Sample records for democ rat mi

  1. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan, E-mail: johan.jakobsson@med.lu.se

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  2. MI high power operation and future plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kourbanis, Ioanis; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab's Main Injector on acceleration cycles to 120 GeV has been running a mixed mode operation delivering beam to both the antiproton source for pbar production and to the NuMI[1] target for neutrino production since 2005. On January 2008 the slip stacking process used to increase the beam to the pbar target was expanded to include the beam to the NuMI target increasing both the beam intensity and power. The current high power MI operation will be described along with the near future plans.

  3. Addendum to NuMI shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The original safety assessment and the Safety Envelope for the NuMI beam line corresponds to 400 kW of beam power. The Main Injector is currently capable of and approved for producing 500 kW of beam power2. However, operation of the NuMI beam line at 400 kW of power brings up the possibility of an occasional excursion above 400 kW due to better than usual tuning in one of the machines upstream of the NuMI beam line. An excursion above the DOE approved Safety Envelope will constitute a safety violation. The purpose of this addendum is to evaluate the radiological issues and modifications required to operate the NuMI beam line at 500 kW. This upgrade will allow 400 kW operations with a reasonable safety margin. Configuration of the NuMI beam line, boundaries, safety system and the methodologies used for the calculations are as described in the original NuMI SAD. While most of the calculations presented in the original shielding assessment were based on Monte Carlo simulations, which were based on the design geometries, most of the results presented in this addendum are based on the measurements conducted by the AD ES&H radiation safety group.

  4. MI Gap Clearing Kicker Magnet Design Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Chris; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kicker system requirements were originally conceived for the NOvA project. NOvA is a neutrino experiment located in Minnesota. To achieve the desired neutrino flux several upgrades are required to the accelerator complex. The Recycler will be used as a proton pre-injector for the Main Injector (MI). As the Recycler is the same size as the MI, it is possible to do a single turn fill ({approx}11 {micro}sec), minimizing the proton injection time in the MI cycle and maximizing the protons on target. The Recycler can then be filled with beam while the MI is ramping to extract beam to the target. To do this requires two new transfer lines. The existing Recycler injection line was designed for 10{pi} pbar beams, not the 20{pi} proton beams we anticipate from the Booster. The existing Recycler extraction line allows for proton injection through the MI, while we want direct injection from the Booster. These two lines will be decommissioned. The new injection line from the MI8 line into the Recycler will start at 848 and end with injection kickers at RR104. The new extraction line in the RR30 straight section will start with a new extraction kicker at RR232 and end with new MI injection kickers at MI308. Finally, to reduce beam loss activation in the enclosure, a new gap clearing kicker will be used to extract uncaptured beam created during the slip stack injection process down the existing dump line. It was suggested that the MI could benefit from this type of system immediately. This led to the early installation of the gap clearing system in the MI, followed by moving the system to Recycler during NOvA. The specifications also changed during this process. Initially the rise and fall time requirements were 38 ns and the field stability was {+-}1%. The 38 ns is based on having a gap of 2 RF buckets between injections. (There are 84 RF buckets that can be filled from the Booster for each injection, but 82 would be filled with beam. MI and Recycler contain 588 RF buckets.) A rough cost/benefit analysis showed that increasing the number of empty buckets to 3 decreased the kicker system cost by {approx}30%. This could be done while not extending the running time since this is only a 1% reduction in protons per pulse, hence the rise and fall time are now 57 ns. Additionally, the {+-}1% tolerance would have required a fast correction kicker while {+-}3% could be achieved without this kicker. The loosened tolerance was based on experience on wide band damping systems in the MI. A higher power wideband damping system is a better use of the resources as it can be used to correct for multiple sources of emittance growth. Finally, with the use of this system for MI instead of Recycler, the required strength grew from 1.2 mrad to 1.7 mrad. The final requirements for this kicker are listed.

  5. Sequence determinants of pri-miRNA processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auyeung, Vincent C. (Vincent Churk-man)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNAs that regulate many processes in physiology and pathology by guiding the repression of target messenger RNAs. For classification purposes, miRNAs are defined as ~22 nt RNAs that are produced ...

  6. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jong-Kook [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Henry, Jon C. [Department of Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Jiang, Jinmai [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Esau, Christine [Regulus Therapeutics, Carlsbad, CA (United States)] [Regulus Therapeutics, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Gusev, Yuriy [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States)] [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Lerner, Megan R. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Postier, Russell G. [Department of Surgery, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Brackett, Daniel J. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Schmittgen, Thomas D., E-mail: Schmittgen.2@osu.edu [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  7. Si, Yo Puedo Controlar Mi Diabetes!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¡Si, Yo Puedo Controlar Mi Diabetes! ¡Si, Yo Puedo Controlar Mí Diabetes! (Si, Yo Puedo/Latinos with diabetes. The curriculum is predicated on the American Diabetes Association's national standards of care and lifestyle skills to better control their diabetes. Relevance · Diabetes costs Texas more than 12 billion

  8. BMPs Regulate the Oft Development via miRNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Yan

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    -92 cluster encodes six miRNAs, miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19a, miR-20a, miR19b-1 and miR-92-1. They are known as oncogenes and play roles in the development of heart, lungs and immune system (Koralov et al., 2008; Ventura et al., 2008; Vincentz et al., 2008... previously described (Liu et al., 2004; Ventura et al., 2008; Verzi et al., 2005; Xiao et al., 2008). To generate the Bmp7flox allele, a targeting vector was constructed that introduced one loxP site into upstream of the Bmp7 fourth exon followed by a frt...

  9. Neutral sphingomyelinase inhibition participates to the benefits of N-acetylcysteine treatment in post-myocardial infarction failing heart rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    treatment in post- myocardial infarction failing heart rats Christophe ADAMY1,2,9 , Paul MULDER3,4,9 , Lara-MI failing heart rat Key words: chronic heart failure; glutathione; N-acetylcysteine; neutral, we showed that the left ventricle (LV) of human failing heart was depleted in total glutathione by 54

  10. Mi GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| Open Energy Information TopicsMexicoMi GmbH Jump

  11. ,"Sault St Marie, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sault St Marie, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  12. ,"Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Detroit, MI...

  13. ,"Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Marysville, MI...

  14. Examen de calcul matriciel Licence MASHS -MI -SPC, semestre 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lafont, Yves

    Examen de calcul matriciel Licence MASHS - MI - SPC, semestre 2 14 juin 2007 Durée de l'épreuve : 3

  15. Repression of ATR pathway by miR-185 enhances radiation-induced apoptosis and proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    of miR-34a expression may be responsible for important protective mechanisms counteracting radiationOPEN Repression of ATR pathway by miR-185 enhances radiation-induced apoptosis and proliferation of a human microRNA (miRNA), hsa-miR-185, is downregulated in response to ionizing radiation. Elevation of mi

  16. CID-miRNA: A web server for prediction of novel miRNA precursors in human genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyagi, Sonika; Vaz, Candida [Centre for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, School of Information Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Mehrauli Road, New Delhi 110067 (India); Gupta, Vipin; Bhatia, Rohit [Department of Computer Sciences, Netaji Subhash Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India); Maheshwari, Sachin [Department of Computer Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India); Srinivasan, Ashwin [IBM Research Lab, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India); Bhattacharya, Alok [Centre for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, School of Information Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Mehrauli Road, New Delhi 110067 (India); School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: alok.bhattacharya@gmail.com

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    microRNAs (miRNA) are a class of non-protein coding functional RNAs that are thought to regulate expression of target genes by direct interaction with mRNAs. miRNAs have been identified through both experimental and computational methods in a variety of eukaryotic organisms. Though these approaches have been partially successful, there is a need to develop more tools for detection of these RNAs as they are also thought to be present in abundance in many genomes. In this report we describe a tool and a web server, named CID-miRNA, for identification of miRNA precursors in a given DNA sequence, utilising secondary structure-based filtering systems and an algorithm based on stochastic context free grammar trained on human miRNAs. CID-miRNA analyses a given sequence using a web interface, for presence of putative miRNA precursors and the generated output lists all the potential regions that can form miRNA-like structures. It can also scan large genomic sequences for the presence of potential miRNA precursors in its stand-alone form. The web server can be accessed at (http://mirna.jnu.ac.in/cidmirna/)

  17. MicroRNA miR-125b causes leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousquet, Marina

    MicroRNA miR-125b has been implicated in several kinds of leukemia. The chromosomal translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) found in patients with myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia leads to an overexpression of miR-125b of ...

  18. TOOL KIT CHECKLIST 12DOM_MI058

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    TOOL KIT CHECKLIST 12DOM_MI058 TOOLS fOr DIY Considerthetypesofprojectsyouwillbeundertaking,secondhandisfineifthey'reingoodcondition. Anycuttingsurfacesmustberazorsharpandbespecifictothematerialtobecut. Tools--especiallypowertools--canbeverydangerous. "Reality,wastingmoneyandlettingfrustrationandfailuremakeyourprojectsunpleasant (andunsuccessful)andworsestill,putyouoffanymoreDIY. #12;TOOL KIT CHECKLIST 12DOM_MI058 BASIC TOOL KITS MAY INCLUDE

  19. BMC Bioinformatics Prediction of novel miRNAs and associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Pamela

    . Abstract Background: Small non-coding RNAs (21 to 24 nucleotides) regulate a number of developmental the collection of currently known soybean miRNAs. We developed a bioinformatics pipeline using in-house scripts on regulation patterns between the miRNAs and their predicted target genes expression. We also deposited

  20. ,"St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Exports to Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","St. Clair, MI...

  1. ,"St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","St. Clair, MI...

  2. miR-143 Interferes with ERK5 Signaling, and Abrogates Prostate Cancer Progression in Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    miR-143 Interferes with ERK5 Signaling, and Abrogates Prostate Cancer Progression in Mice Cyrielle-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5) activity. We show here that ERK5 is a miR-143 target in prostate cancer. Conclusions: mi, Apparailly F, Fernandez PL, et al. (2009) miR-143 Interferes with ERK5 Signaling, and Abrogates Prostate

  3. Regulation of Synaptic Structure and Function by FMRP-Associated MicroRNAs miR-125b and miR-132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edbauer, Dieter

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that suppress translation of specific mRNAs. The miRNA machinery interacts with fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which functions as translational repressor. We show that ...

  4. MicroRNAs in early embryonic development : dissecting the role of miR-290 through miR-295 in the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Lucas M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroRNAs mediate developmental regulation of gene expression via translational repression of target mRNAs. Targeted deletion of the miRNA biogenesis machinery in the mouse has demonstrated essential roles for miRNAs during ...

  5. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China) [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China); Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xi’an 710300 (China); Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China); Ren, Hong, E-mail: renhongs2000@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China)

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. •We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. •We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. •These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  6. Validation of MCNPX-PoliMi Fission Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. A. Pozzi; S. D. Clarke; W. Walsh; E. C. Miller; J. Dolan; M. Flaska; B. M. Wieger; A. Enqvist; E. Padovani; J. K. Mattingly; D. L. Chichester; P. Peerani

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new results on the measurement of correlated, outgoing neutrons from spontaneous fission events in a Cf-252 source. 16 EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors are used to measure neutron-neutron correlations for various detector angles. Anisotropy in neutron emission is observed. The results are compared to MCNPX-PoliMi simulations and good agreement is observed.

  7. MCNPX-PoliMi for Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. A. Pozzi; S. D. Clarke; W. Walsh; E. C. Miller; J. Dolan; M. Flaska; B. M. Wieger; A. Enqvist; E. Padovani; J. K. Mattingly; D. L. Chichester; P. Peerani

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past few years, efforts to develop new measurement systems to support nuclear nonproliferation and homeland security have increased substantially. Monte Carlo radiation transport is one of the simulation methods of choice for the analysis of data from existing systems and for the design of new measurement systems; it allows for accurate description of geometries, detailed modeling of particle-nucleus interactions, and event-by-event detection analysis. This paper describes the use of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX-PoliMi for nuclear-nonproliferation applications, with particular emphasis on the simulation of spontaneous and neutron-induced nuclear fission. In fact, of all possible neutron-nucleus interactions, neutron-induced fission is the most defining characteristic of special nuclear material (such as U-235 and Pu-239), which is the material of interest in nuclear-nonproliferation applications. The MCNP-PoliMi code was originally released from the Radiation Safety Shielding Center (RSSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2003 [1]; the MCNPX-PoliMi code contains many enhancements and is based on MCNPX ver. 2.7.0. MCNPX-PoliMi ver. 2.0 was released through RSICC in 2012 as a patch to MCNPX ver. 2.7.0 and as an executable [2].

  8. Supramolecular Chemistry@PoliMI: Where Nano meets Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supramolecular Chemistry@PoliMI: Where Nano meets Biology 28-29 June, 2012 Aula De Donato Piazza:30-12:15 Jonathan W. Steed, Durhan University, United Kingdom Responsive Supramolecular gels 12:15-12:45 Alberto-assembly for Biomedical Applications 14:45-15:15 Markus Linder, VTT-Technical Research Centre of Finland Materials by self

  9. Event Rates for Off Axis NuMI Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Viren

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino interaction rates for experiments placed off axis in the NuMI beam are calculated. Primary proton beam energy is 120 GeV and four locations at 810 km from target and 6, 12, 30 and 40 km off axis are considered. This report is part of the Joint FNAL/BNL Future Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Study.

  10. Yo, yo misma y mi musa1 (mara castrejn)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    siempre que mantengan una distancia prudente de seguridad, pero cuando yo escribo la musa soy yo misma y todo el trabajo «sucio» y eso te convierte en actante, y a mí en lactante. 1. Mi infancia hal-00747889

  11. May 2 6, 2011 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Blake

    May 2 ­ 6, 2011 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Young Researchers and Grad Students of Michigan, Chair, Craig Evans ­ Univ of California, Berkeley, Tai-Ping Liu ­ Stanford, Craig Tracy ­ Univ, Institute of Mathematics and its Applications-University of Minnesota, Department of Mathematics-University

  12. Agent Program Planning Information S! Yo Puedo Controlar Mi Diabetes!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agent Program Planning Information Sí! ¡Yo Puedo Controlar Mi Diabetes! (A culturally appropriate type 2 diabetes self-management program for Hispanic/Latino, Spanish-speaking audiences) Relevance · Estimates from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission indicate that in 2011 diabetes cost Texas more

  13. Discovery of miRNA-regulated processes in mammalian development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Amanda Garfinkel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The genomes of plants and animals encode hundreds of non-coding ~22nt RNAs termed "microRNAs" (miRNAs). These RNAs guide the sequence-specific inhibition of translation and destabilization of mRNA targets through short ...

  14. The action of ARGONAUTE1 in the miRNA pathway and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartel, David

    The action of ARGONAUTE1 in the miRNA pathway and its regulation by the miRNA pathway are crucial, France; 2 Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA; 3 Laboratoire, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous 21

  15. Molecular Aspects of the Regulation of Female Sexual Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Amy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from Charles River (Portage, MI). Upon arrival, rats werepurchased (Charles River, Portage, MI). Upon arrival, rats

  16. MI 625 -Processos Estocasticos Nancy Lopes Garcia, Sala 209 -IMECC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopes Garcia, Nancy

    MI 625 - Processos Estoc´asticos Nancy Lopes Garcia, Sala 209 - IMECC nancy@ime.unicamp.br, www´etrica para Processos de Poisson · MCMC e simula¸c~ao perfeita 1 #12;Processos Estoc´asticos Infer^encia: Seja´es de um Modelo Log´istico Regressivo, cujas vari´aveis regressoras dependem do tempo anterior, por

  17. Groundwater protection for the NuMI project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehmann, A.; Smart, W.; Menary, S.; Hylen, J.; Childress, S.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics requirements for the long base line neutrino oscillation experiment MINOS dictate that the NuMI beamline be located in the aquifer at Fermilab. A methodology is described for calculating the level of radioactivation of groundwater caused by operation of this beamline. A conceptual shielding design for the 750 meter long decay pipe is investigated which would reduce radioactivation of the groundwater to below government standards. More economical shielding designs to meet these requirements are being explored. Also, information on local geology, hydrogeology, government standards, and a glossary have been included.

  18. MHK Technologies/Mi2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagship <HelixKESCClick hereMi2 < MHK

  19. 2012 NIST Precision Measurement Grants Georg Raithel, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    2012 NIST Precision Measurement Grants Georg Raithel, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI to the transition frequencies. Thomas Stace, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Thermometry

  20. Global identification of miRNAs and targets in Populus euphratica under salt stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xing-Wang

    Global identification of miRNAs and targets in Populus euphratica under salt stress Bosheng Li, a typical hydro-halophyte, is ideal for studying salt stress responses in woody plants. MicroRNAs (miRNA may regulate tolerance to salt stress but this has not been widely studied in P. euphratica

  1. MONITORING AND HABITAT ANALYSIS FOR WOLVES IN UPPER MARCEL J. POTVIN,1 School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resources and Environmental Science Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA THOMAS D. DRUMMER, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA DEAN E. BEYER, JR., Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Marquette

  2. 2005 Borchardt Conference: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerenberg, Robert

    -25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 1 Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 2 (sparging) to replenish oxygen: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings

  3. Solar Flare Measurements with STIX and MiSolFA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casadei, Diego

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar flares are the most powerful events in the solar system and the brightest sources of X-rays, often associated with emission of particles reaching the Earth and causing geomagnetic storms, giving problems to communication, airplanes and even black-outs. X-rays emitted by accelerated electrons are the most direct probe of solar flare phenomena. The Micro Solar-Flare Apparatus (MiSolFA) is a proposed compact X-ray detector which will address the two biggest issues in solar flare modeling. Dynamic range limitations prevent simultaneous spectroscopy with a single instrument of all X-ray emitting regions of a flare. In addition, most X-ray observations so far are inconsistent with the high anisotropy predicted by the models usually adopted for solar flares. Operated at the same time as the STIX instrument of the ESA Solar Orbiter mission, at the next solar maximum (2020), they will have the unique opportunity to look at the same flare from two different directions: Solar Orbiter gets very close to the Sun wit...

  4. Modulation of Ago-miRNA regulatory networks by cis-sequence elements and target competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosson, Andrew D. (Andrew David)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulators of gene expression in a wide range of organisms and biological processes. Each miRNA guides Argonaute (Ago) protein complexes to target and repress hundreds of genes in a sequence-dependent manner. To identify ...

  5. Direct miRNA-hybridization assays and their potential in diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Sergey

    Direct miRNA-hybridization assays and their potential in diagnostics David W. Wegman, Sergey N. Wegman, Sergey N. Krylov* Centre for Research on Biomolecular Interactions, York University, Toronto

  6. Posttranscriptional Regulation of BK Channel Splice Variant Stability by miR-9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegelmann , Hava T

    Neuron Article Posttranscriptional Regulation of BK Channel Splice Variant Stability by miR-9Department of Psychiatry, Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical Systems Laboratory, Computer Science Department, University of Massachusetts, 140 Governors Drive, Amherst

  7. RATS VERSUS PEOPLE Rats equal twice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ----= -, - paper car ton s, and wooden containers are easily damaged. #12;By Starting Fires Rats start fires by damaging the insu- lation of electric wiring. A survey of 39 cities showed that 530 fires were started

  8. Modern Instrumentation, 2013, 2, 7-15 doi:10.4236/mi.2013.21002 Published Online January 2013 (http://www.scirp.org/journal/mi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    ://www.scirp.org/journal/mi) Toward a Test Protocol for Conducted Energy Weapons Andy Adler1 , David Dawson1 , Robert Evans2 , Laurin and Computer Engineering, Ottawa, Canada 2 Datrend Systems Inc., Vancouver, Canada 3 Vernac Ltd., Ottawa, Canada 4 MPB Technologies, Montreal, Canada Email: adler@sce.carleton.ca Received November 4, 2012

  9. miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jie [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Zheng, Fangxia [Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Yu, Gang [Department for Disease Control, Tumor Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department for Disease Control, Tumor Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Yin, Yanhua, E-mail: yinyanhuablk@163.com [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Lu, Qingyang [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. •miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. •miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. •NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. •NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2–3 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of miR-196a in cervical carcinogenesis and suggested a potential use of miR-196a for clinical diagnosis and as a therapeutic target.

  10. Controlling Rats and Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    at least 18 inches off the ground. 18? 18? TCE?Wildlife Services P.O. Box 100410 ? San Antonio, Texas 78201-1710 Rat-proofing Whenever it can be accomplished at a rea- sonable cost, rat-proofing is recommended as the most permanent means of control...

  11. Mi2b Is Required for c-Globin Gene Silencing: Temporal Assembly of a GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 Repressor Complex in b-YAC Transgenic Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Flavia C.; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Chazelle, Allen M.; Neades, Renee Y.; Peterson, Kenneth R.

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    - globin expression during adult definitive erythropoiesis. Results Expression of c-globin in Mi2b conditional knockout b- YAC mice The NuRD complex is composed of the ATPase Mi2, MTA-1, MTA-2, p66, RbAp46 (RBBP7), RbAp48 (RBBP4), MBD3 and the histone... (Figure 2N), although the Mi2b conditional knockout mice showed fewer strong HbF-positive cells. Mature RBCs are enucleated, making it difficult to demonstrate that the nuclear-localized Mi2b protein is reduced in these cells. To further demonstrate...

  12. miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma via downregulation of FOXO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Liang [Neurosurgery Institute, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of Guangdong, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China) [Neurosurgery Institute, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of Guangdong, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Tang, Yanping [Neurosurgery Institute, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of Guangdong, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China)] [Neurosurgery Institute, Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration of Guangdong, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Wang, Jian [Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Yan, Zhongjie [Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA,The Bayi Clinical Medical Institute of Southern Medical University, Beijing 100700 (China)] [Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA,The Bayi Clinical Medical Institute of Southern Medical University, Beijing 100700 (China); Xu, Ruxiang, E-mail: RuxiangXu@yahoo.com [Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA,The Bayi Clinical Medical Institute of Southern Medical University, Beijing 100700 (China)] [Affiliated Bayi Brain Hospital, The Military General Hospital of Beijing PLA,The Bayi Clinical Medical Institute of Southern Medical University, Beijing 100700 (China)

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •miR-421 is upregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. •FOXO4 is a direct and functional target of miR-421. -- Abstract: microRNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in cancer development and progression. Hence, identifying functional microRNAs and better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would provide new clues for the development of targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we reported that a microRNA, miR-421 played an oncogenic role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Upregulation of miR-421 induced, whereas inhibition of miR-421 repressed cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, we found that upregulation of miR-421 inhibited forkhead box protein O4 (FOXO4) signaling pathway following downregulation of p21, p27, Bim and FASL expression by directly targeting FOXO4 3?UTR. Additionally, we demonstrated that FOXO4 expression is critical for miR-421-induced cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Taken together, our findings not only suggest that miR-421 promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, but also uncover a novel regulatory mechanism for inactivation of FOXO4 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  13. Single-molecule modeling of mRNA degradation by miRNA: Lessons from data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celine Sin; Davide Chiarugi; Angelo Valleriani

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental results on the effect of miRNA on the decay of its target mRNA have been analyzed against a previously hypothesized single molecule degradation pathway. According to that hypothesis, the silencing complex (miRISC) first interacts with its target mRNA and then recruits the protein complexes associated with NOT1 and PAN3 to trigger deadenylation (and subsequent degradation) of the target mRNA. Our analysis of the experimental decay patterns allowed us to refine the structure of the degradation pathways at the single molecule level. Surprisingly, we found that if the previously hypothesized network was correct, only about 7% of the target mRNA would be regulated by the miRNA mechanism, which is inconsistent with the available knowledge. Based on systematic data analysis, we propose the alternative hypothesis that NOT1 interacts with miRISC before binding to the target mRNA. Moreover, we show that when miRISC binds alone to the target mRNA, the mRNA is degraded more slowly, probably through a deadenylation-independent pathway. The new biochemical pathway we propose both fits the data and paves the way for new experimental work to identify new interactions.

  14. Introduction The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Introduction ® The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy use. When used with specialty fiber optic cables the MI-150 illuminator can also Illuminator from the carton and retain the manual and any additional documents. ! Remove the fiber optic cable

  15. Roles of the MicroRNA miR-31 in tumor metastasis and an experimental system for the unbiased discovery of genes relevant for breast cancer metastasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valastyan, Scott J. (Scott John)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In these studies, the microRNA miR-31 was identified as a potent inhibitor of breast cancer metastasis. miR-31 expression levels were inversely associated with the propensity to develop metastatic disease in human breast ...

  16. miR-122 targets NOD2 to decrease intestinal epithelial cell injury in Crohn’s disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Chengxiao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Liwei; Zheng, Mingxia [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Xu, Chundi [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Ruijin affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Song, Jian, E-mail: jiansongkxy@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China); Meng, Xiaochun [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)] [Department of Pediatrics, Jiangwan Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200434 (China)

    2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •NOD2 is a target gene of miR-122. •miR-122 inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. •miR-122 reduces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-? and IFN-?). •miR-122 promotes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). •NF-?B signaling pathway is involved in inflammatory response induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Crohn’s disease (CD) is one of the two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) thought to be caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recently, miR-122 was found to be deregulated in association with CD progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the gene nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15), which is strongly associated with susceptibility to CD, was identified as a functional target of miR-122. MiR-122 inhibited LPS-induced apoptosis by suppressing NOD2 in HT-29 cells. NOD2 interaction with LPS initiates signal transduction mechanisms resulting in the activation of nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) and the stimulation of downstream pro-inflammatory events. The activation of NF-?B was inhibited in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor or NOD2 shRNA. The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-? and IFN-? was significantly decreased, whereas therelease of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was increased in LPS-stimulated HT-29 cells pretreated with miR-122 precursor, NOD2 shRNA or the NF-?B inhibitor QNZ. Taken together, these results indicate that miR-122 and its target gene NOD2 may play an important role in the injury of intestinal epithelial cells induced by LPS.

  17. Organic scintillation detector response simulation using non-analog MCNPX-PoliMi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, S.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.; Larsen, E. W. [Univ. of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic liquid scintillation detectors are valuable for the detection of special nuclear material since they are capable of detecting both neutrons and gamma rays. Scintillators can also provide energy information which is helpful in identification and characterization of the source. In order to design scintillation based measurement systems appropriate simulation tools are needed. MCNPX-PoliMi is capable of simulating scintillation detector response; however, simulations have traditionally been run in analog mode which leads to long computation times. In this paper, non-analog MCNPX-PoliMi mode which uses variance reduction techniques is applied and tested. The non-analog MCNPX-PoliMi simulation test cases use source biasing, geometry splitting and a combination of both variance reduction techniques to efficiently simulate pulse height distribution and then time-of-flight for a heavily shielded case with a {sup 252}Cf source. An improvement factor (I), is calculated for distributions in each of the three cases above to analyze the effectiveness of the non-analog MCNPX-PoliMi simulations in reducing computation time. It is found that of the three cases, the last case which uses a combination of source biasing and geometry splitting shows the most improvement in simulation run time for the same desired variance. For pulse height distributions speedup ranging from a factor 5 to 25 is observed, while for time-of-flights the speedup factors range from 3 to 10. (authors)

  18. The NuMI proton beam at Fermilab successes and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, S.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NuMI beam at Fermilab has delivered over 5 x 10{sup 20} 120 GeV protons to the neutrino production target since the start for MINOS [1] neutrino oscillation experiment operation in 2005. We report on proton beam commissioning and operation status, including successes and challenges with this beam.

  19. Signatures of Purifying and Local Positive Selection in Human miRNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, Kenneth

    populations adapt to specific environments. These findings will fuel future investigations exploring how, the expression of the respective protein-coding genes. Production of animal miRNAs is a two-step process where implicated in cell growth, tissue differenti- ation, cell proliferation, embryonic development, insulin

  20. L.van BEETHOVEN : Quatuor n10 en Mi bmol majeur, Op.74 Poco Adagio -Allegro -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazliak, Laurent

    L.van BEETHOVEN : Quatuor n°10 en Mi bémol majeur, Op.74 Poco Adagio - Allegro - Adagio ma non con variazioni- Allegro Après le coup de tonnerre que représentait l'achèvement des trois quatuors à apportent une tension qui se fond dans un grand crescendo menant à l'Allegro. Trois accords joyeux pour un

  1. MI-HYUN PARK, PhD Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    and sustainability Stormwater runoff modeling and management Environmental informatics Decision support systems Areas Land use/climate change and human impact on water quality Urban watershed management of Best Management Practices for Urban Stormwater Management, Water Environment Research, in revision Mi

  2. 2000 JAPAN-USA Symposium on Flexible Automation July 23-26, 2000, Ann Arbor, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

    2000 JAPAN-USA Symposium on Flexible Automation July 23-26, 2000, Ann Arbor, MI 2000JUSFA-US1 OFF-LINE ERROR RECOVERY LOGIC SYNTHESIS IN AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY LINES BY USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING Cem M. Baydar by the experts or automated error recovery logic controllers embedded in the system. The previous work

  3. New Loops! MiTeGen* 50MicroMountsTM consist of a thin microfabricated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    New Loops! MiTeGen* 50µMicroMountsTM consist of a thin microfabricated polyimide film attached to a solid non-magnetic stainless steel pin. The film is polyimide, which is used in Kapton® tape and is employed for X- ray transparent windows on X-ray beam lines. The film is curved by wrapping polyimide film

  4. Academic Staff ESS Coversheet Candidate Name (Last, First, M.I.) Banner ID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VandeVord, Pamela

    rev. 6/14 Academic Staff ESS Coversheet Candidate Name (Last, First, M.I.) Banner ID Primary School Initial WSU appointment date Length of ESS-track service (in years & months) Academic Services Officer Archivist Initial WSU rank Dates off ESS-track/Reason Extens Prgm Coordinator Financial Aid Officer Date

  5. We investigated the effects of deforestation on mi-croclimates and sporogonic development of Plasmodium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obbard, Darren

    We investigated the effects of deforestation on mi- croclimates and sporogonic development membrane feeders. Fed mosquitoes were placed in houses in forested and deforest- ed areas in a highland area (1,500 m above sea level) and monitored for parasite development. Deforested sites had higher

  6. MI FARM TO SCHOOL GRANTEES 2014-2015 PROGRAM YEAR AND PREVIOUS GRANTEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MI FARM TO SCHOOL GRANTEES 2014-2015 PROGRAM YEAR AND PREVIOUS GRANTEES FOODSYSTEMS.MSU.EDU 2014-2015 GRANTEES School/ district/ program County Current Grant Years as a grantee A&W Daycare Wayne Planning 1 TO SCHOOL GRANTEES (2011/12 ­ 2013/14) School/ district/ program County Grant Type(s) Grant Years All Aboard

  7. MiTV: Multiple-Implementation Testing of User-Input Validators for Web Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    MiTV: Multiple-Implementation Testing of User-Input Validators for Web Applications Kunal Taneja1 Nuo Li1 Madhuri R. Marri1 Tao Xie1 Nikolai Tillmann2 1 Department of Computer Science, North Carolina,txie}@ncsu.edu, 2nikolait@microsoft.com ABSTRACT User-input validators play an essential role in guarding a web

  8. BNL/SNS TECHNICAL NOTE R. Witkover, D. Gassner, C. Mi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL/SNS TECHNICAL NOTE NO. 118 R. Witkover, D. Gassner, C. Mi BNL, Upton, NY 11973, USA October 31, 2002 The SNS BLM System is designed to measure beam losses from a maximum 1% local loss down to a 1 W/m operating loss tolerance. In fact, resolution of 1 % of the 1 W/m threshold has been requested. This amounts

  9. AUSTRALIAN. N~TIONAL UNIVE~SITY DEPARTMENTO:miNUCLEAR PFf-y'SICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying

    AUSTRALIAN. N~TIONAL UNIVE~SITY DEPARTMENTO:miNUCLEAR PFf-y'SICS 14UD TANK OPENING REPORT/iNo. 51 functions for which it provides power. An order was . immediately placed with N.E.C. for 28 perspex bars microamp hours of b.d.p. generation than its predicted lifetime. In preparation for the next opening

  10. Super Rat Poison Man

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Bob Square Tie. But Zheng Xiaoyu, the deposed head of China's State Food and Drug Administration begs to be excused. A rat poison manufacturer here in China applied for permission to name some of its products after him, partly because he's corrupt...

  11. PIANO DI RIQUALIFICAZIONE AMBIENTALE E PAESAGGISTICA DEL TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) ­ BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA Impianto di costruito negli anni '70 per lo. · Energia elettrica prodotta: 13.000.000 KWh/anno. LAND S.r.l. Landscape Architecture Nature Development

  12. Measurement of Pi-K Ratios from the NuMI Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seun, Sin Man; /Harvard U.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions of protons (p) with the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) target are used to create the neutrino beam for the MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) Experiment. Using the MIPP (Main Injector Particle Production) experimental apparatus, the production of charged pions and kaons in p+NuMI interactions is studied. The data come from a sample of 2 x 10{sup 6} events obtained by MIPP using the 120 GeV/c proton beam from the Main Injector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, USA. Pions and kaons are identified by measurement in a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Presented are measurements of {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}/K{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}/K{sup +} and {pi}{sup -}/K{sup -} production ratios in the momentum range p{sub T} < 2 GeV/c transversely and 20 GeV/c < p{sub z} < 90 GeV/c longitudinally. Also provided are detailed comparisons of the MIPP NuMI data with the MIPP Thin Carbon data, the MIPP Monte Carlo simulation and the current MINOS models in the relevant momentum ranges.

  13. Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpxiong@medmail.com.cn

    2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlight: •MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. •This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. •Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

  14. MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huijuan [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Xiao, ZhengHua [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China)] [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China); Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Hao, Quan, E-mail: quanhao2002@163.com [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. •MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. •p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  15. Horn Operational Experience in K2K, MiniBooNE, NuMI and CNGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardons, A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives an overview of the operation and experience gained in the running of magnetic horns in conventional neutrino beam lines (K2K, MiniBooNE, NuMI and CNGS) over the last decade. Increasing beam power puts higher demands on horn conductors but even more on their hydraulic and electrical systems, while the horn environment itself becomes more hostile due to radiation. Experience shows that designing horns for remote handling and testing them extensively without beam become prerequisites for successful future neutrino beam lines.

  16. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auty, David John; /Sussex U.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT MI54 I See Block 16C I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russianvolunteer | National011-03-2010 1 PAGE 1 PageMI54 I See

  18. Upgrade of the Minos+ Experiment Data Acquisition for the High Energy NuMI Beam Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badgett, William; Torretta, Donatella; Meier, Jerry; Gunderson, Jeffrey; Osterholm, Denise; Saranen, David

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Minos+ experiment is an extension of the Minos experiment at a higher energy and more intense neutrino beam, with the data collection having begun in the fall of 2013. The neutrino beam is provided by the Neutrinos from the Main Injector (NuMI) beam-line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The detector apparatus consists of two main detectors, one underground at Fermilab and the other in Soudan, Minnesota with the purpose of studying neutrino oscillations at a base line of 735 km. The original data acquisition system has been running for several years collecting data from NuMI, but with the extended run from 2013, parts of the system needed to be replaced due to obsolescence, reliability problems, and data throughput limitations. Specifically, we have replaced the front-end readout controllers, event builder, and data acquisition computing and trigger processing farms with modern, modular and reliable devices with few single points of failure. The new system is based on gigabit Ethernet T...

  19. Problem 65 in Section 4.1 (Page 274) Constructing a pipeline Supertankers off-load oil at a docking facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, Anne

    facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery is 9 mi east of the shore point nearest the docking facility. A pipeline must be constructed connecting the docking facility with the refinery. The pipeline costs $300.42 miles away from the refinery, or equivalently 3.58 miles away from Point A (as the back of the book has

  20. A novel mutation in the miR-128b gene reduces miRNA processing and leads to glucocorticoid resistance of MLL-AF4 Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotani, Ai

    MLL-AF4 Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia has a poor prognosis, and the mechanisms by which these leukemias develop are not understood despite intensive research based on well-known concepts and methods. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a ...

  1. Ion Chambers for Monitoring the NuMI Neutrino Beam at FNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; R. Keisler; S. Kopp; S. Mendoza; M. Proga; Z. Pavlovich; R. Zwaska; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald; M. Diwan; B. Viren

    2004-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. The beam must be steered with 1 mRad angular accuracy toward the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays. We review how the monitors will be used to make beam quality measurements, and as well we review chamber construction details, radiation damage testing, calibration, and test beam results.

  2. Proposal for continuously-variable neutrino beam energy for the NuMI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, Mikhail; Kopp, Sacha; /Texas U.; Messier, Mark; /Harvard U.; Harris, Deborah A.; Hylen, Jim; Para, Adam; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NuMI Facility was intended to be flexibly changed between 3 energies of beams, LE, ME, and HE. However, the changeover requires extensive downtime to move and realign horns and the target. We propose to implement a flexible arrangement where the target can be remotely moved in the beamline direction to change the beam energy and the horns remain fixed. In addition to having the attractive feature of keeping the horn optics fixed, the motion of the target can be performed more quickly and hence on a more frequent basis. We discuss potential increases in statistics in the high energy region, systematic cross-checks available, and the improved beam monitoring capabilities with such variable energy beams.

  3. Methods for Isolation of Total RNA to Recover miRNAs and Other Small RNAs from Diverse Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Pamela

    ) size range, the first and most important step is the isolation of high-quality total RNA. Because RNA will present a set of total RNA isolation methods that can be used to maximize the recovery of high-quality RNAChapter 3 Methods for Isolation of Total RNA to Recover miRNAs and Other Small RNAs from Diverse

  4. Corrosion mechanisms of low level vitrified radioactive waste in a loamy soil M.I. Ojovan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Corrosion mechanisms of low level vitrified radioactive waste in a loamy soil M.I. Ojovan1 , W to 19 o C. Both ion-exchange and hydrolysis control the corrosion of this glass. Processing of field disposal facilities, which presumes an understanding of the main glass corrosion mechanisms. The corrosion

  5. Conserved Regulation of p53 Network Dosage by MicroRNA125b Occurs through Evolving miRNATarget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Judy

    Conserved Regulation of p53 Network Dosage by MicroRNA­125b Occurs through Evolving mi, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, 3 Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

  6. Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress and Exposition, Detroit, MI, April, 2006 (draft) 1 MEASURING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SAVINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress and Exposition, Detroit, MI, April, 2006 (draft) 1 MEASURING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SAVINGS Kelly Kissock and Carl Eger Department of Mechanical and Aerospace a general method for measuring industrial energy savings and demonstrates the method using a case study from

  7. Construction of Parallel Analysis of RNA Ends (PARE) libraries for the study of cleaved miRNA targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Pamela

    Construction of Parallel Analysis of RNA Ends (PARE) libraries for the study of cleaved mi Green1 1Delaware Biotechnology Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19711, USA. 2Illumina to M.A.G. (mgerman@dbi.udel.edu) or P.J.G. (green@dbi.udel.edu). Published online 26 February 2009; doi

  8. Observation of Disappearance of Muon Neutrinos in the NuMI Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlovic, Zarko; /Texas U.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a two detector long-baseline neutrino experiment designed to study the disappearance of muon neutrinos. MINOS will test the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation hypothesis and measure precisely {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} oscillation parameters. The source of neutrinos for MINOS experiment is Fermilab's Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline. The energy spectrum and the composition of the beam is measured at two locations, one close to the source and the other 735 km down-stream in the Soudan Mine Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The precision measurement of the oscillation parameters requires an accurate prediction of the neutrino flux at the Far Detector. This thesis discusses the calculation of the neutrino flux at the Far Detector and its uncertainties. A technique that uses the Near Detector data to constrain the uncertainties in the calculation of the flux is described. The data corresponding to an exposure of 2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on the NuMI target is presented and an energy dependent disappearance pattern predicted by neutrino oscillation hypotheses is observed in the Far Detector data. The fit to MINOS data, for given exposure, yields the best fit values for {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} to be (2.38{sub -0.16}{sup +0.20}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and 1.00{sub -0.08}, respectively.

