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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CO{sub 2} mitigation potential of efficient demand-side technologies: The case of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses the techno-economic potential of selected demand-side efficient appliances to mitigate CO{sub 2} emission from the power sector in Thailand under national, consumer, and utility perspectives. A key finding of this study is that about 5.5--7% of the total annual CO{sub 2} emission from the electricity sector of the country can be reduced during 1996--2011 from the national perspective.

Shrestha, R.M.; Biswas, W.K.; Timilsina, G.R. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Pathumthani (Thailand). Energy Program; Khummongkol, P.; Sinbanchongjit, S. [King Mongkut`s Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A tale of two houses: the human dimension of demand response enabling technology from a case study of an adaptive wireless thermostat.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ed Arens. 2008. Demand Response-Enabled ResidentialEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006.The Human Dimension of Demand Response Enabling Technology

Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A; Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

4

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

networks_in_the_home_the_new_growth_market.htm [12] NationalHome Network Technologies and Automating Demand Responsethe University of California. Home Network Technologies and

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings...

6

Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are numerous programs sponsored by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and utility or state efficiency programs that have an objective of reducing peak demand. Most of these programs have targeted the residential and commercial sector, however, there are also huge opportunities for demand response in the industrial sector. This paper describes some of the demand response initiatives that are currently active in New York State, explaining applicability of industrial facilities. Next, we discuss demand response-enabling technologies, which can help an industrial plant effectively address demand response needs. Finally, the paper is concluded with a discussion of case study projects that illustrate application of some of these demand response enabling technologies for process operations. These case studies, illustrating some key projects from the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction program, will describe the technologies and approaches deployed to achieve the demand reduction at the site, the quantitative impact of the project, and a discussion of the overall successes at each site.

Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Transmaterialization: technology and materials demand cycles  

SciTech Connect

Recently concern has risen worldwide regarding the issue of declining materials demand which has been termed dematerialization. A summary of the issues involved appears in the proceedings of the recent conference on metals demand published in Materials and Society (1986). Dematerialization refers to the constant decline in use of materials as a percentage of total production. Dematerialization implies a structural change in an economy, indicating a reduced demand for materials and, therefore, a decline in overall industrial growth. This paper proposes that, instead of dematerialization in the US material markets, the demand change that has been occurring can be more aptly described as transmaterialization. Transmaterialization implies a recurring industrial transformation in the way that economic societies use materials, a process that has occurred regularly or cyclically throughout history. Instead of a once and for all structural change as implied by dematerialization, transmaterialization suggests that minerals demand experiences phases in which old, lower-quality materials linked to mature industries undergo replacement periodically by higher-quality or technologically-more-appropriate materials. The latter, as of recent, tend to be lighter materials with more robust technical properties than those being replaced.

Waddell, L.M.; Labys, W.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in...

9

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

freed from this communications technology constraint. Homeinvestigating several communications technologies capable ofdedicated-wire communications technologies as impractical

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Role of Enabling Technologies in Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a study of the technologies that are crucial to the success of demand response programs. It takes a look at the historical development of demand response programs and analyzes how new technology is needed to enable demand response to make the transition from a small scale pilot operation to a mass market means of improving grid reliability. Additionally, the report discusses the key technologies needed to enable a large scale demand response effort and evaluates current efforts to develop and integrate these technologies. Finally, the report provides profiles of leading developers of these key technologies.

NONE

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)...

12

Demand responsive public transportation using wireless technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution has been the bane of society for which we still have not got a satisfying solution. The air pollution due to automobiles constitutes around 60--90% of the total air pollution in the urban area. To curtail this, the mass transportation, ... Keywords: Djiktra's algorithm, on-demand public transportation, routing algorithms, wireless client-server backbone

S. Prashanth; Sp Geetha; Ga Shanmugha Sundaram

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Demonstration of Demand Control Ventilation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Control Ventilation (DCV) is one of the control strategies that can be used modulate the amount of ventilation air for space conditioning in commercial buildings. DCV modulates the amount of ventilation air introduced into the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system based on carbon dioxide levels sensed in the areas served. The carbon dioxide level is a proxy for the number of people within the space, from which the required quantity of ventilation air is determined. By using this ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Title Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-50626 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Herter, Karen, Roger Levy, John Wilson, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Conference Name 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

16

Technology fluidity and on-demand webcasting adoption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Internet, a truly ''on-demand'' medium and not bound by geographic location, is a natural sphere for local broadcasters to obtain further branding advantages and additional advertising revenues by providing entertainment, infotainment and shopping ... Keywords: Gratification expectation, Media substitution, On-Demand media, Pointcasting, Technology fluidity, Webcasting

Carolyn A. Lin

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Title Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5763E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Venkata Ganti, Nance Matson, and Mary Ann Piette Publisher PG&E/SDG&E/CEC/LBNL Keywords communication and standards, control systems, data centers, demand response, enabling technologies, end-use technologies, load migration, market sectors, technologies Abstract The energy use in data centers is increasing and, in particular, impacting the data center energy cost and electric grid reliability during peak and high price periods. As per the 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company territory, data centers are estimated to consume 500 megawatts of annual peak electricity. The 2011 data confirm the increase in data center energy use, although it is slightly lower than the EPA forecast. Previous studies have suggested that data centers have significant potential to integrate with supply-side programs to reduce peak loads. In collaboration with California data centers, utilities, and technology vendors, this study conducted field tests to improve the understanding of the demand response opportunities in data centers. The study evaluated an initial set of control and load migration strategies and economic feasibility for four data centers. The findings show that with minimal or no impact to data center operations a demand savings of 25% at the data center level or 10% to 12% at the whole building level can be achieved with strategies for cooling and IT equipment, and load migration. These findings should accelerate the grid-responsiveness of data centers through technology development, integration with the demand response programs, and provide operational cost savings.

19

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

20

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Demonstration in New York City Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Title Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6470E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, Sila Kiliccote, and Rongxin Yin Date Published 09/2013 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Abstract Demand response (DR) - allowing customers to respond to reliability requests and market prices by changing electricity use from their normal consumption pattern - continues to be seen as an attractive means of demand-side management and a fundamental smart-grid improvement that links supply and demand. Since October 2011, the Demand Response Research Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority have conducted a demonstration project enabling Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings located in New York City using Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) communication protocols. In particular, this project focuses on demonstrating how OpenADR can automate and simplify interactions between buildings and various stakeholders in New York State including the independent system operator, utilities, retail energy providers, and curtailment service providers. In this paper, we present methods to automate control strategies via building management systems to provide event-driven demand response, price response and demand management based on OpenADR signals. We also present cost control opportunities under day-ahead hourly pricing for large customers and Auto-DR control strategies developed for demonstration buildings. Lastly, we discuss the communication architecture and Auto-DR system designed for the demonstration project to automate price response and DR participation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4982E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Page, Janie, Sila Kiliccote, Junqiao Han Dudley, Mary Ann Piette, Albert K. Chiu, Bashar Kellow, Edward Koch, and Paul Lipkin Date Published 07/2011 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, emerging technologies, market sectors, medium commercial business, openadr, small commercial, small commercial business, technologies Abstract Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

22

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

23

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Peak Demand Baselinewinter morning electric peak demand in commercial buildings.California to reduce peak demand during summer afternoons,

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Impact of selected energy conservation technologies on baseline demands  

SciTech Connect

This study is an application of the modeling and demand projection capability existing at Brookhaven National Laboratory to specific options in energy conservation. Baseline energy demands are modified by introducing successively three sets of conservation options. The implementation of improved building standards and the use of co-generation in industry are analyzed in detail and constitute the body of this report. Two further sets of energy demands are presented that complete the view of a low energy use, ''conservation'' scenario. An introduction to the report covers the complexities in evaluating ''conservation'' in view of the ways it is inextricably linked to technology, prices, policy, and the mix of output in the economy. The term as used in this report is narrowly defined, and methodologies are suggested by which these other aspects listed can be studied in the future.

Doernberg, A

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliability signals for demand response GTA HTTPS HVAC IT kWand Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems. ”and Techniques for Demand Response. California Energy

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Average, minimum, and maximum demand reduction at eachshow the minimum and maximum demand reduction during the7. Average, minimum, and maximum demand reduction at each

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies andStrategies in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak electric demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial buildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. The main objectives of the study were: (1) To evaluate the size of contributions of peak demand commercial buildings in the U.S.; (2) To understand how commercial building control systems support energy efficiency and DR; and (3) To disseminate the results to the building owners, facility managers and building controls industry. In order to estimate the commercial buildings contribution to peak demand, two sources of data are used: (1) Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). These two sources indicate that commercial buildings noncoincidental peak demand is about 330GW. The project then focused on technologies and strategies that deliver energy efficiency and also target 5-10% of this peak. Based on a building operations perspective, a demand-side management framework with three main features: (1) daily energy efficiency, (2) daily peak load management and (3) dynamic, event-driven DR are outlined. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide DR potential in commercial buildings are presented. Case studies involving these technologies and strategies are described. The findings of this project are shared with building owners, building controls industry, researchers and government entities through a webcast and their input is requested. Their input is presented in the appendix section of this report.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial Buildings” Center for Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), IEA/OECD Analyses

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as 15-minute minimum and maximum demand values are provided.8. Hourly average and maximum demand savings of McKinstry on9. Hourly average and maximum demand savings of McKinstry on

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

if the customer’s maximum demand has exceeded 999 kilowattswhose meter indicates a maximum demand of 200 kW or greater2) the customer's maximum billing demand has exceeded 499

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the use of OpenADR communications specification, related data models, technologies, and strategies to send dynamic prices (e.g., real time prices and peak prices) and Time of Use (TOU) rates to commercial and industrial electricity customers. OpenADR v1.0 is a Web services-based flexible, open information model that has been used in California utilities' commercial automated demand response programs since 2007. We find that data models can be used to send real time prices. These same data models can also be used to support peak pricing and TOU rates. We present a data model that can accommodate all three types of rates. For demonstration purposes, the data models were generated from California Independent System Operator's real-time wholesale market prices, and a California utility's dynamic prices and TOU rates. Customers can respond to dynamic prices by either using the actual prices, or prices can be mapped into"operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different methods for mapping actual prices. Some of these methods were implemented in demonstration projects. The study results demonstrate show that OpenADR allows interoperability with existing/future systems/technologies and can be used within related dynamic pricing activities within Smart Grid.

Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

summer peak demand, with hydro power and wind integration,of its hydro system, continued load growth, wind power

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) performed a technology demonstration and evaluation for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in Seattle City Light's (SCL) service territory. This report summarizes the process and results of deploying open automated demand response (OpenADR) in Seattle area with winter morning peaking commercial buildings. The field tests were designed to evaluate the feasibility of deploying fully automated demand response (DR) in four to six sites in the winter and the savings from various building systems. The project started in November of 2008 and lasted 6 months. The methodology for the study included site recruitment, control strategy development, automation system deployment and enhancements, and evaluation of sites participation in DR test events. LBNL subcontracted McKinstry and Akuacom for this project. McKinstry assisted with recruitment, site survey collection, strategy development and overall participant and control vendor management. Akuacom established a new server and enhanced its operations to allow for scheduling winter morning day-of and day-ahead events. Each site signed a Memorandum of Agreement with SCL. SCL offered each site $3,000 for agreeing to participate in the study and an additional $1,000 for each event they participated. Each facility and their control vendor worked with LBNL and McKinstry to select and implement control strategies for DR and developed their automation based on the existing Internet connectivity and building control system. Once the DR strategies were programmed, McKinstry commissioned them before actual test events. McKinstry worked with LBNL to identify control points that can be archived at each facility. For each site LBNL collected meter data and trend logs from the energy management and control system. The communication system allowed the sites to receive day-ahead as well as day-of DR test event signals. Measurement of DR was conducted using three different baseline models for estimation peak load reductions. One was three-in-ten baseline, which is based on the site electricity consumption from 7 am to 10 am for the three days with the highest consumption of the previous ten business days. The second model, the LBNL outside air temperature (OAT) regression baseline model, is based on OAT data and site electricity consumption from the previous ten days, adjusted using weather regressions from the fifteen-minute electric load data during each DR test event for each site. A third baseline that simply averages the available load data was used for sites less with less than 10 days of historical meter data. The evaluation also included surveying sites regarding any problems or issues that arose during the DR test events. Question covered occupant comfort, control issues and other potential problems.

Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Abstract--Smart Grid technology appears necessary to succeed in activating the demand through demand side management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Abstract--Smart Grid technology appears necessary to succeed in activating the demand through recommendations regarding the instruments that should be implemented to maximize the benefits of smart grids by the European Union. The development of smart grids (SG) is a possible solution for achieving these goals [1

39

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

SciTech Connect

Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

Demand Response Program Design and Implementation Case Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delurey, Dan, and J. Schwartz Date Published 022013 Keywords demand response research, demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comes to Demand Response is FERC is own Worst Enemy? ” The2009. Report No. 1018895. FERC. 2009. A National AssessmentLast accessed: 6/22/10. FERC. 2010. National Action Plan on

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oasis. Last accessed: Con Edison. 2010. “Demand Response/is Southern California Edison’s real-time pricing tariff. 2.and Southern California Edison’s Critical Peak Pricing

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

profile (Figure 10), the load profile over the test day isbelow as well as the load profile of the aggregate demandbelow as well as the load profile of the aggregate demand

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Discussion Paper Prepared for: Deploying Demand Side Energy Technologies workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The IEA study Energy Technology Perspectives 2006 (ETP 2006) demonstrates how energy technologies can contribute to a stabilization of CO2 emissions at today’s level by 2050. The results of the scenario analysis showed that no fundamental technology breakthroughs are needed. Technologies that are available today or that are under development today will

Cecilia Tam; Dolf Gielen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are often quickly and poorlycrafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisissubsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared whenthe next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate theevent-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demandresponsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such,demand response can be required as a condition of service, and theoffering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities asan element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore thecosts and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response systemcapable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operatorcontrolled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customercontrolled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Anydemand response program based on this system could consist of either orboth of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled,providing automatic load management through customer-programmed priceresponse, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability inCalifornia. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers toimplementation of such a program in California.

