Returned by Stardust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonaceous matter in Stardust samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 is observed to contain a wide variety of organic functional chemistry. However, some of this chemical variety may be due to contamination or alteration during particle capture in aerogel. We investigated six carbonaceous Stardust samples that had been previously analyzed and six new samples from Stardust Track 80 using correlated transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). TEM revealed that samples from Track 35 containing abundant aliphatic XANES signatures were predominantly composed of cometary organic matter infilling densified silica aerogel. Aliphatic organic matter from Track 16 was also observed to be soluble in the epoxy embedding medium. The nitrogen-rich samples in this study (from Track 22 and Track 80) both contained metal oxide nanoparticles, and are likely contaminants. Only two types of cometary organic matter appear to be relatively unaltered during particle capture. These are (1) polyaromatic carbonyl-containing organic matter, similar to that observed in insoluble organic matter (IOM) from primitive meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and in other carbonaceous Stardust samples, and (2) highly aromatic refractory organic matter, which primarily constitutes nanoglobule-like features. Anomalous isotopic compositions in some of these samples also confirm their cometary heritage. There also appears to be a significant labile aliphatic component of Wild 2 organic matter, but this material could not be clearly distinguished from carbonaceous contaminants known to be present in the Stardust aerogel collector.

B De Gregorio; R Stroud; G Cody; L Nittler; A Kilcoyne; S Wirick

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

chemical chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH(3)-(CH(2)) n -OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). See Fuel Ethanol. Alternative Fuel: Alternative fuels, for transportation applications, include the following: methanol; denatured ethanol, and other alcohols; fuel mixtures containing 85 percent or more by volume of methanol, denatured ethanol, and other alcohols with motor gasoline or other fuels; natural gas; liquefied petroleum gas (propane); hydro- gen; coal-derived liquid fuels; fuels (other than alcohol) derived from biological materials (biofuels such as soy diesel fuel); electricity (including electricity from solar

254

ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 1992.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

POLICY ACT OF 1992 POLICY ACT OF 1992 SEC. 301. DEFINITIONS. Source (http://energy.nfesc.navy.mil/law_us/92epact/hr776toc.htm) For purposes of this title, title IV, and title V (unless otherwise specified)- (1) the term "Administrator" means the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency; (2) the term "alternative fuel" means methanol, denatured ethanol, and other alcohols; mixtures containing 5 percent or more (or such other percentage, but not less than 70 percent, as determined by the Secretary, by rule, to provide for requirements relating to cold start, safety, or vehicle functions) by volume of ethanol, denatured ethanol, and other alcohols with gasoline or other fuels; natural gas; liquefied petroleum gas; hydrogen; coal-derived liquid fuels; fuels (other than alcohol) derived from biological materials;

255

Proliferation resistant fuel for pebble bed modular reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that it is possible to denature the Plutonium produced in Pebble Bed Modular Reactors (PBMR) by doping the nuclear fuel with either 3050 ppm of {sup 237}Np or 2100 ppm of Am vector. A correct choice of these isotopes concentration yields denatured Plutonium with isotopic ratio {sup 238}Pu/Pu {>=} 6%, for the entire fuel burnup cycle. The penalty for introducing these isotopes into the nuclear fuel is a subsequent shortening of the fuel burnup cycle, with respect to a non-doped reference fuel, by 41.2 Full Power Days (FPDs) and 19.9 FPDs, respectively, which correspond to 4070 MWd/ton and 1965 MWd/ton reduction in fuel discharge burnup. (authors)

Ronen, Y.; Aboudy, M.; Regev, D.; Gilad, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Flow of pH-responsive microcapsules in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There are numerous examples in the pharmaceutical industry where encapsulation would be beneficial. For example, if biological materials such as enzymes, which are susceptible to denaturation, are encapsulated their biological activity can be retained (Keen et al... display industry, for example by increasing the lifetime of organic light-emitting diodes, by preventing moisture and oxygen diffusion into the display area (Chwang et al., 2003; Seo et al., 2013). Within the oil industry, no journal articles...

Gun, Wei Jin; Routh, Alexander F.

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

Broccoli: Rapid Selection of an RNA Mimic of Green Fluorescent Protein by Fluorescence-Based Selection and Directed Evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Broccoli: Rapid Selection of an RNA Mimic of Green Fluorescent Protein by Fluorescence-Based Selection and Directed Evolution ... The green-fluorescent protein (GFP) that functions as a bioluminescence energy transfer acceptor in the jellyfish Aequorea was renatured with ?90% yield following acid, base, or guanidine denaturation. ... Detailed output, in the form of structure plots with or without reliability information, single strand frequency plots and energy dot plots', are available for the folding of single sequences. ...

Grigory S. Filonov; Jared D. Moon; Nina Svensen; Samie R. Jaffrey

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

Effects of heat on the rheological and stability properties of cultured buttermilk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Nutritive significance of the browning reac- tion Rheology of Milk and Dairy Products Rheology of Milk Rheology of Milk Gels. Electron Microscopy of Milk and Dairy Products. Microstructure of Milk Microstructure of Milk Gels. Microstructure.... Testing of Gel Strength Data Analysis Relative Viscosity. Stability Serum Protein Denaturation. Electron Microscopy Fixation 16 16 17 17 22 22 22 22 23 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont. ) Page Dehydration and Embedding Sectioning and Viewing...

Pan, Shelley Hsi-Ling

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effect of the Maillard reaction on the stability and chemical properties of globular proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the blood proteins to gel upon heating. This suggests an important approach for min- imizing the effect of heat denaturation on the functional properties of food proteins. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the effects..., 000 by light scattering. Isoelectric oint. The isoelectric point is of special significance in protein chemistry, since the properties of the proteins undergo unique changes at this point. The sol- ubility of proteins and other physical properties...

Morales, Margioly de Leon de

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Production Net Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Conventional Gasoline, Ed55 and Lower Finished conventional motor gasoline blended with a maximum of 55 volume percent denatured fuel ethanol. Conventional Gasoline, Greater than Ed55 Finished conventional motor gasoline blended with denatured fuel ethanol where the volume percent of denatured fuel ethanol exceeds 55%. Distillate Fuel Oil A general classification for one of the petroleum fractions produced in conventional distillation operations. It includes diesel fuels and fuel oils. Products known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 diesel fuel are used in on-highway diesel engines, such as those in trucks and automobiles, as well as off-highway engines, such as those in railroad locomotives and agricultural machinery. Products known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils are used primarily for space heating and electric power generation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

Sharma, Sandeep K. [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goloubinoff, Pierre [Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Christen, Philipp [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: christen@bioc.uzh.ch

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

Surface [4 + 2] Cycloaddition Reaction of Thymine on Si(111)7×7 Observed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WATLab and Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada ... Simple hydrocarbons(1) with aliphatic chain backbones, alkenes, alkynes, and aromatic molecules without and with heteroatoms(3) have been investigated by a number of experimental methods, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as computational methods based on density functional theory (DFT), Moller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and semiempirical techniques. ...

A. Chatterjee; L. Zhang; K. T. Leung

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

Flash photolysis resonance fluorescence investigation of the gas-phase reactions of hydroxyl radicals with cyclic ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of hydroxyl radicals with a series of dioxanes and other cyclic ethers by using the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. Kinetic data for 1,3-dioxane and 1,4-dioxane, reactions 1 and 2, over the temperature range 240-440 K were used to derive the Arrhenius expressions. These results are compared to our earlier measurements for aliphatic ethers and are discussed in terms of reaction mechanisms and the prediction of reaction rates for such compounds from group reactivity values.

Dagaut, P.; Liu, R.; Wallington, T.J.; Kurylo, M.J. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1990-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Microbial degradation of sedimentary organic matter associated with shale gas and coalbed methane in eastern Illinois Basin (Indiana), USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular biodegradation indices for extracts from five Pennsylvanian coals and six New Albany Shale (Devonian – Mississippian) samples from the eastern part of the Illinois Basin help constrain relationships between the degradation of biomarkers and the generation of coalbed methane and shale gas. Investigation of these gas source rocks of varying thermal maturity from different depths facilitates evaluation of the association of microbial degradation with biogenic gas formation distinct from thermogenic processes. Extensive biodegradation of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons is observed in the coal extracts, whereas in shale extracts only short-chain (C15–C19) n-alkanes from the shallowest depth appear to be microbially altered with minimal evidence for losses of acyclic isoprenoid alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons. By contrast, biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons, specifically alkylated naphthalenes and phenanthrenes, occurs in coal extracts in concert with losses of n-alkanes attributable to microbial activity. Thus, the progress of hydrocarbon biodegradation in coals differs from the sequence recognized in petroleum where the effects of microbial alteration of aromatic constituents only appear after extensive losses of aliphatic compounds. The extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation in these coals also decreases with depth, as recorded by the ?(nC25–nC30) index (i.e. abundance relative to 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopane) among the aliphatic constituents and several aromatic compounds (methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene, and trimethyl- and tetramethylphananthrenes). However, the depth variations in the distributions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in the shale extracts primarily reflect the effects of thermal maturity rather than biodegradation. Overall, variations in the extent and patterns of biomarker biodegradation among coals and shales likely reflect their distinct microbial consortia that can be attributed to differences in (i) surviving microorganisms and inoculations from meteoric water, (ii) the characteristics of the sedimentary organic matter, especially the preponderance of aromatic constituents in coals, and (iii) the accessibility to that substrate through pores and cleats. These results help constrain the processes involved in biodegradation and controls on its extent, which, in turn, assist in recognizing sites favorable for methanogenesis and improved estimates of biogenic gas resources in the Illinois Basin.

Ling Gao; Simon C. Brassell; Maria Mastalerz; Arndt Schimmelmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hydrocarbon composition of crude oils near the Caspian depression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural-group composition of hydrocarbons of Mesozoic crude oils near the Caspian depression was investigated by mass-spectrometry, followed by the analysis of the mass-spectra using a computer. The distribution of naphthenic hydrocarbons, according to the number of rings and of aromatic hydrocarbons, according to the degree of hydrogen unsaturation is similar for all the crude oils examined. The hydrocarbon composition of Mesozoic crude oils is characterized by a reduction in the content of aliphatic hydrocarbons and alkyl benzenes.

Botneva, T.A.; Khramova, E.V.; Nekhamkina, L.G.; Polyakova, A.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Kinetic data base for combustion modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to develop a set of evaluated rate constants for use in the simulation of hydrocarbon combustion. The approach has been to begin with the small molecules and then introduce larger species with the various structural elements that can be found in all hydrocarbon fuels and decomposition products. Currently, the data base contains most of the species present in combustion systems with up to four carbon atoms. Thus, practically all the structural grouping found in aliphatic compounds have now been captured. The direction of future work is the addition of aromatic compounds to the data base.

Tsang, W.; Herron, J.T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Molybdenum recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the preparation of propylene oxide and tertiary butyl alcohol. It comprises: propylene and tertiary butyl hydroperoxide are reacted in an epoxidation reaction zone in solution in tertiary butyl alcohol in the presence of a soluble molybdenum catalyst to provide an epoxidation reaction product comprising unreacted propylene, unreacted tertiary butyl hydroperoxide, propylene oxide, tertiary butyl alcohol, dissolved molybdenum catalyst and impurities, including lower aliphatic C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} carboxylic acids, and wherein the epoxidation reaction product is resolved into product fractions in a distillation zone including a distillate propylene fraction.

Meyer, R.A.; Marquis, E.T.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Impact of Ferrocene on the Structure of Diesel Exhaust Soot as Probed with Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering and C(1s) NEXAFS Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the structure of a set of diesel exhaust samples that were obtained from reference diesel fuel and diesel fuel mixed with ferrocene. Characterization was carried out with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (C(1s) NEXAFS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The reference diesel soot shows a pronounced graphite-like microstructure and molecular structure, with a strong (0 0 2) graphite Bragg reflex and a strong aromatic C{double_bond}C resonance at 285 eV. The mineral matter in the reference soot could be identified as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hematite. The soot specimen from the diesel mixed with ferrocene has an entirely different structure and lacks significantly in graphite-like characteristics. NEXAFS spectra of such soot barely show aromatics but pronounced contributions from aliphatic structures. WAXS patterns show almost no intensity at the Bragg (0 0 2) reflection of graphite, but a strong aliphatic {gamma}-side band. The iron from the ferrocene transforms to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} maghemite.

Braun,A.; Huggins, F.; Kelly, K.; Mun, B.; Ehrlich, S.; Huffman, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Computational Study of Bond Dissociation Enthalpies for Substituted $\\beta$-O-4 Lignin Model Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biopolymer lignin is a potential source of valuable chemicals. Phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) is representative of the dominant $\\beta$-O-4 ether linkage. Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the Boltzmann-weighted carbon-oxygen and carbon-carbon bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) of substituted PPE. These values are important in order to understand lignin decomposition. Exclusion of all conformers that have distributions of less than 5\\% at 298 K impacts the BDE by less than 1 kcal mol$^{-1}$. We find that aliphatic hydroxyl/methylhydroxyl substituents introduce only small changes to the BDEs (0-3 kcal mol$^{-1}$). Substitution on the phenyl ring at the $ortho$ position substantially lowers the C-O BDE, except in combination with the hydroxyl/methylhydroxyl substituents, where the effect of methoxy substitution is reduced by hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding between the aliphatic substituents and the ether oxygen in the PPE derivatives has a significant influence on the BDE. CCSD(T)-calculated BDEs and hydrogen bond strengths of $ortho$-substituted anisoles when compared with M06-2X values confirm that the latter method is sufficient to describe the molecules studied and provide an important benchmark for lignin model compounds.

Younker, Jarod M [ORNL; Beste, Ariana [ORNL; Buchanan III, A C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Study of thermal conversion of naphthenic oils on the basis of analysis of their middle fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The composition of the middle fractions of the thermal decomposition products of naphthenic oils obtained at 300, 350, and 400{degrees}C was studied. It was shown that the character of conversions of petroleum hydrocarbons is governed by the intensity of thermal treatment and by the chemical nature of the starting oil. The removal of aliphatic chains from high-boiling components of the petroleum at a temperature below 350{degrees}C results in the new formation of linear and isoprene alkanes in their middle fractions similarly to the catagenic transformations of oils in deposits. The rise in temperature up to 400{degrees}C enhances the destruction processes related to extension of the reactions of the homolytic cleavage of C-C bonds in aliphatic chains. This results in practically complete destruction of isoprene alkanes and in predominance of low-molecular homologs among the linear alkanes. On the basis of the results obtained it can be supposed that the thermal treatment is an important factor in the conversion of naphthenic oils into paraffin oils. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Kayukova, G.P.; Kurbskii, G.P.; Mutalapova, R.I. [A.E. Arbuzov Inst. of Organic and Physical Chemistry, Kazan (Russian Federation)] [and others

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

Safe epoxy encapsulant for high voltage magnetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of Formula 456, an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils and high voltage transformers. Sandia has evaluated a number of MDA-free epoxy encapsulants which relied on either anhydride or other aromatic amine curing agents. The use of aliphatic amine curing agents was more recently evaluated and has resulted in the definition of Formula 456 resin. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy and much of industry. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA. OSHA has regulated MDA because it is a suspect carcinogen. Typically the elimination of OSHA-regulated materials provides a rare opportunity to qualify new formulations in a range of demanding applications. It was important to take full advantage of that opportunity, although the associated materials qualification effort was costly. Small high voltage transformers are one of those demanding applications. The successful implementation of the new formulation for high reliability transformers will be described. The test results that demonstrate the parts are qualified for use in DOE weapon systems will be presented.

Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Isolation and characterization of two crude oil-degrading yeast strains, Yarrowia lipolytica PG-20 and PG-32, from the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Among six crude oil-degrading yeasts that were isolated from an oil-polluted area in the Persian Gulf, two yeast strains showed high degradation activity of aliphatic hydrocarbons. From an analysis of 18S rRNA sequences and biochemical characteristics, these strains were identified as Yarrowia lipolytica strains PG-20 and PG-32. Gas Chromatography (GC) analysis of the crude oil remaining in the culture medium after 1 week at 30 °C showed that the strains PG-20 and PG-32 degraded 68% and 58% of crude oil, respectively. The optimal growth condition and biodegradation of hydrocarbons was in ONR medium with an acidic pH (pH 5). These two strains may degrade aliphatic hydrocarbons more efficiently than aromatic hydrocarbons, although strain PG-20 had better degradation than strain PG-32. The two Y. lipolytica strains reduce surface tension when cultured on hydrocarbon substrates (1% v/v). These strains showed a cell surface hydrophobicity higher than 70%. These results suggested that Y. lipolytica strains PG-20 and PG-32 have high crude oil degrading activity due to their high emulsifying activity and cell hydrophobicity. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process in the Persian Gulf and decreasing oil pollution in this marine ecosystem.

Mehdi Hassanshahian; Hamid Tebyanian; Simone Cappello

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Diffusion Of Hydrophobin Proteins In Solution And Interactions With A Graphite Surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background Hydrophobins are small proteins produced by filamentous fungi that have a variety of biological functions including coating of spores and surface adhesion. To accomplish these functions, they rely on unique interface-binding properties. Using atomic-detail implicit solvent rigid-body Brownian dynamics simulations, we studied the diffusion of HFBI, a class II hydrophobin from Trichoderma reesei, in aqueous solution in the presence and absence of a graphite surface. Results In the simulations, HFBI exists in solution as a mixture of monomers in equilibrium with different types of oligomers. The oligomerization state depends on the conformation of HFBI. When a Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) layer is present in the simulated system, HFBI tends to interact with the HOPG layer through a hydrophobic patch on the protein. Conclusions From the simulations of HFBI solutions, we identify a tetrameric encounter complex stabilized by non-polar interactions between the aliphatic residues in the hydrophobic patch on HFBI. After the formation of the encounter complex, a local structural rearrangement at the protein interfaces is required to obtain the tetrameric arrangement seen in HFBI crystals. Simulations performed with the graphite surface show that, due to a combination of a geometric hindrance and the interaction of the aliphatic sidechains with the graphite layer, HFBI proteins tend to accumulate close to the hydrophobic surface.

Mereghetti, Paolo; Wade, Rebecca C.

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Far- and mid-infrared spectroscopy of complex organic matter of astrochemical interest: coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and asphaltenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coexistence of a large variety of molecular species (i.e., aromatic, cycloaliphatic and aliphatic) in several astrophysical environments suggests that unidentified IR emission (UIE) occurs from small solid particles containing a mix of aromatic and aliphatic structures (e.g., coal, petroleum, etc.), renewing the astronomical interest on this type of materials. A series of heavy petroleum fractions namely DAE, RAE, BQ-1, and asphaltenes derived from BQ-1 were used together with anthracite coal and bitumen as model compounds in matching the band pattern of the emission features of proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). All the model materials were examined in the mid-infrared (2.5-16.7 um) and for the first time in the far-infrared (16.7-200 um), and the IR bands were compared with the UIE from PPNe. The best match of the PPNe band pattern is offered by the BQ-1 heavy aromatic oil fraction and by its asphaltenes fraction. Particularly interesting is the ability of BQ-1 to match the band pattern of the aromatic-ali...

Cataldo, F; Manchado, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

THE CENTRAL REGION OF THE BARRED SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 1097 PROBED BY AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Infrared Camera on board AKARI, we carried out near-infrared (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) spectroscopy of the central kiloparsec region of the barred spiral galaxy, NGC 1097, categorized as Seyfert 1 with a circumnuclear starburst ring. Our observations mapped the area of {approx}50'' Multiplication-Sign 10'' with the resolution of {approx}5'', covering about a half of the ring and the galactic center. As a result, we spatially resolve the starburst ring in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 3.3 {mu}m, the aliphatic hydrocarbon 3.4-3.6 {mu}m features, and the hydrogen Br{alpha} 4.05 {mu}m emission. They exhibit spatial distributions significantly different from each other, indicating that the environments vary considerably around the ring. In particular, the aliphatic features are enhanced near the bar connecting the ring with the nucleus, where the structure of hydrocarbon grains seems to be relatively disordered. Near the center, the continuum emission and the CO/SiO absorption features are strong, which indicates that the environments inside the ring are dominated by old stellar populations. The near-infrared spectra do not show any evidence for the presence of nuclear activity.

Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki; Ishihara, Daisuke; Mori, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki [Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Suzuki, Toyoaki, E-mail: kondo@u.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Crosslinked Polyamide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A crosslinked polyamide material and a process for preparing the crosslinked polyamide material are disclosed. The crosslinked polyamide material comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (1) a polyamide of the formula: ##STR1## wherein n is between about 50 and 10,000, wherein each R is between 1 and 50 carbon atoms alone and is optionally substituted with heteroatoms, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, or phosphorus and combinations thereof, wherein multiple of the R are in vertically aligned spaced relationship along a backbone forming the polyamide, and wherein two or more of the R contain an amino group; and (2) a crosslinking agent containing at least two functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups of the polyamide. In one embodiment of the invention, the crosslinking agent is an aliphatic or aromatic isocyanate compound having 2 or more --N.dbd.C.dbd.O groups. In another embodiment of the invention, the crosslinking agent is an aliphatic aldehyde or aromatic aldehyde compound having 2 or more --CHO groups. In still another embodiment of the invention, the crosslinking agent is selected from a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.2 P(B) and mixtures thereof, wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, and B is hydroxyalkyl, alkyl, or aryl. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the crosslinking agent is selected from the group consisting of epoxy resins having more than one epoxide group per molecule.

Huang, Zhi H. (East Lansing, MI); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Lansing, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

277

Improving GC-PPC-SAFT equation of state for LLE of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds with water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The GC-PPC-SAFT model has been shown to be useful for predicting the liquid–liquid phase split with water [Nguyen-Huynh et al. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 50 (2011) 7467–7483]. In order to extend the use of this model to oxygenated compounds for a large number of families (aliphatic ethers, aldehydes, ketones, formates, acetates, propionates/butyrates, n-aliphatic acids), it is proposed to consider cross-association in addition to a binary interaction parameter lij on the combining rules for the cross-segment diameter between water and the investigated compound. The binary interaction parameters lij, u ? ? , and w ? ? are fitted on mutual solubilities of water and organic compounds. The regressed values which are obtained for each chemical family, are subsequently used for predicting infinite dilution activity coefficient in water and n-octanol/water partition coefficient. In general, the results obtained are very much improved compared to the predictive approach discussed previously [Nguyen et al. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 52 (2013) 7014–7029]. The global deviation values on the decimal log scale for infinite dilution activity coefficient in water, water solubility and n-octanol/water partition coefficient are 0.377, 0.419, and 0.469, respectively.

Thanh-Binh Nguyen; Jean-Charles de Hemptinne; Benoit Creton; Georgios M. Kontogeorgis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Pathogen Detection Lab-On-A-Chip (PADLOC) System for Plant Pathogen Diagnosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approximately 95°C.4 Afterwards, the sample is cooled down to 48-74°C to let the primers in the sample to anneal to denatured DNAs. This temperature range is referred to as annealing temperature and it is directly related to the melting temperature... devices and circular traversing devices. The first serpentine rectangular channel device came out in1998 by Kopp et al.14 The channel length was 2.2 m long and the sample went through three temperature zones of 95, 60 and 77°C for 20 times. The flow...

Cifci, Osman

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Thermal behavior of bovine serum albumin after exposure to barrier discharge helium plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal plasma jets at atmospheric pressure are useful tools nowadays in plasma medicine. Various applications are tested such as cauterization coagulation wound healing natural and artificial surfaces decontamination and sterilization. In order to know more about the effects of gas plasma on biological supramolecules we exposed proteinpowders to a barrier discharge helium plasma jet. Then spectroscopic investigations were carried out in order to obtain information on protein secondary tertiary and quaternary structures. We obtained a reduction of the protein alpha-helix content after the plasma exposure and a different behavior for both thermal denaturation/renaturation kinetics and thermal aggregation process.

R. Jijie; V. Pohoata; I. Topala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Dissipative Dynamics of Enzymes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore enzyme conformational dynamics at sub-Å resolution, specifically, temperature effects. The ensemble-averaged mechanical response of the folded enzyme is viscoelastic in the whole temperature range between the warm and cold denaturation transitions. The dissipation parameter ? of the viscoelastic description decreases by a factor of 2 as the temperature is raised from 10 to 45?°C; the elastic parameter K shows a similar decrease. Thus, when probed dynamically, the enzyme softens for increasing temperature. Equilibrium mechanical experiments with the DNA spring (and a different enzyme) also show, qualitatively, a small softening for increasing temperature.

Amila Ariyaratne; Chenhao Wu; Chiao-Yu Tseng; Giovanni Zocchi

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Neutronics and safety characteristics of a 100% MOX fueled PWR using weapons grade plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary neutronics and safety studies, pertaining to the feasibility of using 100% weapons grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in an advanced PWR Westinghouse design are presented in this paper. The preliminary results include information on boron concentration, power distribution, reactivity coefficients and xenon and control rode worth for the initial and the equilibrium cycle. Important safety issues related to rod ejection and steam line break accidents and shutdown margin requirements are also discussed. No significant change from the commercial design is needed to denature weapons-grade plutonium under the current safety and licensing criteria.

Biswas, D.; Rathbun, R.; Lee, Si Young [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Rosenthal, P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by artificial DNA nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

Moon, Y.; Seo, S.; Park, J.; Park, T.; Ahn, J. R., E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, J.; Dugasani, S. R. [Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, S. H. [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. H., E-mail: sunghapark@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

283

Purification and characterization of an adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase from human lung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Texas ABM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. J. B. Moore, 0 r. A cyclic AMP-speci fi c phosphodiesterase was purified from human lung tissue. Ion-exchange chromatography, hydroxylapatite chroma- tography, gel-exclusion chromatography..., and preparative isoelectric focusing yielded a 300 fold purification. The enzyme was homoge- neous, as judged by non-denaturing gels. The purified phosphodiesterase had a molecular ~eight of 60, 000, a sedimentation coefficient of 3. 2-3. 45, and a pI of 4. 6...