  9. Validation of the MCNPX-PoliMi Code to Design a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many safeguards measurement systems used at nuclear facilities, both domestically and internationally, rely on He-3 detectors and well established mathematical equations to interpret coincidence and multiplicity-type measurements for verifying quantities of special nuclear material. Due to resource shortages alternatives to these existing He-3 based systems are being sought. Work is also underway to broaden the capabilities of these types of measurement systems in order to improve current multiplicity analysis techniques. As a part of a Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technology (MPACT) project within the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technology Program we are designing a fast-neutron multiplicity counter with organic liquid scintillators to quantify important quantities such as plutonium mass. We are also examining the potential benefits of using fast-neutron detectors for multiplicity analysis of advanced fuels in comparison with He-3 detectors and testing the performance of such designs. The designs are being developed and optimized using the MCNPX-PoliMi transport code to study detector response. In the full paper, we will discuss validation measurements used to justify the use of the MCNPX-PoliMi code paired with the MPPost multiplicity routine to design a fast neutron multiplicity counter with liquid scintillators. This multiplicity counter will be designed with the end goal of safeguarding advanced nuclear fuels. With improved timing qualities associated with liquid scintillation detectors, we can design a system that is less limited by nuclear materials of high activities. Initial testing of the designed system with nuclear fuels will take place at Idaho National Laboratory in a later stage of this collaboration.

  10. A new 'Implicit correlation' method for cross-correlation sampling in MCNPX-PoliMi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcath, M. J.; Larsen, E. W.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2104 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo particle transport codes used to accurately model detector response are traditionally run in fully analog mode. Analog simulations of cross-correlation measurements with these codes are extremely time-consuming because the probability of correlated detection is extremely small, approximately equal to the product of the probabilities of a single detection in each detector. The new 'implicit correlation' method described here increases the number of correlation event scores thereby reducing variance and required computation times. The cost of the implicit correlation method is comparable to the cost of simulating single event detection for the lowest absolute detector efficiency in the problem. This method is especially useful in the nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards fields for simulating correlation measurements of shielded special nuclear material. The new method was implemented in MCNPX-PoliMi for neutron-neutron cross-correlations with a Cf-252 spontaneous fission source measured by two detectors of variable stand-offs. The method demonstrated good agreement with analog simulation results for multiple measurement geometries. Small differences between non-analog and analog cross-correlation distributions are attributed to known features of the specific problem simulated that will not be present in practical applications. (authors)

  11. Measurement of Charged Pion Production Yields off the NuMI Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Paley; M. D. Messier; R. Raja; U. Akgun; D. M. Asner; G. Aydin; W. Baker; P. D. Barnes, Jr.; T. Bergfeld; L. Beverly; V. Bhatnagar; B. Choudhary; E. C. Dukes; F. Duru; G. J. Feldman; A. Godley; N. Graf; J. Gronberg; E. Gulmez; Y. O. Gunaydin; H. R. Gustafson; E. P. Hartouni; P. Hanlet; M. Heffner; D. M. Kaplan; O. Kamaev; J. Klay; A. Kumar; D. J. Lange; A. Lebedev; J. Ling; M. J. Longo; L. C. Lu; C. Materniak; S. Mahajan; H. Meyer; D. E. Miller; S. R. Mishra; K. Nelson; T. Nigmanov; A. Norman; Y. Onel; A. Penzo; R. J. Peterson; D. Rajaram; D. Ratnikov; C. Rosenfeld; H. Rubin; S. Seun; A. Singh; N. Solomey; R. A. Soltz; Y. Torun; K. Wilson; D. M. Wright; Q. K. Wu

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The fixed-target MIPP experiment, Fermilab E907, was designed to measure the production of hadrons from the collisions of hadrons of momenta ranging from 5 to 120 GeV/c on a variety of nuclei. These data will generally improve the simulation of particle detectors and predictions of particle beam fluxes at accelerators. The spectrometer momentum resolution is between 3 and 4%, and particle identification is performed for particles ranging between 0.3 and 80 GeV/c using $dE/dx$, time-of-flight and Cherenkov radiation measurements. MIPP collected $1.42 \\times10^6$ events of 120 GeV Main Injector protons striking a target used in the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The data have been analyzed and we present here charged pion yields per proton-on-target determined in bins of longitudinal and transverse momentum between 0.5 and 80 GeV/c, with combined statistical and systematic relative uncertainties between 5 and 10%.

  12. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 page 1 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003 , Anton not LBNL 7 11:18.8 Singer, Brett C 30-39 men 3 8 11:20.2 Yegian, Derek 30-39 men 4 9 11:20.4 Nihei 45 13:26.9 card not turned in 46 13:27.4 Elliott, James B 30-39 men 18 #12;LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3

  13. Program Subject(S) required in Program tyPe addition to engliSh S ma mi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Subject(S) required in Program tyPe addition to engliSh S ma mi comPuter Science (bSc) Computer Science C x x x humanitieS (ba) Aboriginal Studies (J) x x x African Studies (J) x x x American Studies (J) x x x Celtic Studies x x x Christianity and Culture x x x Christianity and Education x Cinema

  14. B.SMETANA: Quatuor n1 en mi mineur "Z mho Zivota " ("De ma vie ") Allegro vivo appassionnato-Allegro moderato alla Polka-Largo sostenuto-Vivace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazliak, Laurent

    B.SMETANA: Quatuor n°1 en mi mineur "Z mého Zivota " ("De ma vie ") Allegro vivo appassionnato- Allegro moderato alla Polka- Largo sostenuto- Vivace Dans la nuit du 19 au 20 octobre 1874, Smetana

  15. Conserved Regulation of p53 Network Dosage by MicroRNA–125b Occurs through Evolving miRNA–Target Gene Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Minh T. N.

    MicroRNAs regulate networks of genes to orchestrate cellular functions. MiR-125b, the vertebrate homologue of the Caenorhabditis elegans microRNA lin-4, has been implicated in the regulation of neural and hematopoietic ...

  16. Executive summary of major NuMI lessons learned: a review of relevant meetings of Fermilab's DUSEL Beamline Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mike; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Bogert, Dixon; Childress, Sam; Cossairt, Don; Griffing, William; Grossman, Nancy; Harding, David; Hylen, Jim; Kuchler, Vic; Laughton, Chris; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have gained tremendous experience with the NuMI Project on what was a new level of neutrino beams from a high power proton source. We expect to build on that experience for any new long baseline neutrino beam. In particular, we have learned about some things which have worked well and/or where the experience is fairly directly applicable to the next project (e.g., similar civil construction issues including: tunneling, service buildings, outfitting, and potential claims/legal issues). Some things might be done very differently (e.g., decay pipe, windows, target, beam dump, and precision of power supply control/monitoring). The NuMI experience does lead to identification of critical items for any future such project, and what issues it will be important to address. The DUSEL Beamline Working Group established at Fermilab has been meeting weekly to collect and discuss information from that NuMI experience. This document attempts to assemble much of that information in one place. In this Executive Summary, we group relevant discussion of some of the major issues and lessons learned under seven categories: (1) Differences Between the NuMI Project and Any Next Project; (2) The Process of Starting Up the Project; (3) Decision and Review Processes; (4) ES&H: Environment, Safety, and Health; (5) Local Community Buy-In; (6) Transition from Project Status to Operation; and (7) Some Lessons on Technical Elements. We concentrate here on internal project management issues, including technical areas that require special attention. We cannot ignore, however, two major external management problems that plagued the NuMI project. The first problem was the top-down imposition of an unrealistic combination of scope, cost, and schedule. This situation was partially corrected by a rebaselining. However, the full, desirable scope was never achievable. The second problem was a crippling shortage of resources. Critical early design work could not be done in a timely fashion, leading to schedule delays, inefficiencies, and corrective actions. The Working Group discussions emphasized that early planning and up-front appreciation of the problems ahead are very important for minimizing the cost and for the greatest success of any such project. Perhaps part of the project approval process should re-enforce this need. The cost of all this up-front work is now reflected in the DOE cost of any project we do. If we are being held to an upper limit on the project cost, the only thing available for compromise is the eventual project scope.

  17. Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachter, Lior

    Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution Rat Genome Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality `draft' covering over 90% of the genome

  18. Water Retrieval by Norway Rats: Behavior as Deduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, R J

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1948). Burrows and feeding of the Norway a radial Mammalogy,Object retrieval preferences of Norway rats: An evolutionaryinedible objects by Norway rats: Motivational interactions

  19. albino rats rattus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    most commonly used in research are believed to be domesticated albino strains of the Norway rat rattus nirvegicus. Rats like mice, belong to the order Rodentia Biology and...

  20. albino rat cfn: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    most commonly used in research are believed to be domesticated albino strains of the Norway rat rattus nirvegicus. Rats like mice, belong to the order Rodentia Biology and...

  1. albino wistar rats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    most commonly used in research are believed to be domesticated albino strains of the Norway rat rattus nirvegicus. Rats like mice, belong to the order Rodentia Biology and...

  2. albino rats exposed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    most commonly used in research are believed to be domesticated albino strains of the Norway rat rattus nirvegicus. Rats like mice, belong to the order Rodentia Biology and...

  3. albino rat anatomical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    most commonly used in research are believed to be domesticated albino strains of the Norway rat rattus nirvegicus. Rats like mice, belong to the order Rodentia Biology and...

  4. Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  5. Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation, Lactation and Weaning Increases Ethanol examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary ethanol consumption by their adolescent young. We found that exposure to an ethanol-ingesting dam

  6. Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

  7. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; et al

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore »reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  8. Modulation of North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Activity by Three Phases of ENSO HYE-MI KIM, PETER J. WEBSTER, AND JUDITH A. CURRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    Modulation of North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Activity by Three Phases of ENSO HYE-MI KIM, PETER J Pacific Ocean warming has been separated into two modes based on the spatial distribution of the maximum impacts on tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the North Pacific by differential modulation of both local

  9. The TAL1 complex targets the FBXW7 tumor suppressor by activating miR-223 in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansour, Marc R.

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in 60% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and initiates T-ALL in mouse models. By performing global microRNA (miRNA) expression ...

  10. Rf : Munoz, M.I., Barcellini F., Mollo, V. (2011). Collective elaboration of care for safety in radiotherapy: cooperative management of patient variability. In HEPS'2011 Healthcare Ergonomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in radiotherapy: cooperative management of patient variability. In HEPS'2011 Healthcare Ergonomics and Patient of patient variability. Maria Isabel Munoz Ergonomics Laboratory Research Center on work Development (CRTD-EA 4132) 41 rue Gay Lussac 75005 Paris mi.munoz@free.fr Flore Barcellini1 Ergonomics Laboratory Research

  11. Michigan State University Community Music School 841-B Timberlane Street East Lansing, MI 48823 Phone: 517-355-7661 Web: cms.msu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University Community Music School 841-B Timberlane Street · East Lansing, MI 48823 Explore Michigan's past through tour of music, exhibits May 1 Contact: Amanda Darche, MSU Community Music School (517) 355-7661, ext. 16, adarche@msu.edu EAST LANSING, Mich. ­Michigan's past is the inspiration

  12. Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Technical Paper 2006-01-1041 Paper presented at SAE 2006 World Congress & Exposition, April 5, 2006, Detroit, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Technical Paper 2006-01-1041 Paper presented at SAE 2006 and Fundamental Advances in Thermal Fluid Sciences 2006. Vol. SP-2015. (Society of Automotive Engineers, Troy, MI and reducing emissions play an essential role in the design of the new-generation automotive internal

  13. Arginine metabolism in enterocytes of diabetic rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, Natalie Anne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetic rats and patients exhibit decreased plasma arginine concentrations. Arginine is important in numerous cellular pathways, including the synthesis of nitric oxide and the release of insulin from pancreatic ? cells. At present, little...

  14. Purification of sulfide oxidase from rat liver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Lixia

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study represents an initial investigative effort to purify sulfide oxidase from rat liver. Two methods to determine sulfide oxidase activity have been established and both are based on measuring substrate disappearance of sulfide. Both...

  15. THE BEHAVIOR OF THE LABORATORY RAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    , Alaska, at 60 degrees North latitude, where rats feed on human garbage, to South Georgia Island, at 55 members that had survived their ini- tial contact with the poisoned bait and had learned to avoid eating

  16. Repression of miR-17-5p with elevated expression of E2F-1 and c-MYC in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma and enhancement of cell growth upon reversing this expression pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Tayebi, H.M.; Omar, K.; Hegy, S.; El Maghrabi, M.; El Brolosy, M. [The Molecular Pathology Research Group, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, German University in Cairo, Cairo (Egypt)] [The Molecular Pathology Research Group, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, German University in Cairo, Cairo (Egypt); Hosny, K.A. [Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Esmat, G. [Department of Endemic Medicine and Hepatology, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of Endemic Medicine and Hepatology, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdelaziz, A.I., E-mail: ahmed.abdel-aziz@guc.edu.eg [The Molecular Pathology Research Group, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, German University in Cairo, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •The oncogenic miR-17-5p is downregulated in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. •E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts are upregulated in non-metastatic HCC patients. •miR-17-5p forced overexpression inhibited E2F-1 and c-MYC expression in HuH-7 cells. •miR-17-5p mimicking increased HuH-7 cell growth, proliferation, migration and colony formation. •miR-17-5p is responsible for HCC progression among the c-MYC/E2F-1/miR-17-5p triad members. -- Abstract: E2F-1, c-MYC, and miR-17-5p is a triad of two regulatory loops: a negative and a positive loop, where c-MYC induces the expression of E2F-1 that induces the expression of miR-17-5p which in turn reverses the expression of E2F-1 to close the loop. In this study, we investigated this triad for the first time in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), where miR-17-5p showed a significant down-regulation in 23 non-metastatic HCC biopsies compared to 10 healthy tissues; however, E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts were markedly elevated. Forced over-expression of miR-17-5p in HuH-7 cells resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, growth, migration and clonogenicity with concomitant inhibition of E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts expressions, while antagomirs of miR-17-5p reversed these events. In conclusion, this study revealed a unique pattern of expression for miR-17-5p in non-metastatic HCC patients in contrast to metastatic HCC patients. In addition we show that miR-17-5p is the key player among the triad that tumor growth and spread.

  17. Cardiopulmonary Function in RatsWith Lung Hemorrhage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Cardiopulmonary Function in RatsWith Lung Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed Ultrasound Exposure Jeffery using superthreshold exposure conditions known to produce sig- nificant lung hemorrhage. Methods. In 1 in the left lung of each rat. In a second group of 6 rats, 5 foci of ultrasound-induced hemorrhage were

  18. A study of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and the NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, John Stuart; /Cambridge U.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of an analysis of {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance with the MINOS experiment, which studies the neutrino beam produced by the NuMI facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The rates and energy spectra of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions are measured in two similar detectors, located at distances of 1 km and 735 km along the NuMI beamline. The Near Detector provides accurate measurements of the initial beam composition and energy, while the Far Detector is sensitive to the effects of neutrino oscillations. The analysis uses data collected between May 2005 and March 2007, corresponding to an exposure of 2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. As part of the analysis, sophisticated software was developed to identify muon tracks in the detectors and to reconstruct muon kinematics. Events with reconstructed tracks were then analyzed using a multivariate technique to efficiently isolate a pure sample of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} events. An extrapolation method was also developed, which produces accurate predictions of the Far Detector neutrino energy spectrum, based on data collected at the Near Detector. Finally, several techniques to improve the sensitivity of an oscillation measurement were implemented, and a full study of the systematic uncertainties was performed. Extrapolating from observations at the Near Detector, 733 {+-} 29 Far Detector events were expected in the absence of oscillations, but only 563 events were observed. This deficit in event rate corresponds to a significance of 4.3 standard deviations. The deficit is energy dependent and clear distortion of the Far Detector energy spectrum is observed. A maximum likelihood analysis, which fully accounts for systematic uncertainties, is used to determine the allowed regions for the oscillation parameters and identifies the best fit values as {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} = 2.29{sub -0.14}{sup +0.14} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} > 0.953 (68% confidence level). The models of neutrino decoherence and decay are disfavored at the 5.0{sigma} and 3.2{sigma} levels respectively, while the no oscillation model is excluded at the 9.4{sigma} level.

  19. HR 5907: Discovery of the most rapidly rotating magnetic B-type star by the MiMeS Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunhut, J H; Wade, G A; Townsend, R H D; Marcolino, W L F; Bohlender, D A; Szeifert, Th; Petit, V; Matthews, J M; Rowe, J F; Moffat, A F J; Kallinger, T; Kuschnig, R; Guenther, B D; Rucinski, S M; Sasselov, D; Weiss, W W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery and analysis of a very strong magnetic field in the rapidly rotating early B-type star HR 5907, based on observations obtained as part of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project. We infer a rotation period of 0.508276 +0.000015/-0.000012 d from photometric and H{\\alpha} EW measurements, making this the shortest period, non-degenerate, magnetic massive star known to date. From the comparison of IUE UV and optical spectroscopy with LTE BRUCE/KYLIE models we find a solid-angle integrated, uniform black-body temperature of 17 000 \\pm 1000 K, a projected rotational velocity of 290 \\pm 10 km/s, an equatorial radius of 3.1 \\pm 0.2 R_sun, a stellar mass of 5.5 \\pm 0.5 M_sun, and an inclination angle of the rotation axis to our line-of-sight of 70 \\pm 10\\circ. Our measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field, which vary between -500 and -2000 G, phase coherently with the rotation period and imply a surface dipole field strength of \\sim15.7 kG. On the other hand, from fits to mean Leas...

  20. Preliminary Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters By NuMI/MINOS and Calibration Studies for Improving this Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Symes, Philip Andrew

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explains the origins of neutrinos and their interactions, and the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations. Experiments for measuring neutrino oscillations are mentioned and the experiment investigated in this thesis, the ''Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search'', and its neutrino beam, the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's ''Neutrinos At The Main Injector'', are described. MINOS is a long baseline (735 km) neutrino oscillation experiment with a near and a far detector, intended to make precision measurements of the atmospheric sector neutrino oscillation parameters. A measurement is made of the ''atmospheric'' neutrino oscillation parameters, {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin {sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}), using neutrinos from the NuMI beam. The results of this analysis are compared to measurements at MINOS using neutrinos from the atmosphere and with other experiments. A more detailed method of beam neutrino analysis is discussed, and the extra calibrations needed to perform that analysis properly are described, with special attention paid to two aspects of the calibration, which comprise the bulk of work for this thesis. The light injection calibration system uses LEDs to illuminate the detector readout and provides a normalization of the stability of the detector over time. The hardware and different modi operandi of the system are described. There is a description of installation and commissioning of the system at one of the MINOS detectors. The response normalization of each detector with cosmic ray muons is described. Special attention is paid to the explanation of necessary corrections that must be made to the muon sample in order for the sample to be used to calibrate each detector to the specified accuracy. The performance of the calibration is shown.

  1. Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wood; William Quinlan

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

  2. Social Influences on Food Choices of Norway Rats and Mate Choices of Japanese Quail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef, Jr., Bennett G.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecology and sociology of the Norway rat . Bethesda: U.S. De-food stealing by young Norway rats. Journal of Comparativesufficient diet by Norway rats. Journal of Comparative

  3. Demography of auklets Aethia spp. in relation to introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus at Kiska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Demography of auklets Aethia spp. in relation to introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus at Kiska................................................................................................4 Norway Rat Abundance and Distribution .........................................................5................................................................................................6 Norway Rat Abundance and Distribution.........................................................7

  4. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - adult rat liver Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from normal rat liver and incubated for 3 or 16 hours with increasing doses... of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Rat ... Source: Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit - Centre for...

  6. adult rat vestibular: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stimulate cell proliferation in adult rat vestibular sensory epithelia, as does the infusion of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF ) plus insulin. We sought to determine...

  7. Suppressed serum prolactin in sinoaortic-denervated rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, N.; Melmed, S.; Morris, M.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors investigated the effect of arterial baroreceptor deafferentation on serum and pituitary prolactin (PRL) and on catecholamines in median eminence (ME) and anterior and posterior pituitaries. Male Wistar rats were sinoaortic denervated (SAD) or sham operated (SO). Three days after surgery serum prolactin, measured by radioimmunoassay, was suppressed in SAD rats, and dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations, measured by radioenzymatic or high-performance liquid chromatography electron capture methods, were significantly reduced in ME of SAD rats. Simultaneously, anterior pituitary of SAD rats had significant increases in both catecholamines, whereas posterior pituitary showed no changes. Four hours after surgery serum PRL was also reduced in SAD rats, but no changes in ME catecholamines were found. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were measured before and after injection of bromocriptine in SAD and SO rats 3 days after surgery. Bromocriptine markedly suppressed serum PRL in both groups and reduced MAP from 144 +/- 10 to 84 +/- 5 and from 116 +/- 2 to 99 +/- 3 in SAD and SO rats, respectively; heart rate was reduced in SAD rats. They conclude that the SAD rat is a model of hypertension with suppressed serum PRL and that interruption of arterial baroreceptor nerves suppresses PRL secretion probably by modulating tuberoinfundibular turnover of catecholamines.

  8. Chemical Renal Denervation in the Rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consigny, Paul M., E-mail: paul.consigny@av.abbott.com; Davalian, Dariush, E-mail: dariush.davalian@av.abbott.com [Abbott Vascular, Innovation Incubator (United States); Donn, Rosy, E-mail: rosy.donn@av.abbott.com; Hu, Jie, E-mail: jie.hu@av.abbott.com [Abbott Vascular, Bioanalytical and Material Characterization (United States); Rieser, Matthew, E-mail: matthew.j.rieser@abbvie.com; Stolarik, DeAnne, E-mail: deanne.f.stolarik@abbvie.com [Abbvie, Analytical Pharmacology (United States)

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: The recent success of renal denervation in lowering blood pressure in drug-resistant hypertensive patients has stimulated interest in developing novel approaches to renal denervation including local drug/chemical delivery. The purpose of this study was to develop a rat model in which depletion of renal norepinephrine (NE) could be used to determine the efficacy of renal denervation after the delivery of a chemical to the periadventitial space of the renal artery. Methods: Renal denervation was performed on a single renal artery of 90 rats (n = 6 rats/group). The first study determined the time course of renal denervation after surgical stripping of a renal artery plus the topical application of phenol in alcohol. The second study determined the efficacy of periadventitial delivery of hypertonic saline, guanethidine, and salicylic acid. The final study determined the dose–response relationship for paclitaxel. In all studies, renal NE content was determined by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results: Renal NE was depleted 3 and 7 days after surgical denervation. Renal NE was also depleted by periadventitial delivery of all agents tested (hypertonic saline, salicylic acid, guanethidine, and paclitaxel). A dose response was observed after the application of 150 ?L of 10{sup ?5} M through 10{sup ?2} M paclitaxel. Conclusion: We developed a rat model in which depletion of renal NE was used to determine the efficacy of renal denervation after perivascular renal artery drug/chemical delivery. We validated this model by demonstrating the efficacy of the neurotoxic agents hypertonic saline, salicylic acid, and guanethidine and increasing doses of paclitaxel.

  9. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States); Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 ?M) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1?, Il-1?, IL-6 and TNF? in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol at similar concentrations in vitro.

  10. A DELAYED NONLINEAR PBPK MODEL FOR GENISTEIN DOSIMETRY IN RATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DELAYED NONLINEAR PBPK MODEL FOR GENISTEIN DOSIMETRY IN RATS #3; MICHAEL G. ZAGER y , HIEN T on laboratory animals and human volunteers [4], and critical literature reviews [32]. Phytoestrogens, a class endocrine-related e#11;ects such as reduced birth weight in rats and humans. In its conjugated form

  11. Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3 Helium Dynamic MRI Ben T. Chen,* Anja C.S. Brau, and G. Allan Johnson Dynamic regional lung function was investigated in rats using by a constant flow ventila- tor. Based on regional differences in the behavior of inspired air, the lung

  12. Impacts of the Norway Rat on the auklet breeding colony at Sirius Point, Kiska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Impacts of the Norway Rat on the auklet breeding colony at Sirius Point, Kiska Island, Alaska-3239 FAX: (709) 737-3018 e-mail: x19hlm@mun.ca #12;Major and Jones Impacts of the Norway Rat... 2 Fresh rat during World War II (Atkinson, 1985). It is believed that the Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus

  13. Differential Expression of Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases 4 in Developing Rat Lung Running Title: PDE4 in developing rat lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Differential Expression of Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases 4 in Developing Rat Lung Running Title: PDE4 in developing rat lung Emmanuel Lopez 1,2,3,4 , Pierre-Henri Jarreau 1,2,3,4 , Elodie Zana 1 Dynamics 239, 9 (2010) 2470-8" DOI : 10.1002/dvdy.22374 #12;2 Abstract During the perinatal period, lungs

  14. Toxicologic and biochemical effects of extracts from Karwinskia humboldtiana on the albino rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Michael Hugh

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oral doses of coyotillo plant extract (Pe-1) given to rats of Group I-A. 12 Weight changes observed in rats following oral administration of coyotillo plant extract (Pe-l). Microscopic lesions observed in rats following oral administration... of coyotillo plant extract (Pe-l). Weight changes observed in rats following chronic oral administration of coyotillo plant extract (Cn-l). 37 Weight changes observed in rats following acute oral administration of coyotillo plant extract (Ch-l). 38...

  15. Acceleration of wound healing in young and aged rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bryan Douglas

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. The effect of ACM on wound healing in young rats. . Page 15 2. The effect of ACM on wound healing in old, ad-lib rats . . . . . . . 17 3. The effect of ACM on wound healing in old, caloric-restricted rats . . . 4. The effect of old and young... group (AL) had been fed a laboratory diet ad libitum during their lifetime. The other group (CR) had been maintained on a calorie-restricted diet at a level of 60% of the food intake of the ad libitum-fed group. This decrease in caloric intake resulted...

  16. 1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP OXYGEN DEFECT FORMATION AND HYDROGEN EFFUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was partially supported by a DOE grant through United Solar Ovonics, Inc., under the Solar America Initiative1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States BACKGROUND THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP

  17. \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments DEPARTMENT: Andrew Wiles March 2015 Brief description of area and location Roof tops, walkways, and Fire Route. Sedum' Roof Area

  18. awake rats achieving: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies of Brain Function in Awake Rats CiteSeer Summary: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive molecular imaging technique using positron-emitting radioisotopes to...

  19. adult rats rattus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 IMPACTS OF INTRODUCED NORWAY RATS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS) ON LEAST AUKLETS (AETHIA PUSILLA) BREEDING AT KISKA ISLAND,...

  20. AMPA-receptor mediated plasticity within the rat spinal cord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoy, Kevin Corcoran

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    AMPA-RECEPTOR MEDIATED PLASTICITY WITHIN THE RAT SPINAL CORD A Thesis by KEVIN CORCORAN HOY JR. Submited to the Ofice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilment of the requirements... for the degre of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Psychology AMPA-RECEPTOR MEDIATED PLASTICITY WITHIN THE RAT SPINAL CORD A Thesis by KEVIN CORCORAN HOY JR. Submited to the Ofice of Graduate...

  1. Distribution of ochratoxin A in the pregnant rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballinger, Michael Brent

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . APPENDIX 1. SAFETY PROCEDURES. APPENDIX 2. BIOLOGICAL OXIDIZER PROCEDURES. . . APPENDIX 3. LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING. . . . APPENDIX 4. PHARMACOKINETIC CALCULATIONS. . . . . VITA. 1V V1 V11 V111 3 4 12 26 27 27 27 28 29 33 35 54 57... 66 68 71 73 74 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1 Pharmacokinetic parameters estimated from the serum radioactivity derived from 3H-ochratoxin A in pregnant rats. . 2 Excretion of 3H radioactivity by pregnant rats. . 38 39 3 Distribution...

  2. Arginine and Conjugated Linoleic Acid Reduce Fat Mass in Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nall, Jennifer L.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ARGININE AND CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID REDUCE FAT MASS IN RATS A Thesis by JENNIFER LYNN NALL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2008 Major Subject: Nutrition ARGININE AND CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID REDUCE FAT MASS IN RATS A Thesis by JENNIFER LYNN NALL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A...

  3. Neuroendocrine effects of acute nickel chloride administration in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemons, G.K.; Garcia, J.F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An sc injection of nickel chloride (20 and 10 mg/kg) led to a profound and consistent increase of circulating prolactin (PRL) levels after 1 day and lasted for 4 days (p < 0.001) in male rats. Increases in insulin levels occurred 1 and 2 days postinjection. The nickel-induced PRL rise could be abolished by a simultaneous administration of 2-bromo-..cap alpha..-ergocryptine (CB 154). In vitro incubation of pituitaries from rats that received 20 mg/kg of nickel chloride 48 hr prior to sacrifice released more PRL into the culture medium, as well as contained more PRL in the final tissue than did the pituitaries from control animals. The hypothalamic extracts (HE) obtained from hypothalami of nickel-injected rats were tested also in vitro on normal rat pituitaries and the results showed that the HE from such rats released more PRL and therefore had less prolactin-inhibiting factor (PIF) than the HE obtained from control rats. The results show that nickel chloride has effects on the endocrine system that (a) last considerably longer than previously reported, (b) are mediated through the neuroendocrine system, and (c) instead of specifically inhibiting PRL secretion from the pituitary promote high circulating PRL levels lasting from 1 to 4 days.

  4. Study of the near-threshold <mi>?> <mi>?> mass enhancement in doubly OZI-suppressed <mi>J> / <mi>?> ? <mi>?> <mi>?> <mi>?> decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Friedel, P.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaefer, B. D.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. Z.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, Z.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.25×10? J/? event sample accumulated with the BESIII detector is used to study the doubly Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-suppressed decay modes J/?????, ????????, ??K?K?. A strong deviation (>30?) from three-body J/????? phase space is observed near the ?? mass threshold that is consistent with a previous observation reported by the BESII experiment. A partial wave analysis with a tensor covariant amplitude that assumes that the enhancement is due to the presence of a resonance, the X(1810), is performed and confirms that the spin-parity of the X(1810) is 0??. The mass and width of the X(1810) are determined to be M=1795±7(stat)+13-5(syst)±19(mod) MeV/c² and ?=95±10(stat)+21-34(syst)±75(mod) MeV/c², respectively, and the product branching fraction is measured to be B(J/???X(1810))×B(X(1810)???)=(2.00±0.08(stat)+0.45-1.00(syst)±1.30(mod))×10??. These results are consistent within errors with those of the BESII experiment.

  5. Systemic toxicity of dermally applied crude oils in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feuston, M.H.; Mackerer, C.R.; Schreiner, C.A.; Hamilton, C.E. [Stonybrook Labs., Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)] [Stonybrook Labs., Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two crude oils, differing in viscosity (V) and nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) content, were evaluated for systemic toxicity, In the Crude I (low V, low N, low S) study, the material was applied to the clipped backs of rats at dose levels of 0, 30, 125, and 500 mg/kg. In the Crude II (high V, high N, moderate S) study, the oil was applied similarly at the same dose levels. The crude oils were applied for 13 wk, 5 d/wk. Exposure sites were not occluded. Mean body weight gain (wk 1-14) was significantly reduced in male rats exposed to Crude II; body weight gain of all other animals was not adversely affected by treatment. An increase in absolute (A) and relative (R) liver weights and a decrease in A and R thymus weights were observed in male and female rats exposed to Crude II at 500 mg/kg; only liver weights (A and R) were adversely affected in male and female rats exposed to Crude I. In general, there was no consistent pattern of toxicity for serum chemistry endpoints; however, more parameters were adversely affected in Crude II-exposed female rats than in the other exposed groups. A consistent pattern of toxicity for hematology endpoints was observed among male rats exposed to Crude I and male and female rats exposed to Crude II. Parameters affected included: Crudes I and II, red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, Crude II, platelet count. Microscopic evaluation of tissues revealed the following treatment-related findings: Crude I, treated skin, thymus, and thyroid; Crude II, bone marrow, treated skin, thymus, and thyroid. The LOEL (lowest observable effect level) for skin irritation and systemic toxicity (based on marginal effects on the thyroid) for both crude oils was 30 mg/kg; effects were more numerous and more pronounced in animals exposed to Crude II. Systemic effects are probably related to concentrations of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) found in crude oil.

  6. Assessing the effects of Norway rats on auklet breeding success and survival at Sirius Point, Kiska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Assessing the effects of Norway rats on auklet breeding success and survival at Sirius Point, Kiska Introduction The presence of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been implicated as a possible sightings of Norway rats at Sirius Point Colony during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Furthermore

  7. Marine Ornithology 41: 4148 (2013) Bond et al.: Crested Auklet survival with Norway Rats 41

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Marine Ornithology 41: 41­48 (2013) Bond et al.: Crested Auklet survival with Norway Rats 41 in the Aleutians (Bailey 1993, Ebbert & Byrd 2002). Another introduced predator, the Norway rat Rattus norvegicus AND REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS OF CRESTED AUKLETS AETHIA CRISTATELLA IN THE PRESENCE OF INTRODUCED NORWAY RATS RATTUS

  8. Variations in the diet of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) inferred using stable isotope analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Variations in the diet of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) inferred using stable isotope predators; island ecosystem conservation; stable isotope analysis; Norway rats; diet. Correspondence Heather of introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus has raised concerns for the fate of the large least auklet Aethia

  9. Stimulus Control of Maternal Responsiveness to Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Pup Ultrasonic Vocalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stimulus Control of Maternal Responsiveness to Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Pup Ultrasonic be considered a specialization of Norway rats and other small rodents. When removed from the nest and placed in a cool environment, infant Norway rats emit USVs. These vocalizations range from 30 to 50 k

  10. STABLE FREQUENCY RESPONSE TO VARYING STIMULUS INTENSITY IN A MODEL OF THE RAT OLFACTORY BULB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STABLE FREQUENCY RESPONSE TO VARYING STIMULUS INTENSITY IN A MODEL OF THE RAT OLFACTORY BULB Thomas Neurosciences et Systèmes sensoriels, CNRS UMR 5020, Lyon, France ABSTRACT In the rat olfactory bulb (OB), fast. Introduction The rat olfactory bulb (OB) is a rich and complex sensory processing system that shows stimulus

  11. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Gallium arsenide in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Greenspan, B.J.; Dill, J.A.; Stoney, K.H.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium arsenide is a crystalline compound used extensively in the semiconductor industry. Workers preparing solar cells and gallium arsenide ingots and wafers are potentially at risk from the inhalation of gallium arsenide dust. The potential for gallium arsenide to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague- Dawley rats and CD-1 (Swiss) mice exposed to 0, 10, 37, or 75 mg/m{sup 3} gallium arsenide, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and {approx}30 positively mated rats or {approx}24 positively mated mice. Mice were exposed on 4--17 days of gestation (dg), and rats on 4--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Gallium and arsenic concentrations were determined in the maternal blood and uterine contents of the rats (3/group) at 7, 14, and 20 dg. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  12. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Acetonitrile in rats. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Boyd, P.J.; Hayden, B.K.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for acetonitrile to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 100, 400, or 1200 ppM acetonitrile, 6 hours/day, 7 days/week. Exposure of rats to these concentrations of acetonitrile resulted in mortality in the 1200 ppM group (2/33 pregnant females; 1/10 non-pregnant females). However, there were no treatment-related effects upon body weights or reproduction indices at any exposure level, nor was there a significant increase in the incidence of fetal malformations or variations. The only effect observed in the fetuses was a slight, but not statiscally significant, exposure-correlated increase in the incidence of supernumerary ribs. Determination of acetonitrile and cyanide concentrations in maternal rat blood showed that acetonitrile concentration in the blood increased with exposure concentration for all exposed maternal rats. Detectable amounts of cyanide in the blood were found only in the rats exposed to 1200 ppM acetonitrile ({approximately}2 {mu}g cyanide/g of blood).

  13. First 450-micron dust continuum mapping of the massive star-forming region NGC 3576 with the P-ArTeMiS bolometer camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. André; V. Minier; P. Gallais; V. Reveret; J. Le Pennec; L. Rodriguez; O. Boulade; E. Doumayrou; D. Dubreuil; M. Lortholary; J. Martignac; M. Talvard; C. De Breuck; G. Hamon; N. Schneider; S. Bontemps; P. O. Lagage; E. Pantin; H. Roussel; M. Miller; C. R. Purcell; T. Hill; J. Stutzki

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: The earliest phases of massive star formation are currently much debated. Aims. In an effort to make progress, we took a census of Class0-like protostellar dense cores in the NGC 3576 region, one of the nearest and most luminous embedded sites of high-mass star formation in the Galaxy. Methods: We used the P-ArTeMiS bolometer camera on the APEX telescope to produce the first 450-micron dust continuum map of the filamentary dense clump associated with NGC 3576. Results: Combining our 450-micron observations with existing data at other wavelengths, we have identified seven massive protostellar sources along the NGC 3576 filament and placed them in the M_env - L_bol evolutionary diagram for protostars. Conclusions: Comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks suggests that these seven protostellar sources will evolve into massive stars with masses M* ~ 15-50 Msun. Four sources are classified as candidate high-mass Class 0 objects, two sources as massive Class I objects, and one source appears to be at an intermediate stage.

  14. The effect of fear on gregariousness and exploration in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Bergie Wayne

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' "ms of the behavior occurring in the open field. Rats display three major behaviors in the open field; these are fear, exploration, and gregariousness. Research has shown that when a pMr of rats are placed into an open field, they display signs... them. The two variables were found to be positively correlated and significant at the 0. 05 level of con- fidence (r = . 16; df = 230). The analysis of variance of the combined fear scores, indicated a significant difference. between methods (F = 4...

  15. The laboratory rat strains most commonly used in research are believed to be domesticated albino strains of the Norway rat rattus nirvegicus. Rats like mice, belong to the order Rodentia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    and the nude rat. Uses Despite the fear that rats invoke in people they actually make quiet, gentle pets rate 70-115 Food consumption 5-6g/100g/d Water consumption 10-12ml/100g/d Breeding onset Male 65-110d

  16. Original article Digestion and fermentation of proteins in rats fed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Digestion and fermentation of proteins in rats fed keratin, albumin, cooked casein the hypothesis that cooking reduces the digestibility of casein, and increases the yield of bacterial me transfer and fermentation in the caecum. The caecal digestion of casein (cooked or not), ker- atin

  17. Facial Wiping in the Rat Fetus: Variation of Chemosensory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Scott R.

    how variation in stimulus parameters of lemon odor infusion (concentration, volume, and infusion time) affected the wiping response of E20 rat fetuses. Infusions of higher concentration or greater volume of stimulation. Intraoral infusion of chemosensory fluids with strong olfactory components, such as lemon extract

  18. Aardvark hunt in Kenya Gaten B. Rat}rUin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I I i Aardvark hunt in Kenya Gaten B. Rat}rUin Dept of Omittrologr & Mamrnalogr, Catifomia Academy eactrirg science as a Peace Corps Volunteer at Mirogi $conOary Scnou in Sou*r Nyanza District or Kenya of Kenya in Nairobi. 14 #12;

  19. Effects of Methanol on the Retinal Function of Juvenile Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, Christian

    Effects of Methanol on the Retinal Function of Juvenile Rats C. Plaziac1 , P. Lachapelle2 , C Received 18 April 2002; accepted 22 July 2002 Abstract We have investigated the effect of methanol exposure recorded prior to and up to 72 h after the administration of methanol. Data were compared to a control

  20. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF VERAPAMIL AGAINST HEXACHLOROBUTADIENE NEPHROTOXICITY IN RATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Moghtadai Khorasgani; K. Manochehri; M. Hosseini

    In order to evaluate the protective effect of verapamil against hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) nephrotoxicity, 30 adult Wistar albino rats were divided into five equal groups, A, B, C, D and E and were given intra-peritonially corn oil (I ml/kg; control), HCBD (50 mg/kg), verapamil (50 µg/kg) with HCBD

  1. Inconclusive Experiment with Rats By Bill Menke, December 1, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    of genetically-modified corn. The Times article says: The editor of the journal, Food and Chemical Toxicology the paper's main result, that rats fed genetically-modified, herbicide-resistant corn have a higher incident was a bit disingenuous of him. I do find delicious the irony that Séralini's paper is critiquing genetically-modified

  2. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices A. Zebda1,2 , S. Cosnier1 the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal further developments. Following recent developments in nano- and biotechnology, state-of-the-art biofuel

  3. Nitrogen sparing by 2-ketoisocaproate in parenterally fed rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yagi, M.; Matthews, D.E.; Walser, M. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In rats receiving total parenteral nutrition with or without sodium 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC; 2.48 g.kg-1.day-1), L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine and (1-{sup 14}C)KIC were constantly infused for 6 h. CO{sub 2} production, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} enrichment, urinary urea nitrogen (N) plus ammonia N and total urinary N were measured. Whole body protein synthesis (S) was calculated in non-KIC-infused rats and also in unfed rats infused with (1-{sup 14}C)leucine from fractional oxidation of labeled leucine (1-F), where F is fractional utilization for protein synthesis, and urea N plus ammonia N excretion (C) as S = C x F/(1-F). Addition of KIC caused a significant reduction in N excretion and a significant improvement in N balance. Fractional oxidation of labeled KIC increased, whereas fractional utilization of labeled KIC for protein synthesis decreased, but the extent of incorporation of infused KIC into newly synthesized protein (as leucine) amounted to at least 40% of the total rate of leucine incorporation into newly synthesized whole body protein. We conclude that addition of KIC spares N in parenterally fed rats and becomes a major source of leucine for protein synthesis.