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

Envelope & Lighting Technologies to Reduce Electric Demand in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of light shelf reflectors. Deploying Integrated Systems Realizing the full energy-saving potential of envelope and lighting technologies for commercial buildings means...

48

New coal plant technologies will demand more water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population shifts, growing electricity demand, and greater competition for water resources have heightened interest in the link between energy and water. The US Energy Information Administration projects a 22% increase in US installed generating capacity by 2030. Of the 259 GE of new capacity expected to have come on-line by then, more than 192 GW will be thermoelectric and thus require some water for cooling. Our challenge will become balancing people's needs for power and for water. 1 ref., 7 figs.

Peltier, R.; Shuster, E.; McNemar, A.; Stiegel, G.J.; Murphy, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

50

Buildings sector demand-side efficiency technology summaries  

SciTech Connect

This report provides descriptions of the following energy efficiency technologies: energy management systems; electronic fluorescent ballasts; compact fluorescent lamps; lighting controls; room air conditioners; high albedo materials, coatings and paints; solar domestic water heaters; heat pump water heaters; energy-efficient motors; adjustable-speed drives; energy-efficient refrigerators; daylight control glazing; insulating glazing; solar control glazing; switchable glazing; tree planting; and advanced insulation. For each technology, the report provides a description of performance characteristics, consumer utility, development status, technology standards, equipment cost, installation, maintenance, conservation programs, and environmental impacts.

Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; Schuman, J. [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has launched the Zero-Net-Energy (ZNE) Commercial Building Initiative (CBI) in order to develop commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge energy-efficient technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. We examine how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or carbon-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies, such as photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive / demand-response technologies. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function: the minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and carbon / CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the CBI. Using a nursing home in northern California and New York with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNE building requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve ZNE. For comparison, we analyze a nursing home facility in New York to examine the effects of a flatter tariff structure and different load profiles. It has trouble reaching ZNE status and its load reductions as well as efficiency measures need to be more effective than those in the CA case. Finally, we illustrate that the multi-criteria frontier that considers costs and carbon emissions in the presence of demand response dominates the one without it.

Stadler , Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; ,, Hirohisa Aki; Lai, Judy

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

Demand Response-Ready Technology Capabilities: A Summary of Multi-Stakeholder Workshop and Survey Perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes technology capabilities that support more automated and ubiquitous demand response. It begins by describing the Demand Response-Ready (DR-Ready) concept and related industry activities that support realization of the concept. In the DR-Ready vision, consumers receive DR-Ready end-use products at the point of purchase, thus eliminating the need for utility truck service visits to retrofit equipment and significantly reducing the cost of deploying DR-enabling technologies. ...

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Does RTP Deliver Demand Response?: Case Studies of Niagara Mohawk RTP and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ educational 40% 46% Average monthly maximum demand 3.0 MW 3.4 MW Option 2 9% 18% The survey response rateDoes RTP Deliver Demand Response?: Case Studies of Niagara Mohawk RTP and ~43 Voluntary Utility RTP Programs Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Mid-Atlantic Demand Response Initiative

54

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Program on Technology Innovation: Tracking the Demand for Electricity from Grid Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help address the many challenges facing the electric power industry in the next 20 years, an effective process of technology research and development (R&D) planning is needed. Based on input from a broad range of stakeholders and using a proven scenario planning process, this report represents an attempt to monitor one of three key drivers, namely, the demand for electricity from grid services, which may impact the industry in the future. Collectively, these drivers form the basis of a ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: drrc.lbl.gov/sites/drrc.lbl.gov/files/lbnl-2743e.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/successful-case-study-small-business- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report presents the results of a pilot study of 78 small commercial customers in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District. Participants were given a participation incentive and provided with both help in implementing energy efficiency measures for their buildings and an array of energy

57

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. “Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”.also provided through the Demand Response Research Center (of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006. fromEngaging our Customers in Demand Response. Retrieved OctoberAdvanced Metering and Demand Response in Electricity

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and  Advanced Metering:  Development for Demand Response  Calculation ? Findings and Energy  Efficiency and  Demand Response with Communicating 

Page, Janie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” In2010. “Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand Forecasts–Final Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to Peak Demand?..5 3.potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildingsbuildings’ contribution to peak demand and the use of energy

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specifications (OpenADR) data model capable of communicating real-time prices to electricity customers. We also show how the same data model could be used to for other types of dynamic pricing tariffs (including peak pricing tariffs, which are common throughout the United States). Customers participating in automated demand response programs with building control systems can respond to dynamic prices by using the actual prices as inputs to their control systems. Alternatively, prices can be mapped into"building operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different strategies customers could use to map prices to operation modes. Our results show that OpenADR can be used to communicate dynamic pricing within the Smart Grid and that OpenADR allows for interoperability with existing and future systems, technologies, and electricity markets.

Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

66

6.25 KHZ -MAXIMUM SPECTRUM EFFICIENCY The demand for wireless connectivity is increasing. Emerging technologies create  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6.25 KHZ - MAXIMUM SPECTRUM EFFICIENCY The demand for wireless connectivity is increasing. Emerging technologies create applications that require instant information. Wireless SCADA solutions demand RF channels is ready today to utilize the existing spectrum for maximum efficiency. Until now, 6.25 kHz bandwidth

Allen, Gale

67

Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

Cheng, Chia-Chin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings...

69

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities o #and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities

Olsen, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Table 4. Average and Maximum Demand Savings Results fromall the test days and maximum demand savings for the best4. Table 4. Average and Maximum Demand Savings Results from

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M.A. Piette, J. Braun “Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-to reduce Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial Buildings”Management (Daily) - TOU - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) natural gas 0.035 forelectricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) natural gas $/kWh $/thermnatural gas tariff combined with the almost constant demand

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Machine to machine (M2M) technology in demand responsive commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Machine to Machine (M2M) is a term used to describe the technologies that enable computers, embedded processors, smart sensors, actuators and mobile devices to communicate with one another, take measurements and make decisions--often without human intervention. M2M technology was applied to five commercial buildings in a test. The goal was to reduce electric demand when a remote price signal rose above a predetermine price. In this system, a variable price signal was generated from a single source on the Internet and distributed using the meta-language, XML (Extensible Markup Language). Each of five commercial building sites monitored the common price signal and automatically shed site-specific electric loads when the price increased above predetermined thresholds. Other than price signal scheduling, which was set up in advance by the project researchers, the system was designed to operate without human intervention during the two-week test period. Although the buildings responded to the same price signal, the communication infrastructures used at each building were substantially different. This study provides an overview of the technologies used at each building site, the price generator/server, and each link in between. Network architecture, security, data visualization and site-specific system features are characterized. The results of the test are discussed, including: functionality at each site, measurement and verification techniques, and feedback from energy managers and building operators. Lessons learned from the test and potential implications for widespread rollout are provided.

Watson, David S.; Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to everyone at the Demand Response Research Center, theEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response with CommunicatingEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and achieve demand response. For example, on a hot August after- noon during the energy crisis, high demand-in trans- former used for everything from cell phones to computers could be up to 50 percent more efficient

76

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.electricitystorage.org/tech/technologies_comparisons_Chandran (2008), “Optimal Technology Selection and Operationand Thermal Storage Technologies,” ACEEE 2008 Summer Study

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Machine to machine (M2M) technology in demand responsive commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State andand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and

Watson, David S.; Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

79

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

80

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to inform people of their energy usage. We tested the systemcertain quality and energy usage standards of variousprice and household energy usage to enable demand response

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand shifting are thermal energy storage systems, whichlockout, pre-cooling, thermal energy storage, cooling loadlockout • Pre-cooling • Thermal energy storage • Cooling

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling offset by absorption cooling, but mostly extensivecooling demand increases, this can constitute a stable heat sink if waste heat for absorption

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Smart finite state devices: A modeling framework for demand response technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the ...

Turitsyn, Konstantin

84

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of communicating real-time prices to electricity customers.and demand conditions. Real-time prices can be set with day-e.g. , mapping real-time prices to “normal, moderate, or

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Program on Technology Innovation: Tracking the Demand for Electricity From Grid-Related Services – Preliminary Delphi Panel Resu lts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a robust research and development portfolio under a variety of future scenarios, EPRI's research has identified three critical drivers which can substantially influence the technologies needed to provide society with clean, reliable and affordable electricity in the decades ahead. These drivers include the price of natural gas, the demand for electricity from grid services, and the potential for change in environmental and energy policy.In its scenario planning ...

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metering technology makes it possible to differentiate electricity usage patterns of buildings on an hourly or sub-

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Signals. ” SGIP NIST Smart Grid Collaboration Site. http://emix/. Last accessed: Open Smart Grid Users Group. “OpenADROpenADR technologies and Smart Grid standards activities.

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electricity demand analysis in different sectors: a case study of Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to estimate the main determinants of electricity demand in Iran for various subsectors (residential, industrial, agricultural and public) using… (more)

Pourazarm, Elham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Controlling inventory by improving demand forecasting within the alcoholic beverage industry : a case study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores how combing statistical demand forecasting methods and causal forecasting methods with judgmental forecasts via a Sales and Operation Planning process can improve… (more)

Deng, Xiaomu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Implementing Innovation in Planning Practice: The Case of Travel Demand Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban Travel Demand Forecasting Project. Institute ofTRB. Metropolitan Travel Forecasting: Current Practice andPurvis. Regional Travel Forecasting Model System for the San

Newmark, Gregory Louis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Case studies of technology roadmapping in mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mining is a long established art with legacy processes and institutional structures that face rapidly changing technological environments. The perception is that technology planning and forecasting receives priority attention only as far as they may ... Keywords: L23, O31, Mining, Technology planning and forecasting, Technology roadmapping

Joe Amadi-Echendu; Obbie Lephauphau; Macks Maswanganyi; Malusi Mkhize

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A System Dynamics Approach for Developing Zone Water Demand Forecasting: A Case Study of Linkong Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System dynamics (SD) approach for developing zone water demand forecasting was developed based on the analysis of its water resources system which has multi-feedback and nonlinear interactions amongst system elements. As an example, Tianjin Binhai Linkong ... Keywords: developing zone, system dynamics, water resources demand, Linkong

Xuehua Zhang; Hongwei Zhang; Xinhua Zhao

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine Climates to someone by E-mail Marine Climates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Marine Climates on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education

94

Smart Finite State Devices: A Modeling Framework for Demand Response Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the following four types: (a) optional loads that can be shed, e.g. light dimming; (b) deferrable loads that can be delayed, e.g. dishwashers; (c) controllable loads with inertia, e.g. thermostatically-controlled loads, whose task is to maintain an auxiliary characteristic (temperature) within pre-defined margins; and (d) storage devices that can alternate between charging and generating. Our analysis of the devices seeks to find their optimal price-taking control strategy under a given stochastic model of the distribution market.

Turitsyn, Konstantin; Ananyev, Maxim; Chertkov, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The process of resort second home development demand quantification : exploration of methodologies and case study application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prevalent methodologies utilized by resort second home development professionals to quantify demand for future projects are identified and critiqued. The strengths of each model are synthesized in order to formulate an ...

Wholey, Christopher J. (Christoper John)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the amount of installed PV, solar thermal, and both electricand, in the case of PV or solar thermal equipment, bythe amount of installed PV and solar thermal to 30 000m 2 (

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

98

Demand Subsidies versus R&D: Comparing the Uncertain Impacts of Policy on a Pre-Commercial Low-Carbon Energy Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine an expert elicitation and a bottom-up manufacturing cost model to compare the effects of R&D and demand subsidies. We model their effects on the future costs of a low-carbon energy technology that is not currently commercially available, purely organic photovoltaics (PV). We find that: (1) successful R&D enables PV to achieve a cost target of 4c/kWh, (2) the cost of PV does not reach the target when only subsidies, and not R&D, are implemented, and (3) production-related effects on technological advance—learning-by-doing and economies of scale—are not as critical to the long-term potential for cost reduction in organic PV than is the investment in and success of R&D. These results are insensitive to two levels of policy intensity, the level of a carbon price, the availability of storage technology, and uncertainty in the main parameters used in the model. However, a case can still be made for subsidies: comparisons of stochastic dominance show that subsidies provide a hedge against failure in the R&D program. 1.

Gregory F. Nemet; Erin Baker

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Materials for Energy How pressing needs for innovative technologies demand new ways of creating materials and putting them together  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Littlewood Littlewood Associate Lab Director, Physical Sciences and Engineering Argonne National Laboratory Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 17 April 2012 Materials for Energy How pressing needs for innovative technologies demand new ways of creating materials and putting them together The scale of the challenge: Energy usage per m 2 Courtesy D J Mackay, UK DECC Renewable deployments are country-sized Courtesy D J Mackay, UK DECC Challenges of Geography, Efficiency, and Cost Power density Watt/m 2 Full insolation Arizona desert 300 Concentrated solar power (desert) 15-20 Solar photovoltaic 5-20 Biomass 1-2 Tidal pools/tidal stream 3-8 Wind 2-8 Rainwater (highland) 0.3 US energy consumption (all sources) 0.3 In the US: Solar + wind + storage + grid infrastructure= sustainable economy

100

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response”, Proceedings ofAuthority (NYSERDA), the Demand Response Research Center (

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J.E. Braun. 2004. “Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-contributor to summer peak demand, with large increases inin driving summer peak demands suggest that commercial

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Forecasting a state-specific demand for highway fuels: the case for Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

An econometric model is developed to predict the demand for highway fuels in Hawaii over the next 20 years. The stock of motor vehicles is separated into six classes, and the demand for new vehicles is estimated using seemingly unrelated regression. Average fuel efficiency for the entire fleet stock, gasoline price, per capita income, and per capita stock are used to estimate per capita vehicle-miles traveled. Highway fuel consumption is then calculated as the quotient of vehicle-miles traveled and average fleet fuel efficiency. The model performs well within and outside the historical sample period. A historical simulation is performed which shows what might have happened had gasoline prices not skyrocketed in the 1970s. Predictions of highway fuel consumption through the year 2000 under three different gasoline price scenarios are then made. 29 references, 3 figures, 9 tables.