Schroedter, Dwight Edward

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Functional Stability of a Mixed Microbial Consortium Producing PHA From Waste Carbon Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) represent an environmentally-effective alternative to synthetic thermoplastics; however, current production practices are not sustainable. In this study, PHA production was accomplished in sequencing batch bioreactors utilizing real wastewaters and mixed microbial consortia from municipal activated sludge as inoculum. Polymer production reached 85%, 53%, and 10% of the cell dry weight from methanol-enriched pulp-and-paper mill foul condensate, fermented municipal primary solids, and biodiesel wastewater, respectively. Employing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S-rDNA from PCR-amplified DNA extracts, distinctly different communities were observed between and within wastewaters following enrichment. Most importantly, functional stability was maintained despite differing and contrasting microbial populations.

David N. Thompson; Erik R. Coats; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; Michael P. Wolcott

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hard boiling eggs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hard boiling eggs Hard boiling eggs Name: Sandburg J High Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have been studying chemical and physical changes in 6th grade science class and we were wondering whether hard boiling an egg would be a chemical or a physical change? Thanks for a reply! Replies: You decide. Here's what's going on: the proteins in the fresh egg are in the shape of tight little balls. When you boil the egg, these proteins unravel ("denature"), like balls of yarn unraveling into loose skeins. The strands of protein then get all tangled up with one another, so much so that they are locked in place and can no longer move. They also lock into place the other liquid components of the egg, forming all together what's called a "gel" instead of the liquid you started off with. The gel acts like a soft, rubbery solid because of the network of protein strands holding it all together. It's certainly true that when the protein denatures some chemical bonds are broken, but the most important effect is the tangling up process.

286

Studies on the thermal inactivation of immobilized enzymes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal inactivation of a great number of immobilized enzymes shows a biphasic kinetics, which distinctly differs from the first-order inactivation kinetics of the corresponding soluble enzymes. As shown for ..cap alpha..-amylase, chymotrypsin, and trypsin covalently bound to silica, polystyrene, or polyacrylamide, the dependence of the remaining activities on the heating time can be well described by the sum of two exponential terms. To interpret this mathematical model function, the catalytic properties of immobilized enzymes (number of active sites in silica-bound trypsin, Km and Ea values in silica-bound ..cap alpha..-amylase and chymotrypsin) at different stages of inactivation and the influence of various factors (coupling conditions, addition of denaturants or stabilizers, etc.) on the thermal inactivation of silica-bound ..cap alpha..-amylase were studied. Furthermore, conformational alterations in the thermal denaturation of spin-labeled soluble and silica-bound ..beta..-amylase were compared by electron spin resonance (ESR) studies. The results suggest that the biphasic inactivation kinetics reflects two different pathways according to which catalytically identical enzyme molecules are predominantly inactivated. 45 references.

Ulbrich, R.; Schellenberger, A.; Damerau, W.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Determining orientation and direction of DNA sequences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Determining orientation and direction of DNA sequences. A method by which fluorescence in situ hybridization can be made strand specific is described. Cell cultures are grown in a medium containing a halogenated nucleotide. The analog is partially incorporated in one DNA strand of each chromatid. This substitution takes place in opposite strands of the two sister chromatids. After staining with the fluorescent DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33258, cells are exposed to long-wavelength ultraviolet light which results in numerous strand nicks. These nicks enable the substituted strand to be denatured and solubilized by heat, treatment with high or low pH aqueous solutions, or by immersing the strands in 2.times.SSC (0.3M NaCl+0.03M sodium citrate), to name three procedures. It is unnecessary to enzymatically digest the strands using Exo III or another exonuclease in order to excise and solubilize nucleotides starting at the sites of the nicks. The denaturing/solubilizing process removes most of the substituted strand while leaving the prereplication strand largely intact. Hybridization of a single-stranded probe of a tandem repeat arranged in a head-to-tail orientation will result in hybridization only to the chromatid with the complementary strand present.

Goodwin, Edwin H. (Los Alamos, NM); Meyne, Julianne (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Atomic-level characterization of disordered protein ensembles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The roles of unfolded states of proteins in normal folding and in diseases involving aggregation, as well as the prevalence and regulatory functions of intrinsically disordered proteins, have become increasingly recognized. The structural representation of these disordered states as ensembles of interconverting conformers can therefore provide critical insights. Experimental methods can be used to probe ensemble-averaged structural properties of disordered states and computational approaches generate representative ensembles of conformers using experimental restraints. In particular, NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering provide quantitative data that can readily be incorporated into calculations. These techniques have gleaned structural information about denatured, unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins. The use of experimental data in different computational approaches, including ensemble molecular dynamics simulations and algorithms that assign populations to pregenerated conformers, has highlighted the presence of both local and long-range structure, and the occurrence of native-like and non-native interactions in unfolded and denatured states. Analysis of the resulting ensembles has suggested important implications of this fluctuating structure for folding, aggregation and binding.

Tanja Mittag; Julie D Forman-Kay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A unified description of solvent effects in the helix-coil transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the problem of the helix-coil transition in explicit solvents analytically by using spin-based models incorporating two different mechanisms of solvent action: explicit solvent action through the formation of solvent-polymer hydrogen bonds that can compete with the intrinsic intra-polymer hydrogen bonded configurations (competing interactions) and implicit solvent action, where the solvent-polymer interactions tune biopolymer configurations by changing the activity of the solvent (non-competing interactions). The overall spin Hamiltonian is comprised of three terms: the background \\emph{in vacuo} Hamiltonian of the "Generalized Model of Polypeptide Chain" type and two additive terms that account for the two above mechanisms of solvent action. We show that on this level the solvent degrees of freedom can be {\\sl explicitly} and {\\sl exactly} traced over, the ensuing effective partition function combining all the solvent effects in a unified framework. In this way we are able to address helix-coil transitions for polypeptides, proteins, and DNA, with different buffers and different external constraints. Our spin-based effective Hamiltonian is applicable for treatment of such diverse phenomena as cold denaturation, effects of osmotic pressure on the cold and warm denaturation, complicated temperature dependence of the hydrophobic effect as well as providing a conceptual base for understanding the behavior of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins and their analogues.

Artem Badasyan; Shushanik A. Tonoyan; Achille Giacometti; Rudolf Podgornik; V. Adrian Parsegian; Yevgeni Sh. Mamasakhlisov; Vladimir F. Morozov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Automation and integration of multiplexed on-line sample preparation with capillary electrophoresis for DNA sequencing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to develop a multiplexed sample processing system in conjunction with multiplexed capillary electrophoresis for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The concept from DNA template to called bases was first demonstrated with a manually operated single capillary system. Later, an automated microfluidic system with 8 channels based on the same principle was successfully constructed. The instrument automatically processes 8 templates through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in a parallel fashion. A multiplexed freeze/thaw switching principle and a distribution network were implemented to manage flow direction and sample transportation. Dye-labeled terminator cycle-sequencing reactions are performed in an 8-capillary array in a hot air thermal cycler. Subsequently, the sequencing ladders are directly loaded into a corresponding size-exclusion chromatographic column operated at {approximately} 60 C for purification. On-line denaturation and stacking injection for capillary electrophoresis is simultaneously accomplished at a cross assembly set at {approximately} 70 C. Not only the separation capillary array but also the reaction capillary array and purification columns can be regenerated after every run. DNA sequencing data from this system allow base calling up to 460 bases with accuracy of 98%.

Tan, H.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Theoretical Perspectives on Protein Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how monomeric proteins fold under in vitro conditions is crucial to describing their functions in the cellular context. Significant advances both in theory and experiments have resulted in a conceptual framework for describing the folding mechanisms of globular proteins. The experimental data and theoretical methods have revealed the multifaceted character of proteins. Proteins exhibit universal features that can be determined using only the number of amino acid residues (N) and polymer concepts. The sizes of proteins in the denatured and folded states, cooperativity of the folding transition, dispersions in the melting temperatures at the residue level, and time scales of folding are to a large extent determined by N. The consequences of finite N especially on how individual residues order upon folding depends on the topology of the folded states. Such intricate details can be predicted using the Molecular Transfer Model that combines simulations with measured transfer free energies of protein building blocks from water to the desired concentration of the denaturant. By watching one molecule fold at a time, using single molecule methods, the validity of the theoretically anticipated heterogeneity in the folding routes, and the N-dependent time scales for the three stages in the approach to the native state have been established. Despite the successes of theory, of which only a few examples are documented here, we conclude that much remains to be done to solve the "protein folding problem" in the broadest sense.

D. Thirumalai; Edward P. O'Brien; Greg Morrison; Changbong Hyeon

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for TETRACHLOROETHYLENE Condensed Toxicity Summary for TETRACHLOROETHYLENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. MARCH 1993 Prepared by: Mary Lou Daugherty, M.S., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Tetrachloroethylene (CAS No. 127-18-4) is a halogenated aliphatic

293

Tracking the Origins of Fossil Fuels | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tailoring the Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures Tailoring the Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures X-ray Holograms Expose Secret Magnetism How Dissolved Metal Ions Interact in Solution One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Tracking the Origins of Fossil Fuels MAY 29, 2007 Bookmark and Share S-XANES absorbance and third derivative absorbance edge spectra of Duvernay (A) Type II kerogen and the results of curve fits using spectra from model compounds. Notice that sharp features appear in the thrid derivative spectrum that are easily associated with FeS2, aliphatic sulfur and

294

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. AND FOREIGN RIGHTS UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-FC36-95GO10099 U.S. AND FOREIGN RIGHTS UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-FC36-95GO10099 WAIVER NO. W(A)-96-015, CH0907. The attached petition by General Electric Corporation (hereafter GE) is for an advance waiver of patent rights under Contract No. DE-FC36-95GO10099. GE requests that the Department of Energy grant an advance waiver for the domestic and foreign rights to inventions made in the performance of work under the above identified contract and in particular, for materials and processes for the production of long-chain aliphatic dicarboxylic acids (diacids) and in applications of diacids in polymeric materials. Further, that these rights vest in GE subject to the standard Advance Waiver Patent Rights Clause with the enclosed U.S. Competitiveness paragraph as previously agreed to. Additionally, GE has accepted the standard

295

Method for the production of hydrocarbons using iron-carbon-based catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for producing C/sub 2/+ aliphatic hydrocarbons from a CO and H/sub 2/ mixture comprising the step of contacting the mixture with a catalyst comprising finely divided nonpyrophoric iron-carbon catalyst particles comprising iron and carbon, in the substantial absence of silicon, a substantial portion of which is dementite, which was produced in a reaction zone in the presence of laser radiation under such conditions of laser flux density, power adsorption, concentration of iron compound reactants selected from the group consisting of iron carbonyls, iron acetylacetonate, and ferrocene, and pressure sufficient to produce non-pyrophoric iron-carbon particles having average diameters between 1 and 100 nm.

Rice, G.W.; Fiato, R.A.; Soled, S.L.

1988-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

296

Profiles in Chemistry: A Historical Perspective on the National Organic Symposium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, he also must have been thinking of his upcoming talk at the first Symposium on Organic Chemistry that was to begin in two weeks in Rochester, NY, because in the weeks leading up to the Symposium, Norris was inspired to change the title of his talk(2, 3) from the advertised Quantitative Measurement of Chemical Reactivity of Organic Compounds to the actual talk he gave on December 29, which was entitled The Opportunities for Research in Aliphatic Chemistry. ... Photo by Bachrach and courtesy of the School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois. ... Ihde, A. J. Chemistry as Viewed from Bascom’s Hill; Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin: Madison, 1990; pp 611– 612. ...

Edward E. Fenlon; Brian J. Myers

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Bending elasticity of a curved amphiphilic film decorated anchored copolymers: a small angle neutron scattering study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microemulsion droplets (oil in water stabilized by a surfactant film) are progressively decorated with increasing amounts of poly ethylene- oxide (PEO) chains anchored in the film by the short aliphatic chain grafted at one end of the PEO chain . The evolution of the bending elasticity of the surfactant film with increasing decoration is deduced from the evolution in size and polydispersity of the droplets as reflected by small angle neutron scattering. The optimum curvature radius decreases while the bending rigidity modulus remains practically constant. The experimental results compare well with the predictions of a model developed for the bending properties of a curved film decorated by non-adsorbing polymer chains, which takes into account, the finite curvature of the film and the free diffusion of the chains on the film.

Jacqueline Appell; Christian Ligoure; Gregoire Porte

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effect of modifying host oil on coprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum is rich in aliphatic and naphthenic compounds, but usually contains relatively few aromatic or hydroaromatic compounds. This paper will explore ways in which petroleum resids (1000{degrees}F+) can be modified to improve them as coprocessing media with coal. Modifications of the resid include (1) hydrogenation with iron and molybdenum-based catalysts, (2) mild hydrogenation with dicobalt octacarbonyl (CO{sub 2}(CO){sub 8}) to convert any aromatics in the resid to hydroaromatics, (3) addition of certain polynuclear aromatic compounds that are excellent hydrogen shuttlers, and (4) catalytic hydrocracking of the resid. The untreated resid and modified oils were evaluated in thermal and catalytic coprocessing experiments. Measures for evaluating coprocessing performance include the fraction of coal converted to M soluble products and the yield of distillable oil, as measured using simulated distillation.

Hajdu, P.E.; Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Structural features of Athabasca bitumen related to upgrading performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a combination of instrumental and chemical methods, many new classes of compounds appearing as homologous series have been detected in Athabasca oil sand bitumen and in the chemical and thermal degradative products of asphaltene and the heavy ends of maltene. In general, the volatile portion of the maltene is rich in cyclic terpenoid structures and devoid in aliphatic compounds or normal alkane-derived cyclic molecules while the asphaltene fraction and heavy ends of maltene are abundant in normal alkyl-substituted aromatics, thianes, thiolanes, thiophenes, benzo- and dibenzothiophenes. This paper reports that Ru(VIII)-catalyzed oxidation permitted the quantitative estimation of the n-alkyl groups attached to aromatic carbons and of n-alkyl bridges between two aromatic units and their concentration distribution according to chain length. It also showed the presence of a large naphthenic core containing cyclic sulfides, which, during oxidation, were converted to their sulfones.

Strausz, O.P.; Lown, E.M. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (CA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Complete genome sequence of Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens type strain (BL-DC-9T) and comparison to Dehalococcoides strains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens is the type species of the genus Dehalogenimonas, which belongs to a deeply branching lineage within the phylum Chloroflexi. This strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, non spore forming, Gram negative staining bacterium was first isolated from chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater at a Superfund site located near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. D. lykanthroporepellens was of interest for genome sequencing for two reasons: (a) its unusual ability to couple growth with reductive dechlorination of environmentally important polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes and (b) its phylogenetic position distant from previously sequenced bacteria. The 1,686,510 bp circular chromosome of strain BL-DC-9{sup T} contains 1,720 predicted protein coding genes, 47 tRNA genes, a single large subunit rRNA (23S-5S) locus, and a single, orphan, small unit rRNA (16S) locus.

Siddaramappa, Shivakumara [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Delano, Susana [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Green, Lance D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Yan, Jun [Louisiana State University; Bowman, Kimberly [Louisiana State University; Da Costa, Milton S, [University of Coimbra, Coimbra Portugal; Rainey, Fred A. [University of Alaska; Moe, William M. [Louisiana State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pressurized thermal and hydrothermal decomposition of algae, wood chip residue, and grape marc: A comparative study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pressurized thermal decomposition of two marine algae, Pinus radiata chip residue and grape marc using high temperature, high pressure reactions has been studied. The yields and composition of the products obtained from liquefactions under CO of a mixture of biomass and H2O (with or without catalyst) were compared with products from liquefaction of dry biomass under N2, at different temperatures, gas pressures and for CO runs, water to biomass ratios. Thermochemical reactions of algae produced significantly higher dichloromethane solubles and generally higher product yields to oil and asphaltene than Pinus radiata and grape marc under the reaction conditions used. Furthermore, the biofuels derived from algae contained significant concentrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons as opposed to those from radiata pine and grape marc which were richer in aromatic compounds. The possibility of air transport fuel production from algae thus appears to have considerable advantages over that from radiata pine and grape marc.

Dirgarini J.N. Subagyono; Marc Marshall; W. Roy Jackson; Alan L. Chaffee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this two-year project is to evaluate methods of preparing demineralized and carbon enriched chars from Illinois Basin coals. There are two processing steps: physical cleaning of the coal and devolatilization under different environments to form chars. Two differents techniques were used, in-situ Diffuse Reflectance FTIR measurements and BTU measurements. Experiments were performed with coals IBC-101, 102, and 104 as received and after cleaning. DR-FTIR spectrums helped to explain the possible existing chemical bonds in the coal structure as well as their changes during drying and mild pyrolysis. Drying coal causes hydrogen bonds between water and coal to be broken. Liquids produced above 500{degrees}C are much higher in aromatic content, thus, effectively reducing the concentration of aliphatic groups in the overall liquid yield. BTU values of coals after methane treatment are higher than after helium treatment.

Smith, G.V.; Malhotra, V.M.; Wiltowski, T.; Myszka, E. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Effect of temperature on the extraction of nitric acid and plutonium(IV) nitrate with 30 vol% tributyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author's own and published data were evaluated for characterizing the effect of temperature on the distribution of nitric acid and plutonium(IV). The solutes were distributed between 30 vol% TBP in an aliphatic diluent and aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and zero to macro amounts of plutonium(IV) and uranyl nitrates. The temperature dependence of the distribution ratios is described with empirical model equations and examples of the dependence in the absence and presence of uranium(VI) are given. Taking infinite dilution of all solutes of the system as a standard state, the enthalpy change of the extraction reaction could be estimated as -17 kJ/mol for nitric acid, but no numerical estimate was possible for plutonium(IV).

Kolarik, Z.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Demonstration of a TODGA/TBP process for recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from a PUREX raffinate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency of the partitioning of trivalent actinides from a PUREX raffinate has been demonstrated with a TODGA + TBP extractant mixture dissolved in an industrial aliphatic solvent TPH. Based on the results coming from cold and hot batch extraction studies and with the aid of computer code calculations a continuous counter current process have been developed and two flowsheets were tested using miniature centrifugal contactors. The feed solutions was a synthetic PUREX raffinate, spiked with {sup 241}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs. More than 99.9 % of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides were extracted and back-extracted and very high decontamination factors to most fission products were obtained. Co-extraction of zirconium, molybdenum and palladium was prevented using oxalic acid and HEDTA. However 10% of ruthenium was extracted and only 3 % could be back extracted using diluted nitric acid. (authors)

Modolo, G.; Asp, H.; Vijgen, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energieforschung, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Malmbeck, R.; Magnusson, D. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements - ITU, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sorel, C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Valrho - CEA, DRCP/SCPS, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Advances in the design of co-poly(ether-imide) membranes for CO2 separations. Influence of aromatic rigidity on crystallinity, phase segregation and gas transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In our previous works, it was observed a clear relationship between the structure and the properties for different copoly(ether-imide)s, besides a good relation was found between SAXS characterization and permeability results. Here, a series of aliphatic aromatic copoly(ether-imide)s, based on an aromatic diamine (ODA), a diamine terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO2000) of a molecular weight of 2000 g/mol and different aromatic dianhydrides (BPDA, BKDA (or BTDA) and PMDA) has been synthesized and characterized. The permeability for O2, N2, CO2 and CH4, increased with the rigidity of the monomers (BKDA CO2/N2 separation. This work gives indications on how to design advanced materials for this separation with the increasing possibilities of controlled structure and properties.

Alberto Tena; Ángel Marcos-Fernández; Mónica de la Viuda; Laura Palacio; Pedro Prádanos; Ángel E. Lozano; Javier de Abajo; Antonio Hernández

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

THE POTENTIAL OF RECLAIMED LANDS TO SEQUESTER CARBON AND MITIGATE THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reclaimed mine lands have the potential to sequester carbon. The use of amendments to increase fertility and overall soil quality is encouraging. Waste amendments such as sewage sludge and clarifier sludge, as well as commercial compost were tested to determine their effects on carbon sequestration and humic acid formation in reclaimed mine lands. Sewage sludge and clarifier sludge have the potential to work as reclaimed mine lands amendments. C:N ratios need to be understood to determine probability of nutrient leaching and water contamination. Microbial activity on the humic acid fraction of sludge is directed toward the readily degradable constituents containing single chain functional groups. This finding indicate that amendments with lower molecular constituents such as aliphatic compounds are more amenable to microbial degradation, therefore serves as better nutrient sources to enhance the formation of vegetation in mine lands and leads to more efficient carbon sequestration.

Terry Brown; Song Jin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Comparative analysis of structural transformations of two bituminous coals with different maximum fluidity during carbonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The variation of the volume of two bituminous coals with different maximum fluidity (MF) values has been determined using carbonization tests, and the quality of coke obtained has been examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. The structural and chemical changes in bituminous coals at the pre-plastic stage during carbonization were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) techniques and compared to the changes in their electric and dielectric parameters. It was observed that the structural and chemical transformations occurred in the disordered phase of both coals in different ways. These differences are attributed to the different redistributions of hydrogen between the radicals generated in the aliphatic and aromatic parts of the macromolecule fragments. 42 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Valentina Zubkova; Victor Prezhdo; Andrzej Strojwas [Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce (Poland). Institute of Chemistry

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Protein Vivisection Reveals Elusive Intermediates in Folding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although most folding intermediates escape detection, their characterization is crucial to the elucidation of folding mechanisms. Here, we outline a powerful strategy to populate partially unfolded intermediates: A buried aliphatic residue is substituted with a charged residue (e.g., Leu {yields} Glu{sup -}) to destabilize and unfold a specific region of the protein. We applied this strategy to ubiquitin, reversibly trapping a folding intermediate in which the {beta}5-strand is unfolded. The intermediate refolds to a native-like structure upon charge neutralization under mildly acidic conditions. Characterization of the trapped intermediate using NMR and hydrogen exchange methods identifies a second folding intermediate and reveals the order and free energies of the two major folding events on the native side of the rate-limiting step. This general strategy may be combined with other methods and have broad applications in the study of protein folding and other reactions that require trapping of high-energy states.

Zheng, Zhongzhou; Sosnick, Tobin R. (UC)

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Chemical Forms of Mercury And Selenium in Fish Following Digestion With Simulated Gastric Fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish is a major dietary source of potentially neurotoxic methylmercury compounds for humans. It is also a rich source of essential selenium. We have used in situ mercury L{sub III}-edge and selenium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy to chemically characterize the methylmercury and selenium in both fresh fish and fish digested with simulated gastric fluid. For the mercury, we confirm our earlier finding [Harris et al. (2003) Science301, 1203] that the methylmercury is coordinated by a single thiolate donor, which resembles cysteine, and for the selenium, we find a mixture of organic forms that resemble selenomethionine and an aliphatic selenenyl sulfide such as Cys-S-Se-Cys. We find that local chemical environments of mercury and selenium do not change upon digestion of the fish with simulated gastric fluid. We discuss the toxicological implications for humans consuming fish.

George, G.N.; Singh, S.P.; Prince, R.C.; Pickering, I.J.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

Poly(arylene ether sulfone) Statistical Copolymers Bearing Perfluoroalkylsulfonic Acid Moieties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Number-average molecular weight (Mn) and polydispersity index (PDI) of the polymeric materials were measured using a gel permeation chromatography (GPC) system consisting of a Waters Alliance 2695 separation module, an online multiangle laser light scattering (MALLS) detector fitted with a gallium arsenide laser (power: 20 mW) operating at 690 nm (MiniDAWN, Wyatt Technology Inc.), an interferometric refractometer (Optilab DSP, Wyatt Technology Inc.), and two Polymer Laboratories mixed D columns (5 ?m bead size) connected in series. ... (23) After experimentation with several alternative neutralizing agents including pyridine and alkali metal hydroxides and carbonates, we determined that the aliphatic tertiary amine, N,N-diisopropylethylamine, produces a salt with favorable solubility and crystallization behavior. ... It is sparingly soluble in water, which facilitates isolation, and as will be shown, it may be used directly in polymerization, and under these conditions, the free amine is released and volatilized out of the polymer product. ...

Haibo Li; Andrew B. Jackson; Nathan J. Kirk; Kenneth A. Mauritz; Robson F. Storey

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

Vacuum pyrolysis of bark residues and primary sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black spruce bark residues and primary sludges derived from the operation of the Daishowa pulp and paper plant in Quebec City, PQ, were processed by vacuum pyrolysis in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The pyrolysis oil, water, charcoal, and gas were recovered and analyzed. The bark residues yielded 30.6% oil and 34.1% charcoal, and the primary sludges gave 40.1% oil and 30.1% charcoal on a feedstock air-dry basis. The oil phases recovered from the two pyrolysis experiments were fractionated into eight fractions; they were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both pyrolysis oil samples had a high content of phenolic compounds. These oils contained various fine chemicals that have possible commercial potential. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as long- and short-chain carboxylic acids, are also present in both pyrolysis oils.