  4. adult rat brain: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rat brain First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Thyroid hormone regulates hippocampal...

  5. JET PROPULSION LAB 0 RAT 0 R Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    JET PROPULSION LAB 0 RAT 0 R Y ANN U A L REP 0 R T #12;#12;------ - - ~ CON TEN T S DIRECTOR Administration for the penod January 1 through December 31, 1986. JET PROPULSION LABORATORY Califorrua Institute, Voyager 2 gave us our first close view of the distant giant Uranus, its complex rings, inclined magnetic

  6. Susceptibility of immature rats to seizures induced by unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Dale Duaine

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Bain. Convulsant hydrazides I. In vito and in vivo inhibition of vitamin B6 enzymes by convulsive hydrazides. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 119:255-262 (1957). 8. Baxter, C. F. , and E. Roberts. Elevation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in rat brain...

  7. Ultrastructure of Primary Afferent Terminals and Synapses in the Rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, David L.

    Ultrastructure of Primary Afferent Terminals and Synapses in the Rat Nucleus of the Solitary Tract tympani (CT), and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves terminate in overlapping patterns in the brainstem electron microscopy. Although all three nerves had features charac- teristic of excitatory nerve terminals

  8. Characterization and Mapping of the Gene Conferring Resistance to Rift Valley Fever Virus Hepatic Disease in WF.LEW Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callicott, Ralph J.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    168 271 164 218 243 142 154 268 168 271 164 218 243 142 D6Rat46 D6Rat68 D6Rat105 D6Rat74 D6Rat144 D6Rat135 D6Rat124 D6Rat116 D6Rat1 155 278 246 253 185 169 260 152 238 155 278 244 255 181 169 260... 220 242 181 349 134 177 256 132 131 160 165 216 242 181 349 134 177 256 132 133 148 159 220 248 203 349 126 175 246 138 171 160 163 214 248 203 349 126 175 246 138 171 160 163 214 248 203 349...

  9. Evidence for <mi>?> <mi>c> ( 2 <mi>S> ) in <mi>?> ( 3686 ) ? <mi>?> <mi>K> <mi>S> 0 <mi>K> ± <mi>?> ? <mi>?> + <mi>?> ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Friedel, P.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaefer, B. D.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I. U.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y. X.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, LiLi; Zhang, R.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. Z.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, Z.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for the M1 radiative transition ?(3686)???c(2S) by reconstructing the exclusive ?c(2S)?K?SK±?????? decay using 1.06×10? ?(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector. The signal is observed with a statistical significance of greater than 4 standard deviations. The measured mass of the ?c(2S) is 3646.9±1.6(stat)±3.6(syst) MeV/c², and the width is 9.9±4.8(stat)±2.9(syst) MeV/c². The product branching fraction is measured to be B(?(3686)???c(2S))×B(?c(2S)?K0SK±??????)=(7.03±2.10(stat)±0.70(syst))×10??. This measurement complements a previous BESIII measurement of ?(3686)???c(2S) with ?c(2S)?K?SK±?? and K?K???.

  10. Daimler Chrysler Auburn Hills, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Sponsored by: Automotive Research Center National Automotive Center (NAC) U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM in ground vehicle simulation. It will present the results of ARC research to university, industry

  11. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year69,023US Virgin

  12. Hemodynamic characterization of chronic bile duct-ligated rats: effect of pentobarbital sodium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.S.; Girod, C.; Braillon, A.; Hadengue, A.; Lebrec, D.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic and splanchnic hemodynamics of the chronic bile duct-ligated rat were characterized by radioactive microspheres. Conscious and pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized, bile duct-ligated and sham-operated rats had cardiac output and regional organ blood flows determined. The conscious bile duct-ligated rat compared with the sham-operated showed a hyperdynamic circulation with an increased cardiac output and portal tributary blood flow. Pentobarbital sodium anesthesia induced marked hemodynamic changes in both sham-operated and bile duct-ligated rats. The latter group was especially sensitive to its effects; thus, comparison of cardiac output and portal tributary blood flow between anesthetized bile duct-ligated and sham-operated rats showed no significant differences. The authors conclude that the rat with cirrhosis due to chronic bile duct ligation is an excellent model for hemodynamic investigations but should be studied in the conscious state, since pentobarbital sodium anesthesia eliminated the hyperdynamic circulation.

  13. Interpretations and implications of the top quark rapidity asymmetries <mi>A> <mi>FB> <mi>t> and <mi>A> <mi>FB> <mi>?>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Zhang, Hao

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forward-backward asymmetries AtFB and AlFB are observed in the top-quark t rapidity distribution and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons l from top-quark decay at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, and a charge asymmetry AC is seen in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this paper, we update our previous studies of the Tevatron asymmetries using the most recent data. We provide expectations for AC at the LHC based first on simple extrapolations from the Tevatron, and second based on new physics models that can explain the Tevatron asymmetries. We examine the relationship of the two asymmetries AtFB and AlFB. We show their connection through the (V–A) spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We show that the ratio of the two asymmetries provides independent insight into the physics interpretation of the top-quark asymmetry. We emphasize the value of the measurement of both asymmetries, and we conclude that a model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is suggested by the present Tevatron data.

  14. Regulation of Endothelial Phenotype in Rat Soleus Muscle Feed Arteries: Influence of Aging and Exercise Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trott, Daniel Wayne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    arrival, rats were exercise trained (Ex) or remained sedentary (Sed) for 10-12 weeks. Thus, at the end of the training program, the ages of the young and old rats were 4-5 mo or 24-25 mo respectively. The resulting experimental design consisted... of four groups of rats: 1) young Sed (n = 10), 2) young Ex (n = 10), 3) old Sed (n = 10), and 4) old Ex (n = 10). To determine whether exogenous antioxidants produce exercise-like effects on aged SFA, a separate group of male Fischer 344 rats (4...

  15. Brain reward deficits accompany withdrawal (hangover) from acute ethanol in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulteis, Gery; Liu, Jian

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stimulation reward: effects of ethanol. Alcohol Clin Exp Resstimulus produced by ethanol withdrawal. J Pharmacol Expthe "anxiogenic" response to ethanol withdrawal in the rat.

  16. 3D MRI of Non-Gaussian He Gas Diffusion in the Rat Lung. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results show that the non-Gaussian effects of ³He gas diffusion in healthy rat lungs are directly attributed to the anisotropic geometry of lung microstructure, and that...

  17. Effects of combined hyperoxia and cyclooxygenase inhibition in neonatal rat lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. Effect of indomethacin on lung development in postnatalinhibition & neonatal rat lungs the fetal ductus arteriosus.expression in human lungs of newborns with congenital

  18. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic evaluation of gentamicin nephrotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Com, Emmanuelle, E-mail: emmanuelle.com@univ-rennes1.fr [sanofi-aventis R and D, Disposition Safety and Animal Research, Vitry-sur-Seine (France) [sanofi-aventis R and D, Disposition Safety and Animal Research, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); INSERM U625, Proteomics Core Facility Biogenouest, Rennes (France); Boitier, Eric; Marchandeau, Jean-Pierre [sanofi-aventis R and D, Disposition Safety and Animal Research, Vitry-sur-Seine (France)] [sanofi-aventis R and D, Disposition Safety and Animal Research, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Brandenburg, Arnd [Genedata AG, Basel (Switzerland)] [Genedata AG, Basel (Switzerland); Schroeder, Susanne [Nycomed GmbH, Barsbüttel (Germany)] [Nycomed GmbH, Barsbüttel (Germany); Hoffmann, Dana; Mally, Angela [University of Würzburg, Department of Toxicology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg (Germany)] [University of Würzburg, Department of Toxicology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg (Germany); Gautier, Jean-Charles [sanofi-aventis R and D, Disposition Safety and Animal Research, Vitry-sur-Seine (France)] [sanofi-aventis R and D, Disposition Safety and Animal Research, Vitry-sur-Seine (France)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic, which induces renal tubular necrosis in rats. In the context of the European InnoMed PredTox project, transcriptomic and proteomic studies were performed to provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were treated with 25 and 75 mg/kg/day subcutaneously for 1, 3 and 14 days. Histopathology observations showed mild tubular degeneration/necrosis and regeneration and moderate mononuclear cell infiltrate after long-term treatment. Transcriptomic data indicated a strong treatment-related gene expression modulation in kidney and blood cells at the high dose after 14 days of treatment, with the regulation of 463 and 3241 genes, respectively. Of note, the induction of NF-kappa B pathway via the p38 MAPK cascade in the kidney, together with the activation of T-cell receptor signaling in blood cells were suggestive of inflammatory processes in relation with the recruitment of mononuclear cells in the kidney. Proteomic results showed a regulation of 163 proteins in kidney at the high dose after 14 days of treatment. These protein modulations were suggestive of a mitochondrial dysfunction with impairment of cellular energy production, induction of oxidative stress, an effect on protein biosynthesis and on cellular assembly and organization. Proteomic results also provided clues for potential nephrotoxicity biomarkers such as AGAT and PRBP4 which were strongly modulated in the kidney. Transcriptomic and proteomic data turned out to be complementary and their integration gave a more comprehensive insight into the putative mode of nephrotoxicity of gentamicin which was in accordance with histopathological findings. -- Highlights: ? Gentamicin induces renal tubular necrosis in rats. ? The mechanisms of gentamicin nephrotoxicity remain still elusive. ? Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to study this toxicity in rats. ? Transcriptomic and proteomic data turned out to be complementary and are integrated. ? A more comprehensive putative model of nephrotoxicity of gentamicin is presented.

  19. Albumin extravasation rates in tissues of anesthetized and unanesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renkin, E.M.; Joyner, W.L.; Gustafson-Sgro, M.; Plopper, G.; Sibley, L.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with /sup 131/I was injected intravenously in chronically prepared, unanesthetized rats and into pentobarbital-anesthetized rats that had received 2 ml 5% BSA to help sustain plasma volume. Initial uptake rates (clearances) in skin, skeletal muscles, diaphragm, and heart (left ventricle) were measured over 1 h. BSA labeled with /sup 125/I was injected terminally to correct for intravascular /sup 131/I-BSA. Observed clearances were in the following order in both groups of animals: heart much greater than diaphragm approximately equal to skin greater than resting skeletal muscles. Differences between unanesthetized and anesthetized animals were small and inconsistently directed. Our results suggest that the lower albumin clearances reported in the literature for anesthetized rats are not the result of their immobility or any direct effect of anesthesia on albumin transport in these tissues. The lower transport rates appear to result indirectly from changes produced by anesthesia and/or surgery in controllable parameters such as plasma volume and intravascular protein mass.

  20. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gate, Laurent [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France)]. E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Micillino, Jean-Claude [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Nunge, Herve [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Bottin, Marie-Claire [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Wrobel, Richard [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Binet, Stephane [Institut National de Recherche et Securite, Avenue de Bourgogne, BP 27, 54501 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  1. Impacts of the Norway Rat on the auklet breeding colony at Sirius Point, Kiska Island, Alaska in 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Impacts of the Norway Rat on the auklet breeding colony at Sirius Point, Kiska Island, Alaska of the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) onto Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, in the 1940s (Murie 1959 and to investigate the biology and demography of the Norway rat population. Moors and Atkinson (1984) suggested

  2. Auklet Demography and the Influence of Norway rats at Kiska Island report on results of monitoring to 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Auklet Demography and the Influence of Norway rats at Kiska Island ­ report on results METHODS 4 AUKLET PRODUCTIVITY 4 TIMING OF BREEDING 5 AUKLET SURVIVAL 6 NORWAY RAT ABUNDANCE 10 NORWAY RAT ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION 10 VEGETATION CHANGES 11 DISCUSSION 11 LEAST AUKLET

  3. Maternal Responsiveness to Infant Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Ultrasonic Vocalizations During the Maternal Behavior Cycle and After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maternal Responsiveness to Infant Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Ultrasonic Vocalizations During environment, Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) pups emit ultrasonic vocalizations that can elicit maternal search is particularly important in altricial species such as the Norway rat in which infants rely on the mother

  4. ECOLOGY OF NORWAY RATS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS) IN RELATION TO CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF SEABIRDS ON KISKA ISLAND,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    ECOLOGY OF NORWAY RATS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS) IN RELATION TO CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF SEABIRDS to predation by introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). In 2001 and 2002 the auklet colony experienced the lowest reproductive success ever recorded for auklets. Norway rats have been suggested as the cause

  5. Activation of orexin signal in basal forebrain facilitates the emergence from sevoflurane anesthesia in rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    anesthesia in rat Hailong Dong 1 , Jiyuan Niu 1 , Binxiao Su, Zhenghua Zhu, Yan Lv, Yizhi Li, Lize Xiong t Orexinergic system may play an important role in the regulation of anesthesia­arousal. However, which region, induction and emergence time to sevoflurane anesthesia in rats. Either orexin-A or orexin-B was injected

  6. Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla Govind Nair* and ADC of the rat eyes were measured at 50 3 50 3 800 lm at 7 Tesla. Profiles of T1, T2, T2* and ADC

  7. Effect of Two Models of Intrauterine Growth Restriction on Alveolarization in Rat Lungs: Morphometric and Gene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of Two Models of Intrauterine Growth Restriction on Alveolarization in Rat Lungs L-NAME impairs lung development before alveolarization. Known growth factors involved in lung on Alveolarization in Rat Lungs: Morphometric and Gene Expression Analysis. PLoS ONE 8(11): e78326. doi:10

  8. Endogenous opioids and attenuated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to immune challenge in pregnant rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, J. A.; Ochedalski, T; Meddle, S. L.; Ma, S.; Brunton, P. J.; Douglas, A. J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , but not pregnant, rats. However, naloxone infused directly into the PVN increased noradrenaline release after IL-1{beta} in pregnant rats. Thus, the HPA axis responses to immune signals are suppressed in pregnancy at the level of pPVN CRH neurons through an opioid...

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of oxygen gradients in rat pial microvessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popel, Aleksander S.

    no substantial impact on the transmural PO2 gradient. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism (2008) 28, 1597Experimental and theoretical studies of oxygen gradients in rat pial microvessels Maithili Sharan1 near cortical arterioles and transmural PO2 gradients in the pial arterioles of the rat. Under control

  10. The Effects of Alcohol and Age on Astrocytes In Female Rats Following an Inflammatory Stimulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Ashley

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL AND AGE ON ASTROCYTES IN FEMALE RATS FOLLOWING AN INFLAMMATORY STIMULUS A Senior Scholars Thesis by ASHLEY NICOLE SIMPSON Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A...&M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR April 2006 Major: Biology THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL AND AGE ON ASTROCYTES IN FEMALE RATS FOLLOWING...

  11. Research Report Effects of ethanol consumption by adult female rats on subsequent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Research Report Effects of ethanol consumption by adult female rats on subsequent consumption January 2004 Abstract We used a two-bottle choice test to measure voluntary ethanol consumption by adolescent rats that had lived with ethanol-consuming or water-consuming adult conspecifics. We found

  12. The harmful effects of late-onset alcohol consumption on cortical bone in aged rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowlin, Julie Lee

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study looked at the effects of late-onset alcohol consumption for 8 weeks on the aged rat model (15 months old). Thirty 15 month old female Fisher 344 rats were divided into three diet groups: Alcohol (n=9), pair-fed (n=9), and pellet (n=6...

  13. Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation RUDY M. ORTIZ AND CHARLES E. WADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Rudy M.

    was observed, the lack of a change in %TBW among the three measurement periods or in water flux over the 12Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation RUDY M. ORTIZ AND CHARLES E. WADE Life; accepted in final form 22 February 2000 Ortiz, Rudy M., and Charles E. Wade. Water balance in rats exposed

  14. Prefrontal involvement in the regulation of emotion: convergence of rat and human studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    experiments designed to bridge human and rodent models of emotion regulation. Addresses 1 Department of prefrontal involvement of emotion regula- tion using rat and human models, and suggest future experimentsPrefrontal involvement in the regulation of emotion: convergence of rat and human studies Gregory J

  15. PMSG responsiveness during adult life after partial oogonia destruction with misulban in the rat embryo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sensitive to X-ray irradiation in the last period of division, i.e. about day 15 of pregnancy in the rat-month old female rats were bred under standard conditions of light (14 h light―10 h dark) and food

  16. Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects of in vivo elastase treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects of in vivo elastase P. Ingenito, and Be´la Suki. Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects behavior of the alveolar walls and the macroscopic mechanical properties of the whole lung in an in vivo

  17. Plasticity in the Rat Posterior Auditory Field Following Nucleus Basalis Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    Plasticity in the Rat Posterior Auditory Field Following Nucleus Basalis Stimulation Amanda C. Plasticity in the rat posterior auditory field following nucleus basalis stimulation. J Neurophysiol 98: 253 have been shown to cause frequency-specific plasticity in both primary and secondary cortical areas

  18. Impedance measurements of ex vivo rat lung at different volumes of inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Impedance measurements of ex vivo rat lung at different volumes of inflation Michael L. Oelze that the occurrence of ultrasonically induced lung hemorrhage in rats was directly correlated to the level of lung inflation. In that study, it was hypothesized that the lung could be modeled as two components consisting

  19. Catheterization of the Hepatic Artery Via the Left Common Carotid Artery in Rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xiao [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Radiology (China); Wang Yixiang, J. [AstraZeneca R and D (United Kingdom); Zhou Xiangping [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Radiology (China)], E-mail: xiangpingzhou46@163.com; Guan Yongsong; Tang Chengwei [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology (China)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The commonly used approach for rat hepatic artery catheterization is via the gastroduodenal artery, which is ligated after the procedure. A new method of rat hepatic artery catheterization via the left common carotid artery (LCCA) is described. The LCCA is repaired after catheterization. The catheterization procedures included the following: (1) opening the rat's abdominal cavity and exposing the portion of abdominal aorta at the level of the celiac trunk; (2) separating and exposing the LCCA; inserting a microguidewire and microcatheter set into the LCCA via an incision; after placement into the descending aorta, the microguidewire and microcatheter are maneuvered into the hepatic artery under direct vision; (3) after transcatheter therapy, the catheter is withdrawn and the incision at the LCCA is repaired. This technique was employed on 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats with diethylnitrosamine-induced liver cancer, using a 3F microguidewire and microcatheter set. Selective hepatic artery catheterization was successfully performed in 57 rats. One rat died during the operation and five rats died within 7 days after the procedure. It is envisaged that as experience increases, the catheterization success rate will increase and the death rate will decrease. A new approach for selective hepatic artery catheterization via the LCCA in rats is introduced, which makes repeat catheterization of this artery possible and allows large embolization particles to be delivered by using a 3F catheter.

  20. Proteomic analysis of rat cerebral cortex following subchronic acrolein toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Lari, Parisa [Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abnous, Khalil, E-mail: Abnouskh@mums.ac.r [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinzadeh, Hossein, E-mail: Hosseinzadehh@mums.ac.ir [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acrolein, a member of reactive ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes, is a major environmental pollutant. Acrolein is also produced endogenously as a toxic by-product of lipid peroxidation. Because of high reactivity, acrolein may mediate oxidative damages to cells and tissues. It has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of pathological states including pulmonary, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we employed proteomics approach to investigate the effects of subchronic oral exposures to 3 mg/kg of acrolein on protein expression profile in the brain of rats. Moreover effects of acrolein on malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reduced glutathione (GSH) content were investigated. Our results revealed that treatment with acrolein changed levels of several proteins in diverse physiological process including energy metabolism, cell communication and transport, response to stimulus and metabolic process. Interestingly, several differentially over-expressed proteins, including ?-synuclein, enolase and calcineurin, are known to be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. Changes in the levels of some proteins were confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, acrolein increases the level of MDA, as a lipid peroxidation biomarker and decreased GSH concentrations, as a non-enzyme antioxidant in the brain of acrolein treated rats. These findings suggested that acrolein induces the oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and so that may contribute to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. - Highlights: • Acrolein intoxication increased lipid peroxidation and deplete GSH in rat brain. • Effect of acrolein on protein levels of cerebral cortex was analyzed by 2DE-PAGE. • Levels of a number of proteins with different biological functions were increased.

  1. Blocking long term consolidation of extinction in rats with puromycin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, William Joseph

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIBNC August 1972 )major Subject: Psychology BLOCKING LONG TERM CONSOLIDATION OF EXTINCTION IN RATS WI ' H PUROMYCIN A Thesis WILLIAM JOSEPH BROUSSARD Approved as to style and content by~ c'F, ~ g, Chairman of Co j. ttee H o e ar men Mem er..., snd Joseph . "lagyvary, this manuscript would have been considerably longer in taking shape. The author e. ,pecially wishes to call attention to his wife. If tolerance, patience, and encourageme. , t can be considered part of a higher education...

  2. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/[mu]), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of [sup 14]C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ([sup 3]H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The [sup 14]C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with [sup 14]C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

  3. The effects of alcohol and irradiation on the albino rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klobukowski, Christopher John

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '&eight During the Test I'eriod. lh Combined. Daily Caloric Intake - Ca- lories per 100 Grams of 3ody Ueight. 17 Survival '?ata and Peak Death Days 3xpt. II. Surv1 vBI Data and Peek !3ea'l h Days Sxpte Ilia 3 j& Average Dody "? eights ( Pram... ~ ) ?" i rat Day I'ostirradiation. Average Pluid Intake (in millili gers) per 100 Grams of Dody Ueight, T~so Dave Pre-, Three ?Days Postirradiafion, "?S Average Percent ?ge of Total Caloric lntal:e per 100 Grams of 3od. , ? '?eight Supplied. 'by...

  4. Organization and evolution of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.R.; Coker, G.T. III; O'Malley, K.L.

    1987-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the organization of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene and compares its structure with the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. Both genes are single copy and contain 13 exons separated by 12 introns. Remarkably, the positions of 10 out 12 intron/exon boundaries are identical for the two genes. These results support the idea that these hydroxylases genes are members of a gene family which has a common evolutionary origin. The authors predict that this ancestral gene would have encoded exons similar to those of TH prior to evolutionary drift to other members of this gene family.

  5. 323. 1JYNJ;MI(S AND 00!ANTIM3 CF OOGINIC rouJJI'ANl' lNll'RICITrns (}l GAY MINERAlS. Z.Z. 2'bang. Penchu 2'bang and D.L. Sjmks. l:epart:lrent of Plant and Soil Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    323. 1JYNJ;MI(S AND 00!ANTIM3 CF OOGINIC rouJJI'ANl' lNll'RICITrns (}l GAY MINERAlS. Z.Z. 2'bangI.ark. IE 19717-lm The interactions of clay minerals with organic pollutants .ere investigated using

  6. Effect of anesthesia on glucose production and utilization in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penicaud, L.; Ferre, P.; Kande, J.; Leturque, A.; Issad, T.; Girard, J.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia (50 mg/kg ip) on glucose kinetics and individual tissue glucose utilization in vivo, in chronically catheterized rats. Glucose turnover studies were carried out using (3-/sup 3/H) glucose as tracer. A transient hyperglycemia and an increased glucose production were observed 3 min after induction of anesthesia. However, 40 min after induction of anesthesia, glycemia returned to the level observed in awake animals, whereas glucose turnover was decreased by 30% as compared with unanesthetized rats. These results are discussed with regard to the variations observed in plasma insulin, glucagon, and catecholamine levels. Glucose utilization by individual tissues was studied by the 2-(1-/sup 3/H) deoxyglucose technique. A four- to fivefold decrease in glucose utilization was observed in postural muscles (soleus and adductor longus), while in other nonpostural muscles (epitrochlearis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm) and other tissues (white and brown adipose tissues) anesthesia did not modify the rate of glucose utilization. A decrease in glucose utilization was also observed in the brain.

  7. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, V. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cascio, W.E. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Phillips, P.M. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Andrews, D. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miller, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Doerfler, D.L. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kodavanti, U.P., E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased ?{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone metabolic effects are only slightly exacerbated in geriatric rats.

  8. A study of the nutritive value of sorghum grain with rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dohm, Carolee Kathryn

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Levels of Protein and Amino Acids Response of Rats Fed Sorghum Grain Basal Diets With Individual Supplemental Amino Acids Omitted I. imiting Amino Acids of Sorghum Grain Protein (Rartin) Determined by Chemical Analysis, Rat Growth and by Plasma... for the s?mino acid analysis. Experi???ent 1 The f?. rst e& perimcnt was ccnducted to obtain necessary pri- lin. inary irinmnatiori on the ability of sorghum grain alone nd supplemented with prot. ein or amino acids to promote growth of. i?eanling rats...

  9. The effect of Zoledronate treatment timing on lumbar and caudal vertebrae in ovariectomized rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruchelsman, Michal (Michal Aliza)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: While there have been numerous studies demonstrating the effect of bisphosphonates in rats as either a preventative treatment or recovering treatment for osteoporosis, few have directly compared the two ...

  10. Skeletal Response to Simulated Microgravity Exposures and Exercise in the Adult Rat Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    mass, structure, and integrity and not an accurate predictor of fracture risk. Therefore, it is essential to measure the mechanical properties of bone tissue directly using animal models. The hindlimb unloaded (HU) rat model is a well-established ground...

  11. Beneficial effects of dietary L-arginine supplementation to diabetic rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohli, Ripla

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetic rats exhibit decrease in plasma arginine, NO synthesis and tetrahydrobiopterin in endothelial cells (EC). Treatment with L-arginine may be beneficial for enhancing NO synthesis in diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. However...

  12. The impact of binge drinking on the young growing female rat skeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Sharon Lee

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous research indicated that chronic alcohol consumption has a detrimental impact on the skeleton in both humans and alcohol-fed rats. The decreased bone mass seen in alcoholics increases their risk for fractures over time and likely contributes...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - anesthetized lactating rats Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in situ and force in the rat plantaris muscle during repeated Effect of lactate infusion on M... .physiology.orgDownloadedfrom 12;Effect of lactate infusion on M-wave...

  14. Effect of passive and active immunization against somatostatin in growing rats and cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Mark Elliott

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    found in other cells throughout the gastro- intestinal mucosa, usually in the midzone of the villi (Polak et al. , 1975). Somatostatin is found in hypothalamic as well as extrahypothalamic regions of the rat brain (Epelbaum et al. , 1977). Epelbaum...

  15. Dose Dependent Response to Cyclodextrin Infusion in a Rat Model of Verapamil Toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Allan R.; Bryant, Sean M; Aks, Steven E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time to asystole in rats infused with both verapamil Westernso that the total volume infused was the same across groups,respectively. The group infused with verapamil and SBE-CD in

  16. The impact of binge drinking on the young growing female rat skeleton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Sharon Lee

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous research indicated that chronic alcohol consumption has a detrimental impact on the skeleton in both humans and alcohol-fed rats. The decreased bone mass seen in alcoholics increases their risk for fractures over ...

  17. Quantification of Neuroepithelial Bodies and Their Innervation in Fawn-Hooded and Wistar Rat Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    Quantification of Neuroepithelial Bodies and Their Innervation in Fawn-Hooded and Wistar Rat Lungs neuroendocrine system (DNES) of the lungs, the neuroendocrine cells of which have been shown to express

  18. Estimating cancellous bone properties of the rat from mechanical testing of the femoral neck 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groves, Jennifer Ann

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESTIMATING CANCELLOIJS BONE PROPERTIES OF THE RAT FROM MECHANICAL TESTING OF THE FEMORAL NECK A Thesis by JENNIFER ANN GROVES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1998 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ESTIMATING CANCELLOUS BONE PROPERTIES OF THE RAT FROM MECHANICAL TESTING OF THE FEMORAL NECK A Thesis by JENNIFER ANN GROVES Submitted to Texas Ai8:M University...

  19. Absence of an inhibitory action of prolactin on plasma luteinizing hormone in ovariectomized rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Robert Ellis

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSENCE OF AN INHIBITORY ACTION OF PROLACTIN ON PLASMA LUTEINIZING HORMONE IN OVARIECTOMIZED RATS A Thesis by ROBERT ELLIS OWENS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction ABSENCE OF AN INHIBITORY ACTION OF PROLACTIN ON PLASMA LUTEINIZING HORMONE IN OVARIECTOMIZED RATS A Thesis by ROBERT ELLIS OWENS Approved as to style and content by: Chai man...

  20. 3-Methylhistidine excretion as an index of dietary protein adequacy in the rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Rebecca Kay

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3-METHYLHISTIDINE EXCRETION AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY PROTEIiV ADEQUACY IN THE RAT A Thesis by REBECCA KAY KIRBY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Biochemistry and Biophysics 3-METHYLHISTIDINE EXCRETION AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY PROTEIN ADEQUACY IN THE RAT A Thesis by REBECCA KAY KIRBY Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member...

  1. Sodium and potassium levels in the serum of acutely irradiated and non-irradiated rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Preston

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Zoology SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head...

  2. The postnatal development of the sex organs in prenatally and early postnatally irradiated male albino rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks, Robert Clinton

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SEX ORGANS IN PRENATALLY AND EARLY POSTNATALLY IRRADIATED MALE ALBINO RATS A Thesis By ROBERT C. RICKS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1964 Major Subject: Zoology THE POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SEX ORGANS IN PRENATALLY AND EARLY POSTNATALLY IRRADIATED MALE ALBINO RATS A Thesis By ROBERT C. RICKS Approved as to style and content by...

  3. Magnesium and pyridoxine intake and mineral content of selected tissues and physical development in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, Susan Elaine

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAGNESIUM AND PYRIDOXINE INTAKE MINERAL CONTENT OF SELECTED TISSUES PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN RATS A Thesis by SU S AN ELA I NE EDGAR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Nutrition MAGNESIUM AND PYRIDOXINE INTAKE MINERAL CONTENT OF SELECTED TISSUES PHYS ICAL DEVELOPMENT IN RATS A Thesis by SUSAN ELAINE EDGAR Approved as to style and content by: 'KAREN...

  4. Effects of simulated microgravity on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of the rat abdominal aorta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Anthony

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ON VASOCONSTRICTOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RAT ABDOMINAL AORTA A Thesis by ANTHONY PAPADOPOULOS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering EFFECTS OF SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ON VASOCONSTRICTOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RAT ABDOMINAL AORTA A Thesis by ANTHONY PAPADOPOULOS Submitted...

  5. Copper induced osteopenia and its relationship to the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis in the rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Cindy Deann

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COPPER INDUCED OSTEOPENIA AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS IN THE RAT A Thesis CINDY DEANN YEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Nutrition COPPER INDUCED OSTEOPENIA AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS IN THE RAT A Thesis CINDY DEANN YEE Approved as to style and content...

  6. LES TYROSINASES CUTANES CHEZ LE RAT. MODIFICATIONS AU COURS DU DVELOPPEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LES TYROSINASES CUTAN�ES CHEZ LE RAT. MODIFICATIONS AU COURS DU D�VELOPPEMENT ET PENDANT LE CYCLE Sciences appliquées, 69621 Villeurbanne 1 1 R�SUM� Nous avons effectué l'étude des tyrosinases de la peau chez le Rat. Ces tyrosinases sont mises en évidence, après électrophorèse par réaction de Dopa sur gel

  7. Magnesium deficiency and type of protein during gestation and lactation in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, Kathryn Ellen Hughes

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAGNESIUM DEFICIENCY AND TYPE OF PROTEIN DURING GESTATION AND LACTATION IN RATS A Thesis by KATHRYN ELLEN HUGHES HOLMES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Nutrition MAGNESIUM DEFICIENCY AND TYPE OF PROTEIN DURING GESTATION AND LACTATION IN RATS A Thesis by KATHRYN ELLEN HUGHES HOLMES Approved as to style and content by: Karen S. Kubena (Chair...

  8. Systematics of the southern races of two species of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys compactus and D. ordi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumgardner, George D

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SYSTEMATICS OF THE SOUTHERN RACES OF TWO SPECIES OF KANGAROO RATS (DIPODOMYS COMPACTUS AND D. ORDI) A Thesis by GEORGE DAVIS BAUMGARDNER Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment o- the requirement... for the deqree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Nildlife and Fisheries Sciences SYSTEMATICS OF THE SOUTHERN RACES OF TWO SPECIES OF KANGAROO RATS (DIPODOMYS COMPACTUS AND D. ORDI) A Thesis by GEORGE DAVIS BAUMGARDNER Approved as to style...

  9. Dose-Response Effect of Charged Carbon Beam on Normal Rat Retina Assessed by Electroretinography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizota, Atsushi, E-mail: mizota-a@med.teikyo-u.ac.j [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu (Japan); Tanaka, Minoru [Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu (Japan); Kubota, Mariko; Negishi, Hisanari [Department of Ophthalmology, National Hospital Organization Chiba Medical Center, Chiba (Japan); Watanabe, Emiko [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the effects of carbon beam irradiation with those of proton beam irradiation on the physiology of the retina of rats. Methods and Materials: Eight-week-old Wister rats were used. The right eyes were irradiated with carbon beam (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy) or proton beam (4, 8, 16, and 24 Gy) with the rats under general anesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the irradiation, and the amplitudes of the a and b waves were compared with those of control rats. Results: The amplitude of b waves was reduced more than that of a waves at lower irradiation doses with both types of irradiation. With carbon ion irradiation, the amplitudes of the b wave were significantly reduced after radiation doses of 8 and 16 Gy at 6 months and by radiation doses of 4, 8, and 16 Gy at 12 months. With proton beam irradiation, the b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced after 16 and 24 Gy at 6 months and with doses of 8 Gy or greater at 12 months. For the maximum b-wave amplitude, a significant difference was observed in rats irradiated with carbon beams of 4 Gy or more and with proton beams of 8 Gy or more at 12 months after irradiation. Conclusions: These results indicate that carbon beam irradiation is about two times more damaging than proton beam irradiation on the rat retina at the same dose.

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeed, Noha M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Demerdash, Ebtehal [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt); Algandaby, Mardi M. [Department of Biology (Botany), Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Biology (Botany), Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Al-Abbasi, Fahad A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B., E-mail: abnaim@pharma.asu.edu.eg [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-?B expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ? Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ? MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ? MP and EP decreased TNF-? and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ? MP and EP reduced NF-?B expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ? MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  11. Prolactin and aging: X-irradiated and estrogen-induced rat mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, A.; Naito, M.; Watanabe, H.; Yokoro, K.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both sexes of inbred WF rats at either 8 or 28-60 weeks of age were exposed to 200 rad whole-body radiation, 2.5 or 5.0 mg 17 beta-estradiol (E2), or both agents The female rats treated with E2 alone or with both X-rays and E2 at 8 weeks of age showed a high incidence of mammary carcinomas (MCA), a large increase in pituitary weight, and a rise in serum prolactin (PRL) levels. However, the same treatments to males did not induce MCA despite a moderate increase in both pituitary weight and serum PRL. Ovariectomy prior to E2 treatment failed to modify the occurrence of MCA or pituitary tumors. When X-rays and E2 were given to female rats at 28-60 weeks of age, pituitary weight, serum PRL levels, and the incidence of MCA were unaffected. When the E2 pellet was kept for the first 24 weeks and withdrawn during the last 12 weeks, the incidence of MCA, pituitary weight, and serum PRL was low. It was concluded that: 1) the pituitary glands of young female rats were susceptible to E2 treatment but were insensitive in older females, and 2) the occurrence of MCA in female rats appeared to be promoted by elevated PRL levels secreted by E2-induced pituitary tumors. Mammary tissue of male rats was less sensitive to PRL levels in the development of MCA.

  12. Ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats release prolactin differently in response to estrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, D.M.; Sensui, N.; Gala, R.R.

    1984-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mature female Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Long-Evans (LE) rats were ovariectomized (OVX), and given a single sc injection of either 25 or 100 ..mu..g polyestradiol phosphate (PEP); seven days later blood samples were withdrawn at two hour intervals from 1100 to 2100 hours to detect the presence of an afternoon surge of prolactin (PRL). Other groups of OVX rats of both strains also treated with PEP were sampled before and at 2, 5, 10 and 30 min after iv administration of 1 ..mu..g synthetic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). Pituitary (AP) and uterine weights were determined following sacrifice one day after TRH treatment. The AP homogenates and plasma samples were assayed for PRL by radioimmunoassay. Rats of both strains had afternoon PRL surges and in both strains the magnitude and/or duration of the surges were enhanced by the higher dose of PEP. However, within each PEP dose LE rats released significantly more PRL during the surge than did SD drats. Rats of both strains also rleased PRL in response to TRH and this response was enhanced in both strains by the higher of the two doses of PEP. These data not only show that strain differences exist in estrogen-induced or mediated PRL release in the rat but also indicate that the differences are not uniform.

  13. Finite element analysis and computed tomography based structural rigidity analysis of rat tibia with simulated lytic defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaziri, Ashkan

    Finite element analysis and computed tomography based structural rigidity analysis of rat tibia) (Damron et al., 2003; Mirels, 1989). In contrast, Computed Tomography based Structural Rigidly Ana- lysis

  14. Ethanol seeking triggered by environmental context is attenuated by blocking dopamine D1 receptors in the nucleus accumbens core and shell in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhri, Nadia; Sahuque, Lacey L.; Janak, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    self-administration when infused into either the NAc core ortest. As test rats were infused with saline and placed intotests where rats were infused with SCH 23390 (0, 0.006,

  15. Comparative Metabolism of Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats, Mice and Hamsters Using Gas Uptake and PBPK Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrall, Karla D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vucelick, Mark E. (FLUOR HANFORD, INC); Gies, Richard A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Zangar, Richard C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Weitz, Karl K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poet, Torka S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Springer, David L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Grant, Donna M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Benson, Janet M. (Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute)

    2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    No study has comprehensively compared the rate of metabolism of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) across species. Therefore, the in vivo metabolism of CCl4 was evaluated using groups of male animals (F344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Syrian hamsters) exposed to 40-1800 ppm CCl4 in a closed, recirculating gas-uptake system. For each species, an optimal fit of the family of uptake curves was obtained by adjusting Michaelis-Menten metabolic constants Km (affinity) and Vmax (capacity) using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The results show that the mouse has a slightly higher capacity and lower affinity for metabolizing CCl4 compared to the rat, while the hamster has a higher capacity and lower affinity than either rat or mouse. A comparison of the Vmax to Km ratio, normalized for mg of liver protein (L/hr/mg) across species indicates that hamsters metabolize more CCl4 than either rats or mice, and should be more susceptible to CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. These species comparisons were evaluated against toxicokinetic studies conducted in animals exposed by nose-only inhalation to 20 ppm 14C-labeled CCl4 for 4 hours. The toxicokinetic study results are consistent with the in vivo rates of metabolism, with rats eliminating less radioactivity associated with metabolism (14CO2 and urine/feces) and more radioactivity associated with the parent compound (radioactivity trapped on charcoal) compared to either hamsters or mice. The in vivo metabolic constants determined here, together with in vitro constants determined using rat, mouse, hamster and human liver microsomes, were used to estimate human in vivo metabolic rates of 1.49 mg/hr/kg body weight and 0.25 mg/L for Vmax and Km, respectively. Normalizing the rate of metabolism (Vmax/Km) by mg liver protein, the rate of metabolism of CCl4 differs across species, with hamster > mouse& > rat > human.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.go [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 suggests ubiquitous and frequent exposure. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats by oral and injection routes. Deuterated BPA was used to avoid issues of background contamination. Linear pharmacokinetics were observed in adult rats treated orally in the range of 0-200 {mu}g/kg bw. Evidence for enterohepatic recirculation of conjugated, but not aglycone, BPA was observed in adult rats. Significant inverse relationships were observed between postnatal age and measures of internal exposures to aglycone BPA and its elimination. In neonatal rats treated orally, internal exposures to aglycone BPA were substantially lower than from subcutaneous injection. The results reinforce the critical role for first-pass Phase II metabolism of BPA in gut and liver after oral exposure that attenuates internal exposure to the aglycone form in rats of all ages. The internal exposures to aglycone BPA observed in adult and neonatal rats following a single oral dose of 100 {mu}g/kg bw are inconsistent with effects mediated by classical estrogen receptors based on binding affinities. However, an impact on alternative estrogen signaling pathways that have higher receptor affinity cannot be excluded in neonatal rats. These findings emphasize the importance of matching aglycone BPA internal dosimetry with receptor affinities in experimental animal studies reporting toxicity.