Leung, P.; Vesenka, M.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

ORNL Residential Reference House Energy Demand model (ORNL-RRHED). Volume 4. Case studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the use and structure of the ORNL Residential Reference House Energy Demand Model (RRHED). RRHED is a computer-based engineering-economic end-use simulation model which forecasts energy demand based on a detailed evaluation of how households use energy for particular appliances. The report is organized into four volumes. The first volume provides an overview of the modeling approach and gives a short summary of the material presented in the other three volumes. The second volume is a user reference guide which provides the details necessary for users of the model to run the code and make changes to fit their particular application. Volume 3 presents the basic theoretical rationale for the RRHED model structure. The last volume reports on the application of the model to the analysis of two different kinds of issues: one is the examination of conservation policy impacts and the other is the forecasting of electricity demand in a need for power assessment. The report has two major objectives. The first is to provide a reader with little background in end-use modeling with an introduction to how the RRHED model works. The second is to provide the details needed by a user of the model to understand not only the theory behind the model specification, but also the structure of the code. This information will allow for the modification of subroutines to fit particular applications.

Hamblin, D.M.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Maddigan, R.J.; Forman, C.W. Jr.; Bibo, L.J.; McKeehan, K.M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a field study of 78 small commercial customers in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District service territory who volunteered for an integrated energy-efficiency/demand-response (EE-DR) program in the summer of 2008. The original objective for the pilot was to provide a better understanding of demand response issues in the small commercial sector. Early findings justified a focus on offering small businesses (1) help with the energy efficiency of their buildings in exchange for occasional load shed, and (2) a portfolio of options to meet the needs of a diverse customer sector. To meet these expressed needs, the research pilot provided on-site energy efficiency advice and offered participants several program options, including the choice of either a dynamic rate or monthly payment for air-conditioning setpoint control. Overall results show that pilot participants had energy savings of 20%, and the potential for an additional 14% to 20% load drop during a 100 F demand response event. In addition to the efficiency-related bill savings, participants on the dynamic rate saved an estimated 5% on their energy costs compared to the standard rate. About 80% of participants said that the program met or surpassed their expectations, and three-quarters said they would probably or definitely participate again without the $120 participation incentive. These results provide evidence that energy efficiency programs, dynamic rates and load control programs can be used concurrently and effectively in the small business sector, and that communicating thermostats are a reliable tool for providing air-conditioning load shed and enhancing the ability of customers on dynamic rates to respond to intermittent price events.

Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth; Rasin, Josh

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

107

Abstract --Demand Response (DR) programs are not a new concept; moreover, the key technologies for their implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. III. DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS UNDER SMARTGRID PARADIGM AND MARKET INTEGRATION. The demand response as SmartGrid). While many of the DR programs under SmartGrid are directed to the distribution sector, DR

Dixon, Juan

108

Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program, Office of Power Technologies, U.S. Department ofand demonstration of technology enhancements to improve theValue and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case

Lasseter, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices, Costs, and Benefits Speaker(s): Naoya Motegi Date: October 2, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. LBNL has conducted a series of case studies of existing EIS, exploring How is the EIS used in day-to-day operation? What are the costs and benefits of an EIS? Where do the energy savings come from?This study reviews the process of these technologies from installation through energy management practice. The study is based on interviews with operators and energy managers who use EIS. Analysis of

110

Wind Power Integration Technology Assessment and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of power electronics, energy storage, and other wind integration technologies can mitigate the impacts of adding large blocks of wind generation and raise the amount of wind capacity that can be connected to the grid without adversely affecting grid reliability, reserve and regulation requirements, and ancillary service costs. The engineering and economic data and case studies presented in this report can be used to address the available wind integration technology options.

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hurdling barriers through market uncertainty: Case studies ininnovative technology adoption  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The crisis atmosphere surrounding electricity availability in California during the summer of 2001 produced two distinct phenomena in commercial energy consumption decision-making: desires to guarantee energy availability while blackouts were still widely anticipated, and desires to avoid or mitigate significant price increases when higher commercial electricity tariffs took effect. The climate of increased consideration of these factors seems to have led, in some cases, to greater willingness on the part of business decision-makers to consider highly innovative technologies. This paper examines three case studies of innovative technology adoption: retrofit of time-and-temperature signs on an office building; installation of fuel cells to supply power, heating, and cooling to the same building; and installation of a gas-fired heat pump at a microbrewery. We examine the decision process that led to adoption of these technologies. In each case, specific constraints had made more conventional energy-efficient technologies inapplicable. We examine how these barriers to technology adoption developed over time, how the California energy decision-making climate combined with the characteristics of these innovative technologies to overcome the barriers, and what the implications of hurdling these barriers are for future energy decisions within the firms.

Payne, Christopher T.; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Payne, Jack

2002-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

113

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

114

Case study: Deploying information technologies for organizational innovation: Lessons from case studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations must innovate if they are to survive in today's fiercely competitive marketplace. In this paper, we explore how leading organizations are using emerging technologies to enable novel forms of ideation that can radically increase the sheer ... Keywords: Case study, Information technologies, Innovation, Innovation process

Jaka Lindi?; Peter Baloh; Vincent M. RibièRe; Kevin C. Desouza

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Framework for energy policy and technology assessment in developing countries: a case study of Peru  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of various energy sources and technology options in meeting national economic and social development goals in developing countries is assessed. The resource options that are of interest are the development of indigenous resources. In general, two categories of options can be considered: those which correspond to the accelerated implementation of existing elements of the energy system and those which correspond to the introduction of a new technology, such as solar electricity. The various resource and technology options that must be analyzed with respect to a number of criteria or payoff functions are: total demand and fuel mix; reduction of oil consumption; national social goals; total energy costs; and environmental quality. First, a view is constructed of the energy implications of current national economic development plans. A consistent description of the future energy system of the country, under the assumption of current trends and policies is constructed for certain reference years in the future. The values of the payoff functions selected are then calculated for that reference case. The major resource and technology options are identified and the rates at which they can be implemented are determined. Finally, the impact on the various payoff functions of the implementation of each option is calculated. The basic element of the framework is the Reference Energy System, discussed in Secton 3. The energy policy analysis for Peru is used as a reference case. 11 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

Mubayi, V.; Palmedo, P.F.; Doernberg, A.B.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Study of Energy and Demand Savings on a High Efficiency Hydraulic Pump System with Infinite Turn Down Technology (ITDT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed field measurement and verification of electrical energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings is conducted on an injection molding machine used in typical plastic manufacturing facility retrofitted with a high efficiency hydraulic pump system. Significant energy usage and demand savings are verified for the retrofitted injection molding machine. The savings are realized by electronically attenuating the torque of a positive displacement pump irrespective of the volumetric flow required by the cycle. With help of a power analyzer, power quality issues are addressed. Some voltage distortion was observed due to the harmonic currents introduced by the control algorithm of the high efficiency hydraulic system. A comparative study of electrical energy and demand savings between an injection molding machine retrofitted with the high efficiency hydraulic pump system or variable frequency drive will also be presented.

Sfeir, R. A.; Kanungo, A.; Liou, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

118

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

119

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Understanding technology diffusion and market adoption through modeling : implications on strategy for demand-side energy firms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deregulation shaping the Electricity industry across the world is a systems challenge cutting across interdisciplinary fields of technology, economics, public policy, environment and sociology. Decision makers that shape ...

Nath, Vivin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Assessing early investments in low carbon technologies under uncertainty : the case of Carbon Capture and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change is a threat that could be mitigated by introducing new energy technologies into the electricity market that emit fewer greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We face many uncertainties that would affect the demand ...

Ereira, Eleanor Charlotte

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sustainable Campus Transportation through Transit Partnership and Transportation Demand Management: A Case Study from the University of Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 2005. The impacts of transportation demand management andUnlimited access. Transportation 28 (3): 233–267. Cervero,transit. Journal of Public Transportation 3 (4):10–19. ???.

Bond, Alex; Steiner, Ruth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Coordinating Inventory Control and Pricing Strategies with Random Demand and Fixed Ordering Cost: the Infinite Horizon Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze an infinite horizon, single product, periodic review model in which pricing and production/inventory decisions are made simultaneously. Demands in different periods are identically distributed random variables ...

Chen, Xin

124

Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predictive Demand Response Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into integrated predictive demand response (IPDR) controllers. The project team will attempt to design an IPDR controller so that it can be used in new or existing buildings or in collections of buildings. In the case of collections of buildings, they may be colocated on a single campus or remotely located as long as they are served by a single utility or independent service operator. Project Description This project seeks to perform the necessary applied research, development, and testing to provide a communications interface using industry standard open protocols and emerging National Institute of Standards and Technology

125

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

127

An adaptive intelligent algorithm for forecasting long term gasoline demand estimation: The cases of USA, Canada, Japan, Kuwait and Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents an adaptive intelligent algorithm for forecasting gasoline demand based of artificial neural network (ANN), conventional regression and design of experiment (DOE). To show the superiority and applicability of the proposed algorithm ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Design of experiment, Forecasting, Gasoline consumption, Multi-Layer Perceptron, Regression

A. Azadeh; R. Arab; S. Behfard

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedTool Berkeley, CA, Demand Response Research Center.2008). "What is Demand Response?" Retrieved 10/10/2008, from

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and have significant electricity demand during utility peakoperates at an average electricity demand of 1.3 MW, withalso has a high electricity demand. In many wastewater

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Impact of Enabling Technologies on Customer Load Curtailment Performance Summer 2001 Results from NYSERDA's PON 585 and 577 Programs and NYISO's Emergency Demand Response Program  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a market and load research study on a small group of participants in the NYISO Emergency Demand Response Program (EDRP) and the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction and Enabling Technology Program Opportunity Notices. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 individual customers that participated in the NYISO EDRP program through New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG), AES NewEnergy, and eBidenergy/ ConsumerPowerLine. These contractors used funding from NYSERDA to apply enabling technologies that were hypothesized to improve customers' ability to curtail load. Both NYSEG and eBidenergy/ConsumerPowerLine offered their customers access to their hourly load data on a day-after basis and, during curtailment events, on a near-real-time basis. Phone interviews were conducted with most customers, however 25% of customers provided initial responses to the survey protocol via email. We then combined the market research information with load data during the curtailment events of August 7-10, 2001 to evaluate the impact of technology on curtailment responses.

Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Title Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6056E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities.

132

Changing fuel formulations will boost hydrogen demand  

SciTech Connect

Refinery demand in the U.S. for on-purpose hydrogen will continue to increase by 5-10 %/year, depending on the extent of implementation of the 1990 U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and other proposed environmental legislation. Although the debate on the economic wisdom of the legislation still rages, it is evident that refiners likely will see a large upswing in hydrogen demand while existing hydrogen production may decline. To better understand the potential impact various reformulation scenarios may have on the refining industry, and specifically, on the demand for hydrogen, Texaco analyzed the hydrogen supply/demand scenario in great detail. Two cases were studied in this analysis: mild and severe reformulation. The mild reformulation case is based on current CAAA legislation along with minor modifications to automobile hardware. The severe case is based on a nationwide implementation of Phase 2 of the CAAA and California's proposed reformulated fuels. The paper discusses the current capacity balance; growth in demand; reformulated gasoline; steam methane reforming; and partial oxidation technology.

Simonsen, K.A.; O' Keefe, L.F. (Texaco Inc., White Plains, N.Y. (United States)); Fong, W.F. (Texaco Development Corp., White Plains, N.Y. (United States))

1993-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

133

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand of 1.3 MW, with peak demand reaching 2 MW. Figure 1summer period. SDG&E’s peak demand period is between 11 AMlast 10 with the highest peak demand (Coughlin 2008). Unlike

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Use of the NII to study impacts of new technologies and policies on supply and demand of electric power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a proposal to use an implementation of client-server technology on the Internet for simulating a number of aspects of electric power production, distribution, and consumption within a wholly new regulatory, financing, operating, and control environment. This approach would use a large number of people to generate strategies and decisions, in a real-time context, needed to drive the simulation. A World Wide Web server would provide background information about the simulation for those who chose to participate as actors in one of supported roles. Roles would be based on activities associated with different business areas and would include utility manager, independent power producer (entrepreneur), electric power futures trader, electric power futures investor, electric power wheeler, industrial customer, commercial customer, and residential customer. The simulation program would run on a system of high-performance computers (parallel computer system) that communicate between each other on a high speed communications bus. These computers would also be the server systems for the client programs used by the actors. People who want to be actors would be required to register before being given a client program, as a way to have some control over the simulation results. Each role will have its corresponding client program with graphical user interface. Each client program will support a common view of the simulation results and a role specific view.