Pakdel, H.; Couture, G.; Roy, C. (Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Potential of producing various hydrocarbons from canola oil by catalytic treatment over Pt-ZSM-5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Canola oil conversion was studied at atmospheric pressure over Pt-ZSM-5 catalyst (0.5 wt% Pt) in a fixed bed micro-reactor. The operating conditions were: temperature range of 400--500 C, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 1.8 and 3.6 h{sup {minus}1} and steam/oil ratio of 4:1. The products were coke, gas, an organic liquid product (OLP) and residue. The gas and OLP consisted mainly of hydrocarbons. The objective of this study was to maximize the amount of gasoline range hydrocarbons in the OLP and the selectivity to isohydrocarbons in the gas. The gas yields varied between 22--65 wt% and were higher in the presence of steam compared to the operation without steam. Also, the gas fraction decreased with increase in space velocity. The olefin/paraffin ratio of C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbon gases varied between 0.31--0.79. The amount of isohydrocarbons relative to n-hydrocarbons were higher with Pt-ZSM-5 (1.6--4.8) compared to pure HZSM-5 catalyst (0.2--0.3). The OLP yields with Pt-ZSM-5 (20--55wt% of canola oil) were slightly lower compared to HZSM-5 (40--63wt% of canola oil) under similar conditions. The major components of OLP were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The main aromatic hydrocarbons were benzene, toluene, xylenes and trimethylbenzenes. Alkylated pentane and hexane were the main aliphatic hydrocarbons. In the presence of steam, Pt-ZSM-5 gave higher yields of liquid hydrocarbons within the gasoline boiling range than HZSM-5.

Katikaneni, S.P.R.; Adjaye, J.D.; Bakhshi, N.N. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Multimedia fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil: Oil matrix of constructed biopiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dynamic multimedia fugacity model was used to evaluate the partitioning and fate of petroleum hydrocarbon fractions and aromatic indicator compounds within the soil: oil matrix of three biopiles. Each biopile was characterised by four compartments: air, water, soil solids and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL). Equilibrium partitioning in biopile A and B suggested that most fractions resided in the NAPL, with the exception of the aromatic fraction with an equivalent carbon number from 5 to 7 (EC5?7). In Biopile C, which had the highest soil organic carbon content (13%), the soil solids were the most important compartment for both light aliphatic fractions (EC5?6 and EC6?8) and aromatic fractions, excluding the EC16?21 and EC21?35. Our starting hypothesis was that hydrocarbons do not degrade within the NAPL. This was supported by the agreement between predicted and measured hydrocarbon concentrations in Biopile B when the degradation rate constant in NAPL was set to zero. In all scenarios, biodegradation in soil was predicted as the dominant removal process for all fractions, except for the aliphatic EC5?6 which was predominantly lost via volatilization. The absence of an explicit NAPL phase in the model yielded a similar prediction of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) behaviour; however the predicted concentrations in the air and water phases were significantly increased with consequent changes in potential mobility. Further comparisons between predictions and measured data, particularly concentrations in the soil mobile phases, are required to ascertain the true value of including an explicit NAPL in models of this kind.

Frédéric Coulon; Michael J. Whelan; Graeme I. Paton; Kirk T. Semple; Raffaella Villa; Simon J.T. Pollard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Isothermal decomposition of New Albany shale from Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isothermal decomposition of a New Albany oil shale has been studied in the temperature range of 375/sup 0/C to 425/sup 0/C. The amount of conversion of kerogen to bitumen, oil, gas and residue products was obtained for different reaction times in this temperature range. Elemental analyses were obtained on the bitumen, oil, and solid reaction products. Molecular weights and /sup 13/C NMR measurements of the aliphatic and aromatic carbon fractions in the solid products were made to complete the analyses. The results show that the thermal decomposition of the New Albany oil shale exhibits complex behavior. None of the data fit a simple first-order kinetic expression with respect to kerogen concentration for all temperatures, indicating that multiple parallel reactions occur during the decomposition. However, by fitting the initial slopes of the oil conversion data, it was possible to obtain the weighted average rate constants at each temperature. These data gave a good fit to the Arrhenius equation with the frequency factor equal to 6.38 x 10/sup 15/ min/sup -1/, and the activation energy equal to 207.5 k.j mol/sup -1/ for the kerogen decomposition. The maximum bitumen concentration was 10% or less of the original kerogen at any temperature, indicating that direct conversion of kerogen to oil, gas and residue occurs during heating. Since the highly aliphatic Green River oil shale forms large amounts of bitumen whereas the more aromatic New Albany shale forms only small amounts, the formation of bitumen may be related to the aromatic nature of the kerogen. In general, the chemical properties of the oil were fairly constant at all reaction times and temperatures studied. Hydrogen sulfide was the dominant species in the gas phase. The solid and liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data show that the net increase of total aromatic carbon in the products was about 30% of the raw shale value. 37 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

Miknis, F.P.; Conn, P.J.; Turner, T.F.; Berdan, G.L.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Reducible Supports for Ni-based Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear spin relaxation, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques are used to determine supramolecular arrangement of 3-methyl-1-octyl-4-phenyl-1H-triazol-1,2,3-ium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [OMPhTz][Tf{sub 2}N], an example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid. The results obtained showed first-order thermodynamic dependence for nuclear spin relaxation of the anion. First-order relaxation dependence is interpreted as through-bond dipolar relaxation. Greater than first-order dependence was found in the aliphatic protons, aromatic carbons (including nearest neighbors), and carbons at the end of the aliphatic tail. Greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of spin relaxation rates is interpreted as relaxation resulting from at least one mechanism additional to through-bond dipolar relaxation. In rigid portions of the cation, an additional spin relaxation mechanism is attributed to anisotropic effects, while greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of the octyl side chain’s spin relaxation rates is attributed to cation–cation interactions. Little interaction between the anion and the cation was observed by spin relaxation studies or by ESI-MS. No extended supramolecular structure was observed in this study, which was further supported by MS and SAXS. nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) factors are used in conjunction with spin–lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) measurements to calculate rotational correlation times for C–H bonds (the time it takes for the vector represented by the bond between the two atoms to rotate by one radian). The rotational correlation times are used to represent segmental reorientation dynamics of the cation. A combination of techniques is used to determine the segmental interactions and dynamics of this example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid.

Bhavsar, Saurabh; Veser, Goetz

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Alkaline-Side Extraction of Cesium from Savannah River Tank Waste Using a Calixarene-Crown Ether Extractant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented supporting the viability of the alkaline-side CSEX process as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removal of cesium from aqueous high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Under funding from the USDOE Efficient Separations and Crosscutting program, a flowsheet was suggested in early June of 1998, and in the following four months, this flowsheet underwent extensive testing, both in batch tests at ORNL and ANL and in two centrifugal-contactor tests at ANL. To carry out these tests, the initial ESP funding was augmented by direct funds from Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation. The flowsheet employed a solvent containing a calixarene-crown hybrid compound called BoBCalixC6 that was invented at ORNL and can now be obtained commercially for government use from IBC Advanced Technologies. This special extractant is so powerful and selective that it can be used at only 0.01 M, compensating for its expense, but a modifier is required for use in an aliphatic diluent, primarily to increase the cesium distribution ratio D{sub Cs} in extraction. The modifier selected is a relatively economical fluorinated alcohol called Cs3, invented at ORNL and so far available. only from ORNL. For the flowsheet, the modifier is used at 0.2 M in the branched aliphatic kerosene Isopar{reg_sign} L. Testing at ORNL and ANL involved simulants of the SRS HLW. After extraction of the Cs from the waste simulant, the solvent is scrubbed with 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} and stripped with a solution comprised of 0.0005 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.0001 M CsNO{sub 3}. The selection of these conditions is justified in this report, both on the basis of experimental data and underlying theory.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Blend Mandate Blend Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Mandate Within one year after the Montana Department of Transportation has certified that ethanol producers in the state have produced a total of 40 million gallons of denatured ethanol and have maintained that level of

318

ConsumTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oxygenate. oxygenate. A small amount of fuel ethanol is used as an alternative fuel, such as E85. It is typ- ically produced chemically from ethylene, or biologically from fermenta- tion of various sugars from carbohydrates found in agricultural crops and cellulosic residues from crops or wood. For 1981 forward, fuel ethanol es- timates are maintained separately from motor gasoline in SEDS and shown in the state energy consumption data tables to illustrate renewable energy use. The U.S. total fuel ethanol consumption in SEDS is a series developed by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) from annual reports of field production of oxygenated gasoline (prior to 2005), finished motor gasoline and motor gasoline blending components adjustments (2005 for- ward), and refinery and blender net inputs of fuel ethanol (all years). The fuel ethanol series used in SEDS is denatured fuel ethanol,

319

The Entire Molecular Biology Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Biology Archives Molecular Biology Archives Molecular Biology, Since May 2000 Table of Contents: Blood pH and Oxygen DNA Extraction Flesh Eating Bacteria Amino Acid Differences Lyme Disease Effects Vinegar and Alcohol Mosquito and Blood Caffeine and Smoking Bread Mold and pH Hemocyanin and Hemerythrin Hodospin Man-made Bacteria Pregnancy Tips mRNA Killing Bacteria Gram Stain Milk Bacteria Denatured Protein Pseudmands Bacteria Nucleotide Order Bacteria Resistance Albinism Genes DNA Healing Re-constitution of Proteins H. pylori and Multiple sclerosis Smallest Organism Sugars and Fats Bacteria Systematics Slow Regeneration Media Cultures Butter and Bacteria AIDS and Survival in Air Cell Intelligence Giardia gingivalis Meat Bacteria Pus and Immune Cells Chalones Culture of T. ferrooxisans Amphibian E. coli

320

Definition: Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol A colorless, flammable liquid produced by fermentation of sugars. While it is also the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, it can be denatured for fuel use. Fuel ethanol is used principally for blending in low concentrations with motor gasoline as an oxygenate or octane enhancer. In high concentrations, it is used to fuel alternative-fuel vehicles specially designed for its use.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ethanol fuel is ethanol (ethyl alcohol), the same type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. It is most often used as a motor fuel, mainly as a biofuel additive for gasoline. World ethanol production for transport fuel tripled between 2000 and 2007 from 17 billion to more than 52 billion liters. From 2007 to 2008, the share of ethanol in global gasoline type

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321

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

& Blender Net Production & Blender Net Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Conventional Gasoline, Ed55 and Lower Finished conventional motor gasoline blended with a maximum of 55 volume percent denatured fuel ethanol.

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Production Tax Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit An ethanol facility is eligible for a credit of $0.075 per gallon of ethanol, before denaturing, for new production for up to 36 consecutive

323

Financial determinants of corn market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies the effects of the TNX ten-year treasury note, the crude oil light sweet, the denatured fuel ethanol, the S&P 500 Stock Index and the US dollar/yen exchange rate on the conditional mean and variance return of corn futures. It employs daily data from January 1, 2002 to August 31, 2009. Using the GJR-GARCH(1, 1) model, we provide empirical evidence of positive influence of bond, energy and capital market on corn market. There is also evidence that the volatility shocks of the US dollar/yen exchange rate have a positive impact on the conditional volatility of corn futures returns. Finally, the structural analysis of volatility with the GJR-GARCH model has shown that current volatility is more influenced by past volatility rather than by the previous day shocks.

Nikolaos Sariannidis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Characterization of the microdialysis junction interface for capillary electrophoresis/microelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CE/ESI-MS) interface, based on an electric circuit across a microdialysis membrane surrounding a short capillary segment closely connected to the separation capillary terminus, is demonstrated to be sensitive, efficient, and rugged. A microspray type ionization emitter produces a stable electrospray at the low flow rates provided by CE and thus avoids both the need for a makeup liquid flow provided by liquid junction or sheath flow interfaces and the subsequent dilution and reduction in sensitivity. Reproducibility studies and comparisons with CE/UV and the CE/sheath flow interface with ESI-MS are presented. Additionally, postrun acidification via the microdialysis junction interface is demonstrated and shown to be capable of denaturing the holomyoglobin protein noncovalent complex while maintaining separation efficiency. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Severs, J.C.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Unwinding relaxation dynamics of polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relaxation dynamics of a polymer wound around a fixed obstacle constitutes a fundamental instance of polymer with twist and torque and it is of relevance also for DNA denaturation dynamics. We investigate it by simulations and Langevin equation analysis. The latter predicts a relaxation time scaling as a power of the polymer length times a logarithmic correction related to the equilibrium fluctuations of the winding angle. The numerical data support this result and show that at short times the winding angle decreases as a power-law. This is also in agreement with the Langevin equation provided a winding-dependent friction is used, suggesting that such reduced description of the system captures the basic features of the problem.

Jean-Charles Walter; Marco Baiesi; Gerard Barkema; Enrico Carlon

2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

326

Exploring the conformational energy landscape of proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proteins possess a complex energy landscape with a large number of local minima called conformational substates that are arranged in a hierarchical fashion. Here we discuss experiments aimed at the elucidation of the energy landscape in carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO). In the highest tier of the hierarchy, a few taxonomic substates exist. Because of their small number, these substates are accessible to detailed structural investigations. Spectroscopic experiments are discussed that elucidate the role of protonations of amino acid side chains in creating the substates. The lower tiers of the hierarchy contain a large number of statistical substates. Substate interconversions are observed in the entire temperature range from below 1 K up to the denaturation temperature, indicating a wide spectrum of energy barriers that separate the substates.

Nienhaus, G.U. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); [Universitaet Ulm (Germany); Mueller, J.D.; McMahon, B.H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A Unique Box in 28S rRNA Is Shared by the Enigmatic Insect Order Zoraptera and Dictyoptera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[66]. The primer sets used for amplification as well as sequencing were listed in Table S2. The functions of these primers were annotated in File S1. The PCR protocal for 28S rDNA included an initial denaturation at 94uC for 1 minute, followed by 30... cycles of 30 seconds at 94uC, 30 seconds-1 minute at 48–55uC and 1–2 minutes at 72uC, ending with a final extension at 72uC for 8–10 minutes. The thermal cycling program for 18S rDNA followed Johnson and Clayton [67]. All fragments were sequenced in both...

Wang, Yanhui; Engel, Michael S.; Rafael, Jose A.; Dang, Kai; Wu, Haoyang; Wang, Ying; Xie, Quang; Bu, Wenjun

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

328

Protein folding and cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

González-Diáz, P F

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Rhoptry protein 6 from Toxoplasma gondii is an intrinsically disordered protein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rhoptry protein 6 (ROP6) from Toxoplasma gondii is a 480-amino acid protein with no homology to any reported excretory or secretory protein. Especially, unlike the many other rhoptry protein types, ROP6 does not have a kinase domain. The biochemical and biophysical properties of ROP6 are unknown. Here, we investigated its structure using an in silico analysis method and overexpression and purification using an Escherichia coli system. The protein was purified to more than 85% homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography in denaturing conditions. After purification, ROP6 showed slow migration in SDS–PAGE, including fast proteolysis. This implies that ROP6 has a high percentage of flexible regions or extended loop structures. Secondary structure prediction and prediction of intrinsically disordered regions by using various bioinformatics tools, indicated that approximately 60% of ROP6 is predicted to be intrinsically disordered or random coil regions. These observations indicate that ROP6 is an intrinsically disordered protein.

Won-Kyu Lee; Hye-Jin Ahn; Yeon Gyu Yu; Ho-Woo Nam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Enhancement of sludge reduction and methane production by removing extracellular polymeric substances from waste activated sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The management of waste activated sludge (WAS) recycling is a concern that affects the development of the future low-carbon society, particularly sludge reduction and biomass utilization. In this study, we investigated the effect of removing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play important roles in the adhesion and flocculation of WAS, on increased sludge disintegration, thereby enhancing sludge reduction and methane production by anaerobic digestion. EPS removal from WAS by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly enhanced sludge reduction, i.e., 49 ± 5% compared with 27 ± 1% of the control at the end the digestion process. Methane production was also improved in WAS without EPS by 8881 ± 109 CH4 ?mol g?1 dry-weight of sludge. Microbial activity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction, which showed that the hydrolysis and acetogenesis stages were enhanced by pretreatment with 2% EDTA, with a larger methanogenic community and better methane production.

Minh Tuan Nguyen; Nazlina Haiza Mohd Yasin; Toshiki Miyazaki; Toshinari Maeda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Stabilizing effect of small concentrations of PAMAM dendrimers at the insulin aggregation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dendrimers’ action on proteins and peptides has a dual and controversial character. On one hand, they dissolve prion protein and amyloid fibrils aggregates, which are otherwise only soluble in solvents containing both detergents and high denaturant concentrations. On the other hand they are able to destabilize proteins in generation dependent manner. In present work we estimated the influence of small concentrations (up to 1.4 ?g/ml) of cationic, neutral and anionic poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of 3rd and 4th generations on dithiotreitol induced aggregation of insulin. It was found that cationic dendrimers decreased the insulin aggregation, while anionic and neutral ones did not. At the same time, destabilizing effect of dendrimers on insulin structure was not observed. The conclusion was made that small concentrations of dendrimers can be applied to prevent or decrease the formation of misfolded structures of protein.

Olga Nowacka; Dzmitry Shcharbin; Barbara Klajnert-Maculewicz; Maria Bryszewska

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Protein folding and cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz; C. L. Siguenza

1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

333

Putting the Squeeze on Biology: Biomolecules Under Pressure  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Modest pressures encountered in the biosphere (i.e., below a few kbar) have extraordinary effects on biomembranes and proteins. These include pressure denaturation of proteins, dramatic changes in protein-protein association, substrate binding, membrane ion transport, DNA transcription, virus infectivity, and enzyme kinetics. Yet all of the biomaterials involved are highly incompressible. The challenge to the physicist is to understand the structural coupling between these effects and pressure to elucidate the relevant mechanisms. X-ray diffraction studies of membranes and proteins under pressure will be described. It is seen that it is not so much the magnitude of the changes, but rather the differential compressibilities of different parts of the structure that are responsible for effects.

Sol Gruner

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

334

Kinder Morgan Central Florida Pipeline Ethanol Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

KINDER MORGAN CENTRAL FLORIDA PIPELINE ETHANOL PROJECT ï‚· In December 2008, Kinder Morgan began transporting commercial batches of denatured ethanol along with gasoline shipments in its 16-inch Central Florida Pipeline (CFPL) from Tampa to Orlando, making CFPL the first transmarket gasoline pipeline in the United States to do so. The 16-inch pipeline previously only transported regular and premium gasoline. ï‚· Kinder Morgan invested approximately $10 million to modify the line for ethanol shipments which involved chemically cleaning the pipeline, replacing pipeline equipment that was incompatible with ethanol and expanding storage capacity at its Orlando terminal to handle ethanol shipments. ï‚· Kinder Morgan is responding to customer interest in ethanol blending. Our Florida

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

E85 Definition to E85 Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type E85 Definition E85 motor fuel is defined as an alternative fuel that is a blend of ethanol and hydrocarbon, of which the ethanol portion is 75-85% denatured fuel ethanol by volume and complies with the most current ASTM specification

336

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard Within six months following the point at which monthly production of denatured ethanol produced in Louisiana equals or exceeds a minimum annualized production volume of 50 million gallons, at least 2% of the

337

Premixed ignition behavior of alternative diesel fuel-relevant compounds in a motored engine experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A motored engine study using premixed charges of fuel and air at a wide range of diesel-relevant equivalence ratios was performed to investigate autoignition differences among surrogates for conventional diesel fuel, gas-to-liquid (GTL) diesel fuel, and biodiesel, as well as n-heptane. Experiments were performed by delivering a premixed charge of vaporized fuel and air and increasing the compression ratio in a stepwise manner to increase the extent of reaction while monitoring the exhaust composition via Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry and collecting condensable exhaust gas for subsequent gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Each fuel demonstrated a two-stage ignition process, with a low-temperature heat release (LTHR) event followed by the main combustion, or high-temperature heat release (HTHR). Among the three diesel-relevant fuels, the magnitude of LTHR was highest for GTL diesel, followed by methyl decanoate, and conventional diesel fuel last. FTIR analysis of the exhaust for n-heptane, the conventional diesel surrogate, and the GTL diesel surrogate revealed that LTHR produces high concentrations of aldehydes and CO while producing only negligible amounts of CO{sub 2}. Methyl decanoate differed from the other two-stage ignition fuels only in that there were significant amounts of CO{sub 2} produced during LTHR; this was the result of decarboxylation of the ester group, not the result of oxidation. GC/MS analysis of LTHR exhaust condensate for n-heptane revealed high concentrations of 2,5-heptanedione, a di-ketone that can be closely tied to species in existing autoignition models for n-heptane. GC/MS analysis of the LTHR condensate for conventional diesel fuel and GTL diesel fuel revealed a series of high molecular weight aldehydes and ketones, which were expected, as well as a series of organic acids, which are not commonly reported as products of combustion. The GC/MS analysis of the methyl decanoate exhaust condensate revealed that the aliphatic chain acts similarly to n-paraffins during LTHR, while the ester group remains intact. Thus, although the FTIR data revealed that decarboxylation occurs at significant levels for methyl decanoate, it was concluded that this occurs after the aliphatic chain has been largely consumed by other LTHR reactions. (author)

Szybist, James P.; Boehman, Andre L.; Haworth, Daniel C. [Pennsylvania State University, Fuel Science Program, 405 Academic Activities Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Koga, Hibiki [Honda R and D Company, Ltd., Asaka-shi, Saitama 351-0024 (Japan)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

XAS Catches the Chemical Form of Mercury in Fish  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

view large image view large image contact info Friday, 29 August 2003 X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Catches the Chemical Form of Mercury in Fish - SSRL Scientists Reveal New Findings in Science Article The presence of "methyl mercury" in fish is well-known, but until now the detailed chemical identity of the mercury has remained a mystery. In an x-ray absorption spectroscopy study published in the August 29 issue of Science (Science 301, 2003: 1203; Science now: Murky Picture on Fish Mercury), SSRL scientists report that the chemical form of mercury involves a sulfur atom (most likely in a so-called aliphatic form). The study presents significant new knowledge - because the toxic properties of mercury (or any element) are critically dependent upon its chemical form - and represents an important milestone in developing an understanding of how harmful mercury in fish might actually be. The study was carried out by SSRL staff scientists Ingrid Pickering and Graham George and postdoctoral fellow Hugh Harris using SSRL's structural molecular biology beam line 9-3. The very high flux, excellent beam stability and state-of-the-art detector technology allowed the team to measure samples of fish containing micromolar levels of mercury, much lower than had previously been possible.

339

Composting of the solid fraction of digestate derived from pig slurry: Biological processes and compost properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this paper was to assess the characteristics of the solid fractions (SF) obtained by mechanical separation of digestate, their compostability and compost quality. To do so, the SF of digestates obtained from anaerobic digestion of pig slurry, energy crops and agro-industrial residues were sampled in five plants located in Northern Italy. Results obtained indicated that anaerobic digestion by itself promoted the high biological stability of biomasses with a Potential Dynamic Respiration Index (PDRI) close to 1000 mgO2 kg V S?1 h?1. Subsequent composting of digestates, with an added bulking agent, did not give remarkably different results, and led only to a slight modification of the characteristics of the initial non-composted mixtures; the composts obtained fully respected the legal limits for high quality compost. Chemical studies of organic matter composition of the biomasses by using CP MAS 13C NMR, indicated that the compost was composed of a high relative content of O-alkyl-C (71.47% of total C) (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and a low alkyl-C (12.42%) (i.e. volatile fatty acids, steroid-like molecules, aliphatic biopolymers and proteins).

Fulvia Tambone; Laura Terruzzi; Barbara Scaglia; Fabrizio Adani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Compositional Analysis of Water-Soluble Materials in Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corn stover is one of the leading feedstock candidates for commodity-scale biomass-to-ethanol processing. The composition of water-soluble materials in corn stover has been determined with greater than 90% mass closure in four of five representative samples. The mass percentage of water-soluble materials in tested stover samples varied from 14 to 27% on a dry weight basis. Over 30 previously unknown constituents of aqueous extracts were identified and quantified using a variety of chromatographic techniques. Monomeric sugars (primarily glucose and fructose) were found to be the predominant water-soluble components of corn stover, accounting for 30-46% of the dry weight of extractives (4-12% of the dry weight of feedstocks). Additional constituents contributing to the mass balance for extractives included various alditols (3-7%), aliphatic acids (7-21%), inorganic ions (10-18%), oligomeric sugars (4-12%), and a distribution of oligomers tentatively identified as being derived from phenolic glycosides (10-18%).

Chen, S. F.; Mowery, R. A.; Scarlata, C. J.; Chambliss, C. K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The influence of a presence of a heavy atom on the spin-spin coupling constants between two light nuclei in organometallic compounds and halogen derivatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {sup 1}J{sub CC} and {sup 1}J{sub CH} spin-spin coupling constants have been calculated by means of density functional theory (DFT) for a set of derivatives of aliphatic hydrocarbons substituted with I, At, Cd, and Hg in order to evaluate the substituent and relativistic effects for these properties. The main goal was to estimate HALA (heavy-atom-on-light-atom) effects on spin-spin coupling constants and to explore the factors which may influence the HALA effect on these properties, including the nature of the heavy atom substituent and carbon hybridization. The methods applied range, in order of reduced complexity, from Dirac-Kohn-Sham method (density functional theory with four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian), through DFT with two- and one-component Zeroth Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonians, to scalar non-relativistic effective core potentials with the non-relativistic Hamiltonian. Thus, we are able to compare the performance of ZORA-DFT and Dirac-Kohn-Sham methods for modelling of the HALA effects on the spin-spin coupling constants.

Wody?ski, Artur; Pecul, Magdalena, E-mail: mpecul@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)] [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

ON THE EXCITATION AND FORMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR FULLERENES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare and analyze the Spitzer mid-infrared spectrum of three fullerene-rich planetary nebulae in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds: Tc1, SMP SMC 16, and SMP LMC 56. The three planetary nebulae share many spectroscopic similarities. The strongest circumstellar emission bands correspond to the infrared active vibrational modes of the fullerene species C{sub 60} and little or no emission is present from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The strengths of the fullerene bands in the three planetary nebulae are very similar, while the ratios of the [Ne III]15.5 {mu}m/[Ne II]12.8 {mu}m fine structure lines, an indicator of the strength of the radiation field, are markedly different. This raises questions about their excitation mechanism and we compare the fullerene emission to fluorescent and thermal models. In addition, the spectra show other interesting and common features, most notably in the 6-9 {mu}m region, where a broad plateau with substructure dominates the emission. These features have previously been associated with mixtures of aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbon solids. We hypothesize on the origin of this band, which is likely related to the fullerene formation mechanism, and compare it with modeled hydrogenated amorphous carbon that present emission in this region.