  17. Inhalation carcinogenicity study with nickel metal powder in Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oller, Adriana R. [NiPERA, 2605 Meridian Parkway, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)], E-mail: aoller@nipera.org; Kirkpatrick, Daniel T.; Radovsky, Ann [WIL Research Laboratories, LLC, 1407 George Road, Ashland, OH 44805 8946 (United States); Bates, Hudson K. [NiPERA, 2605 Meridian Parkway, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epidemiological studies of nickel refinery workers have demonstrated an association between increased respiratory cancer risk and exposure to certain nickel compounds (later confirmed in animal studies). However, the lack of an association found in epidemiological analyses for nickel metal remained unconfirmed for lack of robust animal inhalation studies. In the present study, Wistar rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation to 0, 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 mg Ni/m{sup 3} nickel metal powder (MMAD = 1.8 {mu}m, GSD = 2.4 {mu}m) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for up to 24 months. A subsequent six-month period without exposures preceded the final euthanasia. High mortality among rats exposed to 1.0 mg Ni/m{sup 3} nickel metal resulted in the earlier termination of exposures in this group. The exposure level of 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} was established as the MTD for the study. Lung alterations associated with nickel metal exposure included alveolar proteinosis, alveolar histiocytosis, chronic inflammation, and bronchiolar-alveolar hyperplasia. No increased incidence of neoplasm of the respiratory tract was observed. Adrenal gland pheochromocytomas (benign and malignant) in males and combined cortical adenomas/carcinomas in females were induced in a dose-dependent manner by the nickel metal exposure. The incidence of pheochromocytomas was statistically increased in the 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} male group. Pheochromocytomas appear to be secondary to the lung toxicity associated with the exposure rather than being related to a direct nickel effect on the adrenal glands. The incidence of cortical tumors among 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} females, although statistically higher compared to the concurrent controls, falls within the historical control range; therefore, in the present study, this tumor is of uncertain relationship to nickel metal exposure. The lack of respiratory tumors in the present animal study is consistent with the findings of the epidemiological studies.

  18. In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Michael F., E-mail: hughes.michaelf@epa.go [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Edwards, Brenda C. [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flow-through diffusion cells, and radiolabeled bifenthrin, deltamethrin or cis-permethrin was applied in acetone to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid were collected every 4 h. At 24 h, the skins were washed with soap and water to remove unabsorbed chemical. The skin was then solubilized. Two additional experiments were performed after washing the skin; the first was tape-stripping the skin and the second was the collection of receptor fluid for an additional 24 h. Receptor fluid, skin washes, tape strips and skin were analyzed for radioactivity. For rat skin, the wash removed 53-71% of the dose and 26-43% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid ranged from 1 to 5%. For human skin, the wash removed 71-83% of the dose and 14-25% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid was 1-2%. Tape-stripping removed 50-56% and 79-95% of the dose in rat and human skin, respectively, after the wash. From 24-48 h, 1-3% and about 1% of the dose diffused into the receptor fluid of rat and human skin, respectively. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin penetrated rat and human skin following dermal application in vitro. However, a skin wash removed 50% or more of the dose from rat and human skin. Rat skin was more permeable to the pyrethroids than human skin. Of the dose in skin, 50% or more was removed by tape-stripping, suggesting that permeation of pyrethroids into viable tissue could be impeded. The percentage of the dose absorbed into the receptor fluid was considerably less than the dose in rat and human skin. Therefore, consideration of the skin type used and fractions analyzed are important when using in vitro dermal absorption data for risk assessment.

  19. Dietary apigenin and naringenin protect against colon carcinogenesis by lowering high multiplicity aberrant crypt foci and enhancing apoptosis in azoxymethane-treated rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardi, Tety

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    investigated the potentially protective effects of four citrus flavonoids and one limonoid mixture against the promotion stage of chemically-induced colon cancer in rats. Male SD rats (n =60; 10 rats/group) were assigned to receive diets containing 0...

  20. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  1. Pancreatic hydrolases in cold-induced hyperphagia of rats fed a low or high-fat diet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Bellevue, France. Summary. Rats fed either a low (2 p. 100) or high (40 p. 100)-fat diet were exposed to 22 or 5 °C consumption which entails increased digestive processes. The cold-adapted rat therefore provides containing 2.5 p. 100 lard supplemented with 0.4 p. 100 sunflower oil to provide the necessary unsaturated

  2. Methods for testing the strength of cancellous bone and tested method effects on cortical bone in the ovariectomized rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruhmann, Sean Phillip

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, two mechanical testing procedures were developed to test the strength of cancellous bone from the proximal tibia of the rat, the "punch method" and the "whole slice method". These were used to quantify the effect of ovariectomy on rat...

  3. A Novel Method for the Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Cancellous Bone in the Rat Distal Femur 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Matthew W.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................................................................................................. 35 3.7.1 Analysis of Mechanical Testing Data .............................................................. 35 3.7.2 Material Properties ........................................................................................... 37 3.7.3 Core....2 Osteoporosis and the Ovariectomized Rat Model .................................................... 5 2.3 Mechanical Testing of Cancellous Bone in Rats ..................................................... 5 2.3.1 Femoral Neck Testing...

  4. Characterization of the Bone Loss and Recovery Response at the Distal Femur Metaphysis of the Adult Male Hindlimb Unloaded Rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Joshua Morgan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Metaphysis of the Rat ....................................................................... 10 2.4 Mechanical Testing Methods for Rat Distal Femur Metaphysis ............................ 13 2.5 Reduced Platen Compression Mechanical Testing... ........................................................... 27 3.5 RPC Mechanical Testing and Analysis .................................................................... 30 3.6 Data Analysis .......................................................................................................... 32 4...

  5. Failure to find aversive marking of toxic foods by Norway rats BENNETT G. GALEF, JR, SHANNON PRETTY & ELAINE E. WHISKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Failure to find aversive marking of toxic foods by Norway rats BENNETT G. GALEF, JR, SHANNON PRETTY, not where or what they avoid eating. We discuss possible ultimate explanations for this failure of naive a rat dam is eating may enter her amni- otic fluid, and fetal exposure to such cues may enhance pups

  6. Methods for testing the strength of cancellous bone and tested method effects on cortical bone in the ovariectomized rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruhmann, Sean Phillip

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the effect of two testing methods, torsion and three-point bending, on the mechanical strength of the rat femur and the changes in strength due to ovariectomy. From these tests, little change in cortical bone properties for the OVX rats compared to the Sham...

  7. The effects of exercise and dietary fat on calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc on selected tissues in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Thuy Huong

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and had a 12-hour photoperiod. Cages were lined with woodchip bedding, and stainless steel feeders were used. Design Following a three-day acclimation period, during which rats were fed the control diet, the rats were weighed and randomly assigned...

  8. Oxytocin receptors in the nucleus accumbens shell are involved in the consolidation of maternal memory in postpartum rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    memory. In Experiment 1, postpartum female rats given 1 hour of maternal experience were infused, postpartum female rats were infused with either a high or low dose of OT into the NA shell after a 15-minute no significant differences between the females infused with OT and females treated with a vehicle infused

  9. Dual constrictor and dilator actions of ETB receptors in the rat renal microcirculation: interactions with ETA receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Just, Armin

    Dual constrictor and dilator actions of ETB receptors in the rat renal microcirculation, and William J. Arendshorst. Dual constrictor and dilator actions of ETB receptors in the rat renal the combination of vasoconstrictor ETA and ETB receptors on smooth muscle cells and vasodilator ETB receptors

  10. The effect of alcohol on the bone growth spurt of rats at a time equivalent to adolescent females 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaffin, Catherine Lee

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to determine the effect of long-term alcohol consumption on the growth spurt in adolescent rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed one of three diets (alcohol, pair-fed or chow) for 3 months. ...

  11. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smajilovic, Sanela [Laboratory of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Cardiac Arrhythmia (DARC), Copenhagen (Denmark); Hansen, Jakob Lerche [Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Cardiac Arrhythmia (DARC), Copenhagen (Denmark); Christoffersen, Tue E.H. [Laboratory of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Cardiac Arrhythmia (DARC), Copenhagen (Denmark)] (and others)

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  12. Cardiovascular changes in unanesthetized and ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 2. 8-GHz radiofrequency radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jauchem, J.R.; Frei, M.R. (United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation, first while unanesthetized and then while anesthetized with ketamine (150 mg/kg.I.M.). Irradiation at a power density of 60 mW/cm2 (whole-body average specific absorption rate of approximately 14 W/kg) was conducted for sufficient duration to increase colonic temperature from 38.5 to 39.5 degrees C. The time required for the temperature increase was significantly longer in the anesthetized state. During irradiation, heart rate increased significantly both with and without anesthesia, while mean arterial blood pressure increased only when the rats were unanesthetized. The heart rate increase in the anesthetized state contrasts with a lack of change in a previous study of Fischer rats. This difference between anesthetized Sprague-Dawley and Fischer rats should be considered when comparing cardiovascular data obtained from these two strains of rats.

  13. Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

    2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

  14. Application of synchrotron radiation computed microtomography for quantification of bone microstructure in human and rat bones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parreiras Nogueira, Liebert; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Braz, Delson; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Borba de Andrade, Cherley; Tromba, Giuliana [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Physics Institute / State University of Rio de Janeiro, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratory of Radiological Sciences / State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Strada Statale S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This work aims to evaluate histomorphometric quantification by synchrotron radiation computed microto-mography in bones of human and rat specimens. Bones specimens are classified as normal and pathological (for human samples) and irradiated and non-irradiated samples (for rat ones). Human bones are specimens which were affected by some injury, or not. Rat bones are specimens which were irradiated, simulating radiotherapy procedures, or not. Images were obtained on SYRMEP beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. The system generated 14 {mu}m tomographic images. The quantification of bone structures were performed directly by the 3D rendered images using a home-made software. Resolution yielded was excellent what facilitate quantification of bone microstructures.

  15. Grafting fibroblasts genetically modified to produce L-dopa in a rat model of Parkinson disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, J.A.; Fisher, L.J.; Xu, L.; Jinnah, H.A.; Rosenberg, M.B.; Shimohama, S.; Gage, F.H. (Univ. of California School of Medicine, La Jolla (USA)); Langlais, P.J. (Univ. of California School of Medicine, La Jolla (USA) School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, La Jolla (USA) San Diego State Univ., CA (USA)); Iuvone, P.M. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (USA)); O'Malley, K.L. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rat fibroblasts were infected with a retroviral vector containing the cDNA for rat tyrosine hydroxylase. A TH-positive clone was identified by biochemical assay and immunohistochemical staining. When supplemented in vitro with pterin cofactors required for TH activity, these cells produced L-dopa and released it into the cell cultured medium. Uninfected control cells and fibroblasts infected with the TH vector were grafted separately to the caudate of rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway. Only grafts containing TH-expressing fibroblasts were found to reduce rotational asymmetry. These results have general implications for the application of gene therapy to human neurological disease and specific implications for Parkinson disease.

  16. The urinary excretion of unchanged d-amphetamine by rats at ground level and at altitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harwell, James Franklin

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    divided into 3 equal groups. One group received ammonium chloride to acidify the urine, a second group received sodium bicarbonate to alkalinize the urine, and the third group received distilled water. Immediately after receiving the pretreatment... solutions each rat was in3ected subcutaneously with d-amphetamine sulfate at the rate of 3 mg/kg body weight. Each rat was put into a metabolic cage and a 4 hour urine sample was collected at ground level. After a rest period of at least 48 hours...

  17. Chronic cellular responses of rat skin to 13 Mev proton irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkle, Donald King

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AErM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1966 Major Subject: Laboratory Animal Medicine CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial...

  18. Effect of exercise training and dietary fat on rat adipose tissue lipolysis and morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neale, Sonia Barstad

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , Colorado State University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Karen S. Kubena Dr. Stephen B. Smith The effects of exercise training and dietary fat on lipolysis rate and adipocyte morphology of epididymal fat pads were studied. Male rats (5 wk old...-free. The diets were initiated when the rats were 4 wk old. Body weight (p&0. 001), fat pad weight (p&0. 001), and adipocyte diameter (p&0. 05) were significantly less in the exercised group than in the sedentary group. Adipocyte number was not significantly...

  19. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in Hydra attenuata and in rat whole embryo culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Marion Carol

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TOXICITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA A?TENUATA AND IN RAT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE A Thesis by MARION CAROL BECKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Toxicology TOXICITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA A1TENUATA AND IN RAT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE by MARION CAROL BECKER Approved as to style and content by: Stephen H. S (Ca...

  20. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in Hydra attenuata and in rat whole embryo culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Marion Carol

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TOXICITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA A?TENUATA AND IN RAT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE A Thesis by MARION CAROL BECKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Toxicology TOXICITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA A1TENUATA AND IN RAT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE by MARION CAROL BECKER Approved as to style and content by: Stephen H. S (Ca...

  1. Testicular damage and regeneration in rats following low-level gamma irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Wesley Howard

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these animals were examined using several recognized histological procedures. The sequential damage and recovezy of the germinal epithelium was s'tudied for S4 days post-irradiation. The lower dose rate (7 R/hr) resulted in temporari. ly arresting meiotic...- ation of the germinal epithelium of rats irradiated with 7 R/hr was seen by 84 days post-irradiation. However, this same time iv. was not sufficient for total recovery of the rats irradiated to a total dose of 1000 R, at 14 R/hr. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT...

  2. Magnesium and pyridoxine intake and mineral content of selected tissues and physical development in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, Susan Elaine

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lower f eed intake s than did rats from other dietary treatments. During lactation, dai ly feed consumpt ion was lower in an ima1 s depr ived of magnesium. Approximately 24 hr postpartum, in dams who consumed a magnesium-deficient diet, the heart... and kidney contained significantly more calcium, 150'% and 300% respectively. During lactation, mild magnesium restriction resulted in increased weight loss by dams and decreased weight gain by pupa. In the of f spring of rats dep1 et ed o f magnesium...

  3. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan suppresses food intake in food-deprived and stressed rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtman, Richard

    Research Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA c Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA Received 22 January 2003 deprivation and a standardized stress (tail pinch), and on plasma 5-HTP levels in humans. In rats, 5-HTP (3

  4. High-resolution imaging of vessels in the isolated rat brain M. F. Valverde Salzmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the distribution of vessels in the rat brain. Angiography is able to use the blood flow in the brain of the living into a test tube filled with fluorocarbon fluid for susceptibility matching. MR Images were acquired at a horizontal 16.4 T scanner with a homemade microstrip volume coil, using gradient echo sequences

  5. Resveratrol Improves Survival, Hemodynamics and Energetics in a Rat Model of Hypertension Leading to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Resveratrol Improves Survival, Hemodynamics and Energetics in a Rat Model of Hypertension Leading and vascular function as well as cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism were assessed in a hypertensive/kg/day; HS-RSV) was given for 8 weeks after hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy were established (which

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Present in Cigarette Smoke Cause Bone Loss in an Ovariectomized Rat Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldman, Stephen D.

    of epidemiological studies have suggested that cigarette smoking is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Benzo- (a and fragility seen in smoking-related osteoporosis. In this study four groups of 9-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats; Ovariectomy (ovx); Estrogen; Osteoporosis. Introduction Epidemiological studies have focused

  7. Some histological manifestations in the vitamin B b12 sdeficient newborn rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Carroll Christian

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &dna;, . and spieen 1n duced by a materw?l v1tamin Rl? deficiency 1? the ?suborn albino rat, 4 secondary porno a Ips to co"lpga e the '?Jot'. , +t dif faro loca bot'i&en the hearts, livorn and '. . Tdnevs of novborn offspring oi' v'to oin Q2 deficient mothers...

  8. Imaging Oxygen Consumption in Forepaw Somatosensory Stimulation in Rats Under Isoflurane Anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Imaging Oxygen Consumption in Forepaw Somatosensory Stimulation in Rats Under Isoflurane Anesthesia consumption, indicative of partial coupling of CBF and CMRO2. This study describes a useful forepaw. Following Fox et al.'s (2) initial study with positron emission tomography (PET), stimulus- evoked CMRO2

  9. Diffuse Optical Tomography of Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxygenation, and Metabolism in Rat During Focal Ischemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    of oxygen consumption (CMRO2). Temporary (60-minute) MCAO was performed on five rats. Ischemic changes--Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of the brain is an attractive new complementary to those of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomog- raphy (PET), and holds

  10. anticoagulant-susceptible norway rats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anticoagulant-susceptible norway rats First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Assessing the...

  11. Effects of Dietary Lead and Cholesterol Supplementation on Hemolysis in the Sprague-Dawley Rat1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Effects of Dietary Lead and Cholesterol Supplementation on Hemolysis in the Sprague-Dawley Rat1 has been observed in a number of organisms exposed to lead. Previous investigators have proposed into the serum. Lead-exposed fish have displayed depressed serum cholesterol and elevated serum protein

  12. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  13. JOURNAL OF THE EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR INCREASED EATING IN RATS DEPRIVED OF RUNNING'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Premack, David

    JOURNAL OF THE EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR INCREASED EATING IN RATS DEPRIVED OF RUNNING of the wheel. When this outcome is coupled with the positive relation between food deprivation and running-and food depriva- tion is seen as a loss of eating rather than as a physiological state

  14. Dim Light at Night Increases Immune Function in Nile Grass Rats, a Diurnal Rodent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randy J.

    Dim Light at Night Increases Immune Function in Nile Grass Rats, a Diurnal Rodent Laura K. Fonken lighting during the 20th century, human and nonhuman animals became exposed to high levels of light significant implications for certain ecological niches because of the important influence light exerts

  15. Effect of fermentable carbohydrates on volatile fatty acids, ammonia and mineral absorption in the rat caecum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    intestine on caecal digestion and absorption have been studied in the rat. Even in diets lacking these carbo of the urea nitrogen was used in bacterial protein synthesis. Arteriovenous differences in the caecum showed, for which hydrolysing enzymes are lacking or poorly efficient in the small i ntesti ne. These carbohydrates

  16. A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1 *, Chantal Gondran2 , Fabien Giroud2 powerful ones, Glucose BioFuel Cells (GBFCs), are based on enzymes electrically wired by redox mediators applications. Citation: Cinquin P, Gondran C, Giroud F, Mazabrard S, Pellissier A, et al. (2010) A Glucose BioFuel

  17. Inositol lipid metabolism in vasopressin stimulated hepatocytes from rats infused with tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitzer, J.A.; Rodriguez de Turco, E.B. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans (USA))

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the effect of i.v. infusion of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha (rHuTNF alpha, Cetus, 15 micrograms/100 g bw over 3 h) on vasopressin (VP)-stimulated {sup 32}P-inositol lipid turnover and the release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates in isolated rat hepatocytes. The early VP-induced decrease (within 30 s) in {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate labeling was significantly reduced (-40%) and at the same time the uptake of {sup 32}P into phosphatidic acid was 50% lower than in saline-infused (matched control) rats. Within 5 min of VP-stimulation, lower {sup 32}P phosphatidylinositol (-40%) and higher {sup 32}P-phosphatidic acid (+30%) labeling were observed in rHuTNF alpha-infused rats. Infusion of rHuTNF alpha also affected the VP-induced release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates. The accumulation of {sup 3}H-inositol-labeled water soluble products was decreased by 25% and 17% at 30 s and 10 min, respectively. These data show that rHuTNF alpha mimics early perturbations induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin infusion in VP-stimulated inositol lipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes.

  18. acid-challenged rat stomach: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acid-challenged rat stomach First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Activities of amino acid...

  19. ALZHEIMER'S AMYLOID-BETA PEPTIDE INHIBITS SODIUM/CALCIUM EXCHANGE MEASURED IN RAT AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALZHEIMER'S AMYLOID-BETA PEPTIDE INHIBITS SODIUM/CALCIUM EXCHANGE MEASURED IN RAT AND HUMAN BRAIN-beta1­40 (A 1­40) and A 25­35 reduced vesicular Ca2+ content. Both peptides produced a maximal reduction in Ca2+ content of approximately 50%. The peptides reduced Ca2+ content with similar potency and half

  20. UPTAKE OF [3H]-COLCHICINE INTO BRAIN AND LIVER OF MOUSE, RAT, AND CHICK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Edward L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by M.R. Rosenzweig and E.l. Bennett, Cambridge, MA: The MITJ.F. , D.W. landry, E.l. Bennett, and M.E. Jarvik. long-termRAT,AND CHICK Edward L. Bennett, Marie Hebert Alberti, and

  1. Imaging of Alcohol-Induced Dopamine Release in Rats: Preliminary Findings With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Evan D,

    . Normandin: Yale PET Center, P.O. Box 208048, New Haven, CT 06520 *Correspondence to: Evan D. Morris, YaleImaging of Alcohol-Induced Dopamine Release in Rats: Preliminary Findings With [11 C]Raclopride PET positron emission tomography (PET). PET images were acquired in 44 alcohol-nai¨ve male Wistar and alcohol

  2. fMRI visualisation of transient activations in the rat olfactory bulb using short odour stimulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    fMRI visualisation of transient activations in the rat olfactory bulb using short odour in the olfactory bulb OB displays both spatial and temporal organization. The difficulty when assessing spatio of the olfactory bulb (OB). Hence, in this structure, the identity of odorants is associated with a unique spatial

  3. Increased severity of acute Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in rats with alloxan-induced diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -induced diabetes Ikechukwu Onyebuchi Igbokwea Sani Isaa Umma Kalsum Aliyub Hajja Gana Hamzab Tobias Egbe made diabetic by treatment with alloxan monohydrate (10 % solution, 100 mg/kg body weight). Ten diabetic and ten non-diabetic rats were intraperitoneally infected with the same infective doses

  4. Grid Cells and Theta as Oscillatory Interference: Electrophysiological Data From Freely Moving Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Neil

    Grid Cells and Theta as Oscillatory Interference: Electrophysiological Data From Freely Moving Rats, regular firing patterns by medial entorhinal cortical (mEC) grid cells in terms of the interference specific relationships between the intrinsic firing frequency and spa- tial scale of grid cell firing

  5. Regulation of Endothelial Phenotype in Rat Soleus Muscle Feed Arteries: Influence of Aging and Exercise Training 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trott, Daniel Wayne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    (AUC) was calculated using the trapezoidal method. Body composition and adiposity. The body mass of the rats was measured to the nearest 0.01 g and body composition was determined using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR-1000/w DEXA...

  6. How Enrichment Affects Exploration Trade-Offs in Rats: Implications for Welfare and Well-Being

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    How Enrichment Affects Exploration Trade-Offs in Rats: Implications for Welfare and Well-being and animal welfare, we designed a novel test of exploration behavior. Environmentally and socially enriched, 20 animals remained in enriched housing (enrichment-maintenance) while 40 animals were re

  7. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor increases TRPC3 expression in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Shan-Li [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Sun, Ming-Rui [Department of Pharmacology, Qiqihaer Medical College, Qiqihaer 160001 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Qiqihaer Medical College, Qiqihaer 160001 (China); Li, Ting-Ting; Yin, Xin [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Xu, Chang-Qing [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Sun, Yi-Hua, E-mail: syh200415@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) activation stimulates TRP channels. {yields} CaR promoted transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) expression. {yields} Adult rat ventricular myocytes display capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which was operated by TRPCs. {yields} TRPC channels activation induced by CaR activator sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} to evoke cardiomyocytes apoptosis. -- Abstract: Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes, which gate a type of influx of extracellular calcium, the capacitative calcium entry. TRP channels play a role in mediating Ca{sup 2+} overload in the heart. Calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) are also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and promote the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by Ca{sup 2+} overload. However, data about the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart are few. In this study, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of the TRP canonical proteins TRPC1 and TRPC3 in adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Laser scan confocal microscopy was used to detect intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. The results showed that, in adult rat cardiomyocytes, the depletion of Ca{sup 2+} stores in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) by thapsigargin induced a transient increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and the subsequent restoration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} for a few minutes, whereas, the persisting elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365. The stimulation of CaR by its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or spermine also resulted in the same effect and the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. In adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, GdCl{sub 3} increased the expression of TRPC3 mRNA and protein, which were reversed by SKF96365 but not by inhibitors of the L-type channels and the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchangers. However, GdCl{sub 3} had no obvious effect on the expression of TRPC1 protein. These results suggested that CaR stimulation induced activation of TRP channels and promoted the expression of TRPC3, but not TRPC1, that sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}.

  8. Plasma kinetics, tissue distribution, and cerebrocortical sources of reverse triiodothyronine in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obregon, M.J.; Larsen, P.R.; Silva, J.E.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in vitro have shown that rT3 is a potent and competitive inhibitor of T4 5'-deiodination (5'D). Recent studies in vivo have shown that cerebrocortical (Cx) T4 5'D-type II (5'D-II) activity (propylthiouracil (PTU) insensitive pathway), is reduced by T4 and rT3, the latter being more potent than T3 in Cx 5'D-II suppression. Some other reports had described rT3 production in rat brain as a very active pathway of thyroid hormone metabolism. To examine the possibility that rT3 plays a physiological role in regulating Cx 5'D-II, we have explored rT3 plasma kinetics, plasma to tissue exchange, and uptake by tissues in the rat, as well as the metabolic routes of degradation and the sources of rT3 in cerebral cortex (Cx). Plasma and tissue levels were assessed with tracer (/sup 125/I)rT3. Two main compartments were defined by plasma disappearance curves in euthyroid rats (K/sub 1/ = -6.2 h-1 and K/sub 2/ = -0.75 h-1). In Cx of euthyroid rats, (/sup 125/I)rT3 peaked 10 min after iv injection, tissue to plasma ratio being 0.016 +/- 0.004 (SE). In thyroidectomized rats, plasma and tissue (/sup 125/I)rT3 concentrations were higher than in euthyroid rats, except for the Cx that did not change. PTU caused further increases in all the tissues studied, except for the Cx and the pituitaries of thyroidectomized rats. From the effect of blocking 5'D-I with PTU or reducing its activity by making the animals hypothyroid, we concluded that 5'D-I accounts for most of the rT3 clearance from plasma. In contrast, in Cx and pituitary the levels of rT3 seem largely affected by 5'D-II activity. Since the latter results suggest that plasma rT3 does not play a major role in determining rT3 levels in these tissues, we explored the sources of rT3 in Cx using (/sup 125/I)T4. The (/sup 125/I)rT3 (T4) to (/sup 125/I)T4 ratio remained constant at 0.03 from 1 up to 5 h after injection of (/sup 125/I)T4.

  9. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)] [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)] [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ? Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ? Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ? Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  10. Demonstration of lactogenic receptors in rat endocrine pancreases by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, M.; Scharfmann, R.; Ban, E.; Haour, F.; Postel-Vinay, M.C.; Czernichow, P. (National Institute of Health and Medical Research, Paris (France))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct effect of growth hormone and/or prolactin on the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell has been proposed. This study assessed the presence of human growth hormone (hGH)-binding sites in male adult rat endocrine pancreas via quantitative autoradiography. The binding of 125I-labeled hGH was evaluated by receptor autoradiography on frozen-pancreas cryostat cut sections. The sections were incubated with 125I-hGH (10(-10) M) for 75 min at room temperature, and nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of excess native hGH (5 X 10(-7) M). The specificity of the binding was assessed in competition experiments with bovine GH and ovine prolactin. The autoradiograms were quantified with a computer-assisted image-processing system. The sections were then stained to visualize the endocrine islets. Nondiabetic control and streptozocin (STZ)-injected rats were used. Our results show that (1) there is specific binding of iodinated hGH in small areas of the pancreas, which appear as the Langerhans islets when the autoradiogram and the stained sections are superimposed; (2) the specificity of hGH binding in rat islets is lactogenic; (3) the density of the hGH-binding sites in the endocrine pancreas is estimated at 4.8 fmol/mg protein, with IC50 ranging from 0.98 to 2.50 nM; and (4) binding sites may be present on the beta-cell, because specific binding disappears in STZ-injected rats. In conclusion, by use of a quantitative autoradiographic technique, we provide evidence for the presence of lactogenic receptors on rat beta-cells.

  11. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.04,000 64,000 64,000 Monthly

  12. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.04,000 64,000 64,000 Monthly4,925

  13. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0Cubic Feet)Delaware23.80 44,275

  14. Microsoft Word - MI.01-8.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF OfficialJulyMaybell, Colorado

  15. The role of constrictor prostanoids in the development of aortic coarctation-induced hypertension in male and female rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltzer, Wendy Irene

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    function and arterial blood pressure (MAP) during development of aortic coarctation-induced hypertension (HT). M and F rats, (15-18 wks.) in four groups: normotensive (NT), hypertensive (HT), ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX estrogen-replaced (OE), underwent...

  16. Inactivation of the insular cortex increases anxiety-like behavior in rats : relevance to drug abuse and interoception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Monica

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    µl of lidocaine (or aCSF) was infused over the period of twocompared to vehicle-infused controls. It is important toplus maze. Specifically, rats infused with lidocaine showed

  17. Redescription of the enigmatic long-tailed rat Sigmodontomys aphrastus (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) with comments on taxonomy and natural history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCain, Christy M.; Timm, Robert M.; Weksler, Marcelo

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sigmodontomys aphrastus, the long-tailed rat, is an exceedingly rare rodent species from montane regions of Central and South America of which very little is known ecologically or systematically. It has been variously ...

  18. Periadolescent oral manganese exposure affects conditioned place preference by cocaine and conditioned place aversion by lithium chloride in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Samuel Ming Hin

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Manganese neurotoxicity compromises basal ganglia functions that could affect the limbic system and drug sensitivity. Male rats were orally exposed to manganese chloride (0, 100, 200 mg/kg/day Mn) for 15 days starting at postnatal day (PND) 28...

  19. Effect of dietary protein quality on fractional rates of muscle protein synthesis and catabolism in the rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roeder, Richard Anthony

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF DIETARY PROTEIN QUALITY ON FRACTIONAL RATES OF MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND CATABOLISM IN THE RAT A Thesis by RICHARD ANTHONY ROEDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition EFFECT OF DIETARY PROTEIN QUALITY ON FRACTIONAL RATES OF MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND CATABOLISM IN THE RAT A Thesis by RICHARD ANTHONY ROEDER Approved...

  20. A radiographic analysis of the effect of dietary fiber on transit time through the rat large intestine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meacher, Mary Melanie

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER ON TRANSIT TIME THROUGH THE RAT LARGE INTESTINE A Thesis by MARY MELANIE MEACHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject. ' Nutrition A RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER ON TRANSIT TIME THROUGH THB RAT LARGE INTESTINE A Thesis by MARY MELANIE MEACHER Approved as to style and content by...

  1. Effects of electrical brain stimulation on the temperature of interscapular brown adipose tissue in the adult rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Patricia Hilliard

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF ELECTRICAL BRAIN STIMULATI ON ON THE TEMPERATURE OF INTERSCAPULAR BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE IN'THE ADULT RAT A Thesis by PATRICIA HILL IARD FREEMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Psychology EFFECTS OF ELECTRICAL BRAIN STIMULATION ON THE TEMPERATURE OF BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE IN THE ADULT RAT A Thesis by PATRICIA HILL IARD FREEMAN Approved as to style...

  2. Opiate activity in the rat prefrontal cortex: modulation of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic influence on cortical efferent neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Mary, John Steven

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPIATE ACTIVITY IN THE RAT PREFRONTAL CORTEX: MODULATION OF VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA DOPAMINERGIC INFLUENCE ON CORTICAL EFFERENT NEURONS A Thesis by JOHN STEVEN ST. MARY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... Thesis by JOHN STEVEN ST. MARY Approved as to style and content by: Steven Peterson (Chairman of Committee) Robert Matthews (- '" j'pj") Ger a ((~Fe g (Mem er) George Chion (Member) December 1986 ABSTRACT Opiate Activity in the Rat...

  3. An investigation of the potentiating effects of ethanol on a chronic exposure of rats to 1,1,1-trichloroethane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, DeWayne Harold

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIATING EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ON A CHRONIC EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 1, 1&I-TRICHLOROETHANE A Thesis by DEWAYNE HAROLD WALKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AFM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Laboratory Animal Medicine AN INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIATING EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ON A CHRONIC EXPOSURE OF RATS TQ 1&1, 1-TRICHLOROETHANE A Thesis by DENAYNE HAROLD WALKER...

  4. Combustion-derived flame generated ultrafine soot generates reactive oxygen species and activates Nrf2 antioxidants differently in neonatal and adult rat lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neonatal and adult rat lungs. Particle and Fibre Toxicologysensitivity of the postnatal lung to environmental insultsdevelopment of the human lung. Prog Clin Biol Res 1983, 140:

  5. Protective effects of tocotrienols against lipid-induced nephropathy in experimental type-2 diabetic rats by modulation in TGF-? expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Shabeena [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India); Ahsan, Haseeb [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Khan, Mohammad Rashid [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India); Siddiqui, Waseem A., E-mail: wasiddiqui01@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dyslipidemia is common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and is considered a risk factor for the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia act synergistically to induce renal injury. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of tocotrienols as tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm (PO) and rice bran oils (RBO) against lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetic rats and its probable molecular mechanism. Male Wistar rats (175–200 g) were divided into four groups. The first group served as diabetic control, while the second and third groups received PO-TRF and RBO-TRF, respectively by gavage over a period of sixteen weeks post-induction of diabetes. The fourth group comprised of age-matched rats that served as normal control. The effects of TRF on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress markers, expression of TGF-?, fibronectin and collagen type IV were analyzed in the kidney of diabetic rats. Treatment with PO-TRF and RBO-TRF significantly improved glycemic status, serum lipid profile and renal function in type-2 diabetic rats. In addition, TRF supplementation down-regulated the expression of TGF-?, fibronectin and collagen type IV in the kidney of diabetic rats. Transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) plays a critical role in progression of DN, but its modulation by tocotrienols in DN remains unexplored. TRF ameliorated lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetes by its hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities as well as by modulation of TGF-? to prevent increased expression of collagen type IV and fibrinogen. We finally propose a mechanism for the expression of molecular markers that are significant in the events leading to diabetic nephropathy and its modulation by tocotrienols/TRF. - Highlights: • The nephroprotective effect of TRF in type-2 diabetic rats was investigated. • Treatment with TRF improved glycemic status, lipid profile and renal functions in rats. • TRF down-regulated the expression of TGF-?, fibronectin and collagen in rats' kidney. • TRF ameliorated nephropathy by hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant activity. • Tocotrienols modulate the expression of TGF-? in DN in type-2 diabetic rats.

  6. Thyroid organotypic rat and human cultures used to investigate drug effects on thyroid function, hormone synthesis and release pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine CA 92612 (United States); Heale, Jason; Sinclair, John R.; Morris, Stephen; Rowe, Josh M. [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine CA 92612 (United States)] [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States)] [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drug induced thyroid effects were evaluated in organotypic models utilizing either a rat thyroid lobe or human thyroid slices to compare rodent and human response. An inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) function led to a perturbation in the expression of key genes in thyroid hormone synthesis and release pathways. The clinically used thiourea drugs, methimazole (MMI) and 6-n-propyl-2-thioruacil (PTU), were used to evaluate thyroid drug response in these models. Inhibition of TPO occurred early as shown in rat thyroid lobes (2 h) and was sustained in both rat (24–48 h) and human (24 h) with ? 10 ?M MMI. Thyroid from rats treated with single doses of MMI (30–1000 mg/kg) exhibited sustained TPO inhibition at 48 h. The MMI in vivo thyroid concentrations were comparable to the culture concentrations (? 15–84 ?M), thus demonstrating a close correlation between in vivo and ex vivo thyroid effects. A compensatory response to TPO inhibition was demonstrated in the rat thyroid lobe with significant up-regulation of genes involved in the pathway of thyroid hormone synthesis (Tpo, Dio1, Slc5a5, Tg, Tshr) and the megalin release pathway (Lrp2) by 24 h with MMI (? 10 ?M) and PTU (100 ?M). Similarly, thyroid from the rat in vivo study exhibited an up-regulation of Dio1, Slc5a5, Lrp2, and Tshr. In human thyroid slices, there were few gene expression changes (Slc5a5, ? 2-fold) and only at higher MMI concentrations (? 1500 ?M, 24 h). Extended exposure (48 h) resulted in up-regulation of Tpo, Dio1 and Lrp2, along with Slc5a5 and Tshr. In summary, TPO was inhibited by similar MMI concentrations in rat and human tissue, however an increased sensitivity to drug treatment in rat is indicated by the up-regulation of thyroid hormone synthesis and release gene pathways at concentrations found not to affect human tissue. -- Highlights: ? Novel model of rat thyroid or human thyroid slices to evaluate pathways of injury. ? TPO inhibition by MMI or PTU altered hormone synthesis and release genes. ? Rat thyroid was more sensitive to the drug effects than human tissue.

  7. The effect of exercise and dietary fiber on the rate of gastrointestinal transit in the rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorr, Jerri Suzanne

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with cancer of the rectum. These data were compared to the life-time occupational physical exercise of 1, 43l patients with non-neoplastic, nondigestive diseases. Results indicate an increasing risk of colon cancer with increasing work years, proportion... cancer incidence, Several studies have reported changes in body composition that occur as a result of exercise (59, 67, 68). We found that the exercised rats weighed less than the non- exercised controls after they had been swimming for three weeks...

  8. Some histological manifestations in the early postnatal vitamin B?? deficient albino rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Elmer Marshall

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rats were slightly smeller in sine. Ilistologically the cortex was reduced in thickness ?nd therefore in total volume There was a considerable increase in intercellular space which was often filled with connective tissue and sometimes blood..., The renal corpus- cles were characterised by an increase in the space between Bowman's capsule and the glomerulus (I~'ig, 7). The loops of Henle in the medul- lary region showed reduoed lumina. The convoluted tubules (pr obably due to the fatty...

  9. The Relation of Lime and Phosphoric Acid to the Growth and Bone Development of White Rats.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blum, J. K. (Joseph Kelly)

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY, A & M COLLEGE. CAMPUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Brazos County, Texas BULLETIN NO. 441 DECEMBER, 1931 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Relation of Lime and Phosphoric Acid to the Growth... and Bone Development of White Rats 2 ., .t .I* .-. /.' AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS--. .. T. 0. WALTON, President ..- STATION STAFF+ ADMINISTRATION: VETERINARY SCIENCE: A B. CONNER M S. Director *M. FRANCIS, D. V. M., Chief. R: E...

  10. The gestation-dependent variation in aflatoxin B? activation by rat liver microsomes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Florence Elizabeth

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microsomes. (May t 989) Florence Elizabeth Wall, B. A. , Trinity University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. T. Rick Irvin The metabolic capacity of maternal rat liver microsomes to bioactivate a model teratogen, AFBt, was examined through a series... BCA (bicinchoninic acid) protein assay. . . . . . . . . . Microsomal metabolism assay . DNA isolation . Liquid scintillation counting . Sa/mone//a /mammalian-microsome mutagenicity assay Postimplantation embryo culture assay . . RESULTS Page...

  11. Effects of chronic cadmium exposure on the conditioned reinforcing properties of morphine and fentanyl in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Dennis K

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: ck R. Nation (C ir of Committee) Gerald D. Frye (Member) Paul J. Wellman (Member) Paul J. Wellman (Head of Department... the metal (Nation, Livermore, Bratton, & Schenk, 1996). A similar attenuation was shown with repeated cocaine exposure--the development of locomotor sensitization. Rats that received chronic cadmium exposure required more cocaine administration sessions...