Munro, J.K. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Robust Dynamic Traffic Assignment under Demand and Capacity Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assignment under Demand and Capacity Uncertainty ? Giuseppeworst-case sce- nario of demand and capacity con?gurations.uncertain demands and capacities are modeled as unknown-but-

Calafiore, Giuseppe; El Ghaoui, Laurent

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

137

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

The effect of location and facility demand on the marginal cost of delivered wood chips from energy crops: A case study of the state of Tennessee  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost-supply curves for delivered wood chips from short rotation woody crops were calculated for 21 regularly-spaced locations spanning the state of Tennessee. These curves were used to systematically evaluate the combined effects of location and facility demand on wood chip feedstock costs in Tennessee. The cost-supply curves were developed using BRAVO, a GIS-based decision support system which calculates marginal cost of delivering wood chips to a specific location given road network maps and maps of farmgate prices and supplies of woody chips from short rotation energy crops. Marginal costs of delivered chips varied by both facility location in the state and facility demand. Marginal costs were lowest in central Tennessee unless the facility demand was greater than 2.7 million dry Mg per year (3 million dry tons per year) in which case west Tennessee was the lowest cost region. Marginal costs rose rapidly with increasing facility demand in the mountainous eastern portion of the state. Transportation costs accounted for 18 to 29% of the delivered cost and ranged between $8 and $18/dry Mg ($7 and $16/dry ton). Reducing the expected farmer participation rate from 100% to 50% or 25% dramatically raised the marginal costs of feedstock supply in the east and central regions of the state. The analysis demonstrates the need to use geographically-specific information when projecting the potential costs and supplies of biomass feedstock.

Graham, R.L.; Liu, W.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biofuels Feedstock Development Program; Noon, C.; Daly, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Management Science Program; Moore, A. [Dept. of Trade and Industry, Harwell (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Support Unit

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Humid Climates to someone by E-mail Humid Climates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education

140

Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates to someone by E-mail Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Investigating the use of information technology in managing innovation: A case study from a university technology transfer office  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of information technology to manage innovation. It is based on a case study on the adoption of an innovation application, which provides an interface between R&D, marketing and administration functions of innovation development. ... Keywords: Innovation applications, Innovation process management, O31 (secondary), O32 (primary), Technology acceptance

Giselle Rampersad; Carolin Plewa; Indrit Troshani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Teacher's Attitudes towards Integrating Technology: Case Studies in Saudi Arabia and the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines teachers' attitudes towards integrating technology in Saudi Arabia and the United States. A case study approach was used to identify several factors… (more)

Alharbi, Asma Mohammed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Available Technologies: Behind Casing Fluid Sampler to Monitor ...  

Ion Sources with Antennas; Semiconductor and Other Manufacturing; Ion Source and Beam Tools; Nano- & Micro-technology; Software and IT ;

144

Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Cold...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next...

145

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

146

Introducing transformational information technologies: the case of the world wide web technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transformational information technologies, by definition, transform organizations. Research on radical technological innovation and revolutionary change suggests a particular set of conditions and strategies for the successful introduction of transformational ... Keywords: diffusion of innovation, internet, organization design, technological innovation, transformational technology, world wide web

Sirkka L. Jarvenpaa; Blake Ives

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Mixed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Construction Case Studies Improvements to Existing Homes Case Studies Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Mixed-Humid Climates - Volume 16 New...

148

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Culler: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)Chen, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Dept. , UCkai Chen, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Dept,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first situation, energy is wasted, and in the second, thefirst situation, energy is wasted, and in the second, the

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wright, “Thin Film Piezoelectric Energy Scavenging SystemsWright, “Thin Film Piezoelectric Energy Scavenging Systems,”in the field of piezoelectric vibration energy scavenging

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is normally of thermistor or RTD (resistance temperatureour temperature sensors (RTD’s) were prepackaged with matingsimulation model MZEST. The RTD temperature sensor boards

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

achieved by connecting an RTD (temperature sensor elsewhereterminals. Because the RTD is powered straight off thethat when calibrating the RTD, the current battery level

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occupied Bay Area house under study. Passive Proximity ACPASSIVE PROXIMITY AC CURRENT SENSOR 27 WIRELESSLY CONTROLLED MONITORING-OUTLETS28 WIRELESS MONITORING OF A TEST HOUSE House Meter”. ) Some final observations for sensors a) Size matters: Though the passive

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The extent of CASE technology use within systems development projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer-aided software engineering (CASE) was developed to increase the productivity and quality of information systems development. While a great deal of attention has been given to developing an understanding of CASE, we still do not know ... Keywords: CASE functionality, CASE usage, systems development

Russell Purvis

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Dynamic controls for energy efficiency and demand response: Framework concepts and a new construction study case in new york  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many of today’s advanced building control systems are designed to improve granularity of control for energy efficiency. Examples include direct digital controls for building heating, ventilation, and cooling systems (HVAC), and dimmable ballasts for continuous dimming for daylighting applications. This paper discusses recent research on the use of new and existing controls in commercial buildings for integrated energy efficiency and demand response (DR). The paper discusses the use of DR controls strategies in commercial buildings and provides specific details on DR control strategy design concepts for a new building in New York. We present preliminary results from EnergyPlus simulations of the DR strategies at the New York Times Headquarters building currently under construction. The DR strategies at the Times building involve unique state of the art systems with dimmable ballasts, movable shades on the glass facade, and underfloor air HVAC. The simulation efforts at this building are novel, with an innovative building owner considering DR and future DR program participation strategies during the design phase. This paper also discusses commissioning plans for the DR strategies. The trends in integration of various systems through the EMCS, master versus supervisory controls and dynamic operational modes concepts are presented and future research directions are outlined.

Sila Kiliccote; Mary Ann Piette; David S. Watson; Glenn Hughes; Sila Kiliccote Mary Ann Piette; David S. Watson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response:Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

SciTech Connect

Many of today's advanced building control systems are designed to improve granularity of control for energy efficiency. Examples include direct digital controls for building heating, ventilation, and cooling systems (HVAC), and dimmable ballasts for continuous dimming for daylighting applications. This paper discusses recent research on the use of new and existing controls in commercial buildings for integrated energy efficiency and demand response (DR). The paper discusses the use of DR controls strategies in commercial buildings and provides specific details on DR control strategy design concepts for a new building in New York. We present preliminary results from EnergyPlus simulations of the DR strategies at the New York Times Headquarters building currently under construction. The DR strategies at the Times building involve unique state of the art systems with dimmable ballasts, movable shades on the glass facade, and underfloor air HVAC. The simulation efforts at this building are novel, with an innovative building owner considering DR and future DR program participation strategies during the design phase. This paper also discusses commissioning plans for the DR strategies. The trends in integration of various systems through the EMCS, master versus supervisory controls and dynamic operational modes concepts are presented and future research directions are outlined.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response:Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

SciTech Connect

Many of today's advanced building control systems are designed to improve granularity of control for energy efficiency. Examples include direct digital controls for building heating, ventilation, and cooling systems (HVAC), and dimmable ballasts for continuous dimming for daylighting applications. This paper discusses recent research on the use of new and existing controls in commercial buildings for integrated energy efficiency and demand response (DR). The paper discusses the use of DR controls strategies in commercial buildings and provides specific details on DR control strategy design concepts for a new building in New York. We present preliminary results from EnergyPlus simulations of the DR strategies at the New York Times Headquarters building currently under construction. The DR strategies at the Times building involve unique state of the art systems with dimmable ballasts, movable shades on the glass facade, and underfloor air HVAC. The simulation efforts at this building are novel, with an innovative building owner considering DR and future DR program participation strategies during the design phase. This paper also discusses commissioning plans for the DR strategies. The trends in integration of various systems through the EMCS, master versus supervisory controls and dynamic operational modes concepts are presented and future research directions are outlined.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

160

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand-response programs and technologies that tend to reduce the variability of hourly electric demand and the resulting supply requirement would reduce the need ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collective output isQg, and intermittent generators (which we will assume here is wind generation) whose output is assumed to have a fixed and stochastic component Qw,0+ ?w. We assume that E[?w] = 0 and V ar[?w] = ?2w. The intermittent output is produced by a... conventional generation assets. In equilibrium demand matches supply: DT = Qg +Qw,0 + ?w, (2) and using (1) gives: p = D0 ? b(Qg +Qw,0 + ?w). (3) We assume that a conventional generator has a quadratic cost function: Cg(Qg) = ?Qg + ? 2Q 2 g, (4) and thus...

Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

When it comes to Demand Response, is FERC its Own Worst Enemy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

made between traditional demand response (DR) programs andpricing. Traditional demand response programs typically payFor overviews of demand response technologies and program

Bushnell, James; Hobbs, Benjamin; Wolak, Frank A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Martin Aspen. 2006. Demand Response Enabling TechnologiesDon. 2007. “Pricing for Demand Response from Residential andthe Level of Demand Response,” Power Point Presentation, 24

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity2006. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and2010. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Case Western Reserve University Office of Research & Technology Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Website, http://ora.ra.case.edu/techtransfer/pages /about.htm (last visited Jan 20, 2010). #12), http://ora.ra.cwru.edu/techtransfer/forms/IntellectualPropertyPolicy.pdf. 8 Id. (stating [u

Dormidontova, Elena E.

167

Y-12s Training and Technology ? Case Histories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Labor designated as the Manpower Research Monograph No. 29 and titled A model for training the disadvantaged: TAT at Oak Ridge, Tenn., comes the following case histo- ries of...

168

Coal in transition 1980--2000 demand considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The usefulness of the Brookhaven model, TESOM, lies in its exploration of the demand side of the energy system. Sectors where coal may be substituted for other energy forms are identified, and attractive technologies are highlighted. The results of the runs accord well with intuitive expectations. The increasing prices of oil and natural gas usually imply that (a) coal synthetics become increasingly attractive technologies, except in the High Demand and CRUNCH Cases (b) nuclear and hydro-electric generation are preferred technologies, (c) coal steam electric, even with expensive scrubbers, becomes more attractive than oil or gas steam electric by year 1990, (d) fluidized bed combustion for electricity generation is cost effective (with relatively small environmental impacts) when compared to oil, gas and coal steam electric. FBC process steam exhibits similar behavior. In the High Demand and CRUNCH scenarios, technologies such as solar electric, which are usually not chosen on the basis of cost, enter the solution because meeting demands has become extremely difficult. As the allowed coal expansion rate becomes a limiting factor, coal synthetics manufacturing becomes an unattractive alternative. This is due both to the need for coal electric generation to meet high electricity demand levels, and to the inefficiencies in the manufacturing process. Due to preferred allocation of coal to electricity generation or synthetics, direct coal use is reduced, although this is normally a preferred option.

Kydes, A S; Cherniavsky, E A

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Net Demand3 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) 1. In addition, US DOE has issued a second Request For Information regarding uses of and markets for these critical materials (RFI;(USDOE 2011)). This report examines how critical materials demand for SOFC applications could impact markets for these materials and vice versa, addressing categories 1,2,5, and 6 in the RFI. Category 1 – REE Content of SOFC Yttria (yttrium oxide) is the only critical material (as defined for the timeframe of interest for SOFC) used in SOFC 2. Yttrium is used as a dopant in the SOFC’s core ceramic cells.. In addition, continuing developments in SOFC technology will likely further reduce REE demand for SOFC, providing credible scope for at least an additional 50 % reduction in REE use if desirable. Category 2 – Supply Chain and Market Demand SOFC developers expect to purchase

J. Thijssen Llc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Book Review: The Technology-Energy-Environment-Health (TEEH) Chain in China: A Case Study of Cokemaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Book Review: The Technology-Energy-Environment-Health (TEEH) Chain in China: A Case Study of Cokemaking

Anderson, Dave M.; Roop, Joseph M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

172

Control and Optimization Meet the Smart Power Grid - Scheduling of Power Demands for Optimal Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The smart power grid aims at harnessing information and communication technologies to enhance reliability and enforce sensible use of energy. Its realization is geared by the fundamental goal of effective management of demand load. In this work, we envision a scenario with real-time communication between the operator and consumers. The grid operator controller receives requests for power demands from consumers, with different power requirement, duration, and a deadline by which it is to be completed. The objective is to devise a power demand task scheduling policy that minimizes the grid operational cost over a time horizon. The operational cost is a convex function of instantaneous power consumption and reflects the fact that each additional unit of power needed to serve demands is more expensive as demand load increases.First, we study the off-line demand scheduling problem, where parameters are fixed and known. Next, we devise a stochastic model for the case when demands are generated continually and sched...

Koutsopoulos, Iordanis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Harvesting technology and catch-to-biomass dependence: The case of small pelagic fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harvesting technology and catch-to-biomass dependence: The case of small pelagic fish Pedro Gajardo on the dependence of the stationary solutions upon the nonlinear catch-to-biomass parameter. Given the emphasis

Ramírez, Héctor

174

First-class technology - third-rate bureaucracy: the case of Israel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using Israel as a case study, the article argues that politics rather than technology accounts for the inefficient and wasteful state of technology in the public sector in countries where one finds ample endogenous first-class high tech manpower. In ...

Alon Peled

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Motivating Students by Technologies: A Case Study on Adopting Tips Pedagogy in a General Physics Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a case study on adopting TIPS pedagogy in a general physics course. The TIPS pedagogy is reviewed with ARCS model on how to motivate students by technologies, such as network and IrDA devices. This study also proposed observations ... Keywords: Motivation, Pedagogy, Qualitative Researches, Technology, Wireless Device

Yu-Fen Chen; Sung-Bin Chang; Chen-Chung Liu; Yi-Wen Chu; Ben Chang; Tak-Wai Chan

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Implementation of ASME Code Case N-818  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N-818-1—the objective of which is to help users avoid unnecessary repairs of Class 1 and Class 2 full-penetration butt welds—provides alternatives to the existing ASME Section III acceptance criteria for new fabrication welds. This report presents the bases and justification for Code Case N-818-1 and provides guidance for use of the alternative fitness-for-service acceptance criteria for disposition of subsurface weld flaws that ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Case Study 6: Evaluating a New Technology Alternative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001 by Chan S. Park, Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering, Auburn University - This case that would handle preforms and use the current forging presses for nal forgings. 2 Description of the Disk forging excess material, or ash, is removed and any rough edges are blended before the part leaves

Colton, Jonathan S.