Bernard-Salas, J.; Jones, A. P. [Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay (France); Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Micelotta, E. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Groenewegen, M. A. T., E-mail: jbernard@ias.u-psud.fr [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

345

Yellow perch embryo-larval survival and growth in surface waters associated with oil-sands mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of their land reclamation strategy, Syncrude Canada Ltd. is currently developing environmentally acceptable tailings disposal methods. Fine tailings, a suspension of clay and residual bitumen, is the waste product from oil sands extraction. Fine-tailings contain naphthenic acids, a group of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic carboxylic acids, which occur naturally in petroleum and are partly responsible for the toxicity of process water. The wet landscape method involves covering fine tails with a layer of water such that a self-sustaining ecosystem can be established. A 5 ha demonstration pond with a bottom of fine-tailings was constructed and stocked with yellow perch for experimental purposes. Two other reclaimed ponds formed with oil-sands overburden material were also stocked with perch. Adult perch sampled in the fall of 1995 from the experimental and reclaimed ponds exhibited a 2-fold induction of MFO activity compared to the source lake; indicating organic compound exposure. Perch from one of the reclaimed ponds showed significantly reduced circulating reproductive hormone levels, gonad size and smaller ovarian follicles. Reproductive parameters were not different between the source lake and the remaining ponds. Paired lab and field experiments were conducted to determine if contaminants present would be detrimental to egg viability and development of larvae either through direct exposure of spawned eggs or indirectly by effecting oogenesis. An early life stage toxicity test was also performed using commercially available naphthenic acid standard. Endpoints measured were percent fertilization, percent hatch, mortality, deformities, timing of developmental periods and larval growth.

Peters, L.E.; Heuvel, M.R. van den; Dixon, D.G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Power, M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Boerger, H.; MacKinnon, M.D.; Meer, T. Van [Syncrude Canada, Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Interfacial activity of phosphonated-polyethylene glycol functionalized cerium oxide nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a recent publication, we have highlighted the potential of phosphonic acid terminated PEG oligomers to functionalize strong UV absorption cerium oxide nanoparticles[1], which yield suspensions that are stable in aqueous or organic solvents and are redispersible in different solvent after freeze-drying. In the present work, we highlight the interfacial activity of the functional ceria nanoparticles and their potential to modify hydrophobic surfaces. We first investigated Phosphonated-PEG amphiphilic oligomers behavior as strong surface active species forming irreversibly adsorbed layers. We then show that the oligomers interfacial properties translate to the functional nanoparticles. In particular, the addition of a small fraction of phosphonated-PEG oligomers with an extra C16 aliphatic chain (stickers) into the formulation enabled the tuning of i) the nanoparticles adsorption at the air/water, polystyrene/water, oil/water interfaces and ii) the particle/particle interaction in aqueous solutions. We also found that dense and closely packed two dimensional monolayers of nanoceria can be formed by spontaneous adsorption or surface compression using a Langmuir trough. A hexagonal organization controlled by reversible and repulsive repulsion has been characterized by GISAXS. Mono- or multilayers can also be stably formed or transferred on solid surfaces. Our results are key features in the field of polymer surface modification, solid stabilized emulsions (Pickering) or supracolloidal assemblies.

L. Qi; J. Fresnais; P. Muller; O. Theodoly; J. -F. Berret; J. -P. Chapel

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this two-year project was to evaluate methods of preparing demineralized and carbon enriched chars from Illinois Basin coals. The two processing steps, physical cleaning and devolatilization under different environments, led to the following results. Cleaning coal incompletely removes mineral matter which decreases catalytic activity and increases micropore structure. Water forms hydrogen bonds to oxygen functional groups in coal, and during drying, coals undergo structural changes which affect mild gasification. When methane reacts wit coal, devolatilization and carbon deposition occur, the rates of which depend on temperature and amount of ash. Thermal decomposition of IBC-101 coal starts at 300 C, which is much lower than previously believed, but maximum yields of liquids occur at 500 C for IBC-101 coal and at 550 C for IBC-102 coal. Aliphatic-to-aromatic ratios increase with increasing pyrolysis temperatures to 300 C and then decrease; therefore, liquids formed during gasification of 550 C or higher contain mainly aromatic compounds. Btu values of chars are higher after methane treatment than after helium treatment.

Smith, G.V.; Malhotra, V.M.; Wiltowski, T. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of the In Situ Aerobic Cometabolism of Chlorinated Ethenes by Toluene-Utilizing Microorganisms Using Push-Pull Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-well-push-pull tests were used in a contaminated aquifer to evaluate the ability of toluene-oxidizing microorganisms to aerobically cometabolize chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) such as trichloroethene (TCE). Groundwater containing dissolved toluene was injected into the saturated zone in biostimulate indigenous toluene-utilizers. The test solution was injected into the aquifer using a standard monitoring well and then was transported under natural-gradient conditions. Transport tests demonstrated similar transport characteristics of the conservative tracer and the reactive solutes. Biostimulation tests were then performed by injecting a test solution containing dissolved toluene substrate, hydrogen peroxide, bromide and nitrate in order to increase the biomass of toluene-utilizing microorganisms. During the biostimulation tests, decreases in toluene concentration and the production of o-cresol as an intermediate oxidation product, indicated the simulation of toluene-utilizing microorganisms containing an ortho-monooxygenase enzyme. Transformation tests conducted after biostimulation demonstrated that indigenous microorganisms have the capability to transform the surrogate compounds (e.g. isobutene). Isobutene was transformed to isobutene oxide, indicating transformation by a toluene ortho-monooxygenase.

Azizian, Mohammad F.; Istok, Jonathan; Semprini, Lewis

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Thauera linaloolentis sp. nov. and Thauera terpenica sp. nov., Isolated on Oxygen-containing Monoterpenes (Linalool, Menthol, and Eucalyptol and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The monoterpenes menthol, linalool, and eucalyptol were recently used as sole electron donor and carbon source for the isolation of three denitrifying bacterial strains 21Mol, 47Lol, and 58Eu. The motile, mesophilic, Gram-negative rods had a strictly respiratory metabolism. Monoterpenes were completely mineralised to carbon dioxide, nitrate was reduced to dinitrogen. Strain 47Lol utilised aliphatic monoterpenes, strain 21Mol oxygenated monocyclic monoterpenes, and strain 58Eu the bicyclic eucalyptol and monocyclic monoterpene alkenes. The fatty acid composition of the strains indicated an allocation to the rRNA group III of pseudomonads. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that the new isolates can be assigned as members of the genus Thauera within the beta subclass of Proteobacteria. DNA-DNA hybridisation studies indicated a relateness of 68.5% between strains 21Mol and 58Eu which shared 36.0% and 40.6% DNA similarity with strain 47Lol. The strains are described as new species belonging to the genus Thauera, strain 47Lol (DSM 12138T) as T. linaloolentis sp. nov. and strains 21Mol and 58Eu as T. terpenica sp. nov. with strain 58Eu (DSM 12139T) as type strain.

S. Foss; J. Harder

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Coupled with High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a commercially available autosampler was adapted to perform direct liquid microjunction (LMJ) surface sampling followed by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of the extract components and detection with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). To illustrate the utility of coupling a separation with this direct liquid extraction based surface sampling approach, four different organs (brain, lung, kidney, and liver) from whole-body thin tissue sections of propranolol dosed and control mice were examined. The parent drug was observed in the chromatograms of the surface sampling extracts from all the organs of the dosed mouse examined. In addition, two isomeric phase II metabolites of propranolol (an aliphatic and an aromatic hydroxypropranolol glucuronide) were observed in the chromatograms of the extracts from lung, kidney, and liver. Confirming the presence of one or the other or both of these glucuronides in the extract from the various organs was not possible without the separation. These drug and metabolite data obtained using the LMJ surface sampling/HPLC-MS method and the results achieved by analyzing similar samples by conventional extraction of the tissues and subsequent HPLC-MS analysis were consistent.

Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF)] [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL] [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France] [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada] [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A replacement solvent cleaner/degreaser study at Duffy Electric and Machine Company  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duffy Electric & Machine Company repairs and rebuilds electric motors. The company overhauls large electric motors (AC and DC with greater than 15 hp output). The company also overhauls small electric motors. The process involves gross cleaning of electromechanical devices to achieve a level of cleanliness that facilitates inspection, repair, and testing. The cleaner used in this study, Petroferm BIOACT{trademark} 285, was selected because it is representative of its class of material. BIOACT{trademark} is a mixture of high molecular-weight aliphatic esters and can be categorized as a semi-aqueous fluid. The cleaner is meant to be used without dilution and must be rinsed with alcohol, such as IPA, rather than with water. The alcohol is a technical grade that is at least 98% IPA, with the remainder being water. The IPA rinse is completely miscible with the ester solvent. The IPA evaporates rapidly due to its high vapor pressure (3 mm Hg @ 68{degrees}F).This report describes the performance of the ester and alcohol cleansers with regard to pollution abatement and health hazards as well as cleaning performance.

Springer, J. Jr. [Risk Reduction Engineering Lab., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sass, B. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development of a Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous Separation of Strontium and Cesium from Acidic Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synergistic extraction solvent for the simultaneous removal of cesium and strontium from acidic solutions has been investigated. The extraction solvent consists of, 4,4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), and 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB modifier) in a branched aliphatic kerosene (Isopar® L). Extraction synergy for strontium was observed when DtBuCH18C6 was combined with the BOBCalixC6 cesium extractant solvent and Cs-7SB modifier or if the Cs-7SB modifier was substituted into the SREX (Strontium Extraction) solvent in place of TBP. The novel process extracted both cesium and strontium simultaneously from 1 M nitric acid solutions with distribution ratios of 8.8 and 7.7 for strontium and cesium, respectively, at ambient temperature. Distribution coefficients for cesium and strontium as a function of nitric acid concentration and temperature were also obtained with 0.5 M<[HNO3]<2.5 M giving favorable distribution ratios. This new process utilizing the combined solvent has been named the Fission Product Extraction Process (FPEX).

Catherine L. Riddle; John D. Baker; Jack D. Law; Christopher A. McGrath; David H. Meikrantz; Bruce J. Mincher; Dean R. Peterman; Terry A. Todd

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: A review of current understanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: (1) polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides; (2) carbamate and organophosphorus; (3) herbicides; (4) phenols; (5) halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (6) phthalate esters; (7) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and (8) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Process that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate process are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the US are discussed. 699 refs., 26 figs., 47 tabs.

Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, P.J.; Fusillo, T.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

Park, Sang-Woo [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Cheol-Hyeon, E-mail: jangch@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Microscopic measurement of the linear compressibilities of two-dimensional fatty acid mesophases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The linear compressibility of two-dimensional fatty acid mesophases has determined by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. Surface pressure vs molecular area isotherms were reconstructed from these measurements, and the linear compressibility (relative distortion along a given direction for isotropic applied stress) was determined both in the sample plane and in a plane normal to the aliphatic chain director (transverse plane). The linear compressibilities range over two orders of magnitude from 0.1 to 10 m/N and are distributed depending on their magnitude in 4 different sets which we are able to associate with different molecular mechanisms. The largest compressibilities (10m/N) are observed in the tilted phases. They are apparently independent of the chain length and could be related to the reorganization of the headgroup hydrogen-bounded network, whose role should be revalued. Intermediate compressibilities are observed in phases with quasi long-range order (directions normal to the molecular tilt in L_2 or L_2' phases, S phase), and could be related to the ordering of these phases. The lowest compressibilities are observed in the solid untilted CS phase and for 1 direction of the S and L_2'' phases. They are similar to the compressibility of crystalline polymers and correspond to the interactions between methyl groups in the crystal. Finally, negative compressibilities are observed in the transverse plane for L_2' and L_2'' phases and can be traced to subtle reorganizations upon untilting.

C. Fradin; J. Daillant; A. Braslau; D. Luzet; M. Alba; M. Goldmann

1997-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Metal catalyzed synthesis of hyperbranched ethylene and/or .alpha.-olefin polymers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Oily hyperbranched polymers derived from ethylene, propylene, butene and/or a C.sub.5 -C.sub.24 .alpha.-olefin, and a method for their synthesis, are disclosed. The polymers have non-regular microstructures and are characterized by a ratio ({character pullout})of methyl hydrogens centered around 0.85 ppm on the 1H-NMR spectra of the polymers relative to total aliphatic hydrogens of from about 0.40 to about 0.65 for polymers derived from ethylene or butene, and a ratio ({character pullout})of from greater than 0.50 to about 0.65 for polymers derived from propylene. A method for grafting hyperbranched polymers derived from ethylene, propylene, butene and/or a C.sub.5 -C.sub.24 .alpha.-olefin onto aromatic rings in organic molecules and polymers, and the resulting grafted materials, are also disclosed. The hyperbranched polymers and grafted materials are useful, for example, as lubricants and lubricant additives.

Sen, Ayusman (State College, PA); Kim, Jang Sub (State College, PA); Pawlow, James H. (Gainesville, FL); Murtuza, Shahid (State College, PA); Kacker, Smita (Annandale, NJ); Wojcinski, III, Louis M. (State College, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Internal Molecular Potential Between the Substituent Groups in a Benzene Ring as Derived from the Heats of Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that differences in the observed heats of combustion of isomeric benzene derivatives can be interpreted as the internal molecular potential existing between their substituent groups. A like interpretation can be given for the differences between the values observed for the heats of combustion of certain nonisomeric benzene derivatives and those calculated by the rule of additivity. This internal potential, to which the attractive and repulsive forces between the groups are due, results from the electrostatic potential of the group moments (dipole effect), the polarization of the substituents and of the ring (induction effect), the dispersion effect, and from steric hindrance. We have, therefore, a new and direct method of measuring the internal potential, which determines both the internal motion of groups within an organic molecule and its most stable configuration. The values thus measured are in good agreement with values theoretically evaluated from the above intermolecular (van der Waals) forces. From the data derived by this method we conclude in the case of o-xylene that valence angles of 120° between the C—CH3 bond and the aromatic C—C bonds are extremely stable, for the energy required to distort these angles through 10° is greater than 2 K cal/mole. We find, also, very restricted rotation for the butane molecule, from which it follows that saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons in the gaseous state tend to form zigzag chains. Such restricted rotation is found for the ether molecule as well.

H. A. Stuart

1931-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process. Peroxide formation of dimethyl ether in methanol mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic peroxides could form when dimethyl ether in methanol is stored for three to six months at a time. The objective of this work was to determine the level of peroxide formation from dimethyl ether in reagent grade methanol and raw methanol at room temperature under 3 atmospheres (45 psig) of air. Raw methanol is methanol made from syngas by the LPMEOH Process without distillation. Aliphatic ethers tend to react slowly with oxygen from the air to form unstable peroxides. However, there are no reports on peroxide formation from dimethyl ether. After 172 days of testing, dimethyl ether in either reagent methanol or raw methanol at room temperature and under 60--70 psig pressure of air does not form detectable peroxides. Lack of detectable peroxides suggests that dimethyl ether or dimethyl ether and methanol may be stored at ambient conditions. Since the compositions of {approximately} 1.3 mol% or {approximately} 4.5 mol% dimethyl ether in methanol do not form peroxides, these compositions can be considered for diesel fuel or an atmospheric turbine fuel, respectively.

Waller, F.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

Tabak, S.A. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States). Central Research Lab.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Classes of compounds responsible for mutagenic and cytotoxic activity in tars and oils formed during low BTU gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI), in cooperation with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), has completed toxicity screening of vapors, liquids and solids formed during operation of an experimental pressurized, stirred-bed, coal gasifier at METC. Vapors collected from the cooled process stream on Tenax resins had no mutagenic activity in the Ames Salmonella assay. Dichloromethane extracts of liquids and solids collected from the effluent or process streams were fractionated by gel chromatography into fractions containing mostly aliphatic compounds; neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); polar (PAH) and heterocyclic compounds; and salts. The polar fraction was partitioned into acids, bases, water soluble compounds and phenols. Bacterial mutagenic activity was highest in the basic fraction with additional activity in the neutral PAHs. Highest cytotoxicity toward both the bacteria and canine alveolar macrophages was in the phenolic fraction. Treatment of the gasifier tars by nitrosation or by acetylation to remove primary aromatic amines (PAA) reduced the bacterial mutagenicity by 50-60%, indicating that some, but not all, of the mutagenicity was due to PAA.

Henderson, R.F.; Bechtold, W.F.; Benson, J.M.; Newton, G.J.; Hanson, R.L.; Brooks, A.L.; Dutcher, J.S.; Royer, R.E.; Hobbs, C.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

Process for hydrocracking carbonaceous material in liquid carrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Solid carbonaceous material is hydrocracked to provide aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons for use as gaseous and liquid fuels or chemical feed stock. Particulate carbonaceous material such as coal in slurry with recycled product oil is preheated in liquid state to a temperature of 600.degree.-1200.degree. F. in the presence of hydrogen gas. The product oil acts as a sorbing agent for the agglomerating bitumins to minimize caking within the process. In the hydrocracking reactor, the slurry of oil and carbonaceous particles is heated within a tubular passageway to vaporize the oil and form a gas-solid mixture which is further heated to a hydropyrolysis temperature in excess of 1200.degree. F. The gas-solid mixture is quenched by contact with additional oil to condense normally liquid hydrocarbons for separation from the gases. A fraction of the hydrocarbon liquid product is recycled for quenching and slurrying with the carbonaceous feed. Hydrogen is recovered from the gas for recycle and additional hydrogen is produced by gasification of residual char.

Duncan, Dennis A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Synthetic Resilin Is Largely Unstructured  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proresilin is the precursor protein for resilin, an extremely elastic, hydrated, cross-linked insoluble protein found in insects. We investigated the secondary-structure distribution in solution of a synthetic proresilin (AN16), based on 16 units of the consensus proresilin repeat from Anopheles gambiae. Raman spectroscopy was used to verify that the secondary-structure distributions in cross-linked AN16 resilin and in AN16 proresilin are similar, and hence that solution techniques (such as NMR and circular dichroism) may be used to gain information about the structure of the cross-linked solid. The synthetic proresilin AN16 is an intrinsically unstructured protein, displaying under native conditions many of the characteristics normally observed in denatured proteins. There are no apparent {alpha}-helical or {beta}-sheet features in the NMR spectra, and the majority of backbone protons and carbons exhibit chemical shifts characteristic of random-coil configurations. Relatively few peaks are observed in the nuclear Overhauser effect spectra, indicating that overall the protein is dynamic and unstructured. The radius of gyration of AN16 corresponds to the value expected for a denatured protein of similar chain length. This high degree of disorder is also consistent with observed circular dichroism and Raman spectra. The temperature dependences of the NH proton chemical shifts were also measured. Most values were indicative of protons exposed to water, although smaller dependences were observed for glycine and alanine within the Tyr-Gly-Ala-Pro sequence conserved in all resilins found to date, which is the site of dityrosine cross-link formation. This result implies that these residues are involved in hydrogen bonds, possibly to enable efficient self-association and subsequent cross-linking. The {beta}-spiral model for elastic proteins, where the protein is itself shaped like a spring, is not supported by the results for AN16. Both the random-network elastomer model and the sliding {beta}-turn model are consistent with the data. The results indicate a flat energy landscape for AN16, with very little energy required to switch between conformations. This ease of switching is likely to lead to the extremely low energy loss on deformation of resilin.

Nairn, Kate M.; Lyons, Russell E.; Mulder, Roger J.; Mudie, Stephen T.; Cookson, David J.; Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Kim, Misook; Lau, Deborah; Scholes, Fiona H.; Elvin, Christopher M. (CSIRO/MSE); (CSIRO/MHT); (CSIRO/LI); (Aust. Synch.)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these biomolecular nanomachines must first be folded into a dazzling variety of shapes and forms before they can perform the multitude of functions fundamental to life. However, the mechanisms behind the protein-folding process have remained a foggy mystery. Now the fog is lifting: a team of researchers from Berkeley Lab, Stanford University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has deciphered the crystal structure of a critical control element within chaperonin, the protein complex responsible for the correct folding of other proteins. Chaperonins promote the proper folding of newly translated proteins and proteins that have been stress-denatured-meaning they've lost their structure-by encapsulating them inside a protective chamber formed from two rings of molecular complexes stacked back-to-back. There are two classes of chaperonins, group I found in prokaryotes and group II found in eukaryotes and archaea (organisms with no cell membrane or internal membrane-bound organelles). Much of the basic architecture has been evolutionarily preserved (conserved) across these two classes but they do differ in how the protective chamber is opened to accept proteins and closed to fold them. Whereas group I chaperonins require a detachable ring-shaped molecular lid to open and close the chamber, group II chaperonins have a built-in lid.

371

Molecular architecture of classical cytological landmarks: Centromeres and telomeres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the human telomere repeat and the pericentromeric repeat sequence (GGAAT)n were isolated based on evolutionary conservation. Their isolation was based on the premise that chromosomal features as structurally and functionally important as telomeres and centromeres should be highly conserved. Both sequences were isolated by high stringency screening of a human repetitive DNA library with rodent repetitive DNA. The pHuR library (plasmid Human Repeat) used for this project was enriched for repetitive DNA by using a modification of the standard DNA library preparation method. Usually DNA for a library is cut with restriction enzymes, packaged, infected, and the library is screened. A problem with this approach is that many tandem repeats don`t have any (or many) common restriction sites. Therefore, many of the repeat sequences will not be represented in the library because they are not restricted to a viable length for the vector used. To prepare the pHuR library, human DNA was mechanically sheared to a small size. These relatively short DNA fragments were denatured and then renatured to C{sub o}t 50. Theoretically only repetitive DNA sequences should renature under C{sub o}t 50 conditions. The single-stranded regions were digested using S1 nuclease, leaving the double-stranded, renatured repeat sequences.

Meyne, J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Improvement of protein stability and enzyme recovery under stress conditions by using a small HSP (tpv-HSP 14.3) from Thermoplasma volcanium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study we cloned and expressed a small heat shock protein, tpv-HSP 14.3, from thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma volcanium. This novel recombinant small heat shock protein was purified to homogeneity and produced a protein band of 14.3 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel. Transmission electron microscopy images of the negatively stained tpv-HSP 14.3 samples showed spherical particles of 13 nm diameter. E. coli cells over expressing tpv-HSP 14.3 endowed the cells with some degree of thermotolerance. After exposure to 52 °C for 120 min, survivability of the E. coli cells expressing tpv-HSP 14.3 was approximately 2.5-fold higher than the control cells. As a molecular chaperone tpv-HSP 14.3 enhanced the thermal stabilization of substrate proteins, pig heart citrate synthase and bovine l-glutamic dehdyrogenase, considerably. The highest protection effect of tpv-HSP 14.3 was observed at 47 °C for pig heart citrate synthase; the remaining activity was 5-fold higher than that of the sample without tpv-HSP 14.3. The tpv-sHSP 14.3 prevented inactivation of bovine l-glutamic dehdyrogenase the most effectively at 53 °C; the residual activity was approximately 2-fold higher than that of the sample heated without tpv-HSP 14.3. However, refolding activity of the tpv-HSP 14.3 was relatively weak for the chemically denatured substrate proteins.

Semra Kocab?y?k; Sema Aygar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Characterization of the MVST waste tanks located at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the fall of 1996 there was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns of the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report only discusses the analytical characterization data for the MVST waste tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report support the position that fissile isotopes of uranium and plutonium were ``denatured`` as required by administrative controls. In general, MVST sludge was found to be both hazardous by RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well about the limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the MVST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat, were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Initiation of glycogen biosynthesis in rat heart. Studies with a purified preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two fractions of glycogen synthase were isolated from rat cardiac muscle on the basis of a different affinity for DEAE-cellulose and omega-aminobutyl-agarose. One of these fractions was able to transfer glucosyl residues from UDP-glucose not only to glycogen (GS-1 activity) but also to an endogenous acceptor. The latter reaction (GS-2 activity) occurred in the absence of added glycogen, and its reaction product was insoluble in trichloroacetic acid. This compound was degraded by amylolytic enzymes, thus showing that the product synthesized on the endogenous acceptor was an alpha 1,4-glucan. After incubation with alpha-amylase-free proteolytic enzyme, the compound was rendered trichloroacetic acid-soluble. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, under both native and denaturing conditions, showed that GS-2 reaction products moved electrophoretically associated to protein. The results give further evidence for the association between an alpha 1,4-glucan and protein, which the authors postulate is related to the initiation of glycogen biosynthesis.

Blumenfeld, M.L.; Krisman, C.R.

1985-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project demonstrated the technical viability of pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters, as well as the input fuel flexibility of the PSOFC. PSOFC operation was demonstrated on natural gas and denatured ethanol. The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project goals were to acquire, site, and demonstrate the technical viability of a pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters. Additional goals included educating local permit approval authorities, and other governmental entities about PSOFC technology, existing fuel cell standards and specific code requirements. The project demonstrated the Bloom Energy (BE) PSOFC technology in grid parallel mode, delivering a minimum 15 kW over 8760 operational hours. The PSOFC system demonstrated greater than 81% electricity availability and 41% electrical efficiency (LHV net AC), providing reliable, stable power to a critical, sensitive 911 communications system that serves geographical boundaries of the entire Santa Clara County. The project also demonstrated input fuel flexibility. BE developed and demonstrated the capability to run its prototype PSOFC system on ethanol. BE designed the hardware necessary to deliver ethanol into its existing PSOFC system. Operational parameters were determined for running the system on ethanol, natural gas (NG), and a combination of both. Required modeling was performed to determine viable operational regimes and regimes where coking could occur.