  12. Effects of Nicotine Exposure on In Vitro Metabolism of Chlorpyrifos in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sookwang; Busby, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles; Poet, Torka S.

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a common organophosphate (OP) insecticide which is metabolized by CYP450s to the neurotoxic metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon) and a non-toxic metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP). The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of repeated in vivo nicotine exposures on CPF in vitro metabolism and marker substrate activities in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed subcutaneously with 1 mg nicotine/kg/, for up to 10 days. Animals showed signs of cholinergic crisis after the initial nicotine doses, but exhibited adaptation after a couple days of treatment. Rats were sacrificed on selected days 4 or 24 hr after the last nicotine-treatment. While CYP450 reduced CO spectra were not different across the treatments, the single nicotine dose group showed a 2-fold increase in CYP2E1 marker substrate (p-nitrophenol) activity 24 hr after a single nicotine treatment compared to saline controls. Conversely, repeated nicotine treatments resulted in decreased EROD marker substrate activity 4 hr after the 7th day of treatment. CPF-oxon Vmax and Km did not show significant changes across the different nicotine treatment groups. The Vmax describing the metabolism of CPF to TCP was increased on all groups (days 1, 7, and 10) 24 hr after nicotine treatment but were unchanged 4 hr after nicotine treatment. Results of this in vitro study suggest that repeated nicotine exposure (i.e., from smoking) may result in altered metabolism of CPF. Future in vivo experiments based on these results will be conducted to ascertain the impact of in vivo nicotine exposures on CPF metabolism in rats.

  13. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, and TNF-?), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron increased the levels of IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-? in lung tissues at high altitudes. • Trolox alleviated the iron-induced histological and biochemical changes to the lungs.

  14. Metabolism of the geometric isomers of phosphamidon in insects and rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Rolland Ralph

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metabolism of the Geometric Isomers of Phosphamldon ln Insects and Rats, Nay 1955. Rolland R, Grabbe, B. S. , Iowa State Dnlverslty Directed by: Dr. Don L, Bull Abstract Phosphamldon (2-chloro 2 dlethylcarbamoyl I methylvlnyl dimethyl phosphate) ls a... with phosphamldon that was radlolabeled either with C at the methyl-vinyl and carbonyl carbon atoms or with P 32 Slightly more N deethyl phosphamldon (2 ohloro 2-ethylcarbamoyl I-methylvlnyl dimethyl phosphate) was formed ln Insects treated with cls...

  15. A study of the effect of restricted diets in the male albino rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Travis Barton

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    26 Sections of the Testes Stained with Hematwylin and Eosin 30 CHAPTER l INT RODUCT ION During the past 30 years there has been rr, uch invssti~tion of the various effects of low caloric intake upon laboratory anirrals, This has come about... in decreased growth rats due to decreased food %take, it becomes necessary to differentiate between the various effects and thereby account for those due to caloric decrease. The problem is very coxrplex and cannot becozr. s completely solved until...

  16. Increased activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in the cerebellum of the x-irradiated dystonic rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dopico, A.M.; Rios, H.; Mayo, J.; Zieher, L.M. (Departamentos de Biologia Celular e Histologia y de Farmacologia y Toxicologia, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, (Argentina))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exposure of the cephalic end of rats to repeated doses of x-irradiation (150 rad) immediately after birth induces a long-term increase in the noradrenaline (NA) content of cerebellum (CE) (+ 37.8%), and a decrease in cerebellar weight (65.2% of controls), which results in an increased NA concentration (+ 109%). This increase in the neurotransmitter level is accompanied by a dystonic syndrome and histological abnormalities: Purkinje cells (the target cells for NA afferents to CE) fail to arrange in a characteristic monolayer, and their primary dendritic tree appears randomly oriented. The injection of reserpine 0.9 and 1.2 mg/kg ip to adult rats for 18 h depletes cerebellar NA content in both controls (15.7 {plus minus} 4 ng/CE and 2.8 {plus minus} 1.5 ng/CE, respectively) and x-irradiated rats (17.1 {plus minus} 1 ng/CE and 8.3 {plus minus} 2 ng/CE, respectively). The activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in CE of adult rats, measured by an in vitro assay, is significantly increased in neonatally x-irradiated animals when compared to age-matched controls (16.4 {plus minus} 1.4 vs 6.32 {plus minus} 0.6 nmol CO2/h/mg prot., p less than 0.01). As observed for NA levels, a net increase in TH activity induced by the ionizing radiation is also measured: 308.9 {plus minus} 23.8 vs 408.2 {plus minus} 21.5 nmol CO2/h/CE, p less than 0.01 (controls and x-treated, respectively). These results suggest that x-irradiation at birth may induce an abnormal sprouting of noradrenergic afferents to CE. The possibility that these changes represent a response of the NA system to the dystonic syndrome is discussed.

  17. The effect of stress on the pulsatile pattern of luteinizing hormone in the ovariectomized rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farr, Kathryn Louise

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a model. The first objective of this study was to develop a method to accurately monitor the pattern of pituitary LH release in the ovari- ectomized rat, Using this method the second objective was to deter- mine the influence of two types... is attached to the anterior pituitary qland by the pituitary stalk. Within the pituitary stalk rests the vascular pathway that transports LHRH to the anterior pituitary. This unique vascular network is termed the hypothalamic-hypophysea1 portal system. 13...

  18. Rat lymphoma cell bioassay for prolactin: observations on its use and comparison with radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, D.M.; Sensui, N.; Haisenleder, D.H.; Gala, R.R.

    1982-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The rat Nb/sub 2/ node lymphoma cell bioassay (BA) for prolactin (PRL) was validated for use in our laboratories. During the course of this validation we observed that rat prolactin (NIAMDD-RP-1) stimulated cell division by as much as 16.5 fold over the range of 0.04 to 40.0 ng/ml at the end of 72 hours of incubation. We also observed a dose related increase in the size of the lymphoma cells. Prolactin concentrations in rat plasma, serum, anterior pituitary (AP) homogenates and milk were measured by both radioimmunoassay (RIA) and BA. In individual BA's there was parallelism between samples and standard; but when several dilutions of the same plasma and pituitary homogenates were assayed repeatedly, higher PRL levels were consistently observed for the more concentrated samples. At low or moderate levels of plasma PRL there was excellent agreement between RIA and BA; however, at high levels plasma PRL bioactivity exceeded radioimmunoactivity by a small, but significant, amount. A comparison of pituitary PRL concentrations measured by RIA and BA were in good agreement when homogenization was done at pH 10.6. However, when homogenization was done at pH 7.6, slightly but significantly more PRL was extracted when assayed by BA than when assayed by RIA.

  19. TRIGEMINAL UPTAKE AND CLEARANCE OF INHALED MANGANESECHLORIDE IN RATS AND MICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, J; Bench, G; Myers, O; Tinner, B; Staines, W; Barr, E; Divine, K K; Barrington, W; Karlsson, J

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhaled manganese (Mn) can enter the olfactory bulbs via the olfactory epithelium, and can then be further transported trans-synaptically to deeper brain structures. In addition to olfactory neurons, the nasal cavity is innervated by the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve that projects to the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Direct uptake and transport of inhaled metal particles in the trigeminal system has not been investigated previously. We studied the uptake, deposition, and clearance of soluble Mn in the trigeminal system following nose-only inhalation of environmentally relevant concentrations. Rats and mice were exposed for 10 days (6 hours/day, 5 days/week) to air or MnCl2 aerosols containing 2.3 {+-} 1.3mg Mn/m{sup 3} with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 3.1 {+-} 1.4 {micro}m for rats and 2.0 {+-} 0.09 mg Mn/m{sup 3} MnCl{sup 2} with MMAD of 1.98 {+-} 0.12 {micro}m for mice. Mn concentrations in the trigeminal ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus were measured 2 hours (0 day), 7, 14, or 30 days post-exposure using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Manganese-exposed rats and mice showed statistically elevated levels of Mn in trigeminal ganglia 0, 7 and 14 days after the 10 day exposure period when compared to control animals. The Mn concentration gradually decreased over time with a clearance rate (t{sub 1/2}) of 7-8 days. Rats and mice were similar in both average accumulated Mn levels in trigeminal ganglia and in rates of clearance. We also found a small but significant elevation of Mn in the spinal trigeminal nucleus of mice 7 days post-exposure and in rats 0 and 7 days post-exposure. Our data demonstrate that the trigeminal nerve can serve as a pathway for entry of inhaled Mn to the brain in rodents following nose-only exposure and raise the question of whether entry of toxicants via this pathway may contribute to development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Distribution of bisphenol A into tissues of adult, neonatal, and fetal Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Brown, Ronald P. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA metabolites in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 suggests ubiquitous and frequent exposure in the range of 0.02-0.2 {mu}g/kg bw/d (25th-95th percentiles). The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure placental transfer and concentrations of aglycone (receptor-active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in tissues from Sprague-Dawley rats administered deuterated BPA (100 {mu}g/kg bw) by oral and IV routes. In adult female rat tissues, the tissue/serum concentration ratios for aglycone BPA ranged from 0.7 in liver to 5 in adipose tissue, reflecting differences in tissue perfusion, composition, and metabolic capacity. Following IV administration to dams, placental transfer was observed for aglycone BPA into fetuses at several gestational days (GD), with fetal/maternal serum ratios of 2.7 at GD 12, 1.2 at GD 16, and 0.4 at GD 20; the corresponding ratios for conjugated BPA were 0.43, 0.65, and 3.7. These ratios were within the ranges observed in adult tissues and were not indicative of preferential accumulation of aglycone BPA or hydrolysis of conjugates in fetal tissue in vivo. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in GD 20 fetal brain were higher than in liver or serum. Oral administration of the same dose did not produce measurable levels of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues. Amniotic fluid consistently contained levels of BPA at or below those in maternal serum. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in tissues of neonatal rats decreased with age in a manner consistent with the corresponding circulating levels. Phase II metabolism of BPA increased with fetal age such that near-term fetus was similar to early post-natal rats. These results show that concentrations of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues are similar to those in other maternal and neonatal tissues and that maternal Phase II metabolism, especially following oral administration, and fetal age are critical in reducing exposures to the fetus. - Highlights: > Studies of BPA in rat tissues showed placental transfer and fetal metabolism. > Levels in fetus are similar to maternal tissues. > Fetal metabolism can reduce levels.

  1. Dosimetry considerations in the enhanced sensitivity of male Wistar rats to chronic ethylene glycol-induced nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, R.A. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)], E-mail: rick.corley@pnl.gov; Wilson, D.M. [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States); Hard, G.C. [Tairua, 2853 (New Zealand); Stebbins, K.E.; Bartels, M.J. [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States); Soelberg, J.J. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dryzga, M.D. [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States); Gingell, R. [Shell Oil Company, Houston, TX 77002 (United States); McMartin, K.E. [Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130 (United States); Snellings, W.M. [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI 48674 (United States)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Male Wistar rats have been shown to be the most sensitive sex, strain and species to ethylene glycol-induced nephrotoxicity in subchronic studies. A chronic toxicity and dosimetry study was therefore conducted in male Wistar rats administered ethylene glycol via the diet at 0, 50, 150, 300, or 400 mg/kg/day for up to twelve months. Subgroups of animals were included for metabolite analysis and renal clearance studies to provide a quantitative basis for extrapolating dose-response relationships from this sensitive animal model in human health risk assessments. Mortality occurred in 5 of 20 rats at 300 mg/kg/day (days 111-221) and 4 of 20 rats at 400 mg/kg/day (days 43-193), with remaining rats at this dose euthanized early (day 203) due to excessive weight loss. Increased water consumption and urine volume with decreased specific gravity occurred at 300 mg/kg/day presumably due to osmotic diuresis. Calculi (calcium oxalate crystals) occurred in the bladder or renal pelvis at {>=} 300 mg/kg/day. Rats dying early at {>=} 300 mg/kg/day had transitional cell hyperplasia with inflammation and hemorrhage of the bladder wall. Crystal nephropathy (basophilic foci, tubule or pelvic dilatation, birefringent crystals in the pelvic fornix, or transitional cell hyperplasia) affected most rats at 300 mg/kg/day, all at 400 mg/kg/day, but none at {<=} 150 mg/kg/day. No significant differences in kidney oxalate levels, the metabolite responsible for renal toxicity, were observed among control, 50 and 150 mg/kg/day groups. At 300 and 400 mg/kg/day, oxalate levels increased proportionally with the nephrotoxicity score supporting the oxalate crystal-induced nephrotoxicity mode of action. No treatment-related effects on the renal clearance of intravenously infused {sup 3}H-inulin, a marker for glomerular filtration, and {sup 14}C-oxalic acid were observed in rats surviving 12 months of exposure to ethylene glycol up to 300 mg/kg/day. In studies with naive male Wistar and F344 rats (a less sensitive strain), a significant difference was observed in oxalate clearances between young rats (i.e. Wistar clearance < F344) but not in age-matched old rats. Regardless, the ratios of oxalate:inulin clearances in these two strains of rats, including those exposed to ethylene glycol, were all < 1, suggesting that a fraction of the filtered oxalate is reabsorbed. Other species, including humans, typically have clearance ratios > 1 and are more effective at clearing oxalic acid by both glomerular filtration and active secretion. Thus, the lower renal clearance and kidney accumulation of oxalates in male Wistar rats enhances their sensitivity, which will be a factor in human risk assessments. The benchmark dose values (BMD05, BMDL05) were 170 mg/kg/day and 150 mg/kg/day for nephropathy, and 170 mg/kg/day and 160 mg/kg/day for birefringent crystals, using incidence times severity data in each case. The NOAEL of 150 mg/kg/day is the same as that reported after 16-week exposure and appears to be a threshold dose below which no renal toxicity occurs, regardless of exposure duration.

  2. Physiology & Behavior, Vol. 26, pp. 783-786. Pergamon Press and Brain Research Pub!., 1981. Printed in the U.S.A. Preference for Natural Odors in Rat Pups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    in the U.S.A. Preference for Natural Odors in Rat Pups: Implications of a Failure to Replicatel BENNETT G December 1980 GALEF, B. G., JR. Preference for natural odors in rat pups: Implications of a failure minor changes in the diet on which a rat dam is maintained can have profound effects

  3. PET Imaging of Brain 5-HT1A Receptors in Rat In Vivo with 18F-FCWAY and Improvement by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    PET Imaging of Brain 5-HT1A Receptors in Rat In Vivo with 18F-FCWAY and Improvement by Successful)cyclohexanecarboxamide) is useful in clinical research with PET for measuring serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) re- ceptor densities in brain applicability to measuring brain regional 5-HT1A receptor densities. Methods: PET of rat head after

  4. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid is neuroprotective in rat model of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    , and at 180 min after reperfusion. Neuroprotective effects of t-AUCB were evaluated in primary rat neuronal-AUCB may exert its neuroprotective effects by affecting multiple components of neurovascular unit including]-benzoic acid is neuroprotective in rat model of ischemic stroke Jafar Sadik B. Shaik,1 Muzamil Ahmad,3 Wenjin

  5. Highly accurate quantification of proton MR spectroscopy in rat brain in vivo at 16.4 T , D. Z. Balla1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Highly accurate quantification of proton MR spectroscopy in rat brain in vivo at 16.4 T S-T. Hong1, Minnesota, United States Introduction Localized 1 H MR spectroscopy is an efficient tool capable Wistar rats that were anaesthetized by inhalation of 1.5-2 % concentration of isoflurane. All MR

  6. Implications of a large <mi>B> <mi>s> ? <mi>?> + <mi>?> ? branching fraction for the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; Kelso, Chris

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the CDF Collaboration reported the first nonzero measurement of the Bs????? branching fraction. The LHCb, CMS and ATLAS, collaborations have reported upper limits that are in tension with the CDF result. We consider the implications of these measurements for the specific case of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We also discuss the implications of these measurements for neutralino dark matter and the supersymmetric contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  7. https://mi3.ncdc.noaa.gov/mi3report/MISC/asos-stations.txt

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. HirschOccurrence ReportingSpringSelect aTheNCDCID

  8. Control of the level of unusual estrogen-binding protein in rat liver by sex steroids and the pituitary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnova, O.V.; Rozen, V.B.; Vishnyakova, T.G.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the role of sex steriods and the pituitary in regulation of the unusual estrogen-binding protein (UEBP) level in male rat liver. The concentration of E/sub 2/-binding sites of UEBP in the liver cytosol was determined by measuring binding of a minimal addition of 2,4,6,7-tritium-E/sub 2/, with specific radioactivity of 98-100 Ci/mmole. Data on the effect of hypophysectomy on the UEBP level in the liver of different groups of rats are presented. The presence of comparable quantities of E/sub 2/ and androgens in rats of both sexes is evidence of the existence of a fine mechanism of combined regulation of the UEBP concentration under natural conditions that reflect changes in the absolute E/sub 2/ or androgen levels or in the ratio between them.

  9. Localization of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA and immunoreactivity in the rat heart and human atrial appendage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamid, Q.; Wharton, J.; Terenghi, G.; Hassall, C.J.S.; Aimi, J.; Taylor, K.M.; Nakazato, H.; Dixon, J.E.; Burnstock, G.; Polak, J.M.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The localization of mRNA encoding preproatrial natriuretic peptide was investigated in tissue sections and cultures of rat heart and in sections of human right atrial appendage using the technique of in situ hybridization with /sup 32/P- and /sup 35/S-labeled RNA probes. Rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) transcripts were demonstrated in numerous atrial myocytes and, to a lesser extent, in ventricular myocytes in both tissue sections and newborn rat heart cultures. These findings are consistent with those obtained by RNA blot analysis of rat heart total RNA, indicating that a single prepro-ANP transcript of approx. 900 nucleotides was present in the ventricles as well as the atria. Using a /sup 35/S-labeled RNA probe for human ANP mRNA, ANP transcripts were also localized to the majority of myocytes in the human right atrial appendage. Only background levels of autoradiographic labeling were obtained when RNA probes identical to the coding sequence of rat or human ANP mRNA were used. A close correlation was found between the distribution of ANP immunoreactivity and prepro-ANP mRNA in these preparations. These results provide unequivocal evidence for the expression of the ANP gene in the rat ventricles, as well as the atria, because myocytes in these tissues have been established as the sites of both ANP localization and precursor biosynthesis. The combined use of cardiac cultures and in situ hybridization may be of value in future studies investigating the regulation of ANP synthesis in cardiac myocytes.

  10. RatBot: anti-enumeration peer-to-peer botnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Guanhua [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eidenbenz, Stephan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Songqing [GEORGE MASON UNIV.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Botnets have emerged as one of the most severe cyber threats in recent years. To obtain high resilience against a single point of failure, the new generation of botnets have adopted the peer-to-peer (P2P) structure. One critical question regarding these P2P botnets is: how big are they indeed? To address this question, researchers have proposed both actively crawling and passively monitoring methods to enumerate existing P2P botnets. In this work, we go further to explore the potential strategies that botnets may have to obfuscate their true sizes. Towards this end, this paper introduces RatBot, a P2P botnet that applies some statistical techniques to defeat existing P2P botnet enumeration methods. The key ideas of RatBot are two-fold: (1) there exist a fraction of bots that are indistinguishable from their fake identities, which are spoofing IP addresses they use to hide themselves; (2) we use a heavy-tailed distribution to generate the number of fake identities for each of these bots so that the sum of observed fake identities converges only slowly and thus has high variation. We use large-scale high-fidelity simulation to quantify the estimation errors under diverse settings, and the results show that a naive enumeration technique can overestimate the sizes of P2P botnets by one order of magnitude. We believe that our work reveals new challenges of accurately estimating the sizes of P2P botnets, and hope that it will raise the awareness of security practitioners with these challenges. We further suggest a few countermeasures that can potentially defeat RatBot's anti-enumeration scheme.

  11. Effect of intranasal manganese administration on neurotransmission and spatial learning in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Piechal, Agnieszka; Joniec-Maciejak, Ilona; Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa, E-mail: etyszkiewicz@wum.edu.pl

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of intranasal manganese chloride (MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O) exposure on spatial learning, memory and motor activity was estimated in Morris water maze task in adult rats. Three-month-old male Wistar rats received for 2 weeks MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O at two doses the following: 0.2 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.2) or 0.8 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.8) per day. Control (Con) and manganese-exposed groups were observed for behavioral performance and learning in water maze. ANOVA for repeated measurements did not show any significant differences in acquisition in the water maze between the groups. However, the results of the probe trial on day 5, exhibited spatial memory deficits following manganese treatment. After completion of the behavioral experiment, the regional brain concentrations of neurotransmitters and their metabolites were determined via HPLC in selected brain regions, i.e. prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. ANOVA demonstrated significant differences in the content of monoamines and metabolites between the treatment groups compared to the controls. Negative correlations between platform crossings on the previous platform position in Southeast (SE) quadrant during the probe trial and neurotransmitter turnover suggest that impairment of spatial memory and cognitive performance after manganese (Mn) treatment is associated with modulation of the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in the brain. These findings show that intranasally applied Mn can impair spatial memory with significant changes in the tissue level and metabolism of monoamines in several brain regions. -- Highlights: ? Intranasal exposure to manganese in rats impairs spatial memory in the water maze. ? Regional changes in levels of neurotransmitters in the brain have been identified. ? Cognitive disorder correlates with modulation of 5-HT, NA and DA neurotransmission.

  12. Rat enterohepatic circulation and intestinal distribution of enterally infused thyroid hormones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiStefano, J.J. III; Sternlicht, M.; Harris, D.R.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enterohepatic circulation (recycling), intestinal (gut) distribution, metabolism, and excretion of enterally infused thyroid hormones were studied in the intact rat under approximately normal physiological steady state conditions. Rats with 7-day osmotic minipumps implanted ip received constant intraduodenal infusions to steady state of very small trace doses of either 125I-labeled T3 (T3*) or T4 (T4*). Enterohepatic and other pathways remained open to normal function, and in particular, there was no biliary diversion or ligation. Complete feces and urine were collected daily, to assess daily distributions of radioactivity and establishment of the steady state, which occurred by day 3. On day 7, rats were anesthetized, blood was sampled, whole intestine and minipumps were removed, and the gut was separated into six segments. Fecal samples and the contents of each gut section were homogenized, ethanol extracted, evaporated, and reconstituted in NaOH for quantitative aqueous chromatography along with infusate, urine, and plasma samples, on Sephadex G-25 columns. No T3* or T4* was found in urine, but feces contained 39% of the T3* infused and 36% of the T4* infused in steady state. Statistically significant amounts of both T3* and T4* in systemic plasma on day 7 clearly indicated absorption of the hormones from the intestine, distinctly demonstrating an enterohepatic circulation of T3 and T4 under experimental conditions closely approximating the physiological steady state. This also establishes the intestine (with its contents) as an exchangeable hormone pool, physiologically internal to the system regulating thyroid hormones and their distribution. Gut contents contained 52 times more T3* and 4.34 times more T4* than corresponding plasma pools in steady state.

  13. The effects of a marginal intake of magnesium with soy protein concentrate on growth, gestation, and lactation in the rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Cynthia Anne

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19B6 Major Subject: Nutrrtion THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Approved...

  14. Effect of dietary cysteine, methionine, and sterculic acid on fatty acid distribution in rat adipose tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brotze, Mary Frances

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Statistical Anal sis The data were treated according to the analysis of variance for data with a single criterion of classifica- tion(24). Each of the ratios for the triglyceride frac- tion were analyzed as: Source oi Variation De rees of Freedom Total... ACIDS IN ADIPOSE TISSUE OF THE RAT B. Free Fatty Acid Fraction Group No. Sterculia f~oa ao 1 Methionine level in diet Cysteine level in diet 16/16:1 18/18:1 18/18:2 18:1/18:2 III IV VI VII VIII 0. 2 0. 2 0. 2 0. 2 low low high...

  15. Associative tolerance to nicotine analgesia in the rat: tail-flick and hot-plate assays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynoso, Jose T.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with amphetamine (2 or 3 mg/kg) before access to sweetened milk, and saline injection after access to the sweetened milk. Rats in the after group were administered an equal number of amphetamine and saline injections as the before group but in the reverse order... development. For instance, in order to develop tolerance to the anorectic effects of nicotine the organism must be allowed access to food during exposure to the drug. That is, the anorectic effects of nicotine represent a functional disturbance only when...

  16. Effect of dietary cysteine, methionine, and sterculic acid on fatty acid distribution in rat adipose tissue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brotze, Mary Frances

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Statistical Anal sis The data were treated according to the analysis of variance for data with a single criterion of classifica- tion(24). Each of the ratios for the triglyceride frac- tion were analyzed as: Source oi Variation De rees of Freedom Total... ACIDS IN ADIPOSE TISSUE OF THE RAT B. Free Fatty Acid Fraction Group No. Sterculia f~oa ao 1 Methionine level in diet Cysteine level in diet 16/16:1 18/18:1 18/18:2 18:1/18:2 III IV VI VII VIII 0. 2 0. 2 0. 2 0. 2 low low high...

  17. Measurement of <mi>?> ? ? <mi>?> + <mi>?> ? <mi>e> + <mi>e> ? and <mi>?> ? ? <mi>?> + <mi>?> ? <mi>?> + <mi>?> ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Friedel, P.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Moeini, H.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaefer, B. D.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y. X.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, LiLi; Zhang, R.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a sample of 225.3 million J/? events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII, the decays of ?'?????l?l? are studied via J/????'. A clear ?' signal is observed in the ????e?e? mass spectrum, and the branching fraction is measured to be B(?'?????e?e?)=(2.11±0.12(stat)±0.14(syst))×10?³, which is in good agreement with theoretical predictions and the previous measurement, but is determined with much higher precision. No ?' signal is found in the ???????? mass spectrum, and the upper limit is determined to be B(?'?????????)<2.9×10?? at the 90% confidence level.

  18. High affinity peptide histidine isoleucine-preferring receptors in rat liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, S.; Chou, J.; Kubota, E.

    1987-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Peptide Histidine Isoleucine (PHI) is generally considered a low affinity agonist for Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) receptors. In this study, the authors investigated the presence of characteristics of (/sup 125/I)-PHI binding sites on rat liver membranes. Detergents at nonsolubilizing concentrations were included in the assay buffer to reduce adsorptive loss of PHI to acceptable levels and permit measurement of PHI-binding to receptors. Under these conditions, binding of PHI to liver membranes was time- and temperature-dependent, reversible and saturable. Unlabeled PHI was 9.7-fold more potent than VIP, and 357-fold more potent than secretin in displacing (/sup 125/I)-PHI binding. Scatchard analysis suggested the presence of two classes of PHI receptors, with Kd 27 pM and 512 pM. The data from (/sup 125/I)-PHI and (/sup 125/I)-VIP binding studies suggested that one class of receptors was PHI-preferring, and the other, equally reactive with PHI and VIP. The concentration of immunoreactive PHI, measured by radioimmunoassay, in blood from the hepatic portal vein of anesthetized rats was 2-fold higher than that from the hepatic vein, suggesting uptake of circulating PHI by the liver. 25 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  19. EFFECTS OF ANESTHESIA ON NEURAL ACTIVITY IN THE PRIMARY VISUAL CORTEX OF THE RAT Benjamin L. White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiser, József

    OF ANESTHESIA ON NEURAL ACTIVITY IN THE PRIMARY VISUAL CORTEX OF THE RAT Benjamin L. White andJózsef Fiser. Recordings were made in six stimulus conditions under four levels of isoflurane anesthesia. Recordings from the same cells across conditions and levels of isoflurane are compared here. Anesthesia ranged from deep

  20. Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning in Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning experiments in which rats completed a water-maze blocking procedure, experimental groups were trained to use location. A Room Test (landmarks and background cues only) showed that Stage 1 training with a fixed

  1. Influence of photoperiod on the time of parturition in the rat. III. Comparison of different daily light lengths with changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of photoperiod on the time of parturition in the rat. III. Comparison of different daily light lengths with changes in light timing or light pulse given during darkness. M. J. BOSC Agnès to the light regime applied throughout pregnancy (day 1 : beginning of pregnancy). The majority of deliveries

  2. Hormonal regulation of Sertoli cell function in the rat V. HANSSON, K. PURVIS E. M. RITZN F. S. FRENCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , there have until recently been few attempts to localize the FSH-sensitive target cells. In 1965 MurphyHormonal regulation of Sertoli cell function in the rat V. HANSSON, K. PURVIS E. M. RITZÃ?N F. S of Reproductive Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, U. S. A. Summary. The Sertoli cell is the main

  3. The Effects of Nerve Growth Factor on Spatial Recent Memory in Aged Rats Persist after Discontinuation of Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frick, Karyn M.

    21205 Nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion significantly reduces spatial recent memory deficits in aged examined. Four- and 22-month-old rats were tested preoper- atively, infused intraventricularly with recombinant human NGF or vehicle, and tested both during the 4 week infusion period and during the 4 weeks

  4. A study of the effect of mineralized cotton-seed meal on the growth of Albino rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huebel, Leon William

    1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O. evicionos 2Mct ooy 10 per is a fscxto? Xn tho basil~ cd hceep~b~ indccpu~ of oopper~ but the latter plays a pccrt in oonvorting inorgenio iron into ho'. xoglobin Titus, Cave, anx( ~ stets that ~ee is benefioicl fox' hcexo globin buklning in rats etuxn...

  5. Overexpression of the gene for transmembrane 4 superfamily member 4 accelerates liver damage in rats treated with CCl4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    ; Carbon tetrachloride; Acute liver injury 1. Introduction Rat TM4SF4 (transmembrane 4 superfamily member 4). Abbreviations: TM4SF4, transmembrane 4 superfamily member 4; CCl4, carbon tetrachloride; ALT, alanine­13]. However, the in vivo function conferred by TM4SF4 is still largely unknown. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4

  6. Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlins, Scott A.; Bollinger, Nikki; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca2+o). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca2+]o, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca2+o. Further, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G-protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca2+o-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca2+o. This is consistent with the known expression of TGFa by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR mediated response to increased Ca2+o in Rat-1 fibroblasts, and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

  7. Characterization of the testicular cell types present in the rat by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Grond, J.; Van Pelt, A.M.; van Echteld, C.J.; Dijkstra, G.; Grootegoed, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.; Mali, W.P. (Department of Radiodiagnosis, University of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testes of vitamin A-deficient Wistar rats before and after vitamin A replacement, of rats irradiated in utero, and of control rats were investigated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy. The testicular phosphomonoester/ATP (PM/ATP) ratio ranged from 0.79 {plus minus} 0.05 for testes that contained only interstitial tissue and Sertoli cells to 1.64 {plus minus} 0.04 for testes in which spermatocytes were the most advanced cell types present. When new generations of spermatids entered the seminiferous epithelium, this ratio decreased. The testicular phosphodiester/ATP (PD/ATP) ratio amounted to 0.16 {plus minus} 0.06 for testes in which Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, or spermatocytes were the most advanced cell type present. When new generations of spermatids entered the seminiferous epithelium, the PD/ATP ratio rapidly increased and finally reached a value of 0.71 {plus minus} 0.06 for fully developed testes. Taken together, specific patterns of the PM/ATP ratio, the PD/ATP ratio, and pH were obtained that were correlated to the presence of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids, and elongated spermatids or to the absence of spermatogenic cells. Hence, a good impression of the status of the seminiferous epithelium in the rat can be obtained by in vivo 31P MR spectroscopy.

  8. Clin Cancer Res . Author manuscript Enhanced survival and cure of F98 glioma-bearing rats following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ,FRé ID17, Biomedical Beamline2 ESRF , Grenoble,FR Department of Pathology3 Ohio State University glioma-bearing rats. Experimental Design Carboplatin (20 g/20 l) was administrated i.c. by CED to F98 ; administration & dosage ; Combined Modality Therapy ; Glioma ; drug therapy ; mortality ; pathology ; Humans

  9. Treatment with 8-OH-DPAT attenuates the weight loss associated with activity-based anorexia in female rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Elaine

    ) plays an important role in controlling food intake and regulating body weight. In addition, clinical). This animal model allows researchers to directly manipulate neuronal and endocrine systems that may the effects of pharmacological manipulation of the 5-HT system in female rats exposed to conditions

  10. Integrin Signaling at 2hr and 48hr Post-Eccentric Exercise in Heat Treated Rat Skeletal Muscle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Zachary Aaron

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and refolding proteins and by maintain actin structures of the cellular membrane. Methods: Heat shocked (HS+EE) and non-heat shocked (EE) male Wistar rats performed a two hour downhill treadmill exercise. The soleus (SOL), vastus lateralis white (VLW) and red...

  11. Prostaglandin E2 regulates amyloid precursor protein expression via the EP2 receptor in cultured rat microglia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtman, Richard

    to be positively coupled to cAMP production. Stimulation of the EP2 receptor with butaprost increased APP) expression in cultured rat microglia. PGE2 treatment significantly increased the expression of APP with forskolin also increased APP expression. Co-treatment of microglia with PGE2 and the PKA inhibitor H- 89

  12. The secretion of prolactin (PRL) from pituitary lactotrophs of the rat is predominantly under inhibitory control exerted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertram, Richard

    The secretion of prolactin (PRL) from pituitary lactotrophs of the rat is predominantly under inhibitory control exerted by dopamine (DA) of hypothalamic origin (1). Other PRL-inhibit- ing substances from the Stojilkovic lab (3) and of this report. In addition to the PRL-inhibiting substances, a host

  13. Type 2 diabetes severely impairs structural and functional adaptation of rat resistance arteries to chronic changes in blood flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Type 2 diabetes severely impairs structural and functional adaptation of rat resistance arteries : Diabetes impairs flow-mediated remodeling Address for Correspondence: Dr. Daniel Henrion, Pharm.D., Ph damages in type 2 diabetes. The capacity of the microcirculation to adapt or remodel in response

  14. Effects of naloxone and immobilization stress upon the pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone in the ovariectomized rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Kimberly Ann

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the hypothalamus and modulation of LHRH release. In the intact rat, early studies using morph' ne as a 0 agonist were the first to implicate EOs in the regula- tion of tne preovulatory LH surge (Packman and Rothchild, 1976; Pang et al. , 1977). The EOs were...

  15. Rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cell-mediated mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, P.; Schlemper, B.; Molitor, E.; Platt, K.L.; Seidel, A.; Oesch, F. (Univ. of Mainz (West Germany))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of isolated rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cells to activate benzo(a)pyrene (BP), trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo(a)pyrene (DDBP), trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (DDCH), and aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) to mutagenic metabolites was assessed by means of a cell-mediated bacterial mutagenicity assay and compared with the ability of parenchymal cells to activate these compounds. Endothelial and Kupffer cells from untreated rats were able to activate AFB{sub 1} and DDBP; DDBP was activated even in the absence of an NADPH-generating system. Pretreating the animals with Aroclor 1254 strongly enhanced the mutagenicity of the dihydrodiol, whereas the mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} showed a slight increase. BP and DDCH were only activated by endothelial and Kupffer cells isolated from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Parenchymal cells form untreated animals activated all four carcinogens tested; Aroclor 1254 enhanced the parenchymal cell-mediated mutagenicity of BP and DDCH but did not affect that of DDBP and clearly reduced that of AFB{sub 1}. The reduced mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} correlates with the decrease in the amount of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone formed when testosterone was incubated with parenchymal cell microsomes from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats (compared with microsomes from untreated animals): the formation of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone is specifically catalyzed by cytochrome P-450h, a hemoprotein thought to be involved in the activation of AFB{sub 1}. These results show that not only rat liver parenchymal cells, but also endothelial and Kupffer cells, activated several carcinogens to mutagenic metabolites.

  16. The effect of copper deficiency on fetal growth and liver anti-oxidant capacity in the Cohen diabetic rat model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergaz, Zivanit, E-mail: zivanit@hadassah.org.il [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel); Shoshani-Dror, Dana [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel); Guillemin, Claire [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)] [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Neeman-azulay, Meytal; Fudim, Liza [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel); Weksler-Zangen, Sarah [Diabetes Research Unit, Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School and Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Diabetes Research Unit, Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School and Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel); Stodgell, Christopher J.; Miller, Richard K. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester, Rochester, MN (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester, Rochester, MN (United States); Ornoy, Asher [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High sucrose low copper diet induces fetal growth restriction in the three strains of the Cohen diabetic rats: an inbred copper deficient resistant (CDr), an inbred copper deficient sensitive (CDs that become diabetic on high sucrose low copper diet -HSD) and an outbred Wistar derived Sabra rats. Although those growth restricted fetuses also exhibit increased oxidative stress, antioxidants do not restore normal growth. In the present study, we evaluated the role of copper deficiency in the HSD induced fetal growth restriction by adding to the drinking water of the rats 1 ppm or 2 ppm of copper throughout their pregnancy. Fetal and placental growth in correlation with fetal liver copper content and anti-oxidant capacity was evaluated on day 21 of pregnancy. HSD compared to regular chow induced fetal growth restriction, which was most significant in the Cohen diabetic sensitive animals. The addition of 1 ppm and 2 ppm copper to the drinking water normalized fetal growth in a dose dependent manner and reduced the degree of hyperglycemia in the diabetes sensitive rats. The CDs fetuses responded to the HSD with lower catalase like activity, and less reduced superoxide dismutase levels compared to the Sabra strain, and had high malondialdehyde levels even when fed regular chow. Immunostaining was higher for nitrotyrosine among the CDr and higher for hypoxia factor 1 ? among the CDs. We conclude that in our model of dietary-induced fetal growth restriction, copper deficiency plays a major etiologic role in the decrease of fetal growth and anti-oxidant capacity. -- Highlights: ? High sucrose low copper diet restricted fetal growth in the Cohen diabetic rat model ? Maternal copper blood levels directly correlated with fetal liver copper content ? Copper supplementation decreased embryonic resorption in the inbred strains ? Copper supplementation reduced hyperglycemia in the sucrose sensitive inbred strain ? Copper supplementation alleviated growth restriction and oxidative stress of liver.

  17. An Age-Dependent Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model for the Organophosphorus Insecticide Chlorpyrifos in the Preweanling Rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon) and trichloropyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. In the current study, a modified physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model incorporating age-dependent changes in CYP450, PON-1, and tissue ChE levels for rats was developed. In this model, age was used as a dependent function to estimate body weight which was then used to allometrically scale both metabolism and tissue ChE levels. Model simulations suggest that preweanling rats are particularly sensitive to CPF toxicity, with levels of CPF-oxon in blood and brain disproportionately increasing, relative to the response in adult rats. This age-dependent non-linear increase in CPF-oxon concentration may potentially result from the depletion of non-target B-esterases, and a lower PON-1 metabolic capacity in younger animals. These results indicate that the PBPK/PD model behaves consistently with the general understanding of CPF toxicity, pharmacokinetics and tissue ChE inhibition in neonatal and adult rats. Hence, this model represents an important starting point for developing a computational model to assess the neurotoxic potential of environmentally relevant organophosphate exposures in infants and children.

  18. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China) [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Cheng-Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)] [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ? Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. ? This action did not involve the participation of GABA{sub A} receptors. ? A decrease in the Ca{sup 2+} influx through Ca{sub v}2.2 and Ca{sub v}2.1 channels was involved. ? A role for the MAPK/ERK/synapsin I pathway in the action of hispidulin was suggested. ? This study provided further understanding of the mode of hispidulin action in the brain.

  19. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC INTERACTION FOR A BINARY MIXTURE OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND DIAZINON IN THE RAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.; Hinman, Melissa N.; Busby, Andrea L.; Kousba, Ahmed A.

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) are two commonly used organophosphorus (OP) insecticides and potential exists for concurrent exposures. The primary neurotoxic effects from OP pesticide exposures result from the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by their oxon metabolites. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic impact of acute binary exposures to CPF and DZN in rats were evaluated in this study. Rats were orally administered CPF, DZN or a CPF/DZN mixture (0, 15, 30 or 60 mg/kg) and blood (plasma and RBC), and brain were collected at 0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h post-dosing, urine was also collected at 24 h. Chlorpyrifos, DZN and their respective metabolites 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMHP) were quantified in blood and/or urine and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition was measured in brain, RBCs and plasma. Co-exposure to CPF/DZN at 15/15 mg/kg, did not appreciably alter the pharmacokinetics of CPF, DZN or their metabolites in blood; whereas, a 60/60 mg/kg dose resulted in a transient increase in Cmax, AUC, and decreased clearance of both compounds, likely due to competition between CPF and DZN for CYP450 metabolism. At lower doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental exposures, the pharmacokinetics were linear. A dose-dependent inhibition of ChE was noted in tissues for both the single and co-exposures. The overall potency for ChE inhibition was greater for CPF than DZN and the binary mixture response appeared to be strongly influenced by CPF. A comparison of the ChE binary response at the low dose (15 mg/kg), where there were no apparent pharmacokinetic interactions, suggested that the overall ChE response was additive. These are the first reported experiments we are aware of that characterize both the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between CPF and DZN in the rat, and will be used to further develop a binary physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model for mixtures.