178

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOE’s high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies – steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Technology commercialization cost model and component case study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells seem poised to emerge as a clean, efficient, and cost competitive source of fossil fuel based electric power and thermal energy. Sponsors of fuel cell technology development need to determine the validity and the attractiveness of a technology to the market in terms of meeting requirements and providing value which exceeds the total cost of ownership. Sponsors of fuel cell development have addressed this issue by requiring the developers to prepare projections of the future production cost of their fuel cells in commercial quantities. These projected costs, together with performance and life projections, provide a preliminary measure of the total value and cost of the product to the customer. Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc. and Michael A. Cobb & Company have been retained in several assignments over the years to audit these cost projections. The audits have gone well beyond a simple review of the numbers. They have probed the underlying technical and financial assumptions, the sources of data on material and equipment costs, and explored issues such as the realistic manufacturing yields which can be expected in various processes. Based on the experience gained from these audits, the DOE gave Booz-Allen and Michael A. Cobb & company the task to develop a criteria to be used in the execution of future fuel cell manufacturing cost studies. It was thought that such a criteria would make it easier to execute such studies in the future as well as to cause such studies to be more understandable and comparable.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Technology commercialization cost model and component case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells seem poised to emerge as a clean, efficient, and cost competitive source of fossil fuel based electric power and thermal energy. Sponsors of fuel cell technology development need to determine the validity and the attractiveness of a technology to the market in terms of meeting requirements and providing value which exceeds the total cost of ownership. Sponsors of fuel cell development have addressed this issue by requiring the developers to prepare projections of the future production cost of their fuel cells in commercial quantities. These projected costs, together with performance and life projections, provide a preliminary measure of the total value and cost of the product to the customer. Booz-Allen Hamilton Inc. and Michael A. Cobb Company have been retained in several assignments over the years to audit these cost projections. The audits have gone well beyond a simple review of the numbers. They have probed the underlying technical and financial assumptions, the sources of data on material and equipment costs, and explored issues such as the realistic manufacturing yields which can be expected in various processes. Based on the experience gained from these audits, the DOE gave Booz-Allen and Michael A. Cobb company the task to develop a criteria to be used in the execution of future fuel cell manufacturing cost studies. It was thought that such a criteria would make it easier to execute such studies in the future as well as to cause such studies to be more understandable and comparable.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Utility Investment in Optical Voltage and Current Measurement Technology: Five Installation Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 1999, EPRI polled utility members asking them what optical sensor projects EPRI should work on in 2000 and 2001. One recommendation was to develop a series of case studies on utility experiences. This report documents five installation case studies involving optical voltage and current measurement technology.

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

Simulations and virtual reality tools in technology learning: results from two case studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of two design-based action research case studies. These case studies sought to develop pedagogical models and computer applications for teaching, studying and learning in technology education. The first pedagogical model entitled ... Keywords: learning environment, pedagogical models, simulations, virtual reality

Miika Lehtonen; Tom Page; Gisli Thorsteinsson; Lence Miloseva

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

184

Forecast of California car and truck fuel demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to forecast likely future car and truck fuel demand in California in light of recent and possible additional improvements in vehicle efficiency. Forecasts of gasoline and diesel fuel demand are made based on projections of primary economic, demographic, and transportation technology variables. Projections of car and light truck stock and new sales are based on regression equations developed from historical data. Feasible future vehicle fuel economies are determined from technical improvements possible with existing technology. Several different cases of market-induced efficiency improvement are presented. Anticipated fuel economy improvements induced by federal mileage standards and rising fuel costs will cause lower future fuel demand, even though vehicle miles traveled will continue to increase both on a per capita and total basis. If only relatively low-cost fuel economy improvements are adopted after about 1985, when federal standards require no further improvements, fuel demand will decrease from the 1982 level of 11.7 billion gallons (gasoline equivalent) to 10.6 billion gallons in 2002, about a 9% reduction. Higher fuel economy levels, based on further refinements in existing technology, can produce an additional 7% reduction in fuel demand by 2002.

Stamets, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

European Macro-economic Policy and Technological Development: the case of Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent studies on economic and technological transformation in less developed countries emphasise that improvement of their performance in terms of competitiveness and successful integration into the world economy requires both economic stabilisation at the macroeconomic level and technological development. Greece is a typical case, which during the last twenty years has had to deal with specific imperatives: European integration, technological catch-up and macro-economic stability. These processes are envisaged under the pressure of the opening of the economy, which in principle could facilitate dissemination of new technologies on the one hand but constrain the development of national capabilities on the other. In this paper we present the specificities of the Greek productive system that have shaped its integration into the EC and attempt to link the process of European integration with its technological development. Special reference is made to the macroeconomic policy of the EU and its impact on technological transformation. 2

Ioanna Kastelli

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Case Study on Multiple Technology Aggregate Response: FirstEnergy Smart Grid Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was designed to gain an understanding of the potential impacts of operating a combination of smart grid technologies at the same time.  An AEP-EPRI project team developed a process to determine and manage the impact of concurrent operation of several technologies, including electric vehicles (EVs), community energy storage (CES), volt/var optimization (VVO) and photovoltaic (PV) generation systems.This AEP Smart Grid Demonstration case study describes two aspects of ...

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Program Design Analysis using BEopt Building Energy Optimization Software: Defining a Technology Pathway Leading to New Homes with Zero Peak Cooling Demand; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

An optimization method based on the evaluation of a broad range of different combinations of specific energy efficiency and renewable-energy options is used to determine the least-cost pathway to the development of new homes with zero peak cooling demand. The optimization approach conducts a sequential search of a large number of possible option combinations and uses the most cost-effective alternatives to generate a least-cost curve to achieve home-performance levels ranging from a Title 24-compliant home to a home that uses zero net source energy on an annual basis. By evaluating peak cooling load reductions on the least-cost curve, it is then possible to determine the most cost-effective combination of energy efficiency and renewable-energy options that both maximize annual energy savings and minimize peak-cooling demand.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

190

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

191

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

192

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

193

Understanding human values in adopting new technology-A case study and methodological discussion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a method for understanding and modelling human values in the evaluation of new technology in social settings, and analyses the validity of the proposed method in a specific use case. The method, which is based on the Schwartz universal ... Keywords: Evaluation methods, School attendance control, Schwartz's value model, User experience evaluation, Value based design

Minna Isomursu; Mari Ervasti; Marianne Kinnula; Pekka Isomursu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

195

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of real-time electricity prices (left) and windinflexible) demand and real-time prices. The case study inas a special case. The real-time price process is modeled as

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Successful demand-side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a brief summary of a series of case studies of five publicly-owned utilities that are noted for their success with demand-side management. These utilities are: (1) city of Austin, Texas, (2) Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, (3) Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, (4) Seattle City Light, and (5) Waverly Light and Power in Iowa. From these case studies, the authors identified a number of traits associated with a successful demand-side management program. These traits are: (1) high rates, (2) economic factors, (3) environmental awareness, (4) state emphasis on integrated resource planning/demand side management, (5) local political support, (6) large-sized utilities, and (7) presence of a champion.

Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Differential impact of gas shortages and fuel-price increases on demand: the case of the hotel industry in New York State  

SciTech Connect

The authors assess the impact of the energy crisis on the lodging industry in New York (excluding New York City) by estimating the effects of two related, but not necessarily correlated, variables: gas shortages and energy price increases. Strong evidence supports the conclusion that energy shortages dampen hotel demand while price increases encourage international, intrastate, and interstate shifts in distance distributions of travel destinations as well as changes in number of trips and length of stay, resulting in a slight aggregate increase in demand. Recent industry data relating to occupancy rates and profitability seem to support this conclusion. 16 references, 2 tables.

Arbel, A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY); Ravid, A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Forecasting Electricity Demand by Time Series Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity demand is one of the most important variables required for estimating the amount of additional capacity required to ensure a sufficient supply of energy. Demand and technological losses forecasts can be used to control the generation and distribution of electricity more efficiently. The aim of this paper is to utilize time series model

E. Stoimenova; K. Prodanova; R. Prodanova

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation given at the 2006 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Merit Review in Washington, D.C., May 16-19, 2006, discusses potential future hydrogen demand and the infrastructure needed to support hydrogen vehicles.

Melendez, M.

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

202

Technology Development | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Development Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development Smart Grid Demand Response Federal Smart Grid Task Force Distributed Energy Recovery Act...

203

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, it’s also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if it’s cold, consumers will use ...

204

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

205

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

A case for Sandia investment in complex adaptive systems science and technology.  

SciTech Connect

This white paper makes a case for Sandia National Laboratories investments in complex adaptive systems science and technology (S&T) -- investments that could enable higher-value-added and more-robustly-engineered solutions to challenges of importance to Sandia's national security mission and to the nation. Complex adaptive systems are ubiquitous in Sandia's national security mission areas. We often ignore the adaptive complexity of these systems by narrowing our 'aperture of concern' to systems or subsystems with a limited range of function exposed to a limited range of environments over limited periods of time. But by widening our aperture of concern we could increase our impact considerably. To do so, the science and technology of complex adaptive systems must mature considerably. Despite an explosion of interest outside of Sandia, however, that science and technology is still in its youth. What has been missing is contact with real (rather than model) systems and real domain-area detail. With its center-of-gravity as an engineering laboratory, Sandia's has made considerable progress applying existing science and technology to real complex adaptive systems. It has focused much less, however, on advancing the science and technology itself. But its close contact with real systems and real domain-area detail represents a powerful strength with which to help complex adaptive systems science and technology mature. Sandia is thus both a prime beneficiary of, as well as potentially a prime contributor to, complex adaptive systems science and technology. Building a productive program in complex adaptive systems science and technology at Sandia will not be trivial, but a credible path can be envisioned: in the short run, continue to apply existing science and technology to real domain-area complex adaptive systems; in the medium run, jump-start the creation of new science and technology capability through Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program; and in the long run, inculcate an awareness at the Department of Energy of the importance of supporting complex adaptive systems science through its Office of Science.

Colbaugh, Richard; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Backus, George A.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Jones, Katherine A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Assessment of Residential Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a description of what a residential energy management system comprises, with a focus on demand response applications. It includes findings from a survey of residential energy management system technology vendors; system pricing and availability; an overview of technology components and features; customer load monitoring and control capabilities; utility demand response control functions; communications protocols and technologies supported; and options for demand response si...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

210

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

211

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

212

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

213

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview The project developed technology for demand frequency controlled reserve (DFR) implementation, a system that automatically...

214

How to Get More Response from Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite all the rhetoric, demand response's contribution to meet peak load will remain elusive in the absence of enabling technology and standardized business protocols. (author)

Neumann, Scott; Sioshansi, Fereidoon; Vojdani, Ali; Yee, Gaymond

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Approaches for identifying consumer preferences for the design of technology products : a case study of residential solar panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates ways to obtain consumer preferences for technology products to help designers identify the key attributes that contribute to a product's market success. A case study of residential solar PV panels ...

Chen, Heidi Qianyi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

218

Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assets—at no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary reduction of electric demand in response to grid instability, provides financial incentives to participating facilities that agree to conserve energy. With demand response, facilities also receive advance notice of potential blackouts and can proactively protect their equipment and machinery from sudden losses of power. A detailed case study, focusing on a sample industrial customer’s participation in demand response, will support the presentation.

Collins, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

222

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

224

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

226

Evaluation of the Heating & Cooling Energy Demand of a Case Residential Building by Comparing The National Calculation Methodology of Turkey and EnergyPlus through Thermal Capacity Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In all around the world, because of the rapid population growth and exhausting energy sources over time, energy efficiency and energy conservation gradually come into prominence. Hence, in 2002, a directive (EPBD) which obligates reducing energy usage and energy performance in buildings was published by European Union. In this scope, Turkey has developed a National Building Energy Performance Calculation Methodology, BepTr, which is based on simple hourly method in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document to determine the energy performance of buildings. The aim of the paper is to display the energy demand differences resultant from only the envelope’s thermal capacity between simplified method which is projected in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document and EnergyPlus which is based on full dynamic simulation method.

Atamaca, Merve; Kalaycioglu, Ece; Yilmaz, Zerrin

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Case studies of energy information systems and related technology: Operational practices, costs, and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs, and benefits of EIS, many of these descriptions are idealized and often insufficient for potential users to evaluate cost, benefit and operational usefulness. LBNL has conducted a series of case studies of existing EIS and related technology installations. This study explored the following questions: (1) How is the EIS used in day-to-day operation? (2) What are the costs and benefits of an EIS? (3) Where do the energy savings come from? This paper reviews the process of these technologies from installation through energy management practice. The study is based on interviews with operators and energy managers who use EIS. Analysis of energy data trended by EIS and utility bills was also conducted to measure the benefit. This paper explores common uses and findings to identify energy savings attributable to EIS, and discusses non-energy benefits as well. This paper also addresses technologies related to EIS that have been demonstrated and evaluated by LBNL.

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Dewey, Jim

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

229

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology, the strengthening of the Internet, and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto-DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (Open Auto-DR or OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components, systems, end-uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems, granularity of control, and speed of telemetry. DR, when defined as a discrete event, requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

231

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

232

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand of oil and gas resources is high and the forecasts show a trend for higher requirements in the future. More unconventional resource exploitation along with an increase in the total recovery in current producing fields is required. At this pivotal time the role of emerging technologies is of at most importance. Smart or intelligent well technology is one of the up and coming technologies that have been developed to assist improvements in field development outcome. In this paper a comprehensive review of this technology has been discussed. The possible reservoir environments in which smart well technology could be used and also, the possible benefits that could be realized by utilizing smart well technology has been discussed. The economic impact of smart well technology has been studied thoroughly. Five field cases were used to evaluate the economics of smart well technology in various production environments. Real field data along with best estimate of smart well technology pricings were used in this research. I have used different comparisons between smart well cases and conventional completion to illustrate the economic differences between the different completion scenarios. Based on the research, I have realized that all the smart well cases showed a better economic return than conventional completions. The offshore cases showed a good economic environment for smart well technology. Large onshore developments with smart well technology can also provide a lucrative economic return. These situations can increase the overall economic return and ultimate recovery which will assist in meeting some of the oil demand around the globe.