Fred Mitlitsky; Sara Mulhauser; David Chien; Deepak Shukla; David Weingaertner

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Changes in Rhodospirillum rubrum cytochrome c/sub 2/ and subsequent renaturation: An /sup 15/N NMR study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The /sup 15/N-enriched ferrocytochrome c/sub 2/from Rhodospirillum rubrum was studied by /sup 15/N NMR at different solvent pH values. The mobility and chemical shift to the N-terminal glutamic acid (335.4 ppm at pH 5.1) were found to depend on pH. It was least mobile between pH 8 and 9.0, which is explained in terms of pH-dependent conformational changes and formation of salt linkages and/or hydrogen bonds. The resonances of the lysine side chains are centered around 341.7 ppm at low pH and move upfield with pH by about 8.4 ppm with pH/sub a/ values of 10.8. The exchange rates of the epsilonNH protons are lowest near the pK/sub a/ values. The protein is very stable in the pH range between 4.9 and 10.0 but unfolds abruptly at pH 10.5-11. Denaturation was verified by the measurement of several parameters by NMR. The renaturation of the protein demonstrates that the folding begins with reformation of home coordination and establishment of a hydrophobic core, followed by positioning of side chains and peptide backbones linking the nucleation centers. The repositioning processes had time scales of minutes to hours in contrast to the reported values of seconds in some studies.

Yu, L.P.; Smith, G.M.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Removal of phenols from acidic environment by horseradish peroxidase (HRP): Aqueous thermostabilization of HRP by polysaccharide additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The bio-productive property of combinatorial polysaccharide additives (dextran and sodium alginate) on stability of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for removal of phenols from acidic solutions was studied in this paper. The optimum pH range and temperature were determined for the stabilized enzyme as 3.6–5.4 and 65 °C, respectively. Enzyme stabilization experiments were conducted in the solution state without enzyme immobilization or encapsulation. The combinatorial polysaccharides were selected to construct an appropriate response surface methodology (RSM) for maximum HRP stabilization together with sodium acetate buffer to optimize the polysaccharide additives. The RSM results suggest 10.08% of dextran, 0.41% of sodium alginate and 64 mM sodium acetate buffer for maximum HRP stabilization at 65 °C with a predicted percentage residual activity of 60.01%. DSC results corroborated that the denaturation temperature (TD) values of stabilized HRP to be 30 °C higher than that of the native enzyme. The effect of pH on phenol removal for both native and stabilized HRP suggested that stabilized HRP exhibited high phenol removal activities even under acidic environment and successfully removed phenols.

Ellappan Kalaiarasan; Thayumanavan Palvannan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Membrane associated phospholipase C from bovine brain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cytosolic fractions of bovine brain contain 2 immunologically distinct phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase (PLC), PLC-I and PLC-II, whose MW are 150,000 and 145,000 respectively, under a denaturing condition. Monoclonal antibodies were derived against each form and specific radioimmunoassays were developed. Distribution of PLC-I and PLC-II in cytosolic and particulate fractions was measured using the radioimmunoassay. More than 90% of PLC-II was found in the cytosolic fraction, while the anti-PLC-I antibody cross-reacting protein was distributed nearly equally between the soluble fraction and the 2 M KCl extract of particulate fraction. The PLC enzyme in the particulate fraction was purified to homogeneity, yielding 2 proteins of 140 KDa and 150 KDa when analyzed on SDS-PAGE. Neither of the 2 enzymes cross-reacted with anti-PLC-II antibodies, but both could be immunoblotted by all 4 different anti-PLC-I antibodies. This suggests that the 140 KDa PLC was derived from the 150 KDa form. The 150 Kda form from particulate fraction was indistinguishable from the cytosolic PLC-I when their mixture was analyzed on SDS-PAGE. In addition, the elution profile of tryptic peptides derived from the 150 KDa particulate form was identical to that of cytosolic PLC-I. This result indicates that PLC-I is reversibly associated to membranes.

Lee, K.; Ryu, S.H.; Suh, P.; Choi, W.C.; Rhee, S.G.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The potential of glycerol in freezing preservation of turbine oil-degrading bacterial consortium and the ability of the revised consortium to degrade petroleum wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The turbine oil (TuO)-degrading bacterial consortium Tank-2 (original Tank-2) was preserved as a glycerol stock at ?80 °C from 2009 to 2012. Storage methods have been unavailable so far for any TuO-degrading bacterial consortia or isolates. To evaluate the usefulness of glycerol stock, the original Tank-2 consortium frozen in glycerol at ?80 °C was thawed and then revived by repeated culture in mineral salts medium (MSM) containing 0.5% (w/w) TuO (revived Tank-2). The revived Tank-2 consortium exhibited a high activity to degrade TuO, which was equivalent to that of original Tank-2. It also degraded car engine oil, used car engine oil, Arabian light and Vityaz crude oils and TuO in wastewater. These results indicated that a glycerol stock at ?80 °C was useful for storing Tank-2. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) that targeted the V3 regions of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the DGGE band profiles of principal bacteria were significantly different between the original and revived Tank-2 consortia and between the revived Tank-2 culture grown in MSM containing TuO and that grown in MSM containing other types of petroleum products. This suggested that bacterial strains inherently residing in Tank-2 could adjust their compositions based on the storage and culture conditions.

Kumiko Kurachi; Reia Hosokawa; Marina Takahashi; Hidetoshi Okuyama

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Renewal sequences, disordered potentials, and pinning phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give an overview of the state of the art of the analysis of disordered models of pinning on a defect line. This class of models includes a number of well known and much studied systems (like polymer pinning on a defect line, wetting of interfaces on a disordered substrate and the Poland-Scheraga model of DNA denaturation). A remarkable aspect is that, in absence of disorder, all the models in this class are exactly solvable and they display a localization-delocalization transition that one understands in full detail. Moreover the behavior of such systems near criticality is controlled by a parameter and one observes, by tuning the parameter, the full spectrum of critical behaviors, ranging from first order to infinite order transitions. This is therefore an ideal set-up in which to address the question of the effect of disorder on the phase transition,notably on critical properties. We will review recent results that show that the physical prediction that goes under the name of Harris criterion is indeed fully correct for pinning models. Beyond summarizing the results, we will sketch most of the arguments of proof.

Giambattista Giacomin

2008-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Relationship between rubisco sulfhydryl content and relative sensitivity of potato cultivars to ozone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ozone (O{sub 3}) induced a reduction in quantity of rubisco in potato foliage. In vitro, O{sub 3} predisposed purified rubisco to elevated proteolysis; reagents which protected sulfhydryl (SH) groups suppressed this effect. We hypothesized that rubisco SH content correlated directly with foliar O{sub 3} sensitivity. Rubisco was purified from Solanum tuberosum L. O{sub 3}-tolerant cv. Superior (SP) and Norgold Russet (NR), and O{sub 3}-susceptible cv. Norland (NL) and Cherokee (CK). When native rubisco was titrated with DTNB, protein of NL contained 1.33 and 1.26 times more SH groups than SP and NR, respectively. Rubisco from CK also contained more SH groups than SP and NR, but the difference was not significant. Rubisco of SP, NR and CK denatured by SDS exhibited identical number of SH groups, however, NL exhibited 1.15 times more SH groups. The greater number of SH groups in rubisco from NL versus SP and NR may explain its relative sensitivity to ozone. The role of SH groups in ozone-sensitivity of CK will require further study.

Enyedi, A.J.; Pell, E.J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A turbine oil-degrading bacterial consortium from soils of oil fields and its characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microbial consortium capable of degrading turbine oil (TuO), which consisted mainly of recalcitrant cycloalkanes and isoalkanes, was obtained from a soil sample collected from oil fields using repeated enrichment. When this consortium, named Atsuta A, was cultured in minimal salts medium containing 0.5% (w/v) TuO, it degraded 90% of TuO at 30 °C and pH 7 over 5 days. Although nine bacterial strains were isolated from the Atsuta A consortium, TuO degradation by the individual isolates and by a mixture of them was negligible. The community structure of the consortium, which was investigated by PCR–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes, changed significantly during the degradation of TuO. Four major bands (F, K, N and T) out of at least 23 DGGE bands significantly increased in intensity over time during incubation. The DGGE bands F, K and N corresponded to those of previously isolated species. However, DGGE band T did not correspond to any isolated strain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence collected from band T was 98% homologous to that of an unculturable strain belonging to the ?-Proteobacteria. The degradation of TuO in the consortium may occur by cooperation between the unculturable species corresponding to band T and other strains in the consortium, including species corresponding to bands F, K and N.

Hitoshi Ito; Reia Hosokawa; Masaaki Morikawa; Hidetoshi Okuyama

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Method for introducing unidirectional nested deletions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

Dunn, John J. (Bellport, NY); Quesada, Mark A. (Middle Island, NY); Randesi, Matthew (Upton, NY)

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

384

Method for introducing unidirectional nested deletions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector. The cloning vector has an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe. 1 fig.

Dunn, J.J.; Quesada, M.A.; Randesi, M.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

Dunn, John J. (Bellport, NY); Quesada, Mark A. (Middle Island, NY); Randesi, Matthew (Upton, NY)

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

386

Protein Folding and Assembly  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to carry out their biological functions, most polypeptide chains must fold into stable three-dimensional structures, for it is the precise spatial distribution of chemical groups within a protein that gives the molecule its ability to interact specifically with other molecules and, in the case of an enzyme, catalyze a chemical reaction. In many cases, individual polypeptide chains must also assemble into larger structures containing additional proteins or nucleic acids. The folding of many proteins is reversible, so that the native structure can be disrupted by a change in temperature or addition of a chemical denaturant, and the unfolded protein can then be induced to refold and assemble by returning it to physiological conditions. Experiments of this type demonstrate that the information specifying the native structure of a protein resides in its amino acid sequence, and in vitro studies have provided important insights into the energetic factors that drive folding and assembly and the kinetic mechanisms of these processes. Folding in vivo is often facilitated by transient interactions with other proteins, molecular chaperones. Folding may also compete with the formation of aberrant aggregates in vivo, sometimes leading to pathological conditions such as amyloid diseases.

D.P. Goldenberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Protein folding by a quasi-static-like process: A first-order state transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we report that quasi-static-like processes, in which stable intermediates were introduced carefully and deliberately, may be used to reversibly unfold and refold purified native porcine growth hormone. Through circular dichroism (CD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), we were able to study the secondary structure conformational changes, tertiary structure thermal stabilities, and the particle size distributions of both the intermediates and the final folded product. The CD data showed that the secondary structure was restored in the initial folding stage, whereas the tertiary structure within the protein was restored one step before the last folding stage, as elucidated by thermal stability experiments. DLS analysis suggested that the average hydrodynamic radii of the folding intermediates shrunk to nativelike size immediately after the first folding stage. Our data suggested that the denaturant-containing protein folding reaction is a first-order-like state transition process. This quasi-static-like process may be useful in the prevention of aggregate formation in protein purification and thus can be used in protein engineering to improve the overall yield from harvesting proteins.

Chia-Ching Chang; Ya-Chi Su; Ming-Sung Cheng; Lou-Sing Kan

2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

388

What drives amyloid molecules to assemble into oligomers and fibrils?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a general theory for three states of equilibrium of amyloid peptides: the monomer, oligomer, and fibril. We assume that the oligomeric state is a disordered micelle-like collection of a few peptide chains held together loosely by hydrophobic interactions into a spherical hydrophobic core. We assume that fibrillar amyloid chains are aligned and further stabilized by `steric zipper' interactions -- hydrogen bonding and steric packing, in addition to specific hydrophobic sidechain contacts. The model makes a broad set of predictions, consistent with experiments: (i) Similar to surfactant micellization, amyloid oligomerization should increase with bulk peptide concentration. (ii) The onset of fibrillization limits the concentration of oligomers in the solution. (iii) The average fibril length \\emph{vs.} monomer concentration agrees with data on $\\alpha$-synuclein, (iv) Full fibril length distributions follow those of $\\alpha$-synuclein, (v) Denaturants should `melt out' fibrils, and (vi) Added salt should stabilize fibrils by reducing repulsions between amyloid peptide chains. Interestingly, small changes in solvent conditions can: (a) tip the equilibrium balance between oligomer and fibril, and (b) cause large changes in rates, through effects on the transition-state barrier. This model may provide useful insights into the physical processes underlying amyloid diseases.

Jeremy Schmit; Kingshuk Ghosh; Ken Dill

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

389

Structural and thermodynamic insight into phenylalanine hydroxylase from the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Phenylalanine hydroxylase from Legionella pneumophila (lpPAH) has a major functional role in the synthesis of the pigment pyomelanin, which is a potential virulence factor. We present here the crystal structure of lpPAH, which is a dimeric enzyme that shows high thermostability, with a midpoint denaturation temperature of 79 °C, and low substrate affinity. The structure revealed a dimerization motif that includes ionic interactions and a hydrophobic core, composed of both ?-structure and a C-terminal region, with the specific residues (P255, P256, Y257 and F258) interacting with the same residues from the adjacent subunit within the dimer. This unique dimerization interface, together with a number of aromatic clusters, appears to contribute to the high thermal stability of lpPAH. The crystal structure also explains the increased aggregation of the enzyme in the presence of salt. Moreover, the low affinity for substrate l-Phe could be explained from three consecutive glycine residues (G181, 182, 183) located at the substrate-binding site. This is the first structure of a dimeric bacterial PAH and provides a framework for interpreting the molecular and kinetic properties of lpPAH and for further investigating the regulation of the enzyme.

Hanna-Kirsti S. Leiros; Marte Innselset Flydal; Aurora Martinez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Removal of bisphenol A (BPA) in a nitrifying system with immobilized biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The potential for bisphenol A (BPA) removal by mixed consortia of immobilized microorganisms with high nitrification activity was investigated with BPA concentrations in the influent from 2.5 to 10.0 mg/L. The presence of BPA limited ammonium oxidation; nitrification efficiency decreased from 91.2 ± 1.3% in the control series to 47.4 ± 9.4% when BPA concentration in wastewater was the highest. The efficiency of BPA removal rose from 87.1 ± 5.5% to 92.9 ± 2.9% with increased BPA concentration in the influent. Measurement of oxygen uptake rates by biomass exposed to BPA showed that BPA was mainly removed by heterotrophic bacteria. A strong negative correlation between the BPA removal efficiency and nitrification efficiency indicated the limited contribution of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to BPA biodegradation. Exposure of biomass to BPA changed the quantity and diversity of AOB in the biomass as shown by real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

Magdalena Zieli?ska; Agnieszka Cydzik-Kwiatkowska; Katarzyna Bernat; Katarzyna Bu?kowska; Irena Wojnowska-Bary?a

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The effect of magnesium ions on dielectric relaxation in semidilute DNA aqueous solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of magnesium ion Mg2+ on the dielectric relaxation of semidilute DNA aqueous solutions has been studied by means of dielectric spectroscopy. Two dielectric relaxations in the 100 Hz - 100 MHz frequency range, originating in the motion of DNA counterions, were probed as a function of DNA and Mg2+ ion concentration in added MgCl2 salt. The high-frequency mode in the MHz range, stemming from the structural organization of the DNA network, reveals de Gennes-Pfeuty-Dobrynin correlation length as the pertinent fundamental length scale for sufficiently low concentration of added salt. No relaxation fingerprint of DNA denaturation bubbles, leading to exposed hydrophobic core scaling, was detected at low DNA concentrations, thus indicating an increased stability of the double-stranded conformation as compared to the case of DNA solutions with univalent counterions. The presence of Mg2+ does not change qualitatively the low frequency mode in the kHz range correlated with single DNA conformational properties....

Grgi?in, Danijel; Ivek, Tomislav; Tomi?, Silvia; Podgornik, Rudi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Solvent Sensitivity of Protein Unfolding: Study of Chicken Villin Headpiece Subdomain in Water-Ethanol and Water-DMSO Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work we study and compare unfolding of a small protein, chicken villin headpiece (HP-36) in two different aqueous binary mixtures, namely water-ethanol (EtOH) and water-dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO). In both the binary mixtures, HP-36 is found to unfold (fully or partially, depending on the mixture) under ambient conditions, that otherwise requires temperature as high as ~600 K to denature in pure aqueous solvent. In all the cases, first step of unfolding is found to be similar, i.e. separation of the cluster formed by three hydrophobic (phenylalanine) residues, namely Phe-7, Phe-11 and Phe-18, which constitute the hydrophobic core, thereby initiating melting of helix-2 of the protein. Subsequent unfolding steps follow different paths in different chemical environments. As both water-DMSO and water-ethanol show composition dependent anomalies, so do the details of unfolding dynamics. With an increase of co-solvent concentration different partially unfolded intermediates are found to be formed in b...

Ghosh, Rikhia; Bagchi, Biman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The HPr Proteins from the Thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus Can Form Domain-swapped Dimers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of proteins from extremophilic organisms continues to generate interest in the field of protein folding because paradigms explaining the enhanced stability of these proteins still elude us and such studies have the potential to further our knowledge of the forces stabilizing proteins. We have undertaken such a study with our model protein HPr from a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, and a thermophile, Bacillus stearothermophilus. We report here the high-resolution structures of the wild-type HPr protein from the thermophile and a variant, F29W. The variant proved to crystallize in two forms: a monomeric form with a structure very similar to the wild-type protein as well as a domain-swapped dimer. Interestingly, the structure of the domain-swapped dimer for HPr is very different from that observed for a homologous protein, Crh, from B. subtilis. The existence of a domain-swapped dimer has implications for amyloid formation and is consistent with recent results showing that the HPr proteins can form amyloid fibrils. We also characterized the conformational stability of the thermophilic HPr proteins using thermal and solvent denaturation methods and have used the high-resolution structures in an attempt to explain the differences in stability between the different HPr proteins. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the solution properties of the HPr proteins using a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods.

Sridharan, Sudharsan; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Sacchettini, James C. (TAM)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

A zinc complex of heparan sulfate destabilises lysozyme and alters its conformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-heparan sulfate complex destabilises lysozyme, a model amyloid protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Addition of zinc, without heparan sulfate, stabilises lysozyme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heparan sulfate cation complexes provide alternative protein folding routes. -- Abstract: The naturally occurring anionic cell surface polysaccharide heparan sulfate is involved in key biological activities and is implicated in amyloid formation. Following addition of Zn-heparan sulfate, hen lysozyme, a model amyloid forming protein, resembled {beta}-rich amyloid by far UV circular dichroism (increased {beta}-sheet: +25%), with a significantly reduced melting temperature (from 68 to 58 Degree-Sign C) by fluorescence shift assay. Secondary structure stability of the Zn-heparan sulfate complex with lysozyme was also distinct from that with heparan sulfate, under stronger denaturation conditions using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism. Changing the cation associated with heparan sulfate is sufficient to alter the conformation and stability of complexes formed between heparan sulfate and lysozyme, substantially reducing the stability of the protein. Complexes of heparan sulfate and cations, such as Zn, which are abundant in the brain, may provide alternative folding routes for proteins.

Hughes, Ashley J. [Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom) [Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Hussain, Rohanah [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)] [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Cosentino, Cesare; Guerrini, Marco [Istituto di Chimica e Biochimica 'G. Ronzoni', Via G. Colombo 81, Milano 20133 (Italy)] [Istituto di Chimica e Biochimica 'G. Ronzoni', Via G. Colombo 81, Milano 20133 (Italy); Siligardi, Giuliano [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)] [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Yates, Edwin A., E-mail: eayates@liv.ac.uk [Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Rudd, Timothy R., E-mail: trudd@liv.ac.uk [Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Istituto di Chimica e Biochimica 'G. Ronzoni', Via G. Colombo 81, Milano 20133 (Italy)

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

Mechanism and kinetics of peptide partitioning into membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partitioning properties of transmembrane (TM) polypeptide segments directly determine membrane protein folding, stability, and function, and their understanding is vital for rational design of membrane active peptides. However, direct determination of water-to-bilayer transfer of TM peptides has proved difficult. Experimentally, sufficiently hydrophobic peptides tend to aggregate, while atomistic computer simulations at physiological temperatures cannot yet reach the long time scales required to capture partitioning. Elevating temperatures to accelerate the dynamics has been avoided, as this was thought to lead to rapid denaturing. However, we show here that model TM peptides (WALP) are exceptionally thermostable. Circular dichroism experiments reveal that the peptides remain inserted into the lipid bilayer and are fully helical, even at 90 C. At these temperatures, sampling is 50 500 times faster, sufficient to directly simulate spontaneous partitioning at atomic resolution. A folded insertion pathway is observed, consistent with three-stage partitioning theory. Elevated temperature simulation ensembles further allow the direct calculation of the insertion kinetics, which is found to be first-order for all systems. Insertion barriers are Hin = 15 kcal/mol for a general hydrophobic peptide and 23 kcal/mol for the tryptophan-flanked WALP peptides. The corresponding insertion times at room temperature range from 8.5 s to 163 ms. High-temperature simulations of experimentally validated thermostable systems suggest a new avenue for systematic exploration of peptide partitioning properties.

Ulmschneider, Martin [University of Oxford; Killian, J Antoinette [University of Utrecht; Doux, Jacques P. F. [University of Utrecht; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Ulmschneider, Jakob [University of Heidelberg

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Probing the mechanism of rubredoxin thermal unfolding in the absence of salt bridges by temperature jump experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rubredoxins are the simplest type of iron-sulphur proteins and in recent years they have been used as model systems in protein folding and stability studies, especially the proteins from thermophilic sources. Here, we report our studies on the rubredoxin from the hyperthermophile Methanococcus jannaschii (T {sub opt} = 85 deg C), which was investigated in respect to its thermal unfolding kinetics by temperature jump experiments. Different spectroscopic probes were used to monitor distinct structural protein features during the thermal transition: the integrity of the iron-sulphur centre was monitored by visible absorption spectroscopy, whereas tertiary structure was followed by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and exposure of protein hydrophobic patches was sensed by 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate fluorescence. The studies were performed at acidic pH conditions in which any stabilising contributions from salt bridges are annulled due to protonation of protein side chain groups. In these conditions, M. jannaschii rubredoxin assumes a native-like, albeit more flexible and open conformation, as indicated by a red shift in the tryptophan emission maximum and 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate binding. Temperature jumps were monitored by the three distinct techniques and showed that the protein undergoes thermal denaturation via a simple two step mechanism, as loss of tertiary structure, hydrophobic collapse, and disintegration of the iron-sulphur centre are concomitant processes. The proposed mechanism is framed with the multiphasic one proposed for Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin, showing that a common thermal unfolding mechanism is not observed between these two closely related thermophilic rubredoxins.

Henriques, Barbara J. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Saraiva, Ligia M. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Gomes, Claudio M. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)]. E-mail: gomes@itqb.unl.pt

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

397

Molecular analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in Cipangopaludina chinensis used in aquatic ecological restorations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High pollutant concentrations have led to the breakout of planktonic bloom and the breakdown of the ecosystem in several bodies of water in China. Some restoration projects using constructed wetlands have been enacted to increase the water clarity and rebuild the aquatic ecosystem in these bodies of water. Cipangopaludina chinensis were usually placed to manage the particles and microbes adhering to the surface of the aquatic plants in the wetlands. In the current study, the intestinal bacteria in C. chinensis collected from three restoration projects in Shanghai, China were investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses. The species affiliated to Firmicutes were proven the dominant species in the intestinal bacterial population in C. chinensis. The most dominant phylotypes are closely related to Pseudobutyrivibrio ruminis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Furthermore, significant differences between the intestinal bacterial community constructs and different structures were found in C. chinensis collected from different restoration projects. This information on the intestinal bacteria of C. chinensis is helpful in further understanding the function of these mollusks and in screening for useful bacterial strains.

Kejun Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

41 41 Table 10.3 Fuel Ethanol Overview Feed- stock a Losses and Co- products b Dena- turant c Production d Trade d Stocks d,f Stock Change d,g Consumption d Consump- tion Minus Denaturant h Net Imports e TBtu TBtu Mbbl Mbbl MMgal TBtu Mbbl Mbbl Mbbl Mbbl MMgal TBtu TBtu 1981 Total .................. 13 6 40 1,978 83 7 NA NA NA 1,978 83 7 7 1985 Total .................. 93 42 294 14,693 617 52 NA NA NA 14,693 617 52 51 1990 Total .................. 111 49 356 17,802 748 63 NA NA NA 17,802 748 63 62 1995 Total .................. 198 86 647 32,325 1,358 115 387 2,186 -207 32,919 1,383 117 114 2000 Total .................. 233 99 773 38,627 1,622 138 116 3,400 -624 39,367 1,653 140 137 2001 Total .................. 253 108 841 42,028 1,765 150 315 4,298 898 41,445 1,741 148 144 2002 Total .................. 307 130 1,019 50,956 2,140 182 306 6,200

399

Plasmodium vivax: Collaborative roles for plasmepsin 4 and vivapains in hemoglobin hydrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasmepsins, a family of aspartic proteases of Plasmodium species, are known to participate in a wide variety of cellular processes essential for parasite survival. Therefore, the plasmepsins of malaria parasites have been recognized as attractive antimalarial drug targets. Although the plasmepsins of P. falciparum have been extensively characterized, the plasmepsins of P. vivax are currently not well known. To expand our understanding of the plasmepsins of P. vivax, we characterized plasmepsin 4 of P. vivax (PvPM4). The bacterially expressed recombinant PvPM4 was insoluble, but it was easily refolded into a soluble protein. The processing of PvPM4 into a mature enzyme occurred through autocatalytic activity under acidic conditions in a pepstatin A-sensitive manner, in which process a portion of prodomain was essential for correct folding. PvPM4 could hydrolyze native human hemoglobin at acidic pHs, but preferred denatured hemoglobin as a substrate. PvPM4 acted synergistically with vivapain-2 and vivapain-3, cysteine proteases of P. vivax, in the hydrolysis of hemoglobin. The vivapains also mediated processing of PvPM4 into a mature enzyme. These results collectively suggest that PvPM4 is an active hemoglobinase of P. vivax that works collaboratively with vivapains to enhance the parasite’s ability to hydrolyze hemoglobin.