  20. Effect of HZE radiation and diets rich in fiber and n-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) on colon cancer in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glagolenko, Anna Anatolievna

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the carcinogenic effect of HZE radiation and protective effects of different types of diets against colon carcinogenesis in a rat model. The effect of HZE radiation on health state and colon cancer development was evaluated. HZE...

  1. Effect of HZE radiation and diets rich in fiber and n-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) on colon cancer in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glagolenko, Anna Anatolievna

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the carcinogenic effect of HZE radiation and protective effects of different types of diets against colon carcinogenesis in a rat model. The effect of HZE radiation on health state and colon cancer development was evaluated. HZE...

  2. Characterization of the Femoral Neck Region’s Reponse to the Rat Hindlimb Unloading Model through Tomographic Scanning, Mechanical Testing and Estimated Strengths 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kupke, Joshua Scott

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), mechanical testing in two different loading conditions, and estimated strength indices. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (6-mo) were grouped into baseline (BL), ambulatory cage control (CC) and hindlimb unloaded (HU); HU...

  3. Cytokines and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways in the terminal ileum of hypoxic/hyperoxic neonatal rats: benefits of probiotics supplementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    signaling pathways in the terminal ileum of hypoxic/to formula-feeding in the terminal ileum of neonatal rats.were determined in the terminal ileum. Data were compared to

  4. Luteinizing hormone signaling decreases cyclic GMP production in rat ovarian follicles by rapidly dephosphorylating the NPR2 guanylyl cyclase and by slowly decreasing its agonist CNP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terasaki, Mark

    Luteinizing hormone signaling decreases cyclic GMP production in rat ovarian follicles by rapidly),place on Millicell culture inserts No LH 20-30 min.LH Homogenize follicles,pellet crude membranes at 10,000 x g

  5. Delay Discounting in Lewis and Fischer 344 Rats: Implications for the Use of an Adjusting-amount Procedure to Detect Between-strain Differences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Jeff S.

    2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain-related behavioral differences may facilitate investigation of the genetic and neurochemical determinants of delay discounting. Previous researchers report that Lewis rats make more impulsive choices than Fischer ...

  6. Lung tissue engineering : in vitro synthesis of lung tissue from neonatal and fetal rat lung cells cultured in a three-dimensional collagen matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Patty P., 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this study was to investigate the histology of tissue formed when fetal (16-20 days gestation) and neonatal (2 days old) rat lung cells were grown in a collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold. This project employed ...

  7. Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, and Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wen Fuqiang, E-mail: wenfuqiang.scu@gmail.co [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, and Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

  8. In Situ Casting and Imaging of the Rat Airway Tree for Accurate 3D Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of anatomically accurate, animal-specific airway geometries is important for understanding and modeling the physiology of the respiratory system. One approach for acquiring detailed airway architecture is to create a bronchial cast of the conducting airways. However, typical casting procedures either do not faithfully preserve the in vivo branching angles, or produce rigid casts that when removed for imaging are fragile and thus easily damaged. We address these problems by creating an in situ bronchial cast of the conducting airways in rats that can be subsequently imaged in situ using 3D micro-CT imaging. We also demonstrate that deformations in airway branch angles resulting from the casting procedure are small, and that these angle deformations can be reversed through an interactive adjustment of the segmented cast geometry. Animal work was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  9. Laser speckle-imaging of blood microcirculation in the brain cortex of laboratory rats in stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilensky, M A; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana V; Timoshina, P A; Kuznetsova, Jana V; Semyachkin-Glushkovskii, I A; Agafonov, Dmitry N; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental approbation of the method of laser full-field speckle-imaging for monitoring the changes in blood microcirculation state of the brain cortex of laboratory rats under the conditions of developing stroke and administration of vasodilating and vasoconstrictive agents are presented. The studies aimed at the choice of the optimal conditions of speckle-image formation and recording were performed and the software implementing an adaptive algorithm for processing the data of measurements was created. The transfer of laser radiation to the probed region of the biotissue was implemented by means of a silica-polymer optical fibre. The problems and prospects of speckle-imaging of cerebral microcirculation of blood in laboratory and clinical conditions are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Effects on Rat Bones Using Synchrotron Radiation Computed Microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogueira, Liebert Parreiras; Braz, Delson [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory / COPPE / UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Barroso, Regina Cely [Physics Institute / State University of Rio de Janeiro, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Andrade, Cherley Borba [Laboratory of Radiological Sciences / State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tromba, Giuliana [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Strada Statale S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we investigated the consequences of irradiation in the femora and ribs of rats submitted to radiation doses of 5 Gy. Three different sites in femur specimens (head, distal metaphysis and distal epiphysis) and one in ribs (ventral) were imaged using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography to assess trabecular bone microarchitecture. Histomorphometric quantification was calculated directly from the 3D microtomographic images using synchrotron radiation. The 3D microtomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. A better understanding of the biological interactions that occur after exposure to photon radiation is needed in order to optimize therapeutic regimens and facilitate development and strategies that decrease radiation-induced side effects in humans. Results showed significant differences between irradiated and non-irradiated specimens, mostly in head and distal metaphysis bone sites.

  11. Wallerian degeneration demonstrated by magnetic resonance: spectroscopic measurements on peripheral nerve. [Rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolesz, F.A.; Polak, J.F.; Ruenzel, P.W.; Adams, D.F.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wallerian degeneration of rat sciatic nerves was induced by nerve section. Fifteen days later the degenerated nerves were compared with the intact contralteral nerves from the same animal. Histological sections showed the changes typical of wallerian degeneration: axonal degeneration and secondary demyelination. The freshly dissected nerves were analyzed by magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy at 10 MHz, and the water content was determined by dehydration. In the degenerated nerves there was a marked prolongation of both T1 and T2 relaxation times, accompanied by an increase of water content. These results suggest that it should be possible to detect wallerian degeneration in MR images; this will have an important impact on neuropathological diagnosis of central and peripheral nervous system lesions.

  12. Increased contraction frequency in rat uterine strips treated in vitro with o,p prime -DDT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juberg, D.R.; Loch-Caruso, R. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elevated levels of DDT and other organochlorine pesticides have been associated with spontaneous abortion and preterm birth in several species, including humans. Despite the prevalence of organochlorine pesticides in the environment, a mechanistic basis for this association has not been explored. Furthermore, while DDT has been associated with inhibition of calcium ATPases, altered gap junctional communication and electrophysiological changes, all of which could affect the excitation-contraction process characteristic of smooth muscle, direct effects of DDT on uterine smooth muscle have not been reported. This study was initiated to assess the direct effects of o,p{prime}-DDT (an estrogenic isomer present in the technical grade preparation) on pregnant rat uterine tissue.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptor subtypes in rat kidney

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, J.; Salas, S.P.; Singleton, A.; Polak, J.M. (Univ. of Cambridge (England))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) clearance receptors in rat kidney was investigated by in vitro autoradiography using des(Gln18,Ser19,Gly20,Leu21,Gly22)-ANP-(4- 23) (C-ANP) and 125I-Tyr0-ANP-(5-25) as relatively specific ligands of this receptor. Alpha-125I-ANP (100 pM) bound reversibly but with high affinity to glomeruli, outer medullary vasa recta bundles, and inner medulla. C-ANP (10 microM) inhibited greater than 60% of this glomerular binding but did not inhibit the binding of alpha-125I-ANP to medullary tissues. Alpha-125I-ANP also bound reversibly to the renal arteries up to the glomerulus. This arterial binding was only partly inhibited by 10 microM C-ANP. In the presence of 10 microM C-ANP, increasing concentrations of alpha-125I-ANP bound to a residue of glomerular sites with apparent dissociation constants of 0.82 +/- 0.16 to 2.73 +/- 1.20 nM at different cortical levels. 125I-Tyr0-ANP-(5-25) bound significantly to glomeruli and intrarenal arteries but not to vasa recta bundles or inner medulla. This glomerular binding also occurred with nanomolar dissociation constants. It was completely inhibited by 1 microM alpha-ANP and 10 microM C-ANP, but not by unrelated peptides such as gastrin. These results suggest that renal ANP clearance receptors are restricted in vivo to the glomeruli and renal arterial system of the rat.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in arsenite-induced oxidative injury in rat brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Anya M.Y. [Department of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chao, P.L.; Fang, S.F.; Chi, C.W. [Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, C.H. [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chihyang@ntu.edu.tw

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism underlying sodium arsenite (arsenite)-induced neurotoxicity was investigated in rat brain. Arsenite was locally infused in the substantia nigra (SN) of anesthetized rat. Seven days after infusion, lipid peroxidation in the infused SN was elevated and dopamine level in the ipsilateral striatum was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner (0.3-5 nmol). Furthermore, local infusion of arsenite (5 nmol) decreased GSH content and increased expression of heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1 in the infused SN. Aggregation of {alpha}-synuclein, a putative pathological protein involved in several CNS neurodegenerative diseases, was elevated in the arsenite-infused SN. From the breakdown pattern of {alpha}-spectrin, both necrosis and apoptosis were involved in the arsenite-induced neurotoxicity. Pyknotic nuclei, cellular shrinkage and cytoplasmic disintegration, indicating necrosis, and TUNEL-positive cells and DNA ladder, indicating apoptosis was observed in the arsenite-infused SN. Arsenite-induced apoptosis was mediated via two different organelle pathways, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). For mitochondrial activation, cytosolic cytochrome c and caspase-3 levels were elevated in the arsenite-infused SN. In ER pathway, arsenite increased activating transcription factor-4, X-box binding protein 1, C/EBP homologues protein (CHOP) and cytosolic immunoglobulin binding protein levels. Moreover, arsenite reduced procaspase 12 levels, an ER-specific enzyme in the infused SN. Taken together, our study suggests that arsenite is capable of inducing oxidative injury in CNS. In addition to mitochondria, ER stress was involved in the arsenite-induced apoptosis. Arsenite-induced neurotoxicity clinically implies a pathophysiological role of arsenite in CNS neurodegeneration.

  15. Age-dependent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response in preweanling rats following oral exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.; Kousba, Ahmed A.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to CPF-oxon and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. The pharmacokinetics of CPF, TCP, and the extent of blood (plasma/RBC), and brain ChE inhibition in rats were determined on postnatal days (PND) -5, -12, and -17 following oral gavage administration of 1 and 10 mg CPF/kg of body weight. For all neonatal ages the blood TCP exceeded the CPF concentration, and within each age group there was no evidence of non-linear kinetics over the dose range evaluated. Younger animals demonstrated a greater sensitivity to ChE inhibition as evident by the dose- and age-dependent inhibition of plasma, RBC, and brain ChE. Of particular importance was the observation that even in rats as young as PND-5, the CYP450 metabolic capacity was adequate to metabolize CPF to both TCP and CPF-oxon based on the detection of TCP in blood and extensive ChE inhibition (biomarker of CPF-oxon) at all ages. In addition, the increase in the blood TCP concentration ({approx}3-fold) in PND-17 rats relative to the response in the younger animals, and the higher blood concentrations of CPF in neonatal rats (1.7 to 7.5-fold) relative to adults was consistent with an increase in CYP450 metabolic capacity with age. This is the first reported study that evaluated both the pharmacokinetics of the parent pesticide, the major metabolite and the extent of ChE inhibition dynamics in the same animals as a function of neonatal age. The results suggest that in the neonatal rat, CPF was rapidly absorbed and metabolized, and the extent of metabolism was age-dependent.

  16. Long-term survival and maturation of spinally grafted human fetal and embryonic stem cellderived neural precursors in implantable tacrolimus pellet- immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-G93A model rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    after Tacrolimus releasable pellet implantation. Rats werein implantable tacrolimus pellet-immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-releasing Tacrolimus pellets……………………………. 12 3.2 Tolerability

  17. Dietary long-chain, but not medium-chain, triglycerides impair exercise performance and uncouple cardiac mitochondria in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Andrew J; Knight, Nicholas S; Little, Sarah E; Cochlin, Lowri E; Clements, Mary; Clarke, Kieran

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESEARCH Open Access Dietary long-chain, but not medium-chain, triglycerides impair exercise performance and uncouple cardiac mitochondria in rats Andrew J Murray*, Nicholas S Knight, Sarah E Little, Lowri E Cochlin, Mary Clements and Kieran Clarke... mitochondria were mea- sured using a Clark-type oxygen electrode (Strathkelvin Instruments Ltd, Glasgow, UK), as described previously [18]. The chambers were treated identically throughout the experiment, except that one contained 1 ?mol GDP added...

  18. Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlins, Scott A. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bolllinger, Nikki [Biological Sciences Division, Battelle for the US DOE, PO Box 999, 790 Sixth Street, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Creim, Jeffrey [Biological Sciences Division, Battelle for the US DOE, PO Box 999, 790 Sixth Street, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Rodland, Karin D. [Biological Sciences Division, Battelle for the US DOE, PO Box 999, 790 Sixth Street, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)]. E-mail: Karin.rodland@pnl.gov

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub o}, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}. Furthermore, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}. This is consistent with the known expression of TGF{alpha} by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR-mediated response to increased Ca {sub o} {sup 2+} in Rat-1 fibroblasts and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

  19. EFFECT OF DIETARY GLYCOMACROPEPTIDE AND CHOLESTEROL ON CORTICAL GANGLIOSIDE- AND GLYCOPROTEIN-BOUND N-ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID IN YOUNG RATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kary, Susan Ann

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , acylneuraminate pyruvate-lyase, is present in both bacteria and mammals. However, bacteria that express acylneuraminate pyruvate-lyase do not 8 synthesize Neu5Ac, and this enzyme is absent from mammalian tissues that continuously produce sialic acids (18... EFFECT OF DIETARY GLYCOMACROPEPTIDE AND CHOLESTEROL ON CORTICAL GANGLIOSIDE- AND GLYCOPROTEIN-BOUND N- ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID IN YOUNG RATS by Susan A. Kary B.G.S., University of Kansas, 2006 Submitted to the graduate degree...

  20. The effects of exogenously administered pineal gland extract and melatonin on some reproductive aspects in the albino rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez-Perez, Milton John

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF EXOGENOUSLY ADMINISTERED PINEAL GLAND EXTRACT AND MELATONIN ON SOME REPRODUCTIVE ASPECTS IN THE ALBINO RAT A Thesis by MILTON J. HERNANDEZ-PEREZ Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... by MILTON J. HERNANDEZ-PEREZ Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman o'f Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) (Member) May 1967 ACKNOWLEDGEHENTS I sincerely thank Dr. George M. Krise, Dr. Sidney 0. Brown, and Dr. H. R. Crookshank...

  1. Metabolic Rate Constants for Hydroquinone in F344 Rat and Human Liver Isolated Hepatocytes: Application to a PBPK model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Wu, Hong; English, J C.; Corley, Rick A.

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important industrial chemical that also occurs naturally in foods and in the leaves and bark of a number of plant species. Exposure of laboratory animals to HQ may result in a species-, sex-, and strain-specific nephrotoxicity. The sensitivity of male F344 vs. female F344 and Sprague-Dawley rats or B6C3F1 mice appears to be related to differences in the rates of formation and further metabolism of key nephrotoxic metabolites. Metabolic rate constants for the conversion of HQ through several metabolic steps to the mono-glutathione conjugate and subsequent detoxification via mercapturic acid were measured in suspension cultures of hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats and humans. An in vitro mathematic kinetic model was used to analyze each metabolic step by simultaneously fitting the disappearance of each substrate and the appearance of subsequent metabolites. An iterative, nested approach was used whereby downstream metabolites were considered first and the model was constrained by the requirement that rate constants determined during analysis of individual metabolic steps must also satisfy the complete, integrated metabolism scheme, including competitive pathways. The results from this study indicated that the overall capacity for metabolism of HQ and its mono-glutathione conjugate is greater in hepatocytes from humans than those isolated from rats, suggesting a greater capacity for detoxification of the glutathione conjugates. Metabolic rate constants were applied to an existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the model was used to predict total glutathione metabolites produced in the liver. The results showed that body burdens of these metabolites will be much higher in rats than humans.

  2. Short term effects of commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures and individual PCB congeners in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Chyu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major subject: Toxicology SHORT TERM EFFECTS OF COMMERCIAL POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL (PCB) MIXTURES AND INDIVIDUAL PCB CONGENERS IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS A Thesis... of isomers 3 12 24 42 46 42 24 12 3 1 209 This thesis followed the format and style of Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. isomers and congeners in which there are differences with respect to the number of halogen atoms and their substitution...

  3. Genetic analysis of the endangered silver rice rat (Oryzomys palustris natator) and Lower Keys marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris hefneri)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouse, Amanda Louise

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    al. 1996; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) 1999). These include roadway mortalities (USFWS 1999; Harveson et al. 2004), increased predation by feral cats (Felis domesticus; Forys and Humphrey 1999), competition from black rats (Rattus rattus...; Mace 2004). In a conservation context, this means that management efforts are established on what is perceived, based on taxonomy, as the best way to preserve biological diversity. This is of even greater importance when the taxonomic status...

  4. A Novel Method for the Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Cancellous Bone in the Rat Distal Femur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Matthew W.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Walton Lucas, B.S., Lipscomb University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Harry Hogan Dr. Susan Bloomfield The mechanical properties of the cancellous bone in the laboratory rat animal model... the cortical shell for 50 slices in a region starting ~0.5 mm below the most proximal portion of the growth plate for each animal. Images were binarized (threshold of 100 on a 0-255 scale) and the following parameters were assessed for the three- dimensional...

  5. The effect of a prolonged magnesium restriction on the humoral immune response in maternal rats and their offspring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohill, Diane T

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and to observe alteration in these effects resulting from magnesium supplementation during gestation and lactation. Female weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were provided diets containing adequate (1200 mg Mg/kg diet) or inadequate (200 mg Mg/kg diet) magnesium...), was lower in the magnesium-restricted dams, In the group which had been magnesium restricted during growth but then received supplemental magnesium during gestation and lactation, dams had an improved immune r esponse; but pups did not lt was conc...

  6. The effects of exercise and dietary fat on calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc on selected tissues in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Thuy Huong

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Nutrition THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE AND DIETARY FAT ON CALCIUM, MAGNESIUM, IRON, AND ZINC ON SELECTED TISSUES IN RATS A Thesis by THUY HUONG NGUYEN Approved as to style... and content by: Karen S. ubena (Chair of Committee) L. yne Greene (Member) Barbara C. O' Brien (Member) Gary C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT The Effects of Exercise and Dietary Fat on Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, and Zinc...

  7. The effects of a suboptimal intake of magnesium with soy protein concentrate on parturition, growth, and viability in the rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Sonja D'Awn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % casein or 20% soy concentrate as the protein source, and supplemented with 700 ppm, 650 ppm, 75 ppm or 0 ppm magnesium. The experiment was conducted from growth throughout lactation. Maternal performance postpartum was adversely affected by sub... prompted research of soy products (23). Few have reported on the effects of feeding rats a suboptimal level of magnesium in a diet based on casein or soy protein concentrate from weanling through gestation and lactation. The objectives of this study...

  8. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  9. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera. III. Immunology and immunopathology in rapidly induced models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) frequently develops in the long-term rat radiation chimera, we present three additional models in which a histologically similar disease is rapidly induced. These include adoptive transfer of spleen and bone marrow from rats with spontaneous chronic GVHD into lethally irradiated rats of the primary host strain; sublethal irradiation of stable chimeras followed by a booster transplant; and transfer of spleen cells of chimeras recovering from acute GVHD into second-party (primary recipient strain) or third-party hosts. Some immunopathologic and immune abnormalities associated with spontaneous chronic GVHD were not observed in one or more of the induced models. Thus, IgM deposition in the skin, antinuclear antibodies, and vasculitis appear to be paraphenomena. On the other hand, lymphoid hypocellularity of the thymic medulla, immaturity of splenic follicles, and nonspecific suppressor cells were consistently present in the long term chimeras, and in all models. These abnormalities therefore may be pathogenetically important, or closely related to the development of chronic GVHD.

  10. Disrupted G{sub 1} to S phase clearance via cyclin signaling impairs liver tissue repair in thioacetamide-treated type 1 diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devi, Sachin S. [Department of Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, University of Louisiana at Monroe, 700 University Avenue, Sugar Hall no. 306, Monroe, LA 71209-0470 (United States); Mehendale, Harihara M. [Department of Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, University of Louisiana at Monroe, 700 University Avenue, Sugar Hall no. 306, Monroe, LA 71209-0470 (United States)]. E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously we reported that a nonlethal dose of thioacetamide (TA, 300 mg/kg) causes 90% mortality in type 1 diabetic (DB) rats because of irreversible acute liver injury owing to inhibited hepatic tissue repair, primarily due to blockage of G{sub 0} to S phase progression of cell division cycle. On the other hand, DB rats receiving 30 mg TA/kg exhibited equal initial liver injury and delayed tissue repair compared to nondiabetic (NDB) rats receiving 300 mg TA/kg, resulting in a delay in recovery from liver injury and survival. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that impaired cyclin-regulated progression of G{sub 1} to S phase of the cell cycle may explain inhibited liver tissue repair, hepatic failure, and death, contrasted with delayed liver tissue repair but survival observed in the DB rats receiving 300 in contrast to 30 mg TA/kg. In the TA-treated NDB rats sustained MAPKs and cyclin expression resulted in higher phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (pRb), explaining prompt tissue repair and survival. In contrast, DB rats receiving the same dose of TA (300 mg/kg) exhibited suppressed MAPKs and cyclin expression that led to inhibition of pRb, inhibited tissue repair, and death. On the other hand, DB rats receiving 30 mg TA/kg exhibited delayed up regulation of MAPK signaling that delayed the expression of CD1 and pRb, explaining delayed stimulation of tissue repair observed in this group. In conclusion, the hepatotoxicant TA has a dose-dependent adverse effect on cyclin-regulated pRb signaling: the lower dose causes a recoverable delay, whereas the higher dose inhibits it with corresponding effect on the ultimate outcomes on hepatic tissue repair; this dose-dependent adverse effect is substantially shifted to the left of the dose response curve in diabetes.

  11. Cysteamine, zinc, and thiols modify detectability of rat pituitary prolactin: a comparison with effects on bovine prolactin suggests differences in hormone storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, L.S.; Lorenson, M.Y.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Little is known about the structure of prolactin (PRL) within secretory granules. Evidence from our previous studies in bovine tissue preparations suggests that control of secretion may reside, in part, in the conversion of storage hormone to releasable PRL. The conversion can be monitored by measuring changes in immunodetectability since the oligomeric, storage form is poorly recognized by antisera raised against monomeric PRL. Since many investigators use rats to study the secretory process and changes in detectability of rat pituitary PRL occur during lactation (depletion-transformation), we undertook the present immunodetectability studies to gain insight into the storage structure of rat (r) PRL. Cysteamine and zinc inhibited tissue PRL immunoassayability in male rat pituitary homogenates and also in partially purified secretory granules as they had inhibited bovine (b) PRL; however, zinc inhibited the rodent hormone less potently than the bovine. In vitro incubation of rat tissue samples without additions resulted in increases in rPRL detectability of up to 84% after 180 minutes; such incubation of bovine samples had no significant effect. A striking additional difference between the species was that exposure to reduced glutathione (GSH), cysteine, homocysteine, mercaptoethanol, and dithiothreitol inhibited rPRL by up to 44%. This compared to thiol stimulation of bPRL by as much as 450%. The inhibitory GSH effect on rPRL was abolished when 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was included; in contrast, the stimulatory GSH effect on bPRL did not change with added SDS. SDS alone had no effect on rat homogenate PRL, and only increased rat granule rPRL by 23% compared to its ability to increase bPRL assayability by 44%.

  12. TCDD dysregulation of 13 AHR-target genes in rat liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, John D., E-mail: john.watson@oicr.on.ca [Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Toronto (Canada); Prokopec, Stephenie D., E-mail: stephenie.prokopec@oicr.on.ca [Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Toronto (Canada); Smith, Ashley B., E-mail: ashleyblaines@gmail.com [Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Toronto (Canada); Okey, Allan B., E-mail: allan.okey@utoronto.ca [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Pohjanvirta, Raimo, E-mail: raimo.pohjanvirta@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Toxicology, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio (Finland); Department of Food Hygiene and Environmental Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Boutros, Paul C., E-mail: paul.boutros@oicr.on.ca [Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite several decades of research, the complete mechanism by which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other xenobiotic agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) cause toxicity remains unclear. While it has been shown that the AHR is required for all major manifestations of toxicity, the specific downstream changes involved in the development of toxic phenotypes remain unknown. Here we examine a panel of 13 genes that are AHR-regulated in many species and tissues. We profiled their hepatic mRNA abundances in two rat strains with very different sensitivities to TCDD: the TCDD-sensitive Long–Evans (Turku/AB; L–E) and the TCDD-resistant Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W). We evaluated doses ranging from 0 to 3000 ?g/kg at 19 h after TCDD exposure and time points ranging from 1.5 to 384 h after exposure to 100 ?g/kg TCDD. Twelve of 13 genes responded to TCDD in at least one strain, and seven of these showed statistically significant inter-strain differences in the time course analysis (Aldh3a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2a1, Fmo1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1). Cyp2s1 did not respond to TCDD in either rat strain. Five genes exhibited biphasic responses to TCDD insult (Ahrr, Aldh3a1, Cyp1b1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1), suggesting a secondary event, such as association with additional transcriptional modulators. Of the 12 genes that responded to TCDD during the dose–response analysis, none had an ED{sub 50} equivalent to that of Cyp1a1, the most sensitive gene in this study, while nine genes responded to doses at least 10–100 fold higher, in at least one strain (Ahrr (L–E), Aldh3a1 (both), Cyp1a2 (both), Cyp1b1 (both), Cyp2a1 (L–E), Inmt (both), Nfe2l2 (L–E), Nqo1 (L–E) and Tiparp (both)). These data shed new light on the association of the AHR target genes with TCDD toxicity, and in particular the seven genes exhibiting strain-specific differences represent strong candidate mediators of Type-II toxicities. - Highlights: • NanoString measured hepatic mRNA molecules following TCDD treatment. • TCDD-sensitive Long–Evans and TCDD-resistant Han/Wistar rats were compared. • Time courses and dose responses were analyzed for AHR-core gene changes. • 7 genes displayed inter-strain mRNA differences at times after TCDD exposure. • 2 of the AHR-core genes had significant inter-strain differences in their TCDD ED{sub 50}.

  13. Effects of cysteamine on pituitary, MTTW15 tumor, and serum prolactin levels measured by rat lymphoma cell bioassay and radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, J.A.; Peterson, E.K.; Hartfel, M.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cysteamine (CSH), a sulfhydryl compound, reduces both serum and anterior pituitary (AP) PRL measured by RIA. We have used the Nb2 lymphoma cell bioassay (BIO) for PRL to evaluate possible CSH-related changes in PRL levels in sera and tissues of male and MtTW15 mammosomatotropic tumor-bearing female rats. Experimental animals received a single sc injection of CSH (300 mg/kg), and samples were collected 0.5-24 h later. Since CSH and serum from CSH rats were toxic in BIO, samples were dialyzed before assay. All samples were evaluated for PRL and GH by RIA as well. A significant decrease (P less than 0.05) in BIO serum PRL was evident in male rats 0.5 h after CSH; levels remained low for 24 h. Serum PRL by RIA was significantly depressed at 4 h but not at 0.5 h or 24 h. PRL in AP extracts was decreased (60-90%) at all times by BIO and RIA. Significant decreases of BIO- and RIA-detectable PRL were recorded in serum and tissues (AP and tumors) at 4 h in tumor rats. Sequentially bled (0.5-4 h) CSH-treated tumor-bearing rats showed 50% and 80% reductions in serum PRL at 1 and 4 h by both BIO and RIA. CSH had no effect on GH levels in sera and tissues of any animal studied at any time interval. Our results substantiate earlier reports on CSH-induced decreases in RIA-detectable PRL. They show that such changes cannot be attributed to assay effects alone, as significant decreases in circulating and stored PRL (both AP and tumor) were evident by BIO. Results with tissue extracts were the most dramatic. They suggest an action of CSH or a metabolic intermediate with stored PRL which reduces both extractable PRL and hormone release. Such an effect of CSH on PRL extraction has been suggested by others. Whatever the mechanism, it appears to be relatively specific, since GH cells were not affected.

  14. Effect of in vivo nicotine exposure on chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Soo Kwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is one of the most studied and widely used broad spectrum organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. The neurotoxicity of CPF results from inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) by its metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon), which subsequently leads to cholinergic hyperstimulation. The routine consumption of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products will modify a number of metabolic and physiological processes which may impact the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of other xenobiotics including pesticides. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of repeated ethanol and nicotine co-exposure on in vivo CPF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The major CPF metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine along with changes in plasma and brain AChE activities were measured in male Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats. Animals were repeatedly treated with either saline or ethanol (1 g/kg/day, po) and nicotine (1 mg/kg/day, sc) in addition to CPF (1 or 5 mg/kg/day, po) for 7 days. Rats were sacrificed at times from 1 to 24 hr post-last dosing of CPF. There were apparent differences in blood TCPy pharmacokinetics following ethanol and nicotine pretreatments in both CPF dose groups, which showed higher TCPy peak concentrations and increased blood TCPy AUC in ethanol and nicotine groups over CPF-only (~1.8- and 3.8-fold at 1 and 5 mg CPF doses, respectively). Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities from both ethanol and nicotine-treated groups showed substantially less inhibition following repeated 5 mg CPF/kg dosing compared to CPF-only controls (96 ± 13 and 66 ± 7% of naïve at 4 hr post-last CPF dosing, respectively). Inhibition of brain AChE activities was minimal in both 1 mg CPF/kg/day dosing groups, but a similar trend indicating less inhibition following ethanol/nicotine pretreatment was apparent. No differences were observed in plasma ChE activities due to the combined alcohol and nicotine treatments. In vitro, CPF metabolism was not affected by repeated treatments with ethanol or both ethanol and nicotine. When compared with a previous study of nicotine and CPF exposure, there were no apparent additional exacerbating effects due to ethanol co-exposure.

  15. Delayed effects of neutron irradiation on central nervous system microvasculature in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gordon, W.A.; Yates, A.J.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pathologic examination of a series of 14 patients with malignant gliomas treated with BNCT showed well demarcated zones of radiation damage characterized by coagulation necrosis. Beam attenuation was correlated with edema, loss of parenchymal elements, demyelination, leukocytosis, and peripheral gliosis. Vascular disturbances consisted of endothelial swelling, medial and adventitial proliferation, fibrin impregnation, frequent thrombosis, and perivascular inflammation. Radiation changes appeared to be acute and delayed. The outcome of the patients in this series was not significantly different from the natural course of the disease, even though two of the patients had no residual tumor detected at the time of autopsy. The intensity of the vascular changes raised a suspicion that boron may have sequestered in vessel walls, resulting in selectively high doses of radiation to these structures (Asbury et al., 1972), or that there may have been high blood concentrations of boron at the time of treatment. The potential limiting effects of a vascular ischemic reaction in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) prompted the following study to investigate the delayed response of microvascular structures in a rat model currently being used for pre-clinical investigations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

  17. Bisphenol-A rapidly enhanced passive avoidance memory and phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits in hippocampus of young rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxh63@zjnu.cn; Li Tao; Luo Qingqing; Hong Xing; Xie Lingdan; Tian Dong

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, is found to influence development of brain and behaviors in rodents. The previous study indicated that perinatal exposure to BPA impaired learning-memory and inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits expressions in hippocampus during the postnatal development in rats; and in cultured hippocampal neurons, BPA rapidly promotes dynamic changes in dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit NR2B. In the present study, we examined the rapid effect of BPA on passive avoidance memory and NMDAR in the developing hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at the age of postnatal day 18. The results showed that BPA or estradiol benzoate (EB) rapidly extended the latency to step down from the platform 1 h after footshock and increased the phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, and mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampus within 1 h. While 24 h after BPA or EB treatment, the improved memory and the increased phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, ERK disappeared. Furthermore, pre-treatment with an estrogen receptors (ERs) antagonist, ICI182,780, or an ERK-activating kinase inhibitor, U0126, significantly attenuated EB- or BPA-induced phosphorylations of NR1, NR2B, and ERK within 1 h. These data suggest that BPA rapidly enhanced short-term passive avoidance memory in the developing rats. A non-genomic effect via ERs may mediate the modulation of the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B through ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: > BPA rapidly extended the latency to step down from platform 1 h after footshock. > BPA rapidly increased pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK in hippocampus within 1 h. > ERs antagonist or MEK inhibitor attenuated BPA-induced pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK.

  18. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze, E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  19. Interactive toxicity of inorganic mercury and trichloroethylene in rat and human proximal tubules: Effects on apoptosis, necrosis, and glutathione status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lash, Lawrence H. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)]. E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu; Putt, David A. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Hueni, Sarah E. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Payton, Scott G. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Zwickl, Joshua [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous or prior exposure to one chemical may alter the concurrent or subsequent response to another chemical, often in unexpected ways. This is particularly true when the two chemicals share common mechanisms of action. The present study uses the paradigm of prior exposure to study the interactive toxicity between inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) and trichloroethylene (TRI) or its metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) in rat and human proximal tubule. Pretreatment of rats with a subtoxic dose of Hg{sup 2+} increased expression of glutathione S-transferase-{alpha}1 (GST{alpha}1) but decreased expression of GST{alpha}2, increased activities of several GSH-dependent enzymes, and increased GSH conjugation of TRI. Primary cultures of rat proximal tubular (rPT) cells exhibited both necrosis and apoptosis after incubation with Hg{sup 2+}. Pretreatment of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells with Hg{sup 2+} caused little or no changes in GST expression or activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, decreased apoptosis induced by TRI or DCVC, but increased necrosis induced by DCVC. In contrast, pretreatment of hPT cells with TRI or DCVC protected from Hg{sup 2+} by decreasing necrosis and increasing apoptosis. Thus, whereas pretreatment of hPT cells with Hg{sup 2+} exacerbated cellular injury due to TRI or DCVC by shifting the response from apoptosis to necrosis, pretreatment of hPT cells with either TRI or DCVC protected from Hg{sup 2+}-induced cytotoxicity by shifting the response from necrosis to apoptosis. These results demonstrate that by altering processes related to GSH status, susceptibilities of rPT and hPT cells to acute injury from Hg{sup 2+}, TRI, or DCVC are markedly altered by prior exposures.

  20. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa [Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0818 (Japan); Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C.; Lawton, Kay A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Wulff, Jacob E. [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Guo, Lining, E-mail: lguo@metabolon.com [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. - Highlights: ? We used metabolomics to gain insights on drug induced liver injury (DILI) in rats. ? We profiled rats treated with thirteen hepatotoxins at two doses and two time points. ? The toxins decreased the liver's ability to uptake bile acid from the circulation. ? Oxidative stress induced by the toxins altered bile acid biosynthesis in the liver. ? Selected bile acids in the plasma and urine could be sensitive DILI biomarkers.

  1. Estimating changes in the mechanical properties of the femur in the adult and aged rat due to adult-onset alcohol consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Lyndon Phuoc

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in animals 15 and 19 months of age, which is comparable to the young adult and aged human. 2. 6 Relevant Research on the Mechanical Properties of Rat Bone Emphasis on safety in automotive, aircraft and aerospace engineering has lead to a growing interest... the second set (eight- week alcohol plus six-week cessation) only consisted of an alcohol and a pair-fed group. At eight weeks and again at fourteen weeks, the rats were sacrificed and the femurs were removed for mechanical testing. This is summarized...

  2. Comparison of benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and mutation induction in CHO cells using rat liver homogenate (S9) or Syrian hamster embryonic cell-mediated activation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D.J.; Okinaka, R.T.; Strniste, G.F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mutagenesis in CHO cells has been studied by the addition of an ezymatically active liver homogenate (S9) fraction. However, the metabolism of procarcinogens, such as benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), by rat liver homogenate differs from that in intact cellular activation systems. Consequently, B(a)P-induced mutation frequencies in mammalian cells may vary when different activation systems are used. This study attempts to compare B(a)P metabolism and conjugation in rat liver homogenate (S9 preparation) and in Syrian hamster embryonic (SHE) cells. Furthermore, a CHO mutation assay incorporating either of the activation systems is being used to measure the mutation induction frequency.

  3. Calcium-sensing receptor activation contributed to apoptosis stimulates TRPC6 channel in rat neonatal ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yi-hua [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Li, Yong-quan [Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Feng, Shan-li [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Li, Bao-xin; Pan, Zhen-wei [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Xu, Chang-qing [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Li, Ting-ting [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Yang, Bao-feng, E-mail: syh200415@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacitative calcium entry (CCE) refers to the influx of calcium through plasma membrane channels activated on depletion of endoplasmic sarcoplasmic/reticulum (ER/SR) Ca{sup 2+} stores, which is performed mainly by the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and plays an important role in mediating cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, there are no data regarding the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart. In this study, in rat neonatal myocytes, by Ca{sup 2+} imaging, we found that the depletion of ER/SR Ca{sup 2+} stores by thapsigargin (TG) elicited a transient rise in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), followed by sustained increase depending on extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. But, TRP channels inhibitor (SKF96365), not L-type channels or the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger inhibitors, inhibited [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} relatively high. Then, we found that the stimulation of CaR with its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or by an increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+}([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) increased the concentration of intracelluar Ca{sup 2+}, whereas, the sustained elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of SKF96365. Similarly, the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Western blot analysis showed that GdCl{sub 3} increased the expression of TRPC6, which was reversed by SKF96365. Additionally, SKF96365 reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by GdCl{sub 3}. Our results suggested that CCE exhibited in rat neonatal myocytes and CaR activation induced Ca{sup 2+}-permeable cationic channels TRPCs to gate the CCE, for which TRPC6 was one of the most likely candidates. TRPC6 channel was functionally coupled with CaR to enhance the cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

  4. The effect of a low dosage of parathion upon DRL performance and acquisition in the albino rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Marion Stockton

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studied extensively. Prenatal effects studied by Al Hachim and Fink (1968) may be related to hormone factors since the f'etal environment is largely dependent upon various hormone levels of the mother for its stability. It was re- ported that rats... that this agent, when used in normal con- centrations for pest control, does not pose a significant threat to the integrity of small animal populations through adverse effects on complex behaviors. REFERENCES Al Hachim, G. M. , and Fink, G. B. , "The effect...

  5. Effects of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase inhibitors on uptake and release of norepinephrine and dopamine from rat brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, N.Y.; Hower, J.A.; Borchardt, R.T.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhibitors of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) and amphetamine were evaluated for their effects on the uptake of (TH)-norepinephrine (TH-NE) and the release of endogenous NE and dopamine (DA) from chopped rat brain tissues. Unlike amphetamine, all of PNMT inhibitors tested produced only slight inhibition of (TH)-NE uptake into chopped cerebral cortex. 2,3-Dichloro-alpha-methylbenzylamine (DCMB) and 7,8-dichloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (SKF64139), but not 2-cyclooctyl-2-hydroxyethylamine (CONH) and 1-aminomethylcycloundecanol (CUNH) produced slight release of endogenous NE and DA from chopped hypothalami, but their effects were less pronounced than those produced by amphetamine.

  6. Effect of dietary magnesium and calcium on blood lipids and minerals in tissues in rats fed a high fat diet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conboy-Downs, Jean

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF DIETARY MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM ON BLOOD LIPIDS AND MINERALS ZN TISSUES IN BATS FED A HIGH FAT DIET A Thesis by JEAN CONBOY-DONNS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECT OF DIETARY MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM ON BLOOD LIPZDS AND MZNERALS ZN TISSUES IN RATS FED A BIGS FAT DIET A Thesis by JEAN CONBOY-DOWNS Approved as to style...