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

234

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one...

235

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

units as well as adjusting temperature setpoints. McKinstry duty cycled roof-top units. HVAC and lighting systems in each of the facilities are summarized in Table 5 . Table 5....

236

Analysis of Demand Controlled Ventilation Technology and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the adoption of the Alaska Building Energy Efficiency Standard ... the methanol-fueled vehicle until warm, then parking it in the garage and shutting ...

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As noted earlier, the number of residential customers willto residential customers, aggregate numbers of DR clientsexceed the number of large commercial customers by at

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

security "to" the home from security "in" the home. )homes can be controlled to optimize convenience, comfort and securityhome network protocols. Some protocols are adding security

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Analysis of Demand Controlled Ventilation Technology and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The actual health, comfort, and productivity impacts of mechanical ventilation ... p strat i csp o ... in California and elsewhere is the impact of ambient air ...

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

240

Transactive Control Demand Response - Available Technologies ...  

State of Development & Availability. Software tested and demonstrated in the Olympic Peninsula Smart Grid Demonstration Project. Currently being ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Computers and the internet play an increasingly larger role in the lives of students. In this activity, students must use various web sites to locate specific pieces of...

242

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

243

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

244

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

245

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

246

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

247

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

A new model and a computational study for Demand-wise Shared ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pacity is dedicated to a particular demand, but shared within a demand. It combines .... Two cases have been considered: (i) exploration of the maximum.

252

The Linear Collider Physics Case: International Response to the Technology Independent Questions Posed by the International Technology Recommendation Panel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The International Technology Recommendation Panel distributed a list of questions to each major laboratory. Question 30, part b and d, were technology independent and related to the physics goals of the Linear Collider. An international panel, with representation from Asia, Europe, and the Americas, was formed by the World Wide Study during LCWS04 to formulate a response. This is given below and constitutes the response of the world-wide Linear Collider community.

Klaus Desch; JoAnne Hewett; Akiya Miyamoto; Yasuhiro Okada; Mark Oreglia; Georg Weiglein; Satoru Yamashita

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Indicator strip and portable instrument technologies for determining nitroesters or moisture in combustible cartridge cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sometimes large round-to-round variability observed in accelerated environmental testing, plus difficulties in quantifying the environmental histories of a given round suggest the need for nondestructive rapid tests of munitions to supplement lifetime prediction models in quality assurance of munitions. Technologies are being developed for reagent strips which can be affixed to rounds and which will visually indicate the presence and extent of nitroester migration by a visible color change. A solid state adaptation of a modified Griess reagent develops a red-purple color in the presence of nitroesters. Performance of current designs tested in the laboratory suggest a short-term (ca. one month) single usage. Dielectric capacitance is a promising means for rapid, nondestructive moisture determinations using a portable battery-powered instrument. Laboratory studies with a modified, inexpensive, commercial device have demonstrated fast (a few seconds) detection of case wall moisture content.

Griest, W.H.; Ho, C.H.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Bates, B.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities for industrial refrigerated warehouses in California. The report describes refrigerated warehouses characteristics, energy use and demand, and control systems. It also discusses energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities and provides analysis results from three demand response studies. In addition, several energy efficiency, load management, and demand response case studies are provided for refrigerated warehouses. This study shows that refrigerated warehouses can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for open automated demand response (OpenADR) at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to OpenADR due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Rockoff, Alexandra; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

255

Building Energy Information Systems: State of the Technology and User Case Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

side management, and the smart grid. From a technologyInitiative, and the Smart Grid have brought building energymanagement and the smart grid. From a technology standpoint,

Granderson, Jessica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Case studies of energy information systems and related technology: Operational practices, costs, and benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fume hood position. Daily gas usage was unusual on 3/17/03.by 16.0%, and natural gas usage was reduced by 10.0%. Tableelectric demand, gas usage, outside air temperature, chilled

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Dewey, Jim

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities Title Examining Synergies between Energy Management and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

262

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

263

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

264

Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE Building America Case Study Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Existing homes with vapor open wall assemblies Type: Residential Climate Zones: All PERFORMANCE DATA Insulation Ratio The R-value ratio of exterior to interior insulation (e.g., R-15 exterior insulation on R-11 cavity insulation has a ratio of 0.58). This variable controls sheathing temperature. Vapor Permeable Insulation An insulation with vapor permeance greater than five U.S. perms (e.g., rigid mineral fiber insulations). This variable controls water vapor flow and sheathing temperatures. Water Resisting Barrier A membrane that resists liquid water transfer. Permeable WRBs allow water

265

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

266

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Travel Demand Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Title Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-2294e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., Girish Ghatikar, Jessica Granderson, Paul Haugen, Carlos Romero, and David S. Watson Keywords technologies Abstract Various wireless technologies were field-tested in a six-story laboratory building to identify wireless technologies that can scale for future DR applications through very low node density power consumption, and unit cost. Data analysis included analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), packet loss, and link quality at varying power levels and node densities. The narrowband technologies performed well, penetrating the floors of the building with little loss and exhibiting better range than the wideband technology. 900 MHz provided full coverage at 1 watt and substantially complete coverage at 500 mW at the test site. 900 MHz was able to provide full coverage at 100 mW with only one additional relay transmitter, and was the highest-performing technology in the study. 2.4 GHz could not provide full coverage with only a single transmitter at the highest power level tested (63 mW). However, substantially complete coverage was provided at 2.4 GHz at 63 mW with the addition of one repeater node.

271

Tape storage solutions: meeting growing data demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exponential data growth caused by content-rich applications and new data compliance regulations has led to an increased demand for tape storage due to tape's low cost per GB and long shelf-life. However, tape technology suffers from several disadvantages: ...

Xianbo Zhang / David H. Du

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

Weller, G.H.

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Title Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Cappers, Peter, Andrew D. Mills, Charles A. Goldman, Ryan H. Wiser, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 76 Date Published 10/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords demand response, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable generation integration, smart grid Abstract The penetration of renewable generation technology (e.g., wind, solar) is expected to dramatically increase in the United States during the coming years as many states are implementing policies to expand this sector through regulation and/or legislation. It is widely understood, though, that large scale deployment of certain renewable energy sources, namely wind and solar, poses system integration challenges because of its variable and often times unpredictable production characteristics (NERC, 2009). Strategies that rely on existing thermal generation resources and improved wind and solar energy production forecasts to manage this variability are currently employed by bulk power system operators, although a host of additional options are envisioned for the near future. Demand response (DR), when properly designed, could be a viable resource for managing many of the system balancing issues associated with integrating large-scale variable generation (VG) resources (NERC, 2009). However, demand-side options would need to compete against strategies already in use or contemplated for the future to integrate larger volumes of wind and solar generation resources. Proponents of smart grid (of which Advanced Metering Infrastructure or AMI is an integral component) assert that the technologies associated with this new investment can facilitate synergies and linkages between demand-side management and bulk power system needs. For example, smart grid proponents assert that system-wide implementation of advanced metering to mass market customers (i.e., residential and small commercial customers) as part of a smart grid deployment enables a significant increase in demand response capability.1 Specifically, the implementation of AMI allows electricity consumption information to be captured, stored and utilized at a highly granular level (e.g., 15-60 minute intervals in most cases) and provides an opportunity for utilities and public policymakers to more fully engage electricity customers in better managing their own usage through time-based rates and near-real time feedback to customers on their usage patterns while also potentially improving the management of the bulk power system. At present, development of time-based rates and demand response programs and the installation of variable generation resources are moving forward largely independent of each other in state and regional regulatory and policy forums and without much regard to the complementary nature of their operational characteristics.2 By 2020, the electric power sector is expected to add ~65 million advanced meters3 (which would reach ~47% of U.S. households) as part of smart grid and AMI4 deployments (IEE, 2010) and add ~40-80 GW of wind and solar capacity (EIA, 2010). Thus, in this scoping study, we focus on a key question posed by policymakers: what role can the smart grid (and its associated enabling technology) play over the next 5-10 years in helping to integrate greater penetration of variable generation resources by providing mass market customers with greater access to demand response opportunities? There is a well-established body of research that examines variable generation integration issues as well as demand response potential, but the nexus between the two has been somewhat neglected by the industry. The studies that have been conducted are informative concerning what could be accomplished with strong broad-based support for the expansion of demand response opportunities, but typically do not discuss the many barriers that stand in the way of reaching this potential. This study examines how demand side resources could be used to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system, identifies barriers that currently limit the use of demand side strategies, and suggests several factors that should be considered in assessing alternative strategies that can be employed to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system. It is difficult to properly gauge the role that DR could play in managing VG integration issues in the near future without acknowledging and understanding the entities and institutions that govern the interactions between variable generation and mass market customers (see Figure ES-1). Retail entities, like load-serving entities (LSE) and aggregators of retail customers (ARC), harness the demand response opportunities of mass market customers through tariffs (and DR programs) that are approved by state regulatory agencies or local governing entities (in the case of public power). The changes in electricity consumption induced by DR as well as the changes in electricity production due to the variable nature of wind and solar generation technologies is jointly managed by bulk power system operators. Bulk power system operators function under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and must operate their systems in accordance with rules set by regional reliability councils. These reliability rules are derived from enforceable standards that are set by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and approved by federal regulators. Thus, the role that DR can play in managing VG integration issues is contingent on what opportunities state and local regulators are willing to approve and how customers' response to the DR opportunities can be integrated into the bulk power system both electrically (due to reliability rules) and financially (due to market rules).

274

A Tale of Two Houses: The Human Dimension of Demand Response Enabling Technology from a Case Study of an Adaptive Wireless Thermostat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carlos (Southern California Edison). 2006. January. PersonalSimulation: Southern California Edison. Herter, Karen. 2006.Programs for 2005/2006. Edison Electric Institute http://

Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward; Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A tale of two houses: the human dimension of demand response enabling technology from a case study of an adaptive wireless thermostat.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carlos (Southern California Edison). 2006. January. PersonalPrograms for 2005/2006. Edison Electric Institute http://Simulation: Southern California Edison. Herter, Karen. 2006.

Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A; Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Tale of Two Houses: The Human Dimension of Demand Response Enabling Technology from a Case Study of an Adaptive Wireless Thermostat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underestimate the heating setpoint (Woods 2006). Similarly,Woods, James. 2006. Fiddling with Thermostats: Energy Implications of Heating and

Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward; Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A tale of two houses: the human dimension of demand response enabling technology from a case study of an adaptive wireless thermostat.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underestimate the heating setpoint (Woods 2006). Similarly,Woods, James. 2006. Fiddling with Thermostats: Energy Implications of Heating and

Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A; Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

United Technologies Corporation: Internal Audit Department (IAD) Case Study: A Case Study of the UTC ACE Operating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study of United Technologies Corporation's Internal Audit Department (IAD) examines how stability and change are important factors in how this department functions and improves. IAD is a leader in the adoption of ...

Roth, George

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

280

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

284

Farmers' perception of precision technology: The case of autosteer adoption by cotton farmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precision agriculture and autosteer technology are, overall, profitable investments for farmers, as previous literature has established. However, what has not been investigated is whether or not farmers perceive these technologies as such. This research ... Keywords: Autosteer, Farmers' perception, Input cost saving, MNL, Multinomial logit estimation, PA, Precision agriculture, RTK, SCPF, Technology adoption

Jeremy M. D'Antoni; Ashok K. Mishra; Hyunjeong Joo

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Exploring technology evolution and transition characteristics of leading countries: A case of fuel cell field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the course of the technology evolution, the status of leading countries changes with the times. Leading countries may persist, appear, or disappear, i.e. the change of which is named ''transitions'' which may be effected by some characteristics. An ... Keywords: Fuel cell technology, Leading countries, Patent analysis, Technology evolution, Transition patterns

Ssu-Han Chen, Mu-Hsuan Huang, Dar-Zen Chen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Multidimensional Assessment of Emerging Technologies: Case of Next Generation Internet and Online Gaming Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Internet has changed the world in many ways. Online communications, financial and business-to-business transactions, electronic shopping, banking, and entertainment have become the norm in the digital age. The combined package of technologies that ... Keywords: Evaluating Technologies, Multidimensional Assessment, Next Generation Internet, Online Gaming, Technology Assessment

Ramin Neshati; Tugrul U. Daim

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Constructing a market domain model for start-up software technology companies: A case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market for a complex technology product is sometimes called reference business because references are emphasized by corporate customers. A first customer reference is especially important for a start-up technology company attempting to enter the ... Keywords: First reference customer, High technology markets, M13 - New Firms, M31 - Marketing, Start-up software company, Startups

Jari Ruokolainen; Markus M. Mäkelä

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

Heffner, Grayson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

290

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

291

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

292

On Demand Paging Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power consumption of the network interface plays a major role in determining the total operating lifetime of wireless handheld devices. On demand paging has been proposed earlier to reduce power consumption in cellular networks. In this scheme, a low power secondary radio is used to wake up the higher power radio, allowing the latter to sleep or remain off for longer periods of time. In this paper we present use of Bluetooth radios to serve as a paging channel for the 802.11 wireless LAN. We have implemented an on-demand paging scheme on a WLAN consisting of iPAQ PDAs equipped with Bluetooth radios and Cisco Aironet wireless networking cards. Our results show power saving ranging from 19% to 46% over the present 802.11b standard operating modes with negligible impact on performance.