Sung-Ung Moon; Jung-Mi Kang; Tong-Soo Kim; Yoon Kong; Woon-Mok Sohn; Byoung-Kuk Na

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fractionation of five technical lignins by selective extraction in green solvents and characterisation of isolated fractions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignins from softwood, hardwood, grass and wheat straw were fractionated by selective extraction at ambient temperature using green solvents like acetone/water solutions of 10, 30, 50, 70 and 90% (v/v) acetone and ethyl acetate. A comparison between the isolated fractions and unfractionated lignins was made in terms of extraction yield, lignin solubility factor, molecular weight distribution and functional group composition. Low molecular weight (LMW) lignin fractions with narrow dispersity are obtained by extraction with ethyl acetate and acetone–water solution containing 30% acetone, with yields depending on the type and the functional group content of lignins. A significant amount (56%) of the organosolv hardwood lignin with low molecular weight (Mw = 1868 g/mol) and low dispersity was isolated from ethyl acetate. Insoluble fractions with very high molecular weight (Mw between 10 and 17 kg/mol) are obtained in low yield from acetone–water solutions with 50, 70 and 90% acetone. LMW lignins are in general less condensed and have lower aliphatic hydroxyl content than parent lignins while the HMW fractions have a higher content of condensed hydroxyls. Principal component analysis on the chemical composition of lignins and isolated fractions determined from 31P NMR data showed the high heterogeneity of the technical lignins. Partial least squares models based on FT-IR spectral data were developed to predict the functional group content determined by quantitative 31P NMR analysis of technical lignins and lignin fractions. This approach can be used to develop simple, rapid and accurate analytical tools to monitor and control the selective fractionation of lignin.

Carmen G. Boeriu; Firu?a I. Fi?ig?u; Richard J.A. Gosselink; August E. Frissen; Jan Stoutjesdijk; Francisc Peter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Accurate and Reliable Quantification of Total Microalgal Fuel Potential as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters by in situ Transesterfication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the context of algal biofuels, lipids, or better aliphatic chains of the fatty acids, are perhaps the most important constituents of algal biomass. Accurate quantification of lipids and their respective fuel yield is crucial for comparison of algal strains and growth conditions and for process monitoring. As an alternative to traditional solvent-based lipid extraction procedures, we have developed a robust whole-biomass in situ transesterification procedure for quantification of algal lipids (as fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs) that (a) can be carried out on a small scale (using 4-7 mg of biomass), (b) is applicable to a range of different species, (c) consists of a single-step reaction, (d) is robust over a range of different temperature and time combinations, and (e) tolerant to at least 50% water in the biomass. Unlike gravimetric lipid quantification, which can over- or underestimate the lipid content, whole biomass transesterification reflects the true potential fuel yield of algal biomass. We report here on the comparison of the yield of FAMEs by using different catalysts and catalyst combinations, with the acid catalyst HCl providing a consistently high level of conversion of fatty acids with a precision of 1.9% relative standard deviation. We investigate the influence of reaction time, temperature, and biomass water content on the measured FAME content and profile for 4 different samples of algae (replete and deplete Chlorella vulgaris, replete Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and replete Nannochloropsis sp.). We conclude by demonstrating a full mass balance closure of all fatty acids around a traditional lipid extraction process.

Laurens, L. M. L.; Quinn, M.; Van Wychen, S.; Templeton, D. W.; Wolfrum, E. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Solid state 13C NMR analysis of shales and coals from Laramide Basins. Final report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Western Research Institute (WRI) jointly sponsored research (JSR) project augmented and complemented research conducted by the University of Wyoming Institute For Energy Research for the Gas Research Institute. The project, {open_quotes}A New Innovative Exploitation Strategy for Gas Accumulations Within Pressure Compartments,{close_quotes} was a continuation of a project funded by the GRI Pressure Compartmentalization Program that began in 1990. That project, {open_quotes}Analysis of Pressure Chambers and Seals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana,{close_quotes} characterized a new class of hydrocarbon traps, the discovery of which can provide an impetus to revitalize the domestic petroleum industry. In support of the UW Institute For Energy Research`s program on pressure compartmentalization, solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on sets of shales and coals from different Laramide basins in North America. NMR measurements were made on samples taken from different formations and depths of burial in the Alberta, Bighorn, Denver, San Juan, Washakie, and Wind River basins. The carbon aromaticity determined by NMR was shown to increase with depth of burial and increased maturation. In general, the NMR data were in agreement with other maturational indicators, such as vitrinite reflectance, illite/smectite ratio, and production indices. NMR measurements were also obtained on residues from hydrous pyrolysis experiments on Almond and Lance Formation coals from the Washakie Basin. These data were used in conjunction with mass and elemental balance data to obtain information about the extent of carbon aromatization that occurs during artificial maturation. The data indicated that 41 and 50% of the original aliphatic carbon in the Almond and Lance coals, respectively, aromatized during hydrous pyrolysis.

Miknis, F.P.; Jiao, Z.S.; Zhao, Hanqing; Surdam, R.C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon liquids at high pressures and temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the organic/inorganic interface in the Earth's crust requires values of the thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon species in crude oil, coal, and natural gas at elevated temperatures and pressures. Values of the apparent standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation and the standard partial molal entropies and heat capacities of these organic species can be computed as a function of temperature at 1 bar using the equations of state adopted by Helgeson et al (1991). The pressure dependence of the thermodynamic properties can be calculated from a modified version of the Parameters From Group Contributions (PFGC) equation of state. To improve the accuracy of these predictions, critical evaluation of high-pressure density experiments reported in the literature was used in the present study to characterize b[sub j] as a function of pressure and temperature. The revised PFGC equation of state permits accurate calculation of the standard partial molal volumes of the major hydrocarbon species in the aliphatic, aromatic, and naphthenic fractions of crude oil, as well as fatty acids, phenols, and naphthenic acids at temperatures and pressures to 500 C and 5 kbar. Combining the revised PFGC equation of state and parameters with the standard partial molal properties of these species at one bar and those of aqueous species and minerals permits calculation of the apparent standard partial molal Gibbs Free energies of reaction, and thus equilibrium constants for a wide variety of chemical equilibria among organic liquids, solids, and gases, aqueous species, and minerals at temperatures and pressures characteristic of both diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic processes in the Earth's crust.

Aagaard, P. (Univ. of Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geology); Oelkers, E.H. (Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Geochimie); Helgeson, H.C. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Multisolvent successive extractive refining of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A selected group of commercial solvents, namely, anthracene oil (AO), ethylenediamine (EDA), and liquid paraffin (LP), were used for successive extraction of Assam coal. Hot AO provided a wide range of mixed solvents that dissociate chemically and interact favorably with dissociated and undissociated coal macromolecules (like dissolves like). This resulted in the enhancement of the EDA extractability of the AO-pretreated residual coal. EDA is a good swelling solvent and results in physical dissociation of coal molecules. The residual coal obtained after EDA extraction was subjected to extraction with LP, an H-donor, high-boiling (330--360 C) solvent. LP thermally dissociates coal macromolecules and interacts with the coal at its plastic stage at the free radical pockets. The mechanism and molecular dynamics of the multisolvent successive extraction of Assam coal using AO-EDA-LP solvents are discussed. In early attempts, successive extractions did not modify the extraction yield in the single solvent showing the maximum extraction. However, the AO-EDA-LP extraction resulted in the extraction of 70% coal, more than for any of the individual solvents used. Therefore, AO-EDA-LP extraction of coal affords a process yielding a superclean, high-heating value fuel from coal under milder conditions. Several uses of superclean coal have been recommended. Present studies have revealed a new concept concerning the structure of coal having 30% polyaromatic condensed entangled rings and 70% triaromatic-heterocyclic-naphthenic-aliphatic structure. The insolubility of coal is due to the polyfunctional-heterocyclic-condensed structure having a polyaromatic core with intermacromolecular entanglements.

Sharma, D.K.; Singh, S.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Synthesis of a spheroidal bis-porphyrin: a ligand designed to accept two catalytic metal ions in an isolated environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A spheroidal bis-porphyrin (dual capped quadruply cofacial dimeric tetraphenylporphyrin, 1), designed to be employed as a ligand for a class of catalysts that mimic the combined enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, has been synthesized in 9 steps. C-Alkylation of 2-(2?-lithio-5?-tert-butyldimethylsiloxy-methyl)phenyl-1,3-dioxolane (D) with tetra-bromide 6, prepared from bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-7-ene-2,3,5,6-tetracarboxylic dianhydride by 5 steps, afforded the key intermediate, tetra-alkylated compound 3a, in 68% yield. An alternative route to 3, O-alkylations of tetrol 4 with aliphatic halides 5, was also tested. Conversion of the four protected hydroxy groups to bromo substituents is crucial in the preparation of porphyrin 2. Therefore, tetra-benzyl bromide 24b was prepared and then treated with pyrrole in the presence of boron trifluoride etherate, followed by DDQ oxidation to obtain the capped porphyrin 2. The coupling of two molecules of 2 to form a spheroidal porphyrin 1 was carried out in dilute DMF solution, using 0.8 equivalent of 2-trimethylsilylethane sulfonamide (H2NSO2CH2CH2Si(CH3)3, SES-NH2) and cesium carbonate. The structure of 1 was confirmed by 1H NMR, UV/VIS, FABMS and laser desorption high resolution MS. The two isomers of 1, eclipsed and gauche, formed due to two possible modes of approach of the units of 2, were observed in approximately 1 : 1 ratio by both 1H NMR and HPLC techniques.

Zhang Hong-Yue; Yu Jian-Qiu; Thomas C. Bruice

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The determination of the void structure of microporous coals by small?angle neutron scattering: Void geometry and structure in Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The access of solvents and reactants to the microvoid volume in porous materials such as coal plays an important role in determining the overall chemistry which takes place during a variety of chemical transformations including oxidation combustion and pyrolysis. The structure and surface composition of these voids were studied using small?angle neutron scattering techniques to examine selectively the subset of the overall void volume distribution which comprises the microvoid volume. Powdered Illinois No. 6 coal containing approximately 20% void volume was slurried in several different aqueous and cyclohexane solutions. The solutions used had various hydrogen?to?deuterium ratios in order to contrast match most of the open pore volume thereby making the microvoid volume visible. The microvoid volume observed is characterized as elongated voids having a fairly well?defined diameter and surface composition. The scattering intensity from the microvoid volume shows a well?defined Porod region indicating that the smallest void dimension is resolved by the instrumental configuration employed. A Guinier region exhibiting Q ? 1 behavior which is characteristic of elongated structures is also observed. The average radius of a circular cross section of these voids is found to be 25.4 Å. The microvoids are found to be completely filled by aqueous solutions so that the residual neutron scattering which is not eliminated by the contrast?matching aqueous solution is due to the organic matrix structure. Nonaqueous mixtures of cyclohexane cannot fill the entire microvoid volume as effectively as the aqueous mixtures. The scattering differences observed between the aqueous and nonaqueous filled coal indicates that the surface of the microvoids is predominantly aliphatic in character with the principal compositional variation being the presence or absence of acidic functionality on the surface.

Jon S. Gethner

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Pyrolysis of waste tyres: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of waste tyres produces oil, gas and char, and recovered steel. • Batch, screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed are main reactor types. • Product yields are influenced by reactor type, temperature and heating rate. • Pyrolysis oils are complex and can be used as chemical feedstock or fuel. • Research into higher value products from the tyre pyrolysis process is reviewed. - Abstract: Approximately 1.5 billion tyres are produced each year which will eventually enter the waste stream representing a major potential waste and environmental problem. However, there is growing interest in pyrolysis as a technology to treat tyres to produce valuable oil, char and gas products. The most common reactors used are fixed-bed (batch), screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed. The key influence on the product yield, and gas and oil composition, is the type of reactor used which in turn determines the temperature and heating rate. Tyre pyrolysis oil is chemically very complex containing aliphatic, aromatic, hetero-atom and polar fractions. The fuel characteristics of the tyre oil shows that it is similar to a gas oil or light fuel oil and has been successfully combusted in test furnaces and engines. The main gases produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres are H{sub 2}, C{sub 1}–C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, CO and H{sub 2}S. Upgrading tyre pyrolysis products to high value products has concentrated on char upgrading to higher quality carbon black and to activated carbon. The use of catalysts to upgrade the oil to a aromatic-rich chemical feedstock or the production of hydrogen from waste tyres has also been reported. Examples of commercial and semi-commercial scale tyre pyrolysis systems show that small scale batch reactors and continuous rotary kiln reactors have been developed to commercial scale.

Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ion exchange characteristics of enhanced oil recovery systems (miscibility studies). Sesquiannual report, April 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the period of this report, studies of the hydrotropic properties of organic alkylbenzenesulfonates and particularly of alkylbenzenecarboxylates were extended; the effects of several different alcohols on miscibility between aqueous protosurfactant solutions and aliphatic and aromatic alkanes were investigated; hydrotropic properties of an alicylic carboxylate were determined; the equivalent weight of the organic salts studied was extended into the surfactant range; solubilities of protosurfactants and surfactants in salt solution were measured; and investigations of the adsorption of protosurfactants on minerals as a function of salinity were started. Pseudo three-component representations of hydrocarbon/alcohol/aqueous protosurfactant solutions (constant ratio of organic salt to water) have now been studied extensively, particularly in the case of toluene/1-butanol/aqueous sodium 2,5-diisopropylbenzenesulfonate. Measurements include establishment of the phase behavior in the limiting three-component systems, the effect of protosurfactant concentration in the four-component systems, and determination of the compositions in a limited number of cases of the coexisting phases. In extension of the equivalent weight of organic salts into the recognized surfactant regime, some were found to give miscibiity patterns which appeared to be reasonable extrapolations of the protosurfactants systems and some were quite different. Solubilities of surfactants restrict investigation to compositions having asymmetric boundaries. In these, it appears that protosurfactants are more effective in promoting miscibility than surfactants. Solubilities of organic salts in NaCl solutions, both of protosurfactants and surfactants, decline much more sharply with NaCl concentration than a constant product of the sodium ion concentration times the organic ion concentration would predict.

Ho, P.C.; Kraus, K.A.; Bender, T.M.; Ogden, S.B.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Actinide Lanthanide Separation Process – ALSEP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separation of the minor actinides (Am, Cm) from the lanthanides at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. To increase the safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing, as well as reduce associated costs, a novel solvent extraction process has been developed. The process allows for partitioning minor actinides, lanthanides and fission products following uranium/plutonium/neptunium removal; minimizing the number of separation steps, flowsheets, chemical consumption, and waste. This new process, Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP), uses an organic solvent consisting of a neutral diglycolamide extractant, either N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA), and an acidic extractant 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]), dissolved in an aliphatic diluent (e.g. n-dodecane). The An/Ln co-extraction is conducted from moderate-to-strong nitric acid, while the selective stripping of the minor actinides from the lanthanides is carried out using a polyaminocarboxylic acid/citrate buffered solution at pH anywhere between 3 and 4.5. The extraction and separation of the actinides from the fission products is very effective in a wide range of HNO3 concentrations and the minimum separation factors for lanthanide/Am exceed 30 for Nd/Am, reaching > 60 for Eu/Am under some conditions. The experimental results presented here demonstrate the great potential for a combined system, consisting of a neutral extractant such as T2EHDGA or TODGA, and an acidic extractant such as HEH[EHP], for separating the minor actinides from the lanthanides.

Gelis, Artem V.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assessment of subsurface VOCs using a chemical microsensor array. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of laboratory investigations of several performance parameters relevant to surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) chemical sensor arrays for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated soil and groundwater. The small size, low cost, sensitivity and selectivity of such instruments promise improvements in the quality and quantity of data used to guide site assessment and restoration efforts. In this investigation, calibrations were performed for 15 different coated SAW sensors. Each sensor was exposed to six VOCs selected to represent three chemical classes of contaminants that are commonly found at waste sites (i.e., aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons). A new pattern recognition method was developed for determining which coated sensors would maximize the selectivity and accuracy of quantitation for a given set of vapor contaminants. Using this method, an optimal subwet of four coated sensors was selected for testing in a prototype microsensor instrument. Additional laboratory experiments were performed with this optimized array to assess the limits of detection and linear response ranges for the representative vapors, as well as the additivity of responses to vapors in binary mixtures, temperature and humidity effects, aging effects, and other performance parameters related to the application of this technology to soil and groundwater VOC monitoring. Results demonstrate that SAW microsensor arrays can identify and quantify specific VOCs at concentrations in the {mu}g/L to mg/L range when present alone or in simple (e.g., binary) mixtures. SAW sensor technology offers a potentially effective alternative to existing field instrumentation for headspace analysis, soil vapor monitoring, and vacuum extraction process monitoring of VOCs in subsurface media.

Batterman, S.A.; Zellers, E.T. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Public Health

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A unified algorithm for predicting partition coefficients for PBPK modeling of drugs and environmental chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The algorithms in the literature focusing to predict tissue:blood PC (P{sub tb}) for environmental chemicals and tissue:plasma PC based on total (K{sub p}) or unbound concentration (K{sub pu}) for drugs differ in their consideration of binding to hemoglobin, plasma proteins and charged phospholipids. The objective of the present study was to develop a unified algorithm such that P{sub tb}, K{sub p} and K{sub pu} for both drugs and environmental chemicals could be predicted. The development of the unified algorithm was accomplished by integrating all mechanistic algorithms previously published to compute the PCs. Furthermore, the algorithm was structured in such a way as to facilitate predictions of the distribution of organic compounds at the macro (i.e. whole tissue) and micro (i.e. cells and fluids) levels. The resulting unified algorithm was applied to compute the rat P{sub tb}, K{sub p} or K{sub pu} of muscle (n = 174), liver (n = 139) and adipose tissue (n = 141) for acidic, neutral, zwitterionic and basic drugs as well as ketones, acetate esters, alcohols, aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers. The unified algorithm reproduced adequately the values predicted previously by the published algorithms for a total of 142 drugs and chemicals. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated the relative importance of the various compound properties reflective of specific mechanistic determinants relevant to prediction of PC values of drugs and environmental chemicals. Overall, the present unified algorithm uniquely facilitates the computation of macro and micro level PCs for developing organ and cellular-level PBPK models for both chemicals and drugs.

Peyret, Thomas [DSEST, Universite de Montreal, Canada H3T 1A8 (Canada); Poulin, Patrick [Consultant, 4009 rue Sylvia Daoust, Quebec City, Quebec, G1X 0A6 (Canada); Krishnan, Kannan, E-mail: kannan.krishnan@umontreal.ca [DSEST, Universite de Montreal, H3T 1A8 (Canada)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Determination of risk-based, site-specific cleanup levels for an industrial site in Seattle, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk-based, site-specific cleanup criteria were developed for an active industrial site where shallow soil was contaminated with bunker fuel. This approach resulted in defensible cleanup levels that eliminated the need for complicated and disruptive remedial measures and is expediting site closure under Washington State Department of Ecology`s (Ecology) Independent Remedial Action Program. Initially, in anticipation of the sale of the property, a site investigation was conducted to provide information on the extent of contamination resulting from a leaking underground storage tank. Results of the investigation indicated that at least 3,600 cubic yards of soil contained bunker fuel at concentrations exceeding Ecology`s Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) default Method A cleanup value for heavy oil of 200 milligrams per kilogram. The contamination extended under two of the site structures. Following Ecology`s new interim policy for cleanup of total petroleum hydrocarbons under MTCA, a risk-based cleanup criterion was calculated using an approach in which aliphatic and aromatic fractions of weathered bunker fuel were represented by surrogates of known toxicity. The cleanup criterion yielded by the quantitative evaluation was more than an order of magnitude higher than the default MTCA Method A value for heavy oil. Cleanup criteria for carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (cPAHs) were also derived. Use of these risk-based cleanup levels eliminated the need for remedial measures outside of the immediate vicinity of the former tank location, reducing the volume of soil that required remediation from 3,600 cubic yards to 70 cubic yards.

Birkner, P.D.; Gaulke, S.W.; Tirao, A.C.; Veilleux, A.L. [Shannon & Wilson, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Remediation of contaminated soils and sediments using Daramend bioremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils and sediments containing polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy oils, chlorinated phenols, pesticides, herbicides and phthalates, either individually or in combination, have been difficult to remediate in the past. Not only the species of contaminant, but contaminant concentrations were roadblocks to successful use of bioremediation. Daramend{sup Tm} remediation has removed many of these obstacles through extensive research. Bench-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale demonstrations have been conducted at a variety of industrial sites. At a manufactured gas site, 295 days of Daramend remediation reduced concentrations of chrysene and fluoranthene from 38.9 mg/kg to 5.9 mg/kg and 84.6 mg/kg to 7.8 mg/kg respectively. Elsewhere, the total PAH concentration in a silty soil was reduced from 1,442 mg/kg to 36 mg/kg. Concentrations of even the most refractory PAHs (e.g. pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene) were reduced to below the established clean-up guidelines. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel fuel) have also been reduced from 8,700 mg/kg to 34 mg/kg after 182 days of treatment. Similarly, in a clay soil contaminated by crude oil processing, the concentrations of high molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons were rapidly reduced (138 days) to below the remediation criteria. Demonstrations with wood treatment site soils have proven Daramend remediation effective in enhancing the target compound degradation rates. Soils containing 2170 mg PCP/kg were shown to contain only 11 mg PCP/kg after 280 days of Darmend remediation. The issue of toxicity of soil containing increased amounts of pentachlorophenols was solved. Performance data collected during these projects indicate that Daramend remediation provides a cost effective method for clean-up of soils and sediments containing a variety of organic compounds.

Burwell, S.W.; Bucens, P.G.; Seech, A.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hydrocarbon and non-hydrocarbon gas in salt environments, a contribution to gas genesis understanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of organic inclusions is a contribution to the understanding of the thermal and biochemical history of the evaporite basins by the in-situ observation of organic evolution products which are preserved by entrapment in salt. Recent applications of microanalytical techniques (FT-infrared, Raman, FT-Raman, UV-fluorescence) have confirmed and elucidated the nature of the organic phases trapped in inclusions. Three geological environments were studied corresponding to different levels of organic maturation: (1) the Bresse salt deposit (France) where the presence of solid organic matter, immature oil, carbon dioxide, and ammonium is detected, is characteristic of the early diagenesis of the massive salt series deposited at the Eocene-Oligocene period in the West European continental rift, (2) the Gabon margin where oil, methane, carbon dioxide and ammonium correspond to catagenetic products trapped in a salt diapir of the Cretaceous salt series of the Ogooue delta, and (3) the Lena-Tungusska oil-bearing region of Siberian platform where graphite, carbonaceous material, sulphur, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, and oils correspond to the evolution of the evaporite-brine-organic matter system under influence of basalt intrusions. The organic history of salt rocks can be followed from Bresse to Siberian examples. Proteins and carbohydrates are rapidly destroyed during early diagenesis (Bresse-France): ammonium and carbon dioxide are produced by deamination and decarboxylation respectively, the complex organic molecular association is simplified and geopolymers (kerogen precursors) are produced. With increasing maturity (Gabon), kerogen is transformed in aliphatic compounds which are progressively cracked to produce short alkane chains and finally methane. Residual carbon dioxide is also produced. In Siberia, the organic matter evolution is linked to the d/h ratio, where d is the distance to the dolerite sill and h the thickness of the sill.

Pironon, J. [BP, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Grishina, S. [United Institute of geology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Carbon-Type Analysis and Comparison of Original and Reblended FACE Diesel Fuels (FACE 2, FACE 4, and FACE 7)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel blends, FD-2B, FD 4B, and FD-7B, and makes comparison of the new blends with the original FACE diesel blends, FD 2A, FD 4A, and FD-7A, respectively. Generally, FD-2A and FD-2B are more similar than the A and B blends of FD-4 and FD-7. The aromatic carbon content is roughly equivalent, although the new FACE blends have decreased monoaromatic content and increased di- and tri-cycloaromatic content, as well as a higher overall aromatic content, than the original FACE blends. The aromatic components of the new FACE blends generally have a higher alkyl substitution with longer alkyl substituents. The naphthenic and paraffinic contents remained relatively consistent. Based on aliphatic methyl and methylene carbon ratios, cetane numbers for FD-2A and -2B, and FD-7A and -7B are predicted to be consistent, while the cetane number for FD-4B is predicted to be higher than FD-4A. Overall, the new FACE fuel blends are fairly consistent with the original FACE fuel blends, but there are observable differences. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information on reformulated FACE diesel blends, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of the team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the use of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Identification of quaternary ammonium compounds as potent inhibitors of hERG potassium channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, a member of a family of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels, plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. The reduction of hERG channel activity as a result of adverse drug effects or genetic mutations may cause QT interval prolongation and potentially leads to acquired long QT syndrome. Thus, screening for hERG channel activity is important in drug development. Cardiotoxicity associated with the inhibition of hERG channels by environmental chemicals is also a public health concern. To assess the inhibitory effects of environmental chemicals on hERG channel function, we screened the National Toxicology Program (NTP) collection of 1408 compounds by measuring thallium influx into cells through hERG channels. Seventeen compounds with hERG channel inhibition were identified with IC{sub 50} potencies ranging from 0.26 to 22 {mu}M. Twelve of these compounds were confirmed as hERG channel blockers in an automated whole cell patch clamp experiment. In addition, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of seven compounds belonging to the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) series on hERG channel inhibition. Among four active QAC compounds, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide was the most potent with an IC{sub 50} value of 260 nM in the thallium influx assay and 80 nM in the patch clamp assay. The potency of this class of hERG channel inhibitors appears to depend on the number and length of their aliphatic side-chains surrounding the charged nitrogen. Profiling environmental compound libraries for hERG channel inhibition provides information useful in prioritizing these compounds for cardiotoxicity assessment in vivo.