  7. The effect of temperature and oxygen level on the production of testosterone, androstenedione and progesterone by rat testis in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Peter Anthony

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN LEVEL ON THE PRODUCTION OF TESTOSTERONE, ANDROSTFNEDIONE AND PROGESTERONE BY RAT TESTIS IN VITRO A Thesis by PETER ANTHONY DUDLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A%M University in partial... IN VITRO A Thesis by PETER ANTHONY DUDLEY Approved as to style and content by: (C irman of Committee) (Head of Department) &, 'Mcmbe r ) ' M c'm b e r ) AC KN OW LEDG MENTS The author i'eels extremely fortunate to have had as the chair- man...

  8. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin. Final progress report, May 1, 1990--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/{mu}), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of {sup 14}C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ({sup 3}H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The {sup 14}C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with {sup 14}C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

  9. Fermentation of pectin and cellulose to short chain fatty acids: a comparative study with humans, baboons, pigs, and rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villalba, Leonilde Nonita

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    digestibility to the human results. SCFA were measured using gas chromatography. The pH was measured before and after the fermentations. The percent fiber remaining after fermentation was assayed colorimetrically. The greatest interspecies differences were...%I@ W, W, '. '" yW~, t . . . M~~~)~ '1 r FERMENTATION OF PECTIN AND CELLULOSE TO SHORT CHAIN FATTY ACIDS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY WITH HUMANS, BABOONS, PIGS, AND RATS A Thesis by LEONILDE NONITA VILLALBA IL W I Z IJ Z 4 Z 4 2 5 V Z I...

  10. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Modified Dominant Lethal Study of Sulfur Mustard in Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasser, L. B.; Cushing, J. A.; Kalkwarf, D. R.; Buschbom, R. L.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard (HD) [bis{2-chloroethyl)-sulfide) ' a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Little, however, is known about the mutagenic activity of HD in mammalian species and data regarding the dominant lethal effects of HD are ambiguous. The purpose of this study was to determine the dominant lethal effect in male and female rats orally exposed to HD. The study was conducted in two phases; a female dominant lethal phase and a male dominant lethal phase. Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex were administered 0.08, 0.20, or 0.50 mg/kg HD in sesame oil 5 days/week for 10 weeks. For the female phase, treated or untreated males were mated with treated females and their fetuses were evaluated at approximately 14 days after copulation. For the male dominant lethal phase, treated males cohabited with untreated femal (during 5 days of each week for 10 weeks) and females were sacrificed for fetal evaluation 14 days after the midweek of cohabitation during each of the 10 weeks. The appearance and behavior of the rats were unremarkable throughout the experiment and there were no treatment-related deaths. Growth rates were reduced in both female and male rats treated with 0.50 mg/kg HD. Indicators of reproductive performance did not demonstrate significant female dominant lethal effects, although significant male dominant lethal effects were observed at 2 and 3 week post-exposure. These effects included increases of early fetal resorptions and preimplantation losses and decreases of total live embryo implants. These effects were most consistently observed at a dose of 0.50 mg/kg, but frequently occurred at the lower doses. Although no treatment-related effects on male reproductive organ weights or sperm motility were found, a significant increase in the percentage of abnormal sperm was detected in males exposed to 0. 50 mg/kg HD. The timing of these effects is consistent with an effect during the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis, possibly involving the generally sensitive spermatids.

  11. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Parsons, Loren [Committee on Neurobiology of Affective Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 6–7 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (89–90%) and CPF (78–83%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (88–91%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (35–50%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. • Functional signs were only noted with parathion. • Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. • 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were lesser affected. • The CB1 antagonist AM251 had no effect on chlorpyrifos but reduced parathion toxicity.

  12. Effect of dietary magnesium and calcium on blood lipids and minerals in tissues in rats fed a high fat diet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conboy-Downs, Jean

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF DIETARY MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM ON BLOOD LIPIDS AND MINERALS ZN TISSUES IN BATS FED A HIGH FAT DIET A Thesis by JEAN CONBOY-DONNS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECT OF DIETARY MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM ON BLOOD LIPZDS AND MZNERALS ZN TISSUES IN RATS FED A BIGS FAT DIET A Thesis by JEAN CONBOY-DOWNS Approved as to style...

  13. Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    on Mean Arterial Pressure, Heart Rate, and Regional Cardiac Output Distribution in Aging Rats. (December 2005) Michael Wiechmann Ramsey, B.S.; M.A., Sam Houston State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Michael Delp Many senescent... to extend my gratitude to my friends as well as the faculty and staff that have supported me throughout my studies at Texas A&M University. Thanks also to Dr. Gary Oden who helped instill a love and appreciation of Exercise Physiology. A special thanks...

  14. Involvement of calcium-sensing receptor in ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Weihua [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Fu Songbin [Department of Genetics, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Bio-pharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150086 (China); Lu Fanghao [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)]. E-mail: lufanghao1973@yahoo.com.cn; Wu Bo [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Gong Dongmei [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Pan, Zhen-wei [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Lv Yanjie [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhao Yajun [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Li Quanfeng [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Wang Rui [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ont., P7B5E1 (Canada); Yang Baofeng [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Bio-pharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150086 (China); Xu Changqing [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China) and Bio-pharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150086 (China)]. E-mail: xucq@163.com

    2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor, which activates intracellular effectors, for example, it causes inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation to increase the release of intracellular calcium. Although intracellular calcium overload has been implicated in the cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced apoptosis, the role of CaR in the induction of apoptosis has not been fully understood. This study tested the hypothesis that CaR is involved in I/R cardiomyocyte apoptosis by increasing [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The isolated rat hearts were subjected to 40-min ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion, meanwhile GdCl{sub 3} was added to reperfusion solution. The expression of CaR increased at the exposure to GdCl{sub 3} during I/R. By laser confocal microscopy, it was observed that the intracellular calcium was significantly increased and exhibited a collapsed {delta}{psi} {sub m}, as monitored by 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) during reperfusion with GdCl{sub 3}. Furthermore, the number of apoptotic cells was significantly increased as shown by TUNEL assay. Typical apoptotic cells were observed with transmission electron microscopy in I/R with GdCl{sub 3} but not in the control group. The expression of cytosolic cytochrome c and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3 was significantly increased whereas the expression of mitochondrial cytochrome c significantly decreased in I/R with GdCl{sub 3} in comparison to the control. In conclusion, these results suggest that CaR is involved in the induction of cardiomyocyte apoptosis during ischemia/reperfusion through activation of cytochrome c-caspase-3 signaling pathway.

  15. Morphine-6-glucuronide: analgesic effects and receptor binding profile in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, F.V.; Palmour, R.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The antinociceptive effects of morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) were examined in two animal models of pain, the tail immersion test (reflex withdrawal to noxious heat) and the formalin test (behavioral response to minor tissue injury). In the tail immersion test, M6G produced and increase in withdrawal latency that rose rapidly between 0.01 and 0.025 ug ICV or 1 and 2 mg/kg SC. A further increase occurred at doses greater than 0.2 ug ICV or 4 mg/kg SC and was associated with marked catelepsy and cyanosis. Naloxone, 0.1 mg/kg SC, shifted the lower component of the dose-effect relation by a factor of 24. In the formalin test, 0.01 ug M6G ICV produced hyperalgesia, while between 0.05 and 0.2 ug ICV, antinociception increased rapidly without toxicity. The dose effect relations for hyperalgesia and antinociception were shifted to the right by factors of 20- and 3-fold, respectively. By comparison, ICV morphine was 60 (formalin test) to 145-200 (tail immersion test) times less potent than M6G. At sub-nanomolar concentrations, M6G enhanced the binding of (/sup 3/H)-etorphine, (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone to rat brain membrane receptors by 20-40%. At higher concentrations, M6G displaced each ligand from binding sites, with K/sub i/ values of about 30 nM, as compared to morphine K/sub i/ values of about 3 nM.

  16. Effect of In Vivo Nicotine Exposure on Chlorpyrifos Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Routine use of tobacco products may modify physiological and metabolic functions, including drug metabolizing enzymes, which may impact the pharmacokinetics of environmental contaminants. Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus (OP) insecticide that is bioactivated to chlorpyrifos-oxon, and manifests its neurotoxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated nicotine exposure on the pharmacokinetics of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its major metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine and also to determine the impact on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in plasma and brain. Animals were exposed to 7-daily doses of either 1 mg nicotine/kg or saline (sc), and to either a single oral dose of 35 mg CPF/kg or a repeated dose of 5 mg CPF/kg/day for 7 days. Groups of rats were then sacrificed at multiple time-points after receiving the last dose of CPF. Repeated nicotine and CPF exposures resulted in enhanced metabolism of CPF to TCPy, as evidenced by increases in the measured TCPy concentration and AUC in blood. However, there was no significant difference in the amount of TCPy (free or total) excreted in the urine. The extent of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was reduced due to nicotine co-exposure consistent with an increase in CYP450-mediated dearylation (detoxification) versus desulfuration. It was of interest to note that the impact of nicotine co-exposure was experimentally observed only after repeated CPF doses. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model simulations of CPF-oxon concentrations in blood and brain were predicted to be lower in nicotine treated groups, which were simulated by increasing the dearylation Vmax based upon previously conducted in vitro metabolism studies. These results were consistent with the experimental data. The current study demonstrated that repeated nicotine exposure could alter CPF metabolism in vivo, further modulating brain AChE inhibition.

  17. Maternal exposure to cadmium during gestation perturbs the vascular system of the adult rat offspring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronco, Ana Maria, E-mail: amronco@inta.cl [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Montenegro, Marcela; Castillo, Paula; Urrutia, Manuel [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Saez, Daniel [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Sandra [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Zepeda, Ramiro [Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Llanos, Miguel N. [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several cardiovascular diseases (CVD) observed in adulthood have been associated with environmental influences during fetal growth. Here, we show that maternal exposure to cadmium, a ubiquitously distributed heavy metal and main component of cigarette smoke is able to induce cardiovascular morpho-functional changes in the offspring at adult age. Heart morphology and vascular reactivity were evaluated in the adult offspring of rats exposed to 30 ppm of cadmium during pregnancy. Echocardiographic examination shows altered heart morphology characterized by a concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, we observed a reduced endothelium-dependent reactivity in isolated aortic rings of adult offspring, while endothelium-independent reactivity remained unaltered. These effects were associated with an increase of hem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the aortas of adult offspring. The expression of HO-1 was higher in females than males, a finding likely related to the sex-dependent expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), which was lower in the adult female. All these long-term consequences were observed along with normal birth weights and absence of detectable levels of cadmium in fetal and adult tissues of the offspring. In placental tissues however, cadmium levels were detected and correlated with increased NF-{kappa}B expression - a transcription factor sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress - suggesting a placentary mechanism that affect genes related to the development of the cardiovascular system. Our results provide, for the first time, direct experimental evidence supporting that exposure to cadmium during pregnancy reprograms cardiovascular development of the offspring which in turn may conduce to a long term increased risk of CVD.

  18. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities of olmesartan medoxomil ameliorate experimental colitis in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagib, Marwa M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Misr International University, Cairo (Egypt); Tadros, Mariane G., E-mail: mirogeogo@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); ELSayed, Moushira I. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Misr International University, Cairo (Egypt); Khalifa, Amani E. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) driven through altered immune responses with production of proinflammatory cytokines. Many therapies are used, but side effects and loss of response limit long-term effectiveness. New therapeutic strategies are thus needed for patients who don't respond to current treatments. Recently, there is suggested involvement of the proinflammatory hormone angiotensin II in inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM-M), an angiotensin II receptor blocker in ameliorating ulcerative colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in drinking water for 5 days. OLM-M (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) was administered orally during 21 days prior to the induction of colitis, and for 5 days after. Sulfasalazine (500 mg/kg) was used as reference drug. All animals were tested for changes in colon length, disease activity index (DAI) and microscopic damage. Colon tissue concentration/activity of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-?), myeloperoxidase (MPO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed. Results showed that the OLM-M dose-dependently ameliorated the colonic histopathological and biochemical injuries, an effect that is comparable or even better than that of the standard sulfasalazine. These results suggest that olmesartan medoxomil may be effective in the treatment of UC through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. - Highlights: • Olmesartan medoximil reduced dextran sodium sulphate- induced colitis. • Mechanism involved anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects dose- dependently. • It suppressed malondialdehyde and restored reduced glutathione levels. • It reduced inflammatory markers levels and histological changes.

  19. Olfactory deprivation increases dopamine D2 receptor density in the rat olfactory bulb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, K.M.; Pullara, J.M.; Marshall, J.F.; Leon, M. (University of California, Irvine (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unilateral olfactory deprivation during postnatal development results in significant anatomical and neurochemical changes in the deprived olfactory bulb. Perhaps the most dramatic neurochemical change is the loss of dopaminergic expression by neurons of the glomerular region. The authors describe here the effects of early olfactory deprivation on other elements of the bulb dopaminergic system, namely the dopamine receptors of the olfactory bulb. Rat pups had a single naris occluded on postnatal day 2 (PN2). On PN20 or PN60, animals were sacrificed and the bulbs were examined for catecholamine levels or D2 and D1 dopamine receptor binding. Receptor densities were quantified by in vitro autoradiography using the tritiated antagonists spiperone (D2) and SCH23390 (D1). Dopamine uptake sites were similarly examined using tritiated mazindol. No significant specific labeling of D1 or mazindol sites was observed in the olfactory bulbs of control or experimental animals at either age. Normal animals displayed prominent labeling of D2 sites in the glomerular and nerve layers. After 60 days of deprivation, deprived bulbs exhibited an average increase in D2 receptor density of 32%. As determined by Scatchard analysis, the mean values for Kd and Bmax were 0.134 nM and 293 fmol/mg protein in normal bulbs, and 0.136 nM and 403 fmol/mg protein in deprived bulbs. The results suggest that, as in the neostriatum, dopamine depletion in the olfactory bulb leads to an upregulation of D2 receptor sites. This change may represent an attempt by the system to adapt neurochemically to reduced dopaminergic activity and thereby maintain bulb function.

  20. Stimulation of dopamine synthesis and activation of tyrosine hydroxylase by phorbol diesters in rat striatum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onali, P.; Olianas, M.C.

    1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In rat striatal synaptosomes, 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 4 ..beta..-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), two activators of Ca/sup 2 +/-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) increased dopamine (DA) synthesis measured by following the release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C) tyrosine. Maximal stimulation (21-28% increase of basal rate) was produced by 0.5 ..mu..M PMA and 1 ..mu..M PDBu. 4 ..beta..-Phorbol and 4 ..beta..-phorbol 13-acetate, which are not activators of protein kinase C, were ineffective at 1 ..mu..M. PMA did not change the release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C)DOPA. Addition of 1 mM EGTA to a Ca/sup 2 +/-free incubation medium failed to affect PMA stimulation. KCl (60 mM) enhanced DA synthesis by 25%. Exposure of synaptosomes to either PMA or PDBu prior to KCl addition resulted in a more than additive increase (80-100%) of DA synthesis. A similar synergistic effect was observed when the phorbol diesters were combined with either veratridine or d-amphetamine but not with forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Pretreatment of striatal synaptosomes with phorbol diesters produced an activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) associated with a 60% increase of the Vmax and a decrease of the Km for the pterine cofactor 6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin. These results indicate that protein kinase C participates in the regulation of striatal TH in situ and that its activation may act synergistically with DA releasing agents in stimulating DA synthesis. 37 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Aquaculture University of MiAMi rosenstiel school

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    Miami, University of

    , non-governmental organization, and the general public's environmental and regulatory concerns in unprotected areas offshore. And, they are constantly monitoring environmental impacts and exploring ways is effective in preventing impact on the surrounding environ- ment. the future Remarkably, cobia growth rates

  2. EV Community Readiness projects: Clean Energy Coalition (MI...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    link the Michigan PEV Community Readiness Plan to relevant websites and other appropriate media outlets; incorporate the Plan into the PEV Taskforce website. Clean Cities Recovery...

  3. ann arbor mi: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Copyright Page, and Table of Contents more than one Table, Figure, Appendix, etc. exists, separate lists are in Front Matter Tables Awtar, Shorya 57 Apeared in...

  4. Last First MI CRN Course ID Credit Audit? Days Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Registration Worksheet ON OR AFTER YOUR ASSIGNED REGISTRATION APPOINTMENT TIME... Go to https://goldlink.etsu.edu REGISTRAR'S OFFICE (HELP-LINE) HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY (8:00 AM - 4:30 PM) REGISTRAR HOME PAGE: www.etsu posted by the Bursars office. If you decide not to attend ETSU, you must drop your courses before

  5. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and who is a Negro, Puerto Rican, American Indian, Eskimo, Oriental, or Aleut or is a Spanish speaking individual of Spanish descent; "(2) 'minority business enterprise' means a...

  6. Mi Plato Durante el Embarazo Elija porciones variadas y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    almidones saludables como las legumbres (frijoles, lentejas), camote (batatas), o calabazas. Limite el consumo de pan blanco, arroz blanco y papas fritas. Beba principalmente agua, té o café sin cafeína, y

  7. NEVADA BUREAU OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SPECIAL PUBLICATION MI-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    MINERAL NYE ESMERALDA LANDER EUREKA WASHOE LINCOLN CLARK LYON STOREY DOUGLAS CC Las Vegas Elko Winnemucca

  8. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.04,000 64,000 64,000CubicYear

  9. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.04,000 64,000

  10. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.04,000 64,000Feet) Year Jan

  11. Sault St. Marie, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia (Million Cubic(MillionFeet)

  12. St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3 0.3 0.3612,369

  13. St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3 0.3 0.3612,3696,544

  14. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0Cubic Feet)Delaware23.80 44,2752009

  15. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1Feet)YearDecade

  16. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanPricePrice5,594.9DecadeDecade(Million

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Adrian - MI 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona ArizonaWyoming Wyoming

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carboloy Co - MI 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Detrex Corp - MI 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP ConsideredMill Site -

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oliver Corp - MI 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT

  2. MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beam Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are hereNews item$alt Trinity

  3. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)ThousandFeet) Year Jan Feb

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Star Cutter Corp - MI 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown Site - MO 02

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Michigan - MI 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntownUnited NuclearMiami - FL

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Naval Ordnance - MI 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal - MAWesternPlantNaval

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal -Center -Wolverine Tube

  8. REC Silicon formerly ASiMI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevada <

  9. Immunization with FSH? fusion protein antigen prevents bone loss in a rat ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Wenxin; Yan, Xingrong; Du, Huicong; Cui, Jihong; Li, Liwen, E-mail: liven@nwu.edu.cn; Chen, Fulin, E-mail: chenfl@nwu.edu.cn

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •A GST-FSH fusion protein was successfully expressed in E. coli. •Immunization with GST-FSH antigen can raise high-titer anti-FSH polyclonal sera. •Anti-FSH polyclonal sera can neutralize osteoclastogenic effect of FSH in vitro. •FSH immunization can prevent bone loss in a rat osteoporosis model. -- Abstract: Osteoporosis, a metabolic bone disease, threatens postmenopausal women globally. Hormone replacement therapy (HTR), especially estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), is used widely in the clinic because it has been generally accepted that postmenopausal osteoporosis is caused by estrogen deficiency. However, hypogonadal ? and ? estrogen receptor null mice were only mildly osteopenic, and mice with either receptor deleted had normal bone mass, indicating that estrogen may not be the only mediator that induces osteoporosis. Recently, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), the serum concentration of which increases from the very beginning of menopause, has been found to play a key role in postmenopausal osteoporosis by promoting osteoclastogenesis. In this article, we confirmed that exogenous FSH can enhance osteoclast differentiation in vitro and that this effect can be neutralized by either an anti-FSH monoclonal antibody or anti-FSH polyclonal sera raised by immunizing animals with a recombinant GST-FSH? fusion protein antigen. Moreover, immunizing ovariectomized rats with the GST-FSH? antigen does significantly prevent trabecular bone loss and thereby enhance the bone strength, indicating that a FSH-based vaccine may be a promising therapeutic strategy to slow down bone loss in postmenopausal women.

  10. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity in rat cranial parasympathetic neurons: coexistence with vasoactive intestinal peptide and choline acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leblanc, G.C.; Trimmer, B.A.; Landis, S.C.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is widely distributed in the sympathetic nervous system, where it is colocalized with norepinephrine. The authors report here that NPY-immunoreactive neurons are also abundant in three cranial parasympathetic ganglia, the otic, sphenopalatine, and ciliary, in the rat measured by radioimmunoassay. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material present in the otic ganglion indicates that this material is very similar to porcine NPY and indistinguishable from the NPY-like immunoreactivity present in rat sympathetic neurons. These findings raise the possibility that NPY acts as a neuromodulator in the parasympathetic as well as the sympathetic nervous system. In contrast to what had been observed for sympathetic neurons, NPY-immunoreactive neurons in cranial parasympathetic ganglia do not contain detectable catecholamines or tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, and many do contain immunoreactivity for vasoactive intestinal peptide and/or choline acetyltransferase. These findings suggest that there is no simple rule governing coexpression of NPY with norepinephrine, acetylcholine, or vasoactive intestinal peptide in autonomic neurons. Further, while functional studies have indicated that NPY exerts actions on the peripheral vasculature which are antagonistic to those of acetylcholine and vasoactive intestinal peptide, the present results raise the possibility that these three substances may have complementary effects on other target tissues.

  11. Cell Detection in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscopy Images of Nissl-stained Mouse and Rat Brain Samples Using Random Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lal Das, Shashwat

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopy has developed into a very powerful medium for studying the brain. The Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM), for example, is capable of imaging whole rat and mouse brains in three dimensions, and produces over 1.5 terabytes of images per...

  12. Localized In Vivo 1H NMR Detection of Neurotransmitter Labeling in Rat Brain During Infusion of [1-13C] D-Glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jegelka, Stefanie

    Localized In Vivo 1H NMR Detection of Neurotransmitter Labeling in Rat Brain During Infusion of [1 infusions of 13C-labeled glucose. Magn Reson Med 41:1077­1083, 1999. 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words] glucose infusion In vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy with localization is emerg- ing as an important tool

  13. INteRNatIONal BuSINeSS BuSINeSS adMINIStRatION Students will gain critical insights into business operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MINORS INteRNatIONal BuSINeSS BuSINeSS adMINIStRatION Students will gain critical insights into business operations and strategy from accounting, finance, management and marketing coursework. The Business Administration Minor will provide students with fundamental knowledge and exposure to key business

  14. Simultaneous determination of aromatic acid metabolites of styrene and styrene-oxide in rat urine by gas chromatography -flame ionisation detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to quantitatively analyze styrene, styrene-oxide, ethylbenzene and toluene metabolites in urines samples from rats exposed by inhalation to these compounds at levels close to the occupational threshold limit values of biological monitoring for workers exposed to styrene or related compounds. Keywords: Styrene; styrene

  15. Effects on food intake following stimulation of alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptors within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of dietary-obese and dietary-resistant rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Lance Richard

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -obesity) following intra-PVN injections of the adrenergic compounds norepinephrine (25 nmol), cirazoline (10, 20, and 30 nmol), and phenylpropanolamine (160 nmol) . Experiment 2 investigates food intake of DIO-prone and DR-prone rats (pre-obesity) following intra...

  16. Role of MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 in the development of breast cancer brain and lung metastasis in a syngeneic rat model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Odete Rodrigues

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study the expression of MMP2, MMP 3 and MMP9 in breast cancer brain and lung metastasis, we used a syngeneic rat model of distant metastasis of ENU1564, a carcinogen-induced mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. At six weeks post inoculation...

  17. Estimating changes in the mechanical properties of the femur in the adult and aged rat due to adult-onset alcohol consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Lyndon Phuoc

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous studies have shown that alcohol has a disturbing effect on the mechanical properties of the skeleton. To determine whether alcohol has a deleterious effect on the adult skeleton, fifty-four, nine-month old, female Sprague-Dawley rats were...

  18. Technical Aspects of an Impact Acceleration Traumatic Brain Injury Rat Model with Potential Suitability for both Microdialysis and PtiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    molecules are now conceivable to ameliorate severe head-injury treatment. Keywords: Traumatic Brain Injury of anaesthesia and/or neuroprotection, a traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal model, similar to human head injury1 Technical Aspects of an Impact Acceleration Traumatic Brain Injury Rat Model with Potential

  19. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 527 (2004) 166170 RatCAP: a small, head-mounted PET tomograph for imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electronics, as well as studies with live animals to evaluate their behavior when using the device. of an awake rat. This device will permit neurophysiological studies to be carried out on small animals without of the animal. In order to minimize the weight of the ring, and to keep all of the front end readout electronics

  20. Behavior of vortices near twin boundaries in underdoped Ba(Fe 1 ? <mi>x> <mi mathvariant="normal">Comi> <mi>x> ) 2 <mi mathvariant="normal">Asmi> 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalisky, B.; Kirtley, J. R.; Analytis, J. G.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Moler, K. A.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy to investigate the behavior of vortices in the presence of twin boundaries in the pnictide superconductor Ba(Fe1-xCox)?As?. We show that the vortices avoid pinning on twin boundaries. Individual vortices move in a preferential way when manipulated with the SQUID: They tend to not cross a twin boundary, but rather to move parallel to it. This behavior can be explained by the observation of enhanced superfluid density on twin boundaries in Ba(Fe1-xCox)?As?. The observed repulsion from twin boundaries may be a mechanism for enhanced critical currents observed in twinned samples in pnictides and other superconductors.

  1. Cholinesterase inhibition and acetylcholine accumulation following intracerebral administration of paraoxon in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, A.; Liu, J.; Karanth, S. [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74075 (United States); Gao, Y.; Brimijoin, S. [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pope, C. [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74075 (United States)], E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluated the inhibition of striatal cholinesterase activity following intracerebral administration of paraoxon assaying activity either in tissue homogenates ex vivo or by substrate hydrolysis in situ. Artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or paraoxon in aCSF was infused unilaterally (0.5 {mu}l/min for 2 h) and ipsilateral and contralateral striata were harvested for ChE assay ex vivo. High paraoxon concentrations were needed to inhibit ipsilateral striatal cholinesterase activity (no inhibition at < 0.1 mM; 27% at 0.1 mM; 79% at 1 mM paraoxon). With 3 mM paraoxon infusion, substantial ChE inhibition was also noted in contralateral striatum. ChE histochemistry generally confirmed these concentration- and side-dependent effects. Microdialysates collected for up to 4 h after paraoxon infusion inhibited ChE activity when added to striatal homogenate, suggesting prolonged efflux of paraoxon. Since paraoxon efflux could complicate acetylcholine analysis, we evaluated the effects of paraoxon (0, 0.03, 0.1, 1, 10 or 100 {mu}M, 1.5 {mu}l/min for 45 min) administered by reverse dialysis through a microdialysis probe. ChE activity was then monitored in situ by perfusing the colorimetric substrate acetylthiocholine through the same probe and measuring product (thiocholine) in dialysates. Concentration-dependent inhibition was noted but reached a plateau of about 70% at 1 {mu}M and higher concentrations. Striatal acetylcholine was below the detection limit at all times with 0.1 {mu}M paraoxon but was transiently elevated (0.5-1.5 h) with 10 {mu}M paraoxon. In vivo paraoxon (0.4 mg/kg, sc) in adult rats elicited about 90% striatal ChE inhibition measured ex vivo, but only about 10% inhibition measured in situ. Histochemical analyses revealed intense AChE and glial fibrillary acidic protein staining near the cannula track, suggesting proliferation of inflammatory cells/glia. The findings suggest that ex vivo and in situ cholinesterase assays can provide very different views into enzyme-inhibitor interactions. Furthermore, the proliferation/migration of cells containing high amounts of cholinesterase just adjacent to a dialysis probe could affect the recovery and thus detection of extracellular acetylcholine in microdialysis studies.

  2. Lead and nickel alter the cardiorenal actions of endothelin in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novak, J.; Banks, R.O. [Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the current study, we have determined to what extent lead and nickel alter the cardiorenal actions of endothelin in pentobarbital anesthetized female rates. One hour following surgery, 3 x 15-min renal clearances were collected and endothelin (ET)-1 was infused iv at 100 ng/kg/min for 30 min during which time an additional two clearances was collected. Lead (infused as lead acetate throughout the experiment) at 4.8 nmoles/min and 24 nmoles/min significantly attenuated the ET-induced increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP); lead infused at 0.48 nmoles/min had no effect. An ET-induced decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in control rats was completely blocked by the higher doses of Pb{sup 2+}. By contrast, Pb{sup 2+} had no effect on angiotensin II or norepinephrine induced increases in MAP. In additional experiments, calcium chloride was infused at 500 nmoles/min for 105 min, then Ca{sup 2+} + Pb{sup 2+} (4.8 nmoles/min) were infused for another 105 min; in these experiments, there was no Pb{sup 2+}-induced inhibition of the MAP response to endothelin: the GFR response to the peptide remained blocked. NiCl{sub 2} reduced the ET-induced increase in MAP only at 24 nmoles/min; at 4.8 and 24 nmoles/min, nickel attentuated the decrease in GFR induced by ET. Finally, Ca{sup 2+} infusion had no effect on the inhibition by Ni{sup 2+} of the GFR response to ET. These data illustrate that (i) lead inhibits the cardiorenal actions of endothelin; (ii) a Ca{sup 2+}-related process is involved the systemic but not the renal component of this inhibition; (iii) since the heavy metal does not affect angiotensin II or nonrepinephrine-induced increases in MAP, the inhibition by lead of the systemic response is relatively specific for endothelin; and (iv) nickel also inhibits the renal response to the peptide but higher doses are required to inhibit the systemic response. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Combined contributions of over-secreted glucagon-like peptide 1 and suppressed insulin secretion to hyperglycemia induced by gatifloxacin in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Yunli, E-mail: chrisyu1255@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmaceutics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China) [Department of Pharmaceutics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang, Xinting, E-mail: wxinting1986@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Liu, Can, E-mail: ltsan@163.com [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Yao, Dan, E-mail: erinyao@126.com [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China) [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Shanghai 201203 (China); Hu, Mengyue, E-mail: juliahmy@126.com [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Jia, E-mail: ljbzd@163.com [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hu, Nan, E-mail: hn_324@163.com [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Liu, Li, E-mail: liulee@cpu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Liu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdliu@cpu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accumulating evidences have showed that gatifloxacin causes dysglycemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Our preliminary study demonstrated that gatifloxacin stimulated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal cells. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release and dysglycemia in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and explore the possible mechanisms. Oral administration of gatifloxacin (100 mg/kg/day and 200 mg/kg/day) for 3 and 12 days led to marked elevation of GLP-1 levels, accompanied by significant decrease in insulin levels and increase in plasma glucose. Similar results were found in normal rats treated with 3-day gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release was further confirmed in NCI-H716 cells, which was abolished by diazoxide, a K{sub ATP} channel opener. QT-PCR analysis showed that gatifloxacin also upregulated expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 mRNA. To clarify the contradiction on elevated GLP-1 without insulinotropic effect, effects of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin on insulin release were investigated using INS-1 cells. We found that short exposure (2 h) to GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion and biosynthesis, whereas long exposure (24 h and 48 h) to high level of GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. Moreover, we also confirmed gatifloxacin acutely stimulated insulin secretion while chronically inhibited insulin biosynthesis. All the results gave an inference that gatifloxacin stimulated over-secretion of GLP-1, in turn, high levels of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin synergistically impaired insulin release, worsening hyperglycemia. -- Highlights: ? Gatifloxacin induced hyperglycemia both in diabetic rats and normal rats. ? Gatifloxacin enhanced GLP-1 secretion but inhibited insulin secretion in rats. ? Long-term exposure to high GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. ? GLP-1 over-secretion may be involved in gatifloxacin-induced hyperglycemia.

  4. High-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprinting of metabolites from cecum and distal colon contents of rats fed resistant starch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Timothy J. [Ames Laboratory; Jones, Roger W. [Ames Laboratory; Ai, Yongfeng [Iowa State University; Houk, Robert S. [Ames Laboratory; Jane, Jay-lin [Iowa State University; Zhao, Yinsheng [Iowa State University; Birt, Diane F. [Iowa State University; McClelland, John F. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry along with statistical analysis was utilized to study metabolic profiles among rats fed resistant starch (RS) diets. Fischer 344 rats were fed four starch diets consisting of 55 % (w/w, dbs) starch. A control starch diet consisting of corn starch was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. A subgroup received antibiotic treatment to determine if perturbations in the gut microbiome were long lasting. A second subgroup was treated with azoxymethane (AOM), a carcinogen. At the end of the 8-week study, cecal and distal colon content samples were collected from the sacrificed rats. Metabolites were extracted from cecal and distal colon samples into acetonitrile. The extracts were then analyzed on an accurate-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer to obtain their metabolic profile. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The PLS-DA analysis utilized a training set and verification set to classify samples within diet and treatment groups. PLS-DA could reliably differentiate the diet treatments for both cecal and distal colon samples. The PLS-DA analyses of the antibiotic and no antibiotic-treated subgroups were well classified for cecal samples and modestly separated for distal colon samples. PLS-DA analysis had limited success separating distal colon samples for rats given AOM from those not treated; the cecal samples from AOM had very poor classification. Mass spectrometry profiling coupled with PLS-DA can readily classify metabolite differences among rats given RS diets.

  5. MicroRNA-29a is up-regulated in beta-cells by glucose and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagge, Annika [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Clausen, Trine R. [Diabetes Biology, Novo Nordisk, Maaloev (Denmark)] [Diabetes Biology, Novo Nordisk, Maaloev (Denmark); Larsen, Sylvester [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Ladefoged, Mette [Diabetes Biology, Novo Nordisk, Maaloev (Denmark)] [Diabetes Biology, Novo Nordisk, Maaloev (Denmark); Rosenstierne, Maiken W. [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark) [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Virology, Statens Serum Institut (Denmark); Larsen, Louise [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Vang, Ole [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Nielsen, Jens H. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Dalgaard, Louise T., E-mail: ltd@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased by glucose in human and rat islets and INS-1E cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29a increases proliferation of INS-1E beta-cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Forced expression of miR-29a decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of beta-cell miR-29a improves GSIS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29a may be a mediator of glucose toxicity in beta-cells. -- Abstract: Chronically elevated levels of glucose impair pancreatic beta-cell function while inducing beta-cell proliferation. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased in several tissues in diabetic animals and mediate decreased insulin-stimulated glucose-transport of adipocytes. The aim was to investigate the impact of glucose on miR-29a levels in INS-1E beta-cells and in human islets of Langerhans and furthermore to evaluate the impact of miR-29a on beta-cell function and proliferation. Increased glucose levels up-regulated miR-29a in beta-cells and human and rat islets of Langerhans. Glucose-stimulated insulin-secretion (GSIS) of INS-1E beta-cells was decreased by forced expression of miR-29a, while depletion of endogenous miR-29a improved GSIS. Over-expression of miR-29a increased INS-1E proliferation. Thus, miR-29a up-regulation is involved in glucose-induced proliferation of beta-cells. Furthermore, as depletion of miR-29a improves beta-cell function, miR-29a is a mediator of glucose-induced beta-cell dysfunction. Glucose-induced up-regulation of miR-29a in beta-cells could be implicated in progression from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes.

  6. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin [Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Nagar, Geet Kumar [Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI) (India); Mitra, Kalyan [Electron Microscopy Unit, CSIR-CDRI, Lucknow 226001 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra, E-mail: sanghmitra@iitr.res.in [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2?-, 3?-cyclic-nucleotide-3?-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase. • The retina exhibits diminished neurotrophin levels and cellular differentiation. • The toxic effect is apoptotic.

  7. Characterization of the In Vitro Kinetic Interaction of Chlorpyrifos-Oxon with Rat Salivary Cholinesterase: A Potential Biomonitoring Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kousba, Ahmed A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poet, Torka S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Timchalk, Charles (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a commonly used organophosphate insecticide (OP). The primary mechanism of action for CPF involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by the active metabolite, CPF-oxon, with subsequent accumulation of acetylcholine (ACh) resulting in a wide range of neutotoxicity. CPF-oxon, can likewise inhibit other non-target cholinesterases (ChE) such as butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), which represents a detoxification mechanism and a potential biomarker of exposure/response. Biological monitoring for OPs has focused on measuring parent chemical or metabolite in blood and urine or blood ChE inhibition. Salivary biomonitoring has recently been explored as a practical method for examination of chemical exposure; however, there are a limited number of studies exploring its use for OPs. To evaluate the use of salivary ChE as a biological monitor for OP exposure, the current study characterized salivary ChE activity in Sprague-Dawley rats through its comparison with brain and plasma ChE using BW284C51 and iso-OMPA as selective inhibitors of AChE and BuChE, respectively. The study also estimated the kinetic constants describing BuChE interaction with CPF-oxon. A modified Ellman assay in conjunction with pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling was used to characterize the in vitro titration of diluted rat salivary ChE enzyme with CPF-oxon. The results indicated that, more than 95% of rat salivary ChE activity was associated with BuChE activity, total BuChE active site concentration was 0.0012 0.00013 nmol/ml saliva, reactivation rate constant (Kr) was 0.068 0.008 h-1 and inhibitory (Ki) rate constant of 8.825 and 9.80 nM-1h-1 determined experimentally and using model optimization respectively. These study results would be helpful for further evaluating the potential utility of salivary ChE as a practical tool for biological monitor of OP exposures.

  8. SOME EFFECTS OF CYPROTERONE ACETATE ON EPIDIDYMAL FUNCTION IN RATS. — T. D. GLOVER, D. J. BLACK, J. C. SHENTON, P. BOYD. Univer-T. D. GLOVER, D. J. BLACK J. C. SHENTON P. BOYD. Univer-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SOME EFFECTS OF CYPROTERONE ACETATE ON EPIDIDYMAL FUNCTION IN RATS. — T. D. GLOVER, D. J. BLACK, J. C. SHENTON, P. BOYD. Univer-T. D. GLOVER, D. J. BLACK J. C. SHENTON P. BOYD. Univer- site de

  9. Evaluation of the developmental toxicity of cyclopiazonic acid using H?y?d?r?a? a?t?t?e?n?u?a?t?a? and postimplantation rat whole embryo bioassays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dryden, Catherine Jeane.?

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF CYCLOPIAZONIC ACID USING HYDRA ATTENUATA AND POSTIMPLANTATION RAT WHOLE EMBRYO BIOASSAYS A Thesis by CATHERINE JEANE' DRYDEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology EVALUATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF CYCLOPIAZONIC ACID USING HYDRA A?TENUATA AND POSTIMPLANTATION RAT WHOLE EMBRYO...

  10. Evaluation of the developmental toxicity of cyclopiazonic acid using H?y?d?r?a? a?t?t?e?n?u?a?t?a? and postimplantation rat whole embryo bioassays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dryden, Catherine Jeane.?

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF CYCLOPIAZONIC ACID USING HYDRA ATTENUATA AND POSTIMPLANTATION RAT WHOLE EMBRYO BIOASSAYS A Thesis by CATHERINE JEANE' DRYDEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology EVALUATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF CYCLOPIAZONIC ACID USING HYDRA A?TENUATA AND POSTIMPLANTATION RAT WHOLE EMBRYO...

  11. Prolactin-stimulated ornithine decarboxylase induction in rat hepatocytes: Coupling to diacylglycerol generation and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, A.R.; Buckley, D.J. (Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, MO (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The trophic effects of prolactin (PRL) in rat liver have been linked to activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Since alterations in PKC activity imply its activation by 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG), we tested whether PRL treatment stimulated DAG generation coupled to induction of a growth response in primary hepatocytes. Addition of PRL to hepatocyte cultures significantly increased ({sup 3}H)-glycerol incorporation into DAG within 5 minutes which was followed by a loss of cytosolic PKC activity by 10 minutes. Prolactin also significantly enhanced radiolabel incorporation into triacylglycerol and phospholipids within 10 minutes and induced ODC activity at 6 hours. Therefore, prolactin-stimulated alterations in PKC activity are preceded by enhanced DAG generation. Moreover, these events appear to be coupled to PRL-stimulated entry of hepatocytes into cell cycle.