Bluetooth Radios On; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh K. Gupta

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Solar in Demand | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar in Demand Solar in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's town home. | Credit: Dennis Schroeder. Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's town home. | Credit: Dennis Schroeder. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? A new study says U.S. developers are likely to install about 3,300 megawatts of solar panels in 2012 -- almost twice the amount installed last year. In case you missed it... This week, the Wall Street Journal published an article, "U.S. Solar-Panel Demand Expected to Double," highlighting the successes of

294

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

295

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

296

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

AMI and Demand Response Evaluator, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AMI and Demand Response Evaluator software, Version 2.0, permits a utility to discover the possible functions of an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) or demand response (DR) system, and to determine the benefits and requirements arising from selecting particular functions. The tool also enables a utility to evaluate various communications technologies that may be appropriate for implementing such an AMI or DR system. Description AMI and Demand Response Evaluator is a Microsoft® Access databa...

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

Capitalizing on Two-Way Communications for Demand Response -- Vendor Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume study on communication technologies for demand response. Communications and controls technologies can automate much of the work in a utility's demand response program. This automation can make programs easier for customers to use, therefore making them more attractive and robust. This volume focuses on communication technologies currently available for automated demand response communications. The report also provides an overview of major technology vendors whose produ...

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Environmental Considerations for Backup Generation Applications to Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the pros and cons of customer backup generation (BUG) for offsetting electric demand through demand response programs. The report examines the environmental issues related to this technology and contrasts this information with air quality and environmental agency regulations prevalent in California, Texas, and the model emissions standards being developed in the United States.

2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Future demand for electricity in the Nassau--Suffolk region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory established a new technology for load forecasting for the Long Island Lighting Company and prepared an independent forecast of the demand for electricity in the LILCO area. The method includes: demand for electricity placed in a total energy perspective so that substitutions between electricity and other fuels can be examined; assessment of the impact of conservation, new technology, gas curtailment, and other factors upon demand for electricity; and construction of the probability distribution of the demand for electricity. A detailed analysis of changing levels of demand for electricity, and other fuels, associated with these new developments is founded upon a disaggregated end-use characterization of energy utilization, including space heat, lighting, process energy, etc., coupled to basic driving forces for future demand, namely: population, housing mix, and economic growth in the region. The range of future events covers conservation, heat pumps, solar systems, storage resistance heaters, electric vehicles, extension of electrified rail, total energy systems, and gas curtailment. Based upon cost and other elements of the competition between technologies, BNL assessed the likelihood of these future developments. An optimistic view toward conservation leads to ''low'' demand for electricity, whereas rapid development of new technologies suggests ''high'' demand. (MCW)

Carroll, T.W.; Palmedo, P.F.; Stern, R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Market Potential for Ambient Assisted Living Technology: The Case of Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) environment is an integration of stand-alone assistive technologies, with elements of smart homes, and telehealth services. Successful development of this emerging technology will promote the ability for older people ... Keywords: aging-in-place, gerontechnology, health monitoring, smart homes

Robert Savage; Yongjie Yon; Michael Campo; Ashleigh Wilson; Ravin Kahlon; Andrew Sixsmith

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Role of mobile technology in the construction industry – a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction industry is facing a number of pressures to decrease costs, improve productivity and have a competitive edge in terms of quality of service and customer satisfaction. Recent advancements in mobile technology provide new avenues for addressing ... Keywords: New Zealand, adoption barriers, construction industry, mobile communications, mobile fax, mobile technologies, productivity, remote site, workflow

Sitalakshmi Venkatraman; Pak Yoong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Forecasting Uncertain Hotel Room Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic systems are characterized by increasing uncertainty in their dynamics. This increasing uncertainty is likely to incur bad decisions that can be costly in financial terms. This makes forecasting of uncertain economic variables an instrumental activity in any organization. This paper takes the hotel industry as a practical application of forecasting using the Holt-Winters method. The problem here is to forecast the uncertain demand for rooms at a hotel for each arrival day. Forecasting is part of hotel revenue management system whose objective is to maximize the revenue by making decisions regarding when to make rooms available for customers and at what price. The forecast approach discussed in this paper is based on quantitative models and does not incorporate management expertise. Even though, forecast results are found to be satisfactory for certain days, this is not the case for other arrival days. It is believed that human judgment is important when dealing with ...

Mihir Rajopadhye Mounir; Mounir Ben Ghaliay; Paul P. Wang; Timothy Baker; Craig V. Eister

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

309

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

310

Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Properties of the AIDS Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator 24 #12;Estimating a Demand SystemEstimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey with nonnegativity constraints is presented. This approach, called generalized maximum entropy (GME), is more

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

311

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

312

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This publication is one in series of case studies for "Laboratories for the 21st Century," a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This case study describes the Science and Technology Facility, a new laboratory at NREL that incorporated energy-efficient and sustainable design features including underfloor air distribution in offices, daylighting, and process cooling.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Relationships in Technological Processes: Finding the Common Ground between Diffusion of Innovations and Relationship Marketing Theories-A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process model and theory of Diffusion of Innovations DOI and the new idea of how technology spreads in an organization are discussed. A comparison between DOI and the Relationship Marketing RM theory is examined. Managers who desire innovation or ... Keywords: Diffusion of Innovations DOI, Enterprise Resource Planning ERP, Financial Management Information Systems FMIS, Procurement Process, Relationship Marketing RM, Request for Information RFI, Request for Proposal RFP, Single-Case Study

Francisco Cua, Steve Reames, Joe Choon Yean Chai

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid  

SciTech Connect

The CERTS Microgrid concept is an advanced approach for enabling integration of, in principle, an unlimited quantity of distributed energy resources into the electricity grid. A key feature of a microgrid, is its ability, during a utility grid disturbance, to separate and isolate itself from the utility seamlessly with no disruption to the loads within the microgrid (including no reduction in power quality). Then, when the utility grid returns to normal, the microgrid automatically resynchronizes and reconnects itself to the grid, in an equally seamless fashion. What is unique about the CERTS Microgrid is that it can provide this technically challenging functionality without extensive (i.e., expensive) custom engineering. In addition, the design of the CERTS Microgrid also provides high system reliability and great flexibility in the placement of distributed generation within the microgrid. The CERTS Microgrid offers these functionalities at much lower costs than traditional approaches by incorporating peer-to-peer and plug-and-play concepts for each component within the Microgrid. The predecessor to the current project involved the construction of and completion of initial testing using the world's first, full-scale, inverter-based, distributed generation test bed. The project demonstrated three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, which collectively significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques are: (1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; (2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and (3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under both grid and islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The work conducted in this phase of RD&D on the CERTS Microgrid Concept builds upon this base of technical accomplishments to prioritize, develop, and then demonstrate technology enhancements to further enhance the business case for microgrids. That is, having demonstrated the technical feasibility of microgrid functions, RD&D optimization efforts are now needed to accelerate commercial deployment. The current phase is a contribution to these efforts. This project involved seven distinct analysis, bench-, and full-scale testing tasks. The first five tasks were described in the original proposal submitted and awarded through DOE's solicitation. Two additional tasks were added to address issues that had been identified in the earlier, first phase of testing.

Lasseter, Robert; Eto, Joe

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

Hartman, Raymond Steve

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NREL Successfully Transfers VSHOT Technology to Solar Industry  

NREL Successfully Transfers VSHOT Technology to Solar Industry ... The increasing demand for concentrating solar power, ... Technology Transfer Home;

317

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

318

Trends in Energy Management Technologies - Part 5: Effectiveness of Energy Management Systems: What the Experts Say and Case Studies Reveal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientist, Enviornmental Energy Technologies Division, LBNL.Scientist, Enviornmental Energy Technologies Division, LBNL.Scientist, Enviornmental Energy Technologies Division, LBNL.

Webster, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

320

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Governance structures and technology adoption in the post-communist Caucasus case study: Armenia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster presentation includes a high level review of my research on institutions of political governance in Armenia. It focuses on the ways in which government adopts and diffuses technologies to change key governance processes and mechanisms. This ...

Audrey N. Selian

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Early growth technology analysis : case studies in solar energy and geothermal energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public and private organizations try to forecast the future of technological developments and allocate funds accordingly. Based on our interviews with experts from MIT's Entrepreneurship Center, Sloan School of Management, ...

Kaya Firat, Ayse

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

United Technologies Corporation: Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE): Operating System Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United Technologies Corporation (abbreviated UTC, NYSE ticker symbol UTX) is a large, industrial conglomerate that designs, manufactures, and services a broad range of products, ranging from air conditioners and elevators ...

Roth, George

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Foreign direct investment, intra-organizational proximity, and technological capability : the case of China's automobile industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three self-contained essays, each of which examines part of the causal link among inward/outward foreign direct investment (FDI), intra-organizational proximity, and in-house technology ...

Nam, Kyung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Emerging Industrial Process Heating Technologies:An Update on Electrotechnologies, Applications, and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this technical update, emerging technologies as well as applications of electrotechnologies in industrial process heating are discussed. This technical update is a continuation of the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) research from the previous years and adds new state-of-the-art process heating technologies to the list. The main focus of the research is given to energy-intensive industrial sectors such as primary metals and metal treatment. Successful implementation of the ...

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

327

Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Look Ahead at Demand Response in New England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the demand response programs developed and in operation in New England, and the revised designs for participation in the forward capacity market. This description will include how energy efficiency, demand-side resources, and distributed generation are eligible to participate in this new forward capacity market. The paper will also discuss various methods that can be used to configure and communicate with demand response resources and important concerns in specifying interfaces that accommodate multiple technologies and allow technology choice and evolution.

Burke, Robert B.; Henderson, Michael I.; Widergren, Steven E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Case Studies from the Climate Technology Partnership: Landfill Gas Projects in South Korea and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines landfill gas projects in South Korea. Two case studies provide concrete examples of lessons learned and offer practical guidance for future projects.

Larney, C.; Heil, M.; Ha, G. A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous Control of Microgrids,” IEEE PES Meeting,the business case for microgrids. DOE and the Californiaengineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small

Lasseter, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

332

Gigabit chips: A case history of a transfer of federal technology  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the need for industry/government cooperation in developing new semiconductor technology. In order to increase memory density of chips from 1M bit, it is necessary to use a process other than optical lithography for production. The technique considered here is x-ray lithography. Industry is currently found to be unwilling or unable to finance research into this technology. If US industry is to remain competitive in the world semiconductor market, it is concluded that the government must cooperate and support work in this area. 16 refs. (JDH)

Marcuse, W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Outlook for Biomass Ethanol Production and Demand  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents a midterm forecast for biomass ethanol production under three different technology cases for the period 2000 to 2020, based on projections developed from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. An overview of cellulose conversion technology and various feedstock options and a brief history of ethanol usage in the United States are also presented.

Information Center

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Factors Affecting the Rate of Penetration of Large-Scale Electricity Technologies: The Case of Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This project falls under the Technology Innovation and Diffusion topic of the Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Research Program. The objective was to better understand the critical variables that affect the rate of penetration of large-scale electricity technologies in order to improve their representation in integrated assessment models. We conducted this research in six integrated tasks. In our first two tasks, we identified potential factors that affect penetration rates through discussions with modeling groups and through case studies of historical precedent. In the next three tasks, we investigated in detail three potential sets of critical factors: industrial conditions, resource conditions, and regulatory/environmental considerations. Research to assess the significance and relative importance of these factors involved the development of a microeconomic, system dynamics model of the US electric power sector. Finally, we implemented the penetration rate models in an integrated assessment model. While the focus of this effort is on carbon capture and sequestration technologies, much of the work will be applicable to other large-scale energy conversion technologies.

James R. McFarland; Howard J. Herzog

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

335

Pinch Technology/Process Optimization: Volume 4: Case Study--Abbott Laboratories, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study at a pharmaceuticals manufacturing facility operated by Abbott Laboratories identified specific projects to reduce thermal energy requirements by 30% in the three buildings examined. The study, using advanced process analysis techniques known as `pinch technology,` found cost-effective applications for process heat recovery, heat pumping, refrigeration system improvements, process modification, and adjustable-speed drives.

1998-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

336

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Modeling Structural Changes in Market Demand and Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic events may cause structural changes in markets. To know the effect of the economic event we should analyze the structural changes in the market demand and supply. The purpose of this dissertation is to analyze the effect of selected economic events on market demand and supply using econometric models. Structural changes can be modeled according to the types of changes. For an abrupt and instantaneous break, a dummy variable model can be used. For a smooth and gradual movement, proxy variables which represent the event can be applied, if we know the variables. If we don?t know the appropriate proxy variables, a smooth transition regression model can be employed. The BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) outbreak in the U.S. in 2003 is assumed to make abrupt and instantaneous changes in Korean meat consumption. To analyze the effect on Korean meat consumption, the Korean demands of beef, pork, chicken, and U.S. beef are estimated using an LA/AIDS (Linear Approximate Almost Ideal Demand System) model with the dummy variable specifying the time before and after the BSE. From the results we can confirm that food safety concerns caused by the BSE case changed Korean meat consumption structure. Korean beef and U.S. beef became less elastic, and pork and chicken got more elastic to budget. Korean beef became less price elastic, but pork and U.S. beef got more price elastic. The changes of U.S. natural gas supply caused by technology development and depletion in reserves are analyzed using a smooth transition regression model. From the results, we can confirm that the productivity improvement by technology development is greater than the labor cost increase by depletion, but not greater than the capital cost increase by depletion in mid-2000s. The effects of posting the winning bid in a repeated Vickrey auction are examined using a proxy variable. By applying an unobserved effect Tobit model to the experimental auction done by Corrigan and Rousu (2006) for a candy bar, we can confirm that the changes of bidding behavior are significant, especially when the winning bid is high. By extracting the bid affiliation effects, we showed that true willingness to pay can be estimated.