Xia Menghang, E-mail: mxia@mail.nih.gov [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Shahane, Sampada A.; Huang, Ruili; Titus, Steven A. [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Shum, Enoch; Zhao Yong [Cerep, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States); Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R. [National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Austin, Christopher P. [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Process for using alkyl substituted C8-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons as preferential physical solvents for selective processing of hydrocarbon gas streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the removal of hydrocarbon gas liquids, comprising hydrocarbons heavier than methane, from a hydrocarbon gas stream. The improvement consists of selectively extracting the hydrocarbon gas liquids from the hydrocarbon gas stream with a preferential physical solvent which provides selective capability for recovery according to the selected degree of (a) ethane in amounts ranging from 2-98%, (b) propane in amounts ranging from 2-99%, (c) butane in amounts ranging from 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100% which comprises: A. selectively extracting and stripping the hydrocarbon gas stream with the physical solvent to produce a residue hydrocarbon gas stream of pipeline specifications and a rich solvent stream containing ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components, the preferential physical solvent being: (1) rich in C/sub 8/-C/sub 10/ aromatic compounds having methyl, ethyl, or propyl aliphatic groups and (2) selective for ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the gas stream such that: (a) the relative volatility of methane over ethane is at least 5.0 and the hydrocarbon loading capacity, defined as solubility of ethane in solvent, is at least 0.25 standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of solvent, or (b) the preferential factor determined by the multiplication of relative volatility of methane over ethane by the solubility of ethane in solvent, in standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of solvent, of at least 1.25; and B. distilling the rich solvent to produce the hydrocarbon gas liquids and the physical solvent.

Mehra, Y.R.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

419

Monoclonal antibodies to DNA modified with cis- or trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Murine monoclonal antibodies that bind selectively to adducts formed on DNA by the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), cis-DDP, or to the chemothrapeutically inactive trans isomer trans-DDP were elicited by immunization with calf thymus DNA modified with either cis- or trans-DDP at ratios of bound platinum per nucleotide, (D/N)/sub b/, of 0.06-0.08. The binding of two monoclonal antibodies to cis-DDP-modified DNA was competitively inhibited in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by 4-6 nM concentrations of cis-DDP bound to DNA. Adducts formed by cis-DDP on other synthetic DNA polymers did not inhibit antibody binding to cis-DDP-DNA. The biologically active compounds (Pt(en)Cl/sub 2/), (Pt(dach)Cl/sub 2/), and (Pt(NH/sub 3/)/sub 2/(cbdca)) (carboplatin) all formed antibody-detectable adducts on DNA, whereas the inactive platinum complexes trans-DDP and (Pt(dien)Cl)Cl (dien, diethylenetriamine) did not. The monoclonal antibodies therefore recognize a bifunctional Pt-DNA adduct with cis stereochemistry in which platinum is coordinated by two adjacent guanines or, to a lesser degree, by adjacent adenine and guanine. A monoclonal antibody raised against trans-DDP-DNA was competitively inhibited in an ELISA by 40 nM trans-DDP bound to DNA. This antibody crossreacted with unmodified, denatured DNA. The recognition of cis- or trans-DDP-modified DNAs by monoclonal antibodies thus parallels the known modes of DNA binding of these compounds and may correlate with their biological activities.

Sundquist, W.I.; Lippard, S.J.; Stollar, B.D.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Characterization of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) waste tanks located at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) is located in Melton Valley within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 and includes five underground storage tanks (T1, T2, T3, T4, and T9) ranging from 13,000 to 25,000 gal. capacity. During the period of 1996--97 there was a major effort to re-sample and characterize the contents of these inactive waste tanks. The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, examine concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and to provide the data needed to meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data collected on both the supernatant and sludge samples taken from three different locations in each of the OHF tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) do not satisfy the denature ratios required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The fissile isotope of plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) are diluted with thorium far above the WAC requirements. In general, the OHF sludge was found to be hazardous (RCRA) based on total metal content and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the OHF sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "denatured aliphatic alco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Identification, isolation and partial characterisation of a 14–15 kDa pigment binding protein complex of PS II from spinach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We described recently a new Chl ab binding polypeptide in PS II from spinach (Irrgang, K.-D., Bechtel, C., Vater, J. and Renger, G. (1990) in Current Research in Photosynthesis (Baltscheffsky, M., ed.), Vol. I, pp. 375–378, Kluwer, Dordrecht). This 14–15 kDa chlorophyll ab binding polypeptide complex was isolated and purified from intrinsic photosystem II membrane polypeptides. About 3 Chl a and 1 Chl b were bound per protein molecule. A polyclonal antiserum was induced against this pigment-protein complex. SDS polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis in combination with immunoblotting revealed reactivities with two polypeptides of very similar relative molecular masses of 14 and 15 kDa that are clearly identified in thylakoids, PS II membrane fragments, ISO and RSO thylakoids. Their N-termini were blocked by an as yet unidentified modifying group. Using analytical isoelectric focusing under denaturing conditions their isoelectric points were determined to be 5.2–5.3 and around 6.0–6.5. The isolated polypeptides of the pigment-protein complex tend to self-associate into oligomeric forms of about 66–70 kDa. Furthermore, under mild solubilisation conditions an oligomeric pigment-protein complex of 120 kDa was observed. This oligomer was shown to be heterogeneously composed of the 14–15 kDa proteins and at least another pigment-binding polypeptide with an Mr of 22–24 kDa. The low molecular mass pigment-protein complex (CP14–15) is proposed to act as an additional antenna complex within PS II.

Klaus-Dieter Irrgang; Bärbel Kablitz; Joachim Vater; Gernot Renger

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Variations in AOC and microbial diversity in an advanced water treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The objective of this study was to evaluate the variations in assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and microbial diversities in an advanced water treatment plant. The efficiency of biofiltration on AOC removal using anthracite and granular activated carbon (GAC) as the media was also evaluated through a pilot-scale column experiment. Effects of hydrological factors (seasonal effects and river flow) on AOC concentrations in raw water samples and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of biofiltration on AOC treatment were also evaluated. Results show that AOC concentrations in raw water and clear water of the plant were about 138 and 27 ?g acetate-C/L, respectively. Higher AOC concentrations were observed in wet seasons probably due to the resuspension of organic-contained sediments and discharges of non-point source (NPS) pollutants from the upper catchment. This reveals that seasonal effect played an important role in the variations in influent AOC concentrations. Approximately 82% and 70% of AOC removal efficiencies were observed in GAC and anthracite columns, respectively. Results from column experiment reveal that the applied treatment processes in the plant and biofiltration system were able to remove AOC effectively. Microbial colonization on GAC and anthracite were detected via the observation of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images. Results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and nucleotide sequence analysis reveal significant decrease in microbial diversities after the ozonation process. Higher HRT caused higher microbial contact time, and thus, more microbial colonies and higher microbial diversity were observed in the latter part of the biofilters. Some of the dominant microbial species in the biofiltration columns belonged to the beta-proteobacterium, which might contribute to the AOC degradation. Results of this study provide us insight into the variations in AOC and microbial diversity in the advanced water treatment processes.

B.M. Yang; J.K. Liu; C.C. Chien; R.Y. Surampalli; C.M. Kao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Characterization of the C1 and C2 waste tanks located in the BVEST system at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data for the supernatant and sludge in the BVEST waste tanks C-1 and C-2. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) and plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) were denatured as required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In general, the sludge in tanks C1 and C2 was found to be hazardous based on RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. Additional characteristics of the C1 and C2 sludge inventory relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Unfolded protein ensembles, folding trajectories, and refolding rate prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computer simulations can provide critical information on the unfolded ensemble of proteins under physiological conditions by explicitly characterizing the geometrical properties of the diverse conformations that are sampled in the unfolded state. A general computational analysis across many proteins has not been implemented however. Here we develop a method for generating a diverse conformational ensemble to characterize properties of the unfolded states of intrinsically disordered or intrinsically folded proteins. The method allows unfolded proteins to retain disulfide bonds. We examined physical properties of the unfolded ensembles of several proteins including chemical shifts clustering properties and scaling exponents for the radius of gyration with polymer length. A problem relating simulated and experimental residual dipolar couplings is discussed. We apply our generated ensembles to the problem of folding kinetics by examining whether the ensembles of some proteins are closer geometrically to their folded structures than others. We find that for a randomly selected dataset of 15 non-homologous 2- and 3-state proteins quantities such as the average root mean squared deviation between the folded structure and unfolded ensemble correlate with folding rates as strongly as absolute contact order. We introduce a new order parameter that measures the distance travelled per residue which naturally partitions into a smooth “laminar” and subsequent “turbulent” part of the trajectory. This latter conceptually simple measure with no fitting parameters predicts folding rates in 0 M denaturant with remarkable accuracy (r = ?0.95 p = 1 × 10?7). The high correlation between folding times and sterically modulated reconfigurational motion supports the rapid collapse of proteins prior to the transition state as a generic feature in the folding of both two-state and multi-state proteins. This method for generating unfolded ensembles provides a powerful approach to address various questions in protein evolution misfolding and aggregation transient structures and molten globule and disordered protein phases.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A quantitative measure for protein conformational heterogeneity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conformational heterogeneity is a defining characteristic of proteins. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and denatured state ensembles are extreme manifestations of this heterogeneity. Inferences regarding globule versus coil formation can be drawn from analysis of polymeric properties such as average size shape and density fluctuations. Here we introduce a new parameter to quantify the degree of conformational heterogeneity within an ensemble to complement polymeric descriptors. The design of this parameter is guided by the need to distinguish between systems that couple their unfolding-folding transitions with coil-to-globule transitions and those systems that undergo coil-to-globule transitions with no evidence of acquiring a homogeneous ensemble of conformations upon collapse. The approach is as follows: Each conformation in an ensemble is converted into a conformational vector where the elements are inter-residue distances. Similarity between pairs of conformations is quantified using the projection between the corresponding conformational vectors. An ensemble of conformations yields a distribution of pairwise projections which is converted into a distribution of pairwise conformational dissimilarities. The first moment of this dissimilarity distribution is normalized against the first moment of the distribution obtained by comparing conformations from the ensemble of interest to conformations drawn from a Flory random coil model. The latter sets an upper bound on conformational heterogeneity thus ensuring that the proposed measure for intra-ensemble heterogeneity is properly calibrated and can be used to compare ensembles for different sequences and across different temperatures. The new measure of conformational heterogeneity will be useful in quantitative studies of coupled folding and binding of IDPs and in de novo sequence design efforts that are geared toward controlling the degree of heterogeneity in unbound forms of IDPs.

Rohit V. Pappu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Unusual biophysics of intrinsically disordered proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Research of a past decade and a half leaves no doubt that complete understanding of protein functionality requires close consideration of the fact that many functional proteins do not have well-folded structures. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and proteins with intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are highly abundant in nature and play a number of crucial roles in a living cell. Their functions, which are typically associated with a wide range of intermolecular interactions where \\{IDPs\\} possess remarkable binding promiscuity, complement functional repertoire of ordered proteins. All this requires a close attention to the peculiarities of biophysics of these proteins. In this review, some key biophysical features of \\{IDPs\\} are covered. In addition to the peculiar sequence characteristics of \\{IDPs\\} these biophysical features include sequential, structural, and spatiotemporal heterogeneity of IDPs; their rough and relatively flat energy landscapes; their ability to undergo both induced folding and induced unfolding; the ability to interact specifically with structurally unrelated partners; the ability to gain different structures at binding to different partners; and the ability to keep essential amount of disorder even in the bound form. \\{IDPs\\} are also characterized by the “turned-out” response to the changes in their environment, where they gain some structure under conditions resulting in denaturation or even unfolding of ordered proteins. It is proposed that the heterogeneous spatiotemporal structure of IDPs/IDPRs can be described as a set of foldons, inducible foldons, semi-foldons, non-foldons, and unfoldons. They may lose their function when folded, and activation of some \\{IDPs\\} is associated with the awaking of the dormant disorder. It is possible that \\{IDPs\\} represent the “edge of chaos” systems which operate in a region between order and complete randomness or chaos, where the complexity is maximal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The emerging dynamic view of proteins: Protein plasticity in allostery, evolution and self-assembly.

Vladimir N. Uversky

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Propensity to form amyloid fibrils is encoded as excitations in the free energy landscape of monomeric proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein aggregation, linked to many of diseases, is initiated when monomers access rogue conformations that are poised to form amyloid fibrils. We show, using simulations of src SH3 domain, that mechanical force enhances the population of the aggregation prone ($N^*$) states, which are rarely populated under force free native conditions, but are encoded in the spectrum of native fluctuations. The folding phase diagrams of SH3 as a function of denaturant concentration ($[C]$), mechanical force ($f$), and temperature exhibit an apparent two-state behavior, without revealing the presence of the elusive $N^*$ states. Interestingly, the phase boundaries separating the folded and unfolded states at all [C] and $f$ fall on a master curve, which can can be quantitatively described using an analogy to superconductors in a magnetic field. The free energy profiles as a function of the molecular extension ($R$), which are accessible in pulling experiments, ($R$), reveal the presence of a native-like $N^*$ with a disordered solvent-exposed amino terminal $\\beta$-strand. The structure of the $N^*$ state is identical to that found in Fyn SH3 by NMR dispersion experiments. We show that the time scale for fibril formation can be estimated from the population of the $N^*$ state, determined by the free energy gap separating the native structure and the $N^*$ state, a finding that can be used to assess fibril forming tendencies of proteins. The structures of the $N^*$ state are used to show that oligomer formation and likely route to fibrils occur by a domain-swap mechanism in SH3 domain.

Pavel I. Zhuravlev; Govardhan Reddy; John E. Straub; D. Thirumalai

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

Solvent Sensitivity of Protein Unfolding: Study of Chicken Villin Headpiece Subdomain in Water-Ethanol and Water-DMSO Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work we study and compare unfolding of a small protein, chicken villin headpiece (HP-36) in two different aqueous binary mixtures, namely water-ethanol (EtOH) and water-dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO). In both the binary mixtures, HP-36 is found to unfold (fully or partially, depending on the mixture) under ambient conditions, that otherwise requires temperature as high as ~600 K to denature in pure aqueous solvent. In all the cases, first step of unfolding is found to be similar, i.e. separation of the cluster formed by three hydrophobic (phenylalanine) residues, namely Phe-7, Phe-11 and Phe-18, which constitute the hydrophobic core, thereby initiating melting of helix-2 of the protein. Subsequent unfolding steps follow different paths in different chemical environments. As both water-DMSO and water-ethanol show composition dependent anomalies, so do the details of unfolding dynamics. With an increase of co-solvent concentration different partially unfolded intermediates are found to be formed in both the cases. This is reflected in a remarkable non-monotonic composition dependence of several order parameters, including fraction of native contacts and protein-solvent interaction energy. The emergence of such partially unfolded states is particularly attributed to the preferential solvation of the hydrophobic residues by the ethyl groups of ethanol and methyl groups of DMSO. While in DMSO the protein gradually attains a completely unfolded state at xDMSO=0.30, unfolding in water-ethanol appears to be more complex and sensitive to solvent composition.

Rikhia Ghosh; Susmita Roy; Biman Bagchi

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Defect induced ferromagnetism in undoped ZnO nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Undoped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) with size ?12?nm were produced using forced hydrolysis methods using diethylene glycol (DEG) [called ZnO-I] or denatured ethanol [called ZnO-II] as the reaction solvent; both using Zn acetate dehydrate as precursor. Both samples showed weak ferromagnetic behavior at 300?K with saturation magnetization M{sub s}?=?0.077 ± 0.002 memu/g and 0.088 ± 0.013 memu/g for ZnO-I and ZnO-II samples, respectively. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra showed that ZnO-I nanocrystals had DEG fragments linked to their surface. Photoluminescence (PL) data showed a broad emission near 500?nm for ZnO-II which is absent in the ZnO-I samples, presumably due to the blocking of surface traps by the capping molecules. Intentional oxygen vacancies created in the ZnO-I NPs by annealing at 450?°C in flowing Ar gas gradually increased M{sub s} up to 90?min and x-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) suggested that oxygen vacancies may have a key role in the observed changes in M{sub s}. Finally, PL spectra of ZnO showed the appearance of a blue/violet emission, attributed to Zn interstitials, whose intensity changes with annealing time, similar to the trend seen for M{sub s}. The observed variation in the magnetization of ZnO NP with increasing Ar annealing time seems to depend on the changes in the number of Zn interstitials and oxygen vacancies.

Rainey, K.; Chess, J.; Eixenberger, J.; Tenne, D. A.; Hanna, C. B.; Punnoose, A., E-mail: apunnoos@boisestate.edu [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

A molecular model for Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium coal: Moving toward capturing the continuum structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large-scale molecular model for Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium coal is generated based on an automated construction approach in an effort to move toward capturing the continuum structure. The model contains 50,789 atoms within 728 molecules and is the largest, most complex coal representation constructed to-date. The aromatic ring size distribution was based on multiple high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) lattice fringe micrographs and was duplicated with automated construction protocols (Fringe3D) in molecular modeling space. Additional structural data was obtained from the abundant literature assessing this Argonne Premium coal. Organic oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functionalities were incorporated primarily into the polyaromatic structures according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray adsorption near-edge structure spectroscopy data. Aliphatic carbons were in the form of cross-links (bridges and loops) and pendant alkyl groups based on the combination of laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDIMS), ruthenium ion catalyzed oxidation, elemental analysis, and NMR data in good agreement with the literature. Bound and bulk water was also included. Construction of the coal molecules was performed by use of Perl scripts developed in Materials Studio to eliminate personal bias and improve the accuracy and the scale of the structure generated. The large-scale model captured a broad and continuous molecular weight distribution in accordance with LDIMS data here ranging from 100 to 2850 Da, enabling inclusion of structural diversity to capture a portion of the continuum structure. A theoretical pyridine extraction yield, determined by a group contribution approach, was in agreement with the experimental value. The extract and residue representations were generated from the large-scale Illinois coal model and showed consistency with NMR, elemental analysis and LDIMS trends. The distribution of heteroatomic classes and double bond equivalents was also well-defined experimentally based on electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These data further constrain the molecular weight of extractable material and was consistent with limited pyridine extractability and model heteroatom classes. Future work will be well served by staying within the limits established by the approach and increasing the structural diversity (sampling frequency through increased scale) to better capture the complex nature of coal structural diversity, i.e., the continuum.

Fidel Castro-Marcano; Vladislav V. Lobodin; Ryan P. Rodgers; Amy M. McKenna; Alan G. Marshall; Jonathan P. Mathews

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Examination of body burden and taint for Iceland scallop (chlamys islandica) and American plaice (Hippoglossoides platessoides) near the terra nova offshore oil development over ten Years of drilling on the grand Banks of Newfoundland, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents results of analyses of body burdens of metals and hydrocarbons and taste tests for taint in Iceland scallop and American plaice performed as part of the Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) program for the Terra Nova offshore oil development (Grand Banks of Newfoundland, Canada). Scallop and plaice were collected in a Study Area located within approximately 1 km of drill centres at Terra Nova and in a Reference Area located approximately 20 km from the development. Samples were collected in 1997 to establish a baseline, and from 2000 to 2010, during drilling periods. Scallop adductor muscle was contaminated with >C10-C21aliphatic hydrocarbons resembling the drilling fluid in the synthetic drilling mud (SBM) used at Terra Nova in 2000, 2002 and 2004, but contamination of adductor muscle was not noted in 2006, 2008 and 2010. The maximum concentration in muscle was 28 mg/kg wet weight, noted in 2002. Scallop viscera was contaminated with hydrocarbons resembling drilling fluid in \\{SBMs\\} near drill centres in all EEM years except 2010. Viscera contamination with >C10-C21 hydrocarbons gradually decreased from a maximum of 150 mg/kg in 2000, to a maximum of 27 mg/kg in 2008; all values were below the laboratory reporting detection limit of 15 mg/kg in 2010. Therefore, evidence from both muscle and viscera indicates a decrease in tissue hydrocarbon contamination in recent years. Barium, another major constituent in drilling muds, has not been noted in scallop adductor muscles at concentrations above the reporting detection limit, but barium was detected in viscera in baseline and EEM years. The maximum concentration of barium in viscera during baseline sampling was 8 mg/kg. The maximum concentration in EEM years (29 mg/kg) was noted in 2000. The maximum concentration in 2010 was 25 mg/kg. The concentration of metals other than barium in scallop tissues was similar between the Terra Nova Study Area and the Reference Area. Hydrocarbons resembling the fluid in SBM were noted in one American plaice liver sample collected near drill centres in 2000. Otherwise, there has been no evidence of project-related metals or hydrocarbon contamination in plaice liver or fillet samples. There has been no evidence of taint (off-taste) for scallop adductor muscle and plaice fillet tissue in baseline or EEM years. Combined with a parallel study on fish bioindicators at Terra Nova that showed that fish health at Terra Nova was similar to that at the Reference Area (Mathieu et al., 2011), these results indicate little to no detectable biological effects on Iceland scallop and American plaice as a result of Terra Nova activities.

Elisabeth M. DeBlois; Joe W. Kiceniuk; Michael D. Paine; Bruce W. Kilgour; Ellen Tracy; Roger Crowley; Urban P. Williams; G. Gregory Janes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Burning of coal waste piles from Douro Coalfield (Portugal): Petrological, geochemical and mineralogical characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Douro Coalfield anthracites were exploited for decades (1795–1994). Besides many small mines Douro Coalfield had two principal mining areas (S. Pedro da Cova and Pejão). Coal mining activities cause several impacts on the environment, one of which is the amount of discard or waste which was disposed of all over Douro Coalfield resulting in one of the most significant and severe impacts on the environment. Over 20 waste piles exist in the old mining areas, geographically dispersed, and three of them are presently burning. Their ignition was caused by forest fires during the summer of 2005. Samples from the burning and unburned zones of the waste piles were studied as were the gas from vents and the minerals resulting after combustion. Geochemical processes and mineralogical transformations in the burning coal waste pile were investigated. Microscopic analyses of the samples identified some particular aspects related with combustion: oxidation of pyrite, the presence of iron oxides, organic particles with cracks and rims with lowered (suppressed) Rr, devolatilization vacuoles and some char structures. The occurrence of vitreous (glassy) material as well as Fe–Al spinels in the burning coal waste provide evidences that the combustion temperature could have reached values above 1000 °C. Due to combustion, and as expected, the samples studied reported high ash yields. Samples taken from the burning zones reported an increase of As, Cr, Li, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr and LREE concentrations and a decrease in Zr and HREE concentrations. Enrichment in Cs, Li and Rb was noted when comparing with the geochemical composition of black shales and world coals composition that is related with the contribution of granitic rocks in the sediments that originated the main lithologies of the Douro Coalfield (carbonaceous shale and lithic arenites). Cluster analyses (R-type and Q-type) were performed to understand the trend between the unburned and burning samples and it seems that some chemical variations are responsible for this separation. Elemental sulphur and salammoniac (ammonium salt) are the coal fire gas minerals neoformed on the surface of piles, near the burning zones. They were identified by different techniques, mainly SEM-EDX, XRD and FTIR. Relatively high concentrations of several aromatic compounds were detected in the gas collected at the studied areas, as well as aliphatic hydrocarbons. The highest concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in gas samples from S. Pedro da Cova waste pile. The exposure to hazardous compounds present in the gas is a serious risk to human health and the environment.

J. Ribeiro; E. Ferreira da Silva; D. Flores

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

FY-2011 Status Report for Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the work performed in the area of thermodynamics and kinetics of advanced separations systems under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program during FY 2011 at the INL. On the thermodynamic front, investigations of liquid-liquid distribution of lanthanides at TALSPEAK-related conditions continued in FY11. It has been determined that a classical ion-exchanging phase transfer mechanism, where three HDEHP dimers solvate the metal ion in the organic phase, dominates metal extraction for systems that contain up to 0.1 M free lactate in solution. The correct graphical interpretation of the observed data in those regions relied on incorporating corrections for non-ideal behavior of HDEHP dimer in aliphatic diluents as well as sodium extraction equilibria. When aqueous conditions enter the complex regions of high lactate concentrations, slope analysis is no longer possible. When normalized metal distribution ratios were studied along the increasing concentration of free lactate, a slope of -1 was apparent. Such dependency either indicates aqueous complexing competition from lactate, or, a more likely scenario, a participation of lactate in the extracted metal complex. This finding agrees with our initial assessment of postulated changes in the extraction mechanism as a source of the lactate-mediated loss of extraction efficiency. The observed shape in the lanthanide distribution curve in our studies of TALSPEAK systems was the same for solutions containing no lactate or 2.3 M lactate. As such we may conclude that the mechanism of phase transfer is not altered dramatically and remains similarly sensitive to effective charge density of the metal ion. In addition to these thermodynamics studies, this report also summarizes the first calorimetric determination of heat of extraction of 248Cm in a bi-phasic system. The heat of extraction measured by isothermal titration calorimetry is compared to that determined using van't Hoff calculations. Further investigations on the kinetics of extraction in TALSPEAK with macro quantities of lanthanides present in the initial aqueous phase composition have been performed. These results have been summarized and compared to previous work performed for FCR&D. In addition, the effects of HDEHP concentration in the organic phase on europium extraction have been studied.