  12. Mechano-growth factor induces migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells by altering its mechanical properties and activating ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jiamin; Wu, Kewen; Lin, Feng; Luo, Qing; Yang, Li; Shi, Yisong [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Sung, Kuo-Li Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China) [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0412 (United States)

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •MGF induced the migration of rat MSC in a concentration-dependent manner. •MGF enhanced the mechanical properties of rMSC in inducing its migration. •MGF activated the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway of rMSC in inducing its migration. •rMSC mechanics may synergy with ERK 1/2 pathway in MGF-induced rMSC migration. -- Abstract: Mechano-growth factor (MGF) generated by cells in response to mechanical stimulation has been identified as a mechano effector molecule, playing a key role in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function, including proliferation and migration. However, the mechanism(s) underlying how MGF-induced MSC migration occurs is still unclear. In the present study, MGF motivated migration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner and optimal concentration of MGF at 50 ng/mL (defined as MGF treatment in this paper) was demonstrated. Notably, enhancement of mechanical properties that is pertinent to cell migration, such as cell traction force and cell stiffness were found to respond to MGF treatment. Furthermore, MGF increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ERK inhibitor (i.e., PD98059) suppressed ERK phosphorylation, and abolished MGF-induced rMSC migration were found, demonstrating that ERK is involved molecule for MGF-induced rMSC migration. These in vitro evidences of MGF-induced rMSC migration and its direct link to altering rMSC mechanics and activating the ERK pathway, uncover the underlying biomechanical and biological mechanisms of MGF-induced rMSC migration, which may help find MGF-based application of MSC in clinical therapeutics.

  13. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Linlong [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Université, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Liaobin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause the adaptive change of glucocorticoid-IGF1 axis.

  14. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostrow, Lyle W., E-mail: lostrow1@jhmi.edu [Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick [Department of Physiology and Biophysical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)] [Department of Physiology and Biophysical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+} permeant SACs. {yields} The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. {yields} SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch (<20%) of a rubber substrate increased ET-1 secretion, and 4 {mu}M GsMTx-4 (a specific inhibitor of SACs) inhibited secretion by 30%. GsMTx-4 did not alter basal ET-1 levels in the absence of stretch. Decreasing the calcium influx by lowering extracellular calcium also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion without effecting ET-1 secretion in unstretched controls. Furthermore, inhibiting SACs with the less specific inhibitor streptomycin also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion. The data can be explained with a simple model in which ET-1 secretion depends on an internal Ca{sup 2+} threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  15. Lactational exposure to hexavalent chromium delays puberty by impairing ovarian development, steroidogenesis and pituitary hormone synthesis in developing Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banu, Sakhila K. [Reproductive Endocrinology and Cell Signaling Laboratory, Texas A and M University, TAMU 4458, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A and M University, TAMU 4458, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Interdisciplinary Faculties of Toxicology and Reproductive Biology, Texas A and M University, TAMU 4458, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)], E-mail: skbanu@cvm.tamu.edu; Samuel, Jawahar B. [Department of Zoology, St. John's College, Palayamkottai, 627 002 (India); Arosh, Joe A. [Reproductive Endocrinology and Cell Signaling Laboratory, Texas A and M University, TAMU 4458, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A and M University, TAMU 4458, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Burghardt, Robert C. [Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A and M University, TAMU 4458, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Interdisciplinary Faculties of Toxicology and Reproductive Biology, Texas A and M University, TAMU 4458, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Aruldhas, Michael M. [Department of Endocrinology, Dr. ALM Post Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Taramani Campus, Chennai 600113 (India)], E-mail: aruldhasmm@yahoo.com

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) is used in a wide range of industries. Cr-VI from chromate industries and atmospheric emissions contribute to the Cr contamination in the environment. Cr is a reproductive metal toxicant that can traverse the placental barrier and cause a wide range of fetal effects including ovotoxicity. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the basic mechanisms involved in Cr(VI)-induced ovotoxicity, and the protective role of vitamin C on ovarian follicular development and function in Cr(VI)-induced reproductive toxicity using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. Lactating rats received potassium dichromate (200 mg/L) with or without vitamin C (500 mg/L), through drinking water from postpartum days 1-21. During postnatal days (PND) 1-21 the pups received Cr(VI) via the mother's milk. Pups from both control and treatment groups were continued on regular diet and water from PND-21 onwards, and euthanized on PND-21, -45 and -65. Cr(VI) decreased steroidogenesis, GH and PRL, increased FSH and did not alter LH. Cr(VI) delayed puberty, decreased follicle number, and extended estrous cycle. Spontaneously immortalized rat granulosa cells were treated with 12.5 {mu}M (IC{sub 50}) potassium dichromate for 12 and 24 h, with or without vitamin C pre-treatment. Cr(VI) decreased the mRNA expressions of StAR, SF-1, 17{beta}-HSD-1, 17{beta}-HSD-2, FSHR, LHR, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. Vitamin C pre-treatment protected ovary and granulosa cells from the deleterious effects of Cr(VI) toxicity, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, Cr(VI) toxicity could be a potential risk to the reproductive system in developing females, and vitamin C plays a protective role against Cr(VI)-induced ovotoxicity.

  16. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) on regulation of thyroid-, growth-, and neurochemically related developmental processes in young rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juarez de Ku, L.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neonatal exposure to the toxic chemical polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) induces hypothyroidism and retarded growth. Neonatal rats made hypothyroid by chemical or surgical means experience retarded growth and subnormal activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) This study compared thyroid-, growth-, and neurochemically-related processes altered by hypothyroidism induced by other means, with PCB-induced hypothyroidism: (1) titers of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH); (2) titers of hormones that regulate growth [growth hormone (GH), insulin-growth like factor-I (IGF-1), growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS)]; or (3) brain ChAT activity. Whether PCB-induced growth retardation and other alterations are secondary to accompanying hypothyroidism rather than or in addition to a direct effect of PCB was also examined. Pregnant rats were fed chow containing 0 (controls), 62.5, 125, or 250 ppm PCB (entering offspring through placenta and milk) throughout pregnancy and lactation. Neonates exposed to PCB displayed many alterations similar to those made hypothyroid by other means: depression of overall and skeletal growth, circulating by other means: depression of overall and skeletal growth, circulating T[sub 4] levels and ChAT activity, and no change in hypothalamic GHRH and SS concentrations. Differences included a paradoxical increase in circulating GH levels, and no significant alteration of circulation IGF-1 and TSH levels and pituitary GH and TSH levels (although trends were in the expected direction). Thus, PCB-induced hypothyroidism may partially cause altered skeletal growth, circulating GH and TSH concentrations, and ChAT activity. Both T[sub 4] and T[sub 3] injections returned circulating TSH and GH levels and pituitary TSH content toward control levels; T[sub 3] restored skeletal, but not overall growth; and T[sub 4] elevated ChAT activity.

  17. Combination of /sup 60/Co. gamma. -radiation, misonidazole, and maltose tetrapalmitate in the treatment of Dunning prostatic tumor in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pageau, R.; Nigam, V.N.; Fisher, G.J.; Brailovsky, C.A.; Fathi, M.A.; Corcos, J.; Tahan, T.W.; Elhilali, M.M.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maltose tetrapalmitate (MTP), a synthetic nontoxic immunoadjuvant, the radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO), and /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-radiation, alone or in combination, were used in the management of Dunning prostatic tumor in the rat. Nine groups of 10 rats each were used to assess the efficacy of various therapeutic modalities. Tumor growth rates and animal survival times were determined for each group. Radiation was more effective when combined with MTP, but the adjuvant must be present when radiation is given for synergism to occur. MISO was as effective as MTP when used with radiation, but combining them cancels out their individual effects. In a clinical situation it would be advantageous to use separately the synergisms existing between MISO and radiation on the one hand and MTP and radiation on the other hand.

  18. Concentrations of trace and other elements in the organs of wild rats and birds from the Northern Guinea savanna of Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapu, M.M.; Schaeffer, D.J. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States)); Akanya, H.O. (Federal Univ. of Technology, Minna (Nigeria)); Ega, R.A.; Olofu, E.O.; Balarabe, M.L. (Ahmadu Bello Univ., Zaria (Nigeria)); Chafe, U.M. (Usmanu Danfodiyo Univ., Sokota (Nigeria))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In regions of human activities, where metal enter local aquatic ecosystems from the atmosphere and through wastewater outfalls, metal concentrations in food chains can exceed natural background levels and be above the threshold levels for sensitive species. Accordingly, metal levels in the organs and tissues of livestock and wildlife have been extensively studied. However, there are no reports of metal concentrations in the organs and tissues of wild animals from the Northern Guinea savanna of Nigeria. The mole rat (Africanthus niloticus, L) and village weaver bird (Ploceus cucullatus, L) contribute significantly to farm crop losses from sowing to harvest. Because there are no industries capable of causing metal contamination in the study area, the present study was undertaken to determine the natural baseline levels of metals for wild rats and birds from this environment.

  19. Electron microscopic observations of the adrenal cortical cells of young albino rats after near-lethal doses of chronic gamma irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riggs, James C

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8. Section of normal spongiocyte indicating the position of an endothelial cell io relation to cortical cells 31 9. Cortical cells from an irradiated animal 33 10. Tubular cristae mitochondriales from an irradiated animal 35 11. Vacuolatioo...ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OP THE ADRENAL CORTICAL CELLS OF YOUNG ALBINO RATS AFTER NEAR-LETHAL DOSES OP CHRONIC GAK'IA IRRADIATION A Thesis by JAMES CRAIG RIGGS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University...

  20. Taurine exerts hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, improves insulin-mediated glucose transport signaling pathway in heart and ameliorates cardiac oxidative stress and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Joydeep; Vasan, Vandana; Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@bosemain.boseinst.ac.in

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperlipidemia, inflammation and altered antioxidant profiles are the usual complications in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of taurine in diabetes associated cardiac complications using a rat model. Rats were made diabetic by alloxan (ALX) (single i.p. dose of 120 mg/kg body weight) and left untreated or treated with taurine (1% w/v, orally, in water) for three weeks either from the day of ALX exposure or after the onset of diabetes. Animals were euthanized after three weeks. ALX-induced diabetes decreased body weight, increased glucose level, decreased insulin content, enhanced the levels of cardiac damage markers and altered lipid profile in the plasma. Moreover, it increased oxidative stress (decreased antioxidant enzyme activities and GSH/GSSG ratio, increased xanthine oxidase enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and ROS generation) and enhanced the proinflammatory cytokines levels, activity of myeloperoxidase and nuclear translocation of NF?B in the cardiac tissue of the experimental animals. Taurine treatment could, however, result to a decrease in the elevated blood glucose and proinflammatory cytokine levels, diabetes-evoked oxidative stress, lipid profiles and NF?B translocation. In addition, taurine increased GLUT 4 translocation to the cardiac membrane by enhanced phosphorylation of IR and IRS1 at tyrosine and Akt at serine residue in the heart. Results also suggest that taurine could protect cardiac tissue from ALX induced apoptosis via the regulation of Bcl2 family and caspase 9/3 proteins. Taken together, taurine supplementation in regular diet could play a beneficial role in regulating diabetes and its associated complications in the heart. Highlights: ? Taurine controls blood glucose via protection of pancreatic ? cells in diabetic rat. ? Taurine controls blood glucose via increasing the insulin level in diabetic rat. ? Taurine improves cardiac AKT/GLUT4 signaling pathways in diabetic conditions. ? Taurine exerts antioxidant, antihyperlipidemic and antiinflammatory activities. ? It protects cardiac apoptosis by regulating Bcl2 family and caspase 9/3 proteins.

  1. Threshold of trichloroethylene contamination in maternal drinking waters affecting fetal heart development in the rat. Environ Health Perspect 111(3):289?292

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paula D. Johnson; Stanley J. Goldberg; Mary Z. Mays; Brenda V. Dawson

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Halogenated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) are among the most common water supply contaminants in the United States and abroad. Epidemiologic studies have found an association but not a cause-and-effect relation between halogenated hydrocarbon contamination and increased incidence of congenital cardiac malformations or other defective birth outcomes. Avian and rat studies demonstrated statistically significant increases in the number of congenital cardiac malformations in those treated with high doses of TCE, either via intrauterine pump or in maternal drinking water, compared with controls. This study attempts to determine if there is a threshold dose exposure to TCE above which the developing heart is more likely to be affected. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly placed in test groups and exposed to various concentrations of TCE (2.5 ppb, 250 ppb, 1.5 ppm, 1,100 ppm) in drinking water or distilled water (control group) throughout pregnancy. The percentage of abnormal hearts in the treated groups ranged from 0 to 10.48%, with controls having 2.1 % abnormal hearts, and the number of litters with fetuses with abnormal hearts ranged from 0 to 66.7%, and the control percentage was 16.4%. The data from this study indicate not only that there is a statistically significant probability overall of a dose response to increasing levels of TCE exposure, but also that this trend begins to manifest at relatively low levels of exposure (i.e., < 250 ppb). Maternal rats exposed to more than this level of TCE during pregnancy showed an associated increased incidence of cardiac malformations in their developing rat fetuses. Key words: cardiac malformations, cardiac teratogenicity, environmental contaminants, halogenated hydrocarbon, heart defects, heart development, TCE, trichloroethylene. Environ Health Perspect 111:289–292 (2003). doi:10.1289/ehp.5125 available via

  2. DETERMINATION OF AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THE DISPOSITION OF 2-BUTOXYETHANOL AND ITS METABOLITES IN MICE AND RATS TO IMPROVE PBPK MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Rick A.; Grant, Donna M.; Farris, Elizabeth; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Thrall, K D.; Poet, Torka S.

    2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    2-Butoxyethanol (BE) is the most widely used glycol ether solvent. BE's major metabolite, butoxyacetic acid (BAA), causes hemolysis with significant species differences in sensitivity. Several PBPK models have been developed over the past two decades to describe the disposition of BE and BAA in male rats and humans to refine health risk assessments. More recent efforts by Lee et al. (1998) to describe the kinetics of BE and BAA in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) chronic inhalation studies required the use of several assumptions to extrapolate model parameters from earlier PBPK models developed for young male rats to include female F344 and both sexes of B6C3F1 mice and the effects of aging. To replace these assumptions, studies were conducted to determine the impact of age, gender and species on the metabolism of BE, and the tissue partitioning, renal acid transport and plasma protein binding of BAA. In the current study, the Lee et al. PBPK model was updated and expanded to include the further metabolism of BAA and the salivary excretion of BE and BAA which may contribute to the forestomach irritation observed in mice in the NTP study. The revised model predicted that peak blood concentrations of BAA achieved following 6-hr inhalation exposures are greatest in young adult female rats at concentrations up to 300 ppm. This is not the case predicted for old (>18 months) animals, where peak blood concentrations of BAA in male and female mice were similar to or greater than female rats. The revised model serves as a quantitative tool for integrating an extensive pharmacokinetic and mechanistic database into a format that can readily be used to compare internal dosimetry across dose, route of exposure and species.

  3. Single voxel MR spectroscopy with echo times below 2 ms at 16.4 T in the rat brain: first in vivo results D. Z. Balla1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    results D. Z. Balla1 , S-T. Hong1 , G. Shajan1 , R. Pohmann1 , and K. Ugurbil1,2 1 High-Field MR Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Introduction In vivo 1H MR spectroscopySingle voxel MR spectroscopy with echo times below 2 ms at 16.4 T in the rat brain: first in vivo

  4. D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone protects diabetic rat kidney by ameliorating hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammatory cytokines via NF-?B and PKC signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Semantee [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Manna, Prasenjit [Division of Molecular Medicine, Bose Institute, P-1/12, CIT Scheme VII M, Kolkata-700054 (India); Gachhui, Ratan [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@bosemain.boseinst.ac.in [Division of Molecular Medicine, Bose Institute, P-1/12, CIT Scheme VII M, Kolkata-700054 (India)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and this can be attenuated by antioxidants. D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL) is known for its detoxifying and antioxidant properties. Our early investigation showed that DSL can ameliorate alloxan (ALX) induced diabetes mellitus and oxidative stress in rats by inhibiting pancreatic ?-cell apoptosis. In the present study we, therefore, investigated the protective role of DSL against renal injury in ALX induced diabetic rats. ALX exposure (at a dose of 120 mg/kg body weight, i. p., once) elevated the blood glucose level, serum markers related to renal injury, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries. Oral administration of DSL (80 mg/kg body weight) restored all these alterations close to normal. In addition, DSL could also normalize the aldose reductase activity which was found to increase in the diabetic rats. Investigating the mechanism of its protective activity, we observed the activation of different isoforms of PKC along with the accumulation of matrix proteins like collagen and fibronectin. The diabetic rats also showed nuclear translocation of NF-?B and increase in the concentration of inflammatory cytokines in the renal tissue. The activation of mitochondria dependent apoptotic pathway was observed in the diabetic rat kidneys. However, treatment of diabetic rats with DSL counteracted all these changes. These findings, for the first time, demonstrated that DSL could ameliorate renal dysfunction in diabetic rats by suppressing the oxidative stress related signalling pathways. - Highlights: ? Sustained hyperglycemia and oxidative stress lead to diabetic renal injury. ? D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone prevents renal damage in alloxan-induced diabetes. ? It restores intra-cellular antioxidant machineries and kidney apoptosis. ? DSL reduces hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress via NF-kB and PKC signaling. ? DSL may act as a beneficial agent in hyperglycemia induced renal disorder.

  5. Sonic hedgehog stimulates the proliferation of rat gastric mucosal cells through ERK activation by elevating intracellular calcium concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Ohnishi, Hirohide [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan)]. E-mail: hohnishi@jichi.ac.jp; Takano, Koji [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Noguti, Takasi [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Mashima, Hirosato [Department of Gastroenterology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Hoshino, Hiroko [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Kita, Hiroto [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Sato, Kiichi [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Matsui, Hirofumi [Division of Gastroenterology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8576 (Japan); Sugano, Kentaro [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan)

    2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a member of hedgehog peptides family, is expressed in gastric gland epithelium. To elucidate Shh function to gastric mucosal cells, we examined the effect of Shh on the proliferation of a rat normal gastric mucosal cell line, RGM-1. RGM-1 cells express essential components of Shh receptor system, patched-1, and smoothened. Shh enhanced DNA synthesis in RGM-1 cells and elevated intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). In addition, Shh as well as calcium ionophore A32187 rapidly activated ERK. However, Shh failed to activate ERK under calcium-free culture condition. Pretreatment of cells with PD98059 attenuated the DNA synthesis promoted by Shh. Moreover, when cells were pretreated with cyclopamine, Shh could not elevate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, activate ERK or promote DNA synthesis. On the other hand, although Shh induced Gli-1 nuclear accumulation in RGM-1 cells, Shh activated ERK even in cells pretreated with actinomycin D. These results indicate that Shh promotes the proliferation of RGM-1 cells through an intracellular calcium- and ERK-dependent but transcription-independent pathway via Patched/Smoothened receptor system.

  6. Modulation of rat testes lipid composition by hormones: Effect of PRL (prolactin) and hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebokova, E.; Wierzbicki, A.; Clandinin, M.T. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of prolactin (PRL) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration for 7 days on the composition and function of rat testicular plasma membrane was investigated. Refractory state in Leydig cells desensitized by hCG decreased the binding capacity for {sup 125}I-labeled hCG and also luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and testosterone production. In testicular membranes of hCG-treated animals, a depletion of cholesterol and an increase in total phospholipid content was observed after gonadotropin injection, thereby decreasing the cholesterol-to-phospholipid ratio. Injection of high doses of PRL had no effect on the binding capacity or affinity of the LH-hCG receptor but decreased the response of Leydig cells to LH in terms of cAMP and testosterone synthesis. PRL also increased total and esterified cholesterol and decreased free cholesterol and membrane phospholipid content. The fatty acid composition of testicular lipids was significantly and selectively influenced by both hormonal treatments. These observations suggest that metabolism of cholesterol and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in testicular tissue is affected by chorionic gonadotropin and PRL and may provide the mechanism for regulating steroidogenic functions.

  7. Beta-adrenergic modulation of the release of atrial natriuretic factor from rat cardiac atria in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Imada, T.; Takayanagi, B.; Inagami, T.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several stimulatory factors for the release of atrial natriuretic factor, such as atrial stretch, atrial pacing and vasopressin, have been reported. We studied the effects of the adrenergic nervous system on the release of ANF using an in vitro perfusion system. Right and left atria from Sprague-Dawley rats were quartered and perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution gassed with 95% CO/sub 2//5% O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C. Perfusate factions were collected every 2 minutes. Fractions were collected 20 minutes before and for 2 hours during the administration of test agents. ANF was measured by radioimmunoassay. Within 10 minutes of exposure to 10/sup -6/M isoproterenol, ANF secretion fell to less than 50% of its baseline level. However, beta agonists showed a stimulatory effect of 4-5 fold. Carbachol, in a concentration of 10/sup -2/M was used to demonstrate the viability of the atria exposed to isoproterenol, and produced a stimulation of ANF release of 4-6 times the basal level. The adrenergic nervous system can modulate ANF release in vitro. Further studies are being performed with selective beta agonists and antagonists to elucidate these results.

  8. Early postnatal maternal separation causes alterations in the expression of ?3-adrenergic receptor in rat adipose tissue suggesting long-term influence on obesity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miki, Takanori, E-mail: mikit@med.kagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)] [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan); Liu, Jun-Qian; Ohta, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Shingo [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)] [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan); Kusaka, Takashi [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)] [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan); Warita, Katsuhiko [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)] [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan); Yokoyama, Toshifumi [Department of Bioresource and Agrobiosciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University (Japan)] [Department of Bioresource and Agrobiosciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University (Japan); Jamal, Mostofa [Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)] [Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan); Ueki, Masaaki [Department of Anesthesia, Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital (Japan)] [Department of Anesthesia, Nishiwaki Municipal Hospital (Japan); Yakura, Tomiko; Tamai, Motoki [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)] [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan); Sumitani, Kazunori [Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)] [Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan); Hosomi, Naohisa [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Therapeutics, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Therapeutics, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (Japan); Takeuchi, Yoshiki [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)] [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University (Japan)

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •High-fat diet intake following maternal separation did not cause body weight gain. •However, levels of metabolism-related molecules in adipose tissue were altered. •Increased levels of prohibitin mRNA in white fat were observed. •Attenuated levels of ?3-adrenergic receptor mRNA were observed in brown fat. •Such alterations in adipose tissue may contribute to obesity later in life. -- Abstract: The effects of early postnatal maternal deprivation on the biological characteristics of the adipose tissue later in life were investigated in the present study. Sprague–Dawley rats were classified as either maternal deprivation (MD) or mother-reared control (MRC) groups. MD was achieved by separating the rat pups from their mothers for 3 h each day during the 10–15 postnatal days. mRNA levels of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1), ?3-adrenergic receptor (?3-AR), and prohibitin (PHB) in the brown and white adipose tissue were determined using real-time RT-PCR analysis. UCP-1, which is mediated through ?3-AR, is closely involved in the energy metabolism and expenditure. PHB is highly expressed in the proliferating tissues/cells. At 10 weeks of age, the body weight of the MRC and MD rats was similar. However, the levels of the key molecules in the adipose tissue were substantially altered. There was a significant increase in the expression of PHB mRNA in the white adipose tissue, while the ?3-AR mRNA expression decreased significantly, and the UCP-1 mRNA expression remained unchanged in the brown adipose tissue. Given that these molecules influence the mitochondrial metabolism, our study indicates that early postnatal maternal deprivation can influence the fate of adipose tissue proliferation, presumably leading to obesity later in life.

  9. Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DAN damage in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies. - Highlights: • DPAA, an environmental neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis in rats. • DPAA is an activator of AhR signaling pathway. • DPAA promoted oxidative DNA damage in rat livers. • AhR target gene CYP 1B1 might be involved in the metabolism of DPAA.

  10. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera: I. clinical features, hematology, histology, and immunopathology in long-term chimeras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The clinical features, pathology, and immunopathology of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developing in the long-term rat radiation chimera are described. At 6 to 12 months post-transplant, the previously stable ACI/LEW chimeras developed patchy to diffuse severe hair loss and thickened skin folds, and had microscopic features resembling scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis. Skin histology showed dermal inflammation and acanthosis with atrophy of the appendages, with progression to dermal sclerosis. The liver revealed chronic hepatitis with bile duct injury and proliferation and periportal piecemeal necrosis. The tongue had considerable submucosal inflammation, muscular necrosis, and atrophy and arteritis. The serous salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and bronchi had lymphocytic inflammation and injury to duct, acinar, and mucosal columnar epithelium. The thymus had lymphocyte depletion of the medulla with prominent epithelium. The spleen and lymph nodes had poorly developed germinal centers but increased numbers of plasma cells. IgM was observed along the basement membrane and around the basal cells of the skin and tongue and along the basement membrane of the bile ducts. IgM was present also in the arteries of the tongue. Immunoglobulins eluted from the skin, cross-reacted with the bile duct epithelium and usually with both ACI and Lewis skin. Increased titers of speckled antinuclear antibodies were present in the serum of rats with chronic (GVHD). Chronic GVHD in the long-term rat radiation chimera is very similar to human chronic GVHD and is a potentially excellent model for autoimmune disorders including scleroderma, Sjorgren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis.

  11. o-p?-DDT-mediated uterotrophy and gene expression in immature C57BL/6 mice and Sprague–Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwekel, Joshua C.; Forgacs, Agnes L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Williams, Kurt J. [Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Zacharewski, Timothy R., E-mail: tzachare@msu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(2-chlorophenyl-4-chlorophenyl)ethane (o,p?-DDT) is an organochlorine pesticide and endocrine disruptor known to activate the estrogen receptor. Comprehensive ligand- and species-comparative dose- and time-dependent studies were conducted to systematically assess the uterine physiological, morphological and gene expression responses elicited by o,p?-DDT and ethynyl estradiol (EE) in immature ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice and Sprague–Dawley rats. Custom cDNA microarrays were used to identify conserved and divergent differential gene expression responses. A total of 1256 genes were differentially expressed by both ligands in both species, 559 of which exhibited similar temporal expression profiles suggesting that o,p?-DDT elicits estrogenic effects at high doses when compared to EE. However, 51 genes exhibited species-specific uterine expression elicited by o,p?-DDT. For example, carbonic anhydrase 2 exhibited species- and ligand-divergent expression as confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. The identification of comparable temporal phenotypic responses linked to gene expression demonstrates that systematic comparative gene expression assessments are valuable for elucidating conserved and divergent estrogen signaling mechanisms in rodent uterotrophy. - Highlights: • o,p?-DDT and enthynyl estradiol (EE) both elicit uterotrophy in mice and rats. • o,p?-DDT and EE have different kinetics in uterine wet weight induction. • o,p?-DDT elicited stromal hypertrophy in rats but myometrial hypertrophy in mice. • 1256 genes were differentially expressed by both ligands in both species. • Only 51 genes had species-specific uterine expression.

  12. Phycocyanobilin promotes PC12 cell survival and modulates immune and inflammatory genes and oxidative stress markers in acute cerebral hypoperfusion in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marín-Prida, Javier [Centre for Research and Biological Evaluations (CEIEB), Institute of Pharmacy and Food, University of Havana, Ave. 23 e/ 214 y 222, La Lisa, PO Box: 430, Havana (Cuba); Pavón-Fuentes, Nancy [International Centre for Neurological Restoration (CIREN), Ave. 25 e/ 158 y 160, Playa, PO Box: 11300, Havana (Cuba); Llópiz-Arzuaga, Alexey; Fernández-Massó, Julio R. [Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Ave. 31 e/158 y 190, Playa, PO Box: 6162, Havana (Cuba); Delgado-Roche, Liván [Centre for Research and Biological Evaluations (CEIEB), Institute of Pharmacy and Food, University of Havana, Ave. 23 e/ 214 y 222, La Lisa, PO Box: 430, Havana (Cuba); Mendoza-Marí, Yssel; Santana, Seydi Pedroso; Cruz-Ramírez, Alieski; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen; Nazábal-Gálvez, Marcelo; Cintado-Benítez, Alberto [Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Ave. 31 e/158 y 190, Playa, PO Box: 6162, Havana (Cuba); Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L. [Centre for Research and Biological Evaluations (CEIEB), Institute of Pharmacy and Food, University of Havana, Ave. 23 e/ 214 y 222, La Lisa, PO Box: 430, Havana (Cuba); Polentarutti, Nadia [Istituto Clinico Humanitas (IRCCS), Rozzano (Italy); Riva, Federica [Department of Veterinary Science and Public Health (DIVET), University of Milano (Italy); Pentón-Arias, Eduardo [Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Ave. 31 e/158 y 190, Playa, PO Box: 6162, Havana (Cuba); Pentón-Rol, Giselle [Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Ave. 31 e/158 y 190, Playa, PO Box: 6162, Havana (Cuba)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the inflammatory response and oxidative stress are involved in the stroke cascade, we evaluated here the effects of Phycocyanobilin (PCB, the C-Phycocyanin linked tetrapyrrole) on PC12 cell survival, the gene expression and the oxidative status of hypoperfused rat brain. After the permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAo), the animals were treated with saline or PCB, taking samples 24 h post-surgery. Global gene expression was analyzed with GeneChip Rat Gene ST 1.1 from Affymetrix; the expression of particular genes was assessed by the Fast SYBR Green RT-PCR Master Mix and Bioplex methods; and redox markers (MDA, PP, CAT, SOD) were evaluated spectrophotometrically. The PCB treatment prevented the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glutamate induced PC12 cell injury assessed by the MTT assay, and modulated 190 genes (93 up- and 97 down-regulated) associated to several immunological and inflammatory processes in BCCAo rats. Furthermore, PCB positively modulated 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment and counteracted the oxidative imbalance in the treated BCCAo animals. Our results support the view of an effective influence of PCB on major inflammatory mediators in acute cerebral hypoperfusion. These results suggest that PCB has a potential to be a treatment for ischemic stroke for which further studies are needed. - Highlights: • Phycocyanobilin (PCB) prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glutamate induced PC12 cell viability loss. • Anterior cortex and striatum are highly vulnerable to cerebral hypoperfusion (CH). • PCB modulates 190 genes associated to inflammation in acute CH. • PCB regulates 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment. • PCB restores redox and immune balances showing promise as potential stroke therapy.

  13. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Hamenth Kumar, Palani; Syed Mohamed Puhari, Shanavas; Senthil Murugan, Ponniah; Vasudevan, Varadaraj [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India)] [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India); Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam, E-mail: drselvamgsbiochem@rediffmail.com [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg{sup -1} body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-{kappa}B. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic and control rats. Under these findings, we suggest that targeting of eNOS and Nrf2 signaling by L-arginine supplementation could be used as a potential treatment method to alleviate the late diabetic complications.

  14. The use of labeled leucine in establishing the time of allanto-chorionic fusion in the female albino rat with reference to implantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, James Edward

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE USE OF LABELED LEUCINE IN ESTABLISHING THE TIME OF ALLANTO-CHORIONIC FUSION IN THE FEMALE ALBINO RA T WIT H RE FERE NC E T 0 IM PLANTA T I ON A Thesis By JAMES EDWARD RUTLEDGE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASSAM... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1966 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction THE USE OF LABELED LEUCINE IN ESTABLISHING THE TIME OF ALLANTO- CHORIONIC FUSION IN THE FEMALE ALBINO RAT...

  15. The bulking effect of dietary fiber in the rat large intestine: an in vivo study of cellulose, guar, pectin, wheat bran and oat bran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Jeanne Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE BULKING EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER IN THE RAT LARGE INTESTINE: AN IN VIVO STUDY OF CELLULOSE, GUAR, PECTIN, WHEAT BRAN AND OAT BRAN A Thesis by JEANNE MARIE GAZZANIGA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... JEANNE MARIE GAZZANIGA Approved as to style and content by: o~P L sc J nne R. Lupton (Chair of Committee) Karen S. Kubena (Member) ayne Suter (Member) G. C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1985 ABSTRACT The Bulking Effect of Dietary Fiber...

  16. DDT (2,2,bis(p-chlorophenyl) 1,1,1-trichloroethane) induced structural changes in adrenal glands of rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, A.R.; Gautam, A.K.; Venkatakrishna-Bhatt, H. (National Institute of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad (India))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oldest chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide, DDT was used widely to control pest and vector borne diseases in developing countries. Malaria and vector borne diseases can be econometrically controlled by DDT. Chronic and acute exposures to DDT result in systemic disorders in human as well as this confirmed in animals. Experimental study revealed that DDT caused the structural and functional changes in thyroid and reproductive system. The effects of DDT on adrenal glands are not well documented. Therefore this experimental investigation was undertaken to evaluate the histomorphological changes of adrenal gland after the treatment with DDT in rats.

  17. Synergistic acceleration of thyroid hormone degradation by phenobarbital and the PPAR{alpha} agonist WY14643 in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wieneke, N.; Neuschaefer-Rube, F. [University of Potsdam, Institute of Nutrition Science, Biochemistry of Nutrition, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, D14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Bode, L.M. [University of Potsdam, Institute of Nutrition Science, Food Chemistry, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, D14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Kuna, M. [University of Potsdam, Institute of Nutrition Science, Biochemistry of Nutrition, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, D14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Andres, J. [Charite - Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Carnevali, L.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Biologia Celular e Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hirsch-Ernst, K.I. [Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Institute of Pharmakology and Toxikology, Molekular Pharmakology, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Pueschel, G.P. [University of Potsdam, Institute of Nutrition Science, Biochemistry of Nutrition, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, D14558 Nuthetal (Germany)], E-mail: gpuesche@uni-potsdam.de

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy balance is maintained by controlling both energy intake and energy expenditure. Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in regulating energy expenditure. Their levels are adjusted by a tight feedback-controlled regulation of thyroid hormone production/incretion and by their hepatic metabolism. Thyroid hormone degradation has previously been shown to be enhanced by treatment with phenobarbital or other antiepileptic drugs due to a CAR-dependent induction of phase II enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism. We have recently shown, that PPAR{alpha} agonists synergize with phenobarbital to induce another prototypical CAR target gene, CYP2B1. Therefore, it was tested whether a PPAR{alpha} agonist could enhance the phenobarbital-dependent acceleration of thyroid hormone elimination. In primary cultures of rat hepatocytes the apparent half-life of T3 was reduced after induction with a combination of phenobarbital and the PPAR{alpha} agonist WY14643 to a larger extent than after induction with either compound alone. The synergistic reduction of the half-life could be attributed to a synergistic induction of CAR and the CAR target genes that code for enzymes and transporters involved in the hepatic elimination of T3, such as OATP1A1, OATP1A3, UGT1A3 and UGT1A10. The PPAR{alpha}-dependent CAR induction and the subsequent induction of T3-eliminating enzymes might be of physiological significance for the fasting-induced reduction in energy expenditure by fatty acids as natural PPAR{alpha} ligands. The synergism of the PPAR{alpha} agonist WY14643 and phenobarbital in inducing thyroid hormone breakdown might serve as a paradigm for the synergistic disruption of endocrine control by other combinations of xenobiotics.

  18. Quantified regional and laminar distribution of the noradrenaline innervation in the anterior half of the adult rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Audet, M.A.; Doucet, G.; Oleskevich, S.; Descarries, L.

    1988-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The regional and laminar distribution of the noradrenaline (NA) innervation in the adult rat cerebral cortex was quantified in radioautographs of semithin sections from whole hemisphere slices incubated with tritiated catecholamines and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. Uptake-labeled axonal varicosities (aggregates of silver grains) were counted with the help of a computerized image analyzer in seven cytoarchitectonic areas of the rostral half of the cortex: Cg3, rostral AID, Cg2, Fr1, Par1, caudal AID, and Pir (prepiriform) according to Zilles's nomenclature. Both dopamine (DA) and NA terminals were detected after incubation with (3H)DA and citalopram or with (3H)NA alone. In the presence of desipramine (DMI), DA terminals alone were demonstrated; the number of NA terminals was then obtained by subtraction from counts in adjacent slices incubated with or without DMI. These counts suggested that DA and NA varicosities were fully visualized only after labeling with their respective tritiated amine. Similar numbers of labeled NA varicosities as inferred after (3H)NA incubation with or without DMI were observed after (3H)NA incubation in the presence of benztropine (BZ). This indicated that NA terminals were then maximally detected to the exclusion of the DA ones, and the latter approach was adopted for the acquisition of normative data. Since the average diameter of the labeled NA varicosities was known from earlier measurements in electron microscope radioautographs, the initial counts of labeled sites/mm2 of histological section could be expressed as numbers of varicosities/mm3 of tissue following a double correction for incomplete detection at the chosen duration of radioautographic exposure and section thickness.

  19. The potential reproductive, neurobehavioral and systemic effects of soluble sodium tungstate exposure in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInturf, S.M. [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Bekkedal, M.Y.V. [Two Steps Forward, LLC, Sun Prairie, WI (United States); Wilfong, E. [U.S. Naval Academy, 572M Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD (United States); Arfsten, D. [Navy Drug Screening Laboratory P.O. Box 113, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, FL (United States); Chapman, G. [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Gunasekar, P.G., E-mail: palur.gunasekar@wpafb.af.mil [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The debate on tungsten (W) is fostered by its continuous usage in military munitions. Reports demonstrate W solubilizes in soil and can migrate into drinking water supplies and, therefore, is a potential health risk to humans. This study evaluated the reproductive, systemic and neurobehavioral effects of sodium tungstate (NaW) in rats following 70 days of daily pre-and postnatal exposure via oral gavage to 5, 62.5 and 125 mg/kg/day of NaW through mating, gestation and weaning (PND 0-20). Daily administration of NaW produced no overt evidence of toxicity and had no apparent effect on mating success or offspring physical development. Distress vocalizations were elevated in F{sub 1} offspring from the high dose group, whereas righting reflex showed unexpected sex differences where males demonstrated faster righting than females; however, the effects were not dose-dependent. Locomotor activity was affected in both low and high-dose groups of F{sub 1} females. Low-dose group showed increased distance traveled, more time in ambulatory movements and less time in stereotypic behavior than controls or high dose animals. The high-dose group had more time in stereotypical movements than controls, and less time resting than controls and the lowest exposure group. Maternal retrieval was not affected by NaW exposure. Tungsten analysis showed a systemic distribution of NaW in both parents and offspring, with preferential uptake within the immune organs, including the femur, spleen and thymus. Histopathological evidence suggested no severe chronic injury or loss of function in these organs. However, the heart showed histological lesions, histiocytic inflammation from minimal to mild with cardiomyocyte degeneration and necrosis in several P{sub 0} animals of 125 mg NaW dose group. The result of this study suggests that pre and postnatal exposure to NaW may produce subtle neurobehavioral effects in offspring related to motor activity and emotionality.

  20. Nicotine dose-concentration relationship and pregnancy outcomes in rat: Biologic plausibility and implications for future research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Jabeen [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Farkas, Svetlana [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); MacKinnon, Yolanda [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Ariano, Robert E. [Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Sitar, Daniel S. [Departments of Internal Medicine and, Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Hasan, Shabih U. [Department of Pediatrics, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada)]. E-mail: hasans@ucalgary.ca

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure during pregnancy can lead to profound adverse effects on fetal development. Although CS contains several thousand chemicals, nicotine has been widely used as its surrogate as well as in its own right as a neuroteratogen. The justification for the route and dose of nicotine administration is largely based on inferential data suggesting that nicotine 6 mg/kg/day infused continuously via osmotic mini pumps (OMP) would mimic maternal CS exposure. We provide evidence that 6 mg/kg/day nicotine dose as commonly administered to pregnant rats leads to plasma nicotine concentrations that are 3-10-fold higher than those observed in moderate to heavy smokers and pregnant mothers, respectively. Furthermore, the cumulative daily nicotine dose exceeds by several hundred fold the amount consumed by human heavy smokers. Our study does not support the widely accepted notion that regardless of the nicotine dose, a linear nicotine dose-concentration relationship exists in a steady-state OMP model. We also show that total nicotine clearance increases with advancing pregnancy but no significant change is observed between the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Furthermore, nicotine infusion even at this extremely high dose has little effect on a number of maternal and fetal biologic variables and pregnancy outcome suggesting that CS constituents other than nicotine mediate the fetal growth restriction in infants born to smoking mothers. Our current study has major implications for translational research in developmental toxicology and pharmacotherapy using nicotine replacement treatment as an aid to cessation of cigarette smoking in pregnant mothers.