Park, Beom Su

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Modeling the residential demand for energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand for energy is derived from the demand for services that appliances and energy together provide. This raises a number of serious econometric issues when estimating energy-demand functions: delineation of short-run and long-run household responses, specification of the price variable and in particular, the assumption that the model is recursive, or in other words, that the appliance choice equation and the energy consumption equation are uncorrelated. The dissertation utilizes a structural model of energy use whose theoretical underpinnings derive from the conditional logit model and an extension of that model to the joint-discrete/continuous case by Dubin and McFadden (1980). It uses the 1978 to 1979 National Interim Energy Comsumption Survey. Three appliance portfolio choices are analyzed; choice of water and space heating and central air-conditioning; choice of room air conditioners; and choice of clothes dryers, either as multinomial logit or binary probit choices. Results varied widely across the appliance choice considered; use of Hausman's test led to acceptance of the null hypothesis of orthogonality in some cases but not in others. Demand for electricity and natural gas tended to be price inelastic; however, estimated own-price effects differed considerably when disaggregated by appliance categories and across methods of estimation.

Kirby, S.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but since both battery and inverter costs scale at a linearand PV costs run shown in Figure ES 2. Battery chargingbattery bank (1518 kWh). In this case the effect on costs is

Lasseter, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

342

Complexities in user satisfaction issues during organisational diffusion of in-house developed new technology tools: the case of an Indian IT company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complexities related to user satisfaction during organisational diffusion of new technology tools is studied as a case study in an Indian IT company. This study is important since user satisfaction is directly related to productivity in the use of the ...

V. C. S. Prasad

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Pinch Technology/Process Optimization: Volume 3: Case Study--Port Townsend Paper Corp.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sitewide study of a Kraft pulp and paper mill operated by Port Townsend Paper Corp. identified projects to reduce energy costs by $1.0 million annually while accommodating a 30% increase in plant capacity. The study, using advanced process analysis techniques known as `pinch technology,` found cost-effective applications for improved evaporator integration and enhanced process heat recovery. Payback would be less than two years.

1998-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

344

Standards and Technology Adoption Case Study: Inter-Control Center Protocol (ICCP/TASE.2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the story of the development and deployment of the Inter- Control Center Protocol (ICCP), later to be known as IEC 60870- 6, the Telecontrol Application Service Element 2 (TASE.2). The enthusiastic acceptance of this communications suite by the power industry is one of the most successful stories of standards and technology adoption in a business area that is notorious for its resistance to change. Nearly every Energy Management System (EMS) in use today provides an ICCP connection for exchanging...

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

347

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Demand Uncertainty and Price Dispersion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand uncertainty has been recognized as one factor that may cause price dispersion in perfectly competitive markets with costly and perishable capacity. With the persistence… (more)

Li, Suxi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

350

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

354

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due toaddressed in this report. Maximum Demand Savings Intensity (Echelon Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due to

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Case study: strategic planning process used by the Texas A&M University Career Center when creating technology initiative project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a plethora of research and literature focusing on strategic planning yet there few case studies have been done that describe the strategic planning process for university career centers. No effective strategic planning guide has been written to assist career center employees with building a strategic plan that will assist in reaching all Texas A&M University students with job skills training. The purpose of this study is to give a detailed account of the strategic planning process used by the Texas A&M Career Center to create the technology initiative. The study will also provide guidance to the researcher and others who will be developing similar initiatives in the future. In an effort to assist career centers nationwide it would be helpful for those career centers to look at others, like Texas A&M Career Center, who have already begun the strategic planning process. A descriptive case study design was chosen because it adds strength to what is already known and also helps explain complex issues. Case study research gives an in-depth contextual analysis of a limited number of events. The study of the planning process is very complex and case study research is one method that can be used to bring deeper understanding and add strength to what we already know about the planning process (Dooley, 2002). Following the lead of Rice (2002) a descriptive case study was chosen so that the researcher could describe the strategic planning process and interpret the findings in a way that would provide greater insight. Qualitative methods, including examination of documents, examination of journals, calendars and meeting notes, and interviews with a few members involved in the process to clarify any questions of memory, were used in this study. The study described the technology initiative and split the development into five stages: Conception, Birth, Toddling, Up and Running, and Adolescence (Rice, 2002). The researcher has completed the descriptive case study and analyzed the data according to the planning approach continuum. A new model has been created that provide insight to the researcher and hopefully other planners. Recommendations and conclusions have been provided that will hopefully be beneficial to other planners. The descriptive case study provides a story that highlights good and bad planning techniques and the researcher hopes that others will read and learn from this study. The purpose of the study has been fulfilled.

Vermillion, Mary Gail

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling...

364

Intelligent Grid Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary. With the increasing demand for new energy distribution methods including increased efficiency and alternative sources, ...

365

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory?s research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities for wastewater treatment facilities in California. The report describes the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy use and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities. In addition, several energy efficiency and load management case studies are provided for wastewater treatment facilities.This study shows that wastewater treatment facilities can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for automated demand response at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to open automated demand response due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Song, Katherine; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

AdaptiVolt(TM) Technology Assessment Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology assessment was conducted for AdaptiVolt and Line Drop Compensation (LDC) technologies for reducing energy consumption and demand by controlling feeder voltage.

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Harnessing the power of demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Electric demand growth: An uncertain future for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Broadly conceived, the demand for electricity depends upon three sets of variables: (i) the growths of the many individual demands for energy services; (ii) the competitiveness of electrically driven technologies in meeting these demands; and (iii) the energy-conversion efficiencies of installed electrical technologies. The first set of variables establishes the size of the potential market; the second, the market penetration of electrical equipment; and the third, the quantity of electricity required to operate the equipment. All forecasts of electricity consumption ultimately depend upon inferred or assumed relationships to describe the future behavior of these variables. In this paper, the authors review recent forecasts of electricity demand growth. They also examine, in a qualitative way, some of the causes for the systematic, downward revisions of these forecasts over recent years. Graphical presentations of data are extensively used in the discussions. In an important sense, forecasting, whatever the number of variables, remains a matter of ''curve fitting.''

Asbury, J.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant challenges from severe weather, hot summers, and about 2% annual load growth. To better control costs and manage electric reliability under these conditions, OG&E is pursuing demand response strategies made possible by implementation of smart grid technologies, tools, and techniques from 2010-2012. The objective is to engage customers in lowering peak demand using smart technologies in homes and businesses and to achieve greater efficiencies on the distribution system. The immediate goal: To defer two 165 MW power plants currently planned for

371

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

372

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/ Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/hydra Cost: Free Language: English References: http://maps.nrel.gov/hydra Logo: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Use HyDRA to view, download, and analyze hydrogen data spatially and dynamically. HyDRA provides access to hydrogen demand, resource, infrastructure, cost, production, and distribution data. A user account is

374

Proceedings: 1987 Annual Review of Demand-Side Planning Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent EPRI research in demand-side planning (DSP) has focused on forecasting, end-use technology assessment, demand-side management (DSM), and innovative pricing. These 23 papers discuss vital DSP research, including customer response to interruptible rates, personal computer forecasting tools, integrated value-based planning, customer preference and behavior studies, and a database of end-use load shapes and DSM impacts.

None

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Selected case studies of technology transfer from mission-oriented applied research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD) under the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) supports interdisciplinary applied research and exploratory development that will expand the knowledge base to enable industry to improve its energy efficiency and its capability to use alternative energy resources. AICD capitalizes on scientific and technical advances from the United States and abroad, applying them to address critical technical needs of American industry. As a result, AICD research and development products are many and varied, and the effective transfer of these products to diverse targeted users requires different strategies as well. This paper describes the products of AICD research, how they are transferred to potential users, and how actual transfer is determined.

Daellenbach, K.K.; Watts, R.L.; Young, J.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Abarcar, R.B. (Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effective Transfer of Waste Heat Recovery Technology: A Case Study of GTE Products Corporation's Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GTE Products Corporation recently completed a cost sharing technology acceleration program with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs (Contract No. DE-FC01-80CS40330). The cost shared program called for the installation of 175 ceramic recuperators on 38 different furnace that operate with clean exhaust between 1600 F and 2500 F. The engineering team approach utilized by GTE for the system design, installation, and start-up-shakedown support is considered the major reason for the reported success of the GTE program. Savings attributable to recuperation averaged 38% based on energy audits by Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Battelle was contracted to monitor the furnaces before and after the retrofit by the D.O.E. and condense report and compare the data in terms of specific energy consumption vs. product throughout. Economic analysis shows that payback periods generally range from 1 - 2.5 years.

Gonzalez, J. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Modeling Technology Innovation and Diffusion in Transition Economies: The Case of China  

SciTech Connect

Our research program has involved data collection and analysis, modeling building, and the presentation of results. The data collection and analysis work was done in collaboration with our colleagues at the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) in China. Each summer, we hosted on average four researchers from NBS for 3 months to work with us on the data analysis component of the research. Each summer our NBS colleagues would bring an updated data set of firm-level economic, R&D, and energy data that allowed us to explore the impacts of technological change on firm-level energy consumption. This grant also funded a number of graduate and undergraduate students to work on different elements of the analysis.

Karen Fisher-Vanden

2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

Correlations between industrial demands (direct and total) for communications and transportation in the US economy 1947-1997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information and communications technology on transportation.information and communication technologies (ICT), and travelcommunications and transportation using Almost Ideal Demand System modeling: 1984-2002. Transportation Planning and Technology

Lee, Taihyeong; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Residential Sector Demand Module 1997, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the third edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System. It reflects changes made to the moduleover the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997. Since last year, a subroutinewas added to the model which allows technology and fuel switching when space heaters,heat pump air conditioners, water heaters, stoves, and clothes dryers are retired in bothpre-1994 and post-1993 single-family homes. Also, a time-dependant function forcomputing the installed capital cost of equipment in new construction and the retail costof replacement equipment in existing housing was added.

John H. Cymbalsky

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S. RetailNoureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandanalysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. Energy

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

COMMENTS OF THE DEMAND RESPONSE AND SMART GRID COALITION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 COMMENTS OF THE DEMAND RESPONSE AND SMART GRID COALITION Department of Energy Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy July 12, 2010 The Demand Response and Smart Grid Coalition (DRSG) 1 , the trade association for companies that provide products and services in the areas of demand response and smart grid technologies, respectfully submits its comments to the Department of Energy's Request for Information "Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy."

385

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Projecting market demand for residential heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

Primarily because of technological improvements and sharp increases in energy prices after the 1970s energy crises, the sale of residential electric heat pumps rose ninefold from 1970 to 1983. This report describes current and future market demand for heat pumps used for space heating and cooling. A three-step approach was followed. In the first step, the historical growth of residential electric heat pumps was analyzed, and factors that may have affected market growth were examined. Also examined were installation trends of heat pumps in new single-family and multifamily homes. A market segmentation analysis was used to estimate market size by categories. In the second step, several methods for forecasting future market demand were reviewed and evaluated to select the most suitable one for this study. The discrete-choice approach was chosen. In the third step, a market penetration model based on selected discrete-choice methods was developed to project heat pump demand in key market segments such as home type (single-family or multifamily), new or existing construction, and race-ethnic origin of household (black, Hispanic, or white).

Teotia, A.P.S.; Raju, P.S.; Karvelas, D.; Anderson, J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Demand or Request: Will Load Behave?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power planning engineers are trained to design an electric system that satisfies predicted electrical demand under stringent conditions of availability and power quality. Like responsible custodians, we plan for the provision of electrical sustenance and shelter to those in whose care regulators have given us the responsibility to serve. Though most customers accept this nurturing gladly, a growing number are concerned with the economic costs and environmental impacts of service at a time when technology (particularly distributed generation, storage, automation, and information networks) offers alternatives for localized control and competitive service. As customers’ and their systems mature, a new relationship with the electricity provider is emerging. Demand response is perhaps the first unsteady step where the customer participates as a partner in system operations. This paper explores issues system planners need to consider as demand response matures to significant levels beyond direct load control and toward a situation where service is requested and bargains are reached with the electricity provider based on desired load behavior. On one hand, predicting load growth and behavior appears more daunting than ever. On the other, for the first time load becomes a new resource whose behavior can be influenced during system operations to balance system conditions.

Widergren, Steven E.

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

389

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart...

390

Demand for money in China .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the long-run equilibrium relationship between money demand and its determinants in China over the period 1952-2004 for three definitions of money –… (more)

Zhang, Qing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

392

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

393

Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Well, distillate fuel demand wasn't the reason that stocks increased in January 2001 and kept prices from going higher. As you will hear shortly, natural gas prices spiked...

394

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

395

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand & Marketing Coordinator 1 FTE, 1 HC Administrative Vice Chancellor Transportation and Parking Services Clifford A. Contreras (0245) Director 30.10 FTE Alternative Transportation & Marketing Reconciliation Lourdes Lupercio (4723) Michelle McArdle (7512) Parking

Hammock, Bruce D.

397

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado (Brochure)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Federal Energy Management Program United States Environmental Protection Agency L a b o r a t o r i e s f o r t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y : C a s e S t u d i e s Patrick Corkery/PIX14916 Case Study Index Laboratory Type ❑ Wet lab ❑ Dry lab ❑ Clean room Construction Type ❑ New ❑ Retrofit Type of Operation ❑ Research/development ❑ Manufacturing ❑ Teaching ❑ Chemistry ❑ Biology ❑ Electronics Service Option ❑ Suspended ceiling ❑ Utility service corridor ❑ Interstitial space Featured Technologies ❑ Fume hoods ❑ Controls ❑ Mechanical systems ❑ Electrical loads ❑ Water conservation ❑ Renewables ❑ Sustainable design/ planning ❑ On-site generation ❑ Daylighting ❑ Building commissioning Other Topics ❑ Diversity factor ❑ Carbon trading ❑ Selling concepts to

398

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program United States Environmental Protection Agency L a b o r a t o r i e s f o r t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y : C a s e S t u d i e s Patrick Corkery/PIX14916 Case Study Index Laboratory Type ❑ Wet lab ❑ Dry lab ❑ Clean room Construction Type ❑ New ❑