Leigh R. Martin; Peter R. Zalupski; Travis S. Grimes

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Distribution Behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), and Zr(IV) with N,N-Dihexyl Octanamide Under Uranium-Loading Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-based PUREX process has been the workhorse of the nuclear fuel reprocessing industry for the last four and a half decades, a few drawbacks associated with the use of TBP have caused concern to the separation scientists and technologists. These shortcomings may pose a serious challenge particularly during the reprocessing of (a) short cooled thermal reactor fuels, (b) fast reactor fuels with the larger Pu content and significantly higher burn up, and (c) while treating various waste streams for their disposal to the environment. The N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have received particular attention as alternate potential extractants for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels in view of (a) the innocuous nature of their degradation products, namely, carboxylic acids/amines and (b) the possibility to incinerate the used solvent leading to reduced volume of secondary waste. The physical and chemical properties of these amides are influenced strongly by the nature of alkyl groups. The extractant N,N-dihexyl octanamide (DHOA) was found to be a promising candidate among a large number of extractants studied. Laboratory batch studies as well as mixer settler studies were performed under process conditions with DHOA and compared with those of TBP. DHOA was found to extract Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium loading conditions. In addition, the extraction behavior of Am(III) and Zr(IV) was studied at varying nitric acid concentrations (1 to 6 M). Extraction behavior of uranium at macroconcentrations (9.9 to 157.7 g/l) was carried out at different temperatures, and it was observed that D{sub U} decreased with the increase in U loading as well as with the increase of temperature (in the range 25 to 45 deg. C) and that the two-phase reaction was exothermic in nature. Mixer settler studies on U(VI) revealed that DHOA is similar to TBP during the extraction cycle but better than TBP during the stripping cycle.

Manchanda, V.K.; Ruikar, P.B.; Sriram, S.; Nagar, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Gupta, K.K.; Singh, R.K.; Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Ramanujam, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Development of a novel solvent for the simultaneous separation of strontium and cesium from dissolved Spent Nuclear Fuel solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery of Cs and Sr from acidic solutions by solvent extraction has been investigated. The goal of this project was to develop an extraction process to remove Cs and Sr from high-level waste in an effort to reduce the heat loading in storage. Solvents for the extraction of Cs and Sr separately have been used on both caustic and acidic spent nuclear fuel waste in the past. The objective of this research was to find a suitable solvent for the extraction of both Cs and Sr simultaneously from acidic nitrate media. The solvents selected for this research possess good stability and extraction behavior when mixed together. The extraction experiments were performed with 4 ,4,(5 )-Di-(tbutyldicyclohexano)- 18-crown-6 {DtBuCH18C6}, Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzocrown-6) {BOBCalixC6} and 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol {Cs-7SB modifier} in a branched aliphatic kerosene {Isopar® L}. The BOBCalixC6 and Cs-7SB modifier were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by Bonnesen et al. [1]. The values obtained from the SREX solvent for DSr in 1 M nitric acid ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 at 25oC and 10oC respectively. The values for DCs in 1 M nitric acid with the CSSX solvent ranged from 8.0 to 46.0 at 25oC and 10oC respectively. A new mixed solvent, developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) by Riddle et al. [2], showed distributions for Sr ranging from 8.8 to 17.4 in 1 M nitric acid at 25oC and 10oC respectively. The DCs for the mixed solvent ranged from 7.7 to 20.2 in 1 M nitric acid at 25oC to 10oC respectively. The unexpectedly high distributions for Sr at both 25oC and 10oC show a synergy in the mixed solvent. The DCs, although lower than with CSSX solvent, still showed good extraction behavior.

Catherine L. Riddle; John D. Baker; Jack D. Law; Christopher A. McGrath; David H. Meikrantz; Bruce J. Mincher; Dean R. Peterman; Terry A. Todd

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids II. Imidazolium cations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through 'ionization of the ions': oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) {sigma}{sigma}*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C{sub {alpha}}-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 {+-} 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium trifluorosulfonate). Gradual generation of this polymer accounts for the steady increase in the viscosity of the ILs upon irradiation. Previous studies at lower dose have missed this species due to its wide mass distribution (stretching out to m/z 1600) and broad NMR lines, which make it harder to detect at lower concentrations. Among other observed changes is the formation of water immiscible fractions in hydrophilic ILs and water miscible fractions in hydrophobic ILs. The latter is due to anion fragmentation. The import of these observations for use of ILs as extraction solvents in nuclear cycle separations is discussed.

Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. W.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Hatcher, J.; Wishart, J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (BNL)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Biomass gasification: Influence of torrefaction on syngas production and tar formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper contains results of comparative gasification of standard wood biomass pellets, torrefied pellets and sawdust in a robust industrial fixed-bed gasifier. Parameters such as process stability, operating difficulties, gas parameters and tar content in syngas were analysed. The operating conditions were optimised to maximise production of liquid hydrocarbons, which can be both a problematic by-product and a valuable component. In order to collect the data concerning quantity and composition of the tars, the experimental set-up was equipped with a syngas cooler. The test runs conducted with sawdust and ordinary pellets did not cause any operational problems. The most complicated part of the experiment was maintaining process stability during gasification of torrefied pellets. The stabilisation effect of grinding of torrefied pellets and blending these pellets with wet sawdust were tested. It was concluded that effective and stable gasification of torrefied pellets in the tested type of fixed-bed gasifier is possible, but this type of fuel is much more suitable for co-gasification. The cleaned syngas from standard pellets had a relatively stable composition and calorific values in the range of 4.8–5.6 MJ/Nm3. Cold gas efficiencies of the process were in the range of 0.72–0.77 MJ/Nm3. Using torrefied pellets as a feedstock led to a higher calorific value of syngas, but the cold gas efficiency remained similar (0.75). For sawdust both the calorific value of syngas (LHV = 3.0 MJ/Nm3) and cold gas efficiency (0.57) were significantly lower than for pellets. The collected condensates contained a water fraction with dissolved organic compounds and thick viscous organic substances tar. It was observed that tar production from torrefied pellets is slower, characterised by lower yield, and technically more difficult in comparison to untreated biomass. The effectiveness of liquid hydrocarbon collection (tar to fuel ratio) varied between 0.0138 [kg tar/kg fuel] for torrefied pellets and 0.0213 [kg/kg] for sawdust. The main component of water fractions were organic acids. The content of organic acids in these fractions was as follows: 79.5% from South African pellets, 67% from Polish pellets, 64% from Polish sawdust and 59% from torrefied pellets respectively. The main organic species in tar from torrefied biomass remained acids, whereas in other cases tars were composed of alkylophenols, linear and cyclic aliphatic oxygenates and polyfunctional aromatic oxygenates.

Marek Dudy?ski; Johan C. van Dyk; Kamil Kwiatkowski; Marta Sosnowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from CBM samples) range from 50 to 100 ?g/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 1–4 mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8 mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500 mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000 s of ?g/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20 days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250 days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

William Orem; Calin Tatu; Matthew Varonka; Harry Lerch; Anne Bates; Mark Engle; Lynn Crosby; Jennifer McIntosh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Halophytic microalgae as a feedstock for anaerobic digestion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic digestion can be employed to produce methane biogas from residual microalgae biomass derived from either a lipid based biofuel process or wastewater treatment. There is interest in using halophytic microalgae for biofuel production due to their potential robustness in large-scale open pond production. The anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae biomass would however be challenging due to the high salinities not typically experienced in anaerobic digestion scenarios. Halophytic microalgae biomass as a potential substrate feedstock for anaerobic digestion would have salinities in excess of 3.5%, which is typically found in marine environments. To investigate the anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae issue the first stage of the reported study focuses on the changes undertaken in the bacterial community associated with the anaerobic digestion of piggery effluent under increasing saline conditions, with the aim of establishing a saline tolerant anaerobic digestion inoculum capable of digesting feedstocks under high salinity conditions. Favourable results from this inoculum development study allowed the investigation of anaerobic digestion of halophytic microalgae. The reported results demonstrate that a saline tolerant inoculum was maintained. Subsequent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of the resulting halophytic bacterial community showed several halophytic methanogens. The inoculum was used to digest the halophytic microalgae. The resulting gas data showed that biogas production of 358 ± 53 mL/g of volatile solids (VS) with a methane content of 54 ± 4.3% methane was achieved at 7% salinity. The volume of biogas produced on a wet weight microalgae biomass basis was 122 ± 26 and 175 ± 25 mL/g of halophytic microalgae biomass respectively (74 ± 2.8 wt.% moisture content). The conversion of carbon in the feedstock to methane achieved an efficiency of 26.4% and 46.6% at 3.4% and 7% salinity respectively. A halo-tolerant anaerobic digestion microbial community could be further optimized to complete the loop with nutrient recycle required with the production of halophytic microalgae based biofuels and potentially, hypersaline wastewater treatment applications.

Andrew Ward; Andy Ball; David Lewis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

MA Doping Analysis on Breeding Capability and Protected Plutonium Production of Large FBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent fuel from LWR can be seen as long-live waste if it is not recycled or as a 'new fuel' resource if it is recycled into the reactors. Uranium and plutonium have been used for 'new fuel' resources from LWR spent fuel as MOX fuel type which is loaded into thermal reactor or fast reactor types. Other actinides from the spent fuel such as neptunium, americium and curium as minor actinide (MA) are considered to be loaded into the reactors for specific purposes, recently. Those purposes such as for increasing protected plutonium production and breeding capability for protected plutonium as well as in the same time those amount of MA can be reduced to a small quantity as a burner or transmutation purpose. Some investigations and scientific approaches are performed in order to increase a material ''barrier'' in plutonium isotope composition by increasing the even mass number of plutonium isotope such as Pu-238, Pu-240 and Pu-242 as plutonium protected composition. Higher material barrier which related to intrinsic properties of plutonium isotopes with even mass number (Pu-238, Pu-240 and Pu-242), are recognized because of their intense decay heat (DH) and high spontaneous fission neutron (SFN) rates. Those even number mass of plutonium isotope contribute to some criteria of plutonium characterization which will be adopted for present study such as IAEA, Pellaud and Kessler criteria (IAEA, 1972; Pellaud, 2002; and Kessler, 2007). The present paper intends to evaluate the breeding capability as a fuel sustainability index of the reactors and to analyze the composition of protected plutonium production of large power reactor based on the FaCT FBR as reference (Ohki, et al., 2008). Three dimensional FBR core configuration has been adopted which is based on the core optimization calculation of SRAC-CITATION code as reactor core analysis and JENDL-3.3 is adopted for nuclear data library. Some MA doping materials are loaded into the blanket regions which can be considered as breeding region for protected plutonium production. Breeding capability of the reactor can be increased effectively by increasing MA doping rate while criticality condition of the reactor is reduced by doping MA. Adopting MA cycle is also effective to increase the isotopic Pu-238 production in plutonium vector composition for denaturing purpose of plutonium.

Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Kuno, Yusuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Non-proliferation Science and Technology Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

442

Proton-decoupled CPMG: A better experiment for measuring 15N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract 15N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how \\{IDPs\\} respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality 15N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of \\{IDPs\\} are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as 15N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150 ms. This is much shorter than 15N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample 15N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5–1 s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) 15N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of 15N? spins in arginine side chains. We anticipate that the new experiment will be a valuable addition to the NMR toolbox for studies of IDPs.

Tairan Yuwen; Nikolai R. Skrynnikov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of XPG as well as the C-terminal region of WRN. The physical interaction between XPG and WRN links NER, (made evident by the disease XP) with DSBR, which imparts additional knowledge of the overlapping nature of these two proteins and the previously distinct DNA repair pathways they are associated with. Since genomic integrity is constantly threatened by both endogenous and exogenous (internal and external) damage, understanding the roles of these proteins in coordinating DNA repair processes with replication will signifi cantly further understanding how defects instigate physiological consequences in response to various DNA damaging sources. This ultimately contributes to our understanding of cancer and premature aging.

Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Assessment and reduction of proliferation risk of reactor-grade plutonium regarding construction of ‘fizzle bombs’ by terrorists  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The approximately 23.7 wt% 240Pu in reactor-grade plutonium denatures the 239Pu to the extent that it cannot fuel high yield nuclear weapons. 240Pu has a high spontaneous fission rate, which increases the spontaneous neutron flux within the fuel. When such a nuclear weapon is triggered, these neutrons cause the nuclear fission chain reaction to pre-detonate which blows the imploding fuel shell apart before the designed level of compression and reactivity could be attained, thereby greatly reducing the average energy yield of such “fizzle” bombs. Therefore reactor-grade plutonium is normally viewed as highly proliferation resistant. In this article the literature on the proliferation resistance of reactor-grade plutonium and on the mechanism and effect of fizzle bombs is reviewed in order to test this view. It is shown that even very low yield fizzle bombs, exploded in urban areas, would still cause serious blast damage as well as radioactive contamination. Combined with the high levels of induced terror, fizzle bombs might thus be attractive psychological weapons for terrorists. Therefore reactor-grade plutonium may not be sufficiently proliferation resistant against nuclear terrorism. However, denaturisation with more than 9% 238Pu produces high levels of decay heat which will melt or explode the high explosives around uncooled implosion type weapons, rendering them useless. Unfortunately, reactor-grade Pu contains only 2.7% 238Pu and is thus not sufficiently proliferation resistant in this respect. It is also shown that the associated neptunium poses a substantial proliferation risk. In the present study strong improvement of the proliferation resistance was demonstrated by simulation of incineration of reactor-grade plutonium in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor Demonstration Power Plant. Results for modified fuel cycles, aimed at transmutating 237Np to 238Pu are also reported. However, these modifications increased the disloaded heavy metal mass, thereby substantially increasing the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel. Therefore this intervention is not recommended. 237NP should thus rather be incinerated it in fast reactors, light-water reactors or CANDU reactors.

Dawid E. Serfontein; Eben J. Mulder; Frederik Reitsma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

In contrast to conventional inactivated influenza vaccines, 4xM2e.HSP70c fusion protein fully protected mice against lethal dose of H1, H3 and H9 influenza A isolates circulating in Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ideal vaccines against influenza viruses should elicit not only a humoral response, but also a cellular response. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HSP70 (mHSP70) have been found to promote immunogenic APCs function, elicit a strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, and prevent the induction of tolerance. Moreover, it showed linkage of antigens to the C-terminus of mHSP70 (mHSP70c) can represent them as vaccines resulted in more potent, protective antigen specific responses in the absence of adjuvants or complex formulations. Hence, recombinant fusion protein comprising C-terminus of mHSP70 genetically fused to four tandem repeats of the ectodomain of the conserved influenza matrix protein M2 (M2e) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified under denaturing condition, refolding, and then confirmed by SDS-PAGE, respectively. The recombinant fusion protein, 4xM2e.HSP70c, retained its immunogenicity and displayed the protective epitope of M2e by ELISA and FITC assays. A prime-boost administration of 4xM2e.HSP70c formulated in F105 buffer by intramuscular route in mice (Balb/C) provided full protection against lethal dose of mouse-adapted H1N1, H3N2, or H9N2 influenza A isolates from Iran compared to 0-33.34% survival rate of challenged unimmunized and immunized mice with the currently in use conventional vaccines designated as control groups. However, protection induced by immunization with 4xM2e.HSP70c failed to prevent weight loss in challenged mice; they experienced significantly lower weight loss, clinical symptoms and higher lung viral clearance in comparison with protective effects of conventional influenza vaccines in challenged mice. These data demonstrate that C-terminal domain of mHSP70 can be a superior candidate to deliver the adjuvant function in M2e-based influenza A vaccine in order to provide significant protection against multiple influenza A virus strains.

Ebrahimi, Seyyed Mahmoud, E-mail: smebrahimi@shirazu.ac.ir [Applied Biotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-3651,Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center of Virus and Vaccine, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Science, P.O.Box 14155-3651, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabaghian, Mehran [Department of Pathobiology, University of Tehran, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Pathobiology, University of Tehran, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tebianian, Majid [Department of Biotechnology, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute (RVSRI), P.O. Box 31975/148, Karaj, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biotechnology, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute (RVSRI), P.O. Box 31975/148, Karaj, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabeh Jazi, Mohammad Hossein [Department of Pathobiology, University of Tehran, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Pathobiology, University of Tehran, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and telomere functions are denatured. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide direct evidence of hyperthermia induced gene amplification.

Yan, Bin, E-mail: yanbin@mercyhealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Mercy Cancer Center, Mercy Medical Center-North Iowa, Mason City, IA 50401 (United States); Ouyang, Ruoyun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410011 (China)] [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410011 (China); Huang, Chenghui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Department of Oncology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Liu, Franklin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Neill, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Li, Chuanyuan [Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)] [Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid nanoencapsulation of a synthetic coumarin: Cytotoxicity and bio-distribution in mice, in cancer cell line and interaction with calf thymus DNA as target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several naturally occurring coumarin compounds, including scopoletin (7 hydroxy-6 methoxycoumarin), of plant origin have been reported to have anti-cancer potentials. A related but chemically synthesized coumarin, 4-methyl-7-hydroxy coumarin (SC), was also shown to have similar anti-cancer potentials. In the present study, to test if nano-encapsulated SC could be a more potent anti-cancer agent, we encapsulated SC with poly lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (Nano Coumarin; NC) and tested its potentials with a variety of protocols. NC demonstrated greater efficiency of drug uptake and showed anti-cancer potentials in melanoma cell line A375, as revealed from scanning electronic and atomic force microscopies. To test its possible interaction with target DNA, the combined data of circular dichroism spectra (CD) and melting temperature profile (T{sub m}) of calf thymus DNA treated with NC were analyzed. Results indicated a concentration dependent interaction of NC with calf thymus DNA, bringing in effective change in structure and conformation, and forming a new complex that increased its stability. Particle size and morphology of NC determined through polydispersity index and zeta potential using dynamic light scattering qualified NC to be a more potent anti-cancer agent than SC. Further, SC and NC showed negligible cytotoxic effects on normal skin cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of mice. Distribution assay of PLGA nanoparticles in different tissues like brain, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, and spleen in mice revealed the presence of nanoparticles in different tissues including brain, indicating that the particles could cross the blood brain barrier, significant information for drug design. - Graphical abstract: Nanoencapsulated coumarin (NC) were characterized for their size and morphology by scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microscopies (AFM).The physical interaction of the NC with calf thymus DNA was studied through circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, using UV-visible titration and thermal denaturation studies. NC had a concentration dependent interaction with calf thymus DNA, could form a new complex with double helical DNA, increased the T{sub m} value and altered CD spectra of DNA and showed stronger anti-cancer effect than synthetic coumarin. Display Omitted Research Highlights: > Strategy for PLGA nano-encapsulation of a bioactive synthetic coumarin, 4 methyl 7 hydroxy coumarin (SC) is formulated. > Anti-cancer potentials of nano-encapsulated SC (NC) are evaluated in skin papilloma cells A375 through standard protocols. > Data of CD and Tm indicate concentration dependent interactions of NC bringing conformational changes in target DNA. > Particle size of NC and physico-chemical interactions with target DNA show NC as a more potent anti-cancer drug than SC. > NC has less cytotoxic effects, and can cross the blood brain barrier - important features for strategic drug design.

Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Paul, Saili; De, Arnab; Das, Durba; Samadder, Asmita [Cytogenetyics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani-741235 (India); Boujedaini, Naoual [Boiron Laboratories, Lyon (France); Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman, E-mail: prof_arkb@yahoo.co.in [Cytogenetyics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani-741235 (India)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Structural and Functional Proteomic Analysis of a Developing Energy Transducing Membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While much is known about the light reactions of photosynthesis in purple bacteria, comparatively little information is available on how the requisite integral membrane proteins are assembled, their patterns of cellular localization are established or their apoproteins cooperate with numerous assembly factors in their insertion into the growing intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM). This problem was approached through a detailed structural and functional proteomic analysis of ICM assembly process in the well-characterized purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Proteomic approaches have focused upon identification of membrane proteins temporally expressed during ICM development and spatially localized in both membrane growth initiation sites and in mature ICM vesicles. Protocols were established for ICM induction under reduced aeration and ICM remodeling in cells adapting to low intensity illumination, which permitted isolation, in sucrose density gradients, of ICM growth initiation sites as an upper pigmented band (UPB) and mature ICM vesicles as the main (chromatophore) band. Non-denaturing clear native gel electrophoresis (CNE) of these isolated membrane fractions gave rise to pigmented bands containing the peripheral light-harvesting 2 (LH2) antenna and the reaction center-light-harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex, together with a full array of other ICM proteins, which were subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteomic analysis of the gel bands from chromatophores revealed developmental changes including increasing levels of the LH2 complex as ICM development proceeded, as well as a large array of other associated proteins including high spectral counts for the F1FO� ATP synthase subunits, given the inability to detect this coupling factor, as well as the more abundant cytochrome bc1 complex by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Significant levels of general membrane assembly factors were encountered, as well as high counts for RSP6124, a protein of unknown function, correlated with increasing LH2 levels. RC-LH1-containing CNE gel bands from the UPB were enriched in cytoplasmic membrane (CM) markers, including electron transfer and transport proteins, as well as general membrane assembly factors relative to chromatophore bands. This confirms the origin of the UPB from both peripheral respiratory membrane and sites of CM invagination. Significant levels of preprotein translocases YidC, YajC and SecY, bacterial type 1 signal peptidase and twin arg translocation subunit TatA were found. Such general membrane assembly factors were significantly enriched in the UPB RC-LH1 gel bands, confirming the active role of membrane invagination sites in pigment-protein complex assembly. Functional correlates of proteomics approaches were provided by near-IR fluorescence induction/relaxation transients arising from LH-BChl components. A linear relation was found between increasing functional absorption cross-section and slowing of RC electron transfer turnover rate, thought to arise from the imposition of constraints upon free UQ diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complex as the membrane became saturated with new LH2 rings. In cells undergoing ICM induction in which generation of the electrochemical proton gradient was uncoupled with CCCP, blockage in membrane insertion of the LH and RC polypetides was demonstrated. This was reflected in a diminution of quantum yield of the primary charge separation, a cessation in expansion of functional absorption cross-section and a >4-fold slowing in RC electron transfer turnover. The ICM insertion of ATP synthase and transhydrogenase was also significantly diminished. Importantly, for the UPB fraction, CCCP treatment resulted in accumulation of ~2-fold greater levels of the preprotein translocase SecY, the SecA translocation ATPase, Sec D and SecF insertion components, and chaperonins DnaJ and DnaK, suggesting that these general membrane assembly factors had accumulated in association with nascent LH and RC assembly intermediates. In addition to spectrally homogeneous bands c

Niederman, Robert A

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

449

E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray-Optimized DIG, VCR and Variable Valvetrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of biofuels for internal combustion engines has several well published advantages. The biofuels, made from biological sources such as corn or sugar cane, are renewable resources that reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. Fuels from agricultural sources can therefore reduce a countries energy dependency on other nations. Biofuels also have been shown to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere compared to traditional fossil based fuels. Because of these benefits several countries have set targets for the use of biofuels, especially ethanol, in their transportation fuels. Small percentages of ethanol are common place in gasoline but are typically limited to 5 to 8% by volume. Greater benefits are possible from higher concentrations and some countries such as the US and Sweden have encouraged the production of vehicles capable of operating on E85 (85% denatured ethanol and 15% gasoline). E85 capable vehicles are normally equipped to run the higher levels of ethanol by employing modified fuel delivery systems that can withstand the highly corrosive nature of the alcohol. These vehicles are not however equipped to take full advantage of ethanol's properties during the combustion process. Ethanol has a much higher blend research octane number than gasoline. This allows the use of higher engine compression ratios and spark advance which result in more efficient engine operation. Ethanol's latent heat of vaporization is also much higher that gasoline. This higher heat of vaporization cools the engine intake charge which also allows the engine compression ratio to be increased even further. An engine that is optimized for operation on high concentrations of ethanol therefore will have compression ratios that are too high to avoid spark knock (pre-ignition) if run on gasoline or a gasoline/ethanol blend that has a low percentage alcohol. An engine was developed during this project to leverage the improved evaporative cooling and high octane of E85 to improve fuel economy and offset E85's lower energy content. A 2.0 L production Direct Injection gasoline, (DIg) engine employing Dual Independent Cam Phasing, (DICP) and turbo charging was used as the base engine. Modified pistons were used to increase the geometric compression ratio from 9.2:1 to 11.85:1 by modifying the pistons and adding advanced valvetrain to proved control of displacement and effective compression ratio through valve timing control. The advanced valvetrain utilized Delphi's two step valvetrain hardware and intake cam phaser with increased phasing authority of 80 crank angle degrees. Using this hardware the engine was capable of operating knock free on all fuels tested from E0-E85 by controlling effective compression ratio using a Late Intake Valve Closing, (LIVC) strategy. The LIVC strategy results in changes in the trapped displacement such that knock limited torque for gasoline is significantly lower than E85. The use of spark retard to control knock enables higher peak torque for knock limited fuels, however a loss in efficiency results. For gasoline and E10 fuels, full effective displacement could not be reached before spark retard produced a net loss in torque. The use of an Early Intake Valve Closing, (EIVC) strategy resulted in an improvement of engine efficiency at low to mid loads for all fuels tested from E0- E85. Further the use of valve deactivation, to a single intake valve, improved combustion stability and enabled throttle-less operation down to less than 2 bar BMEP. Slight throttling to trap internal residual provided additional reductions in fuel consumption. To fully leverage the benefits of E85, or ethanol blends above E10, would require a vehicle level approach that would take advantage of the improved low end torque that is possible with E85. Operating the engine at reduced speeds and using advanced transmissions (6 speeds or higher) would provide a responsive efficient driving experience to the customer. The vehicle shift and torque converter lockup points for high ethanol blends could take advantage of the significant efficiency ad

Keith Confer; Harry Husted

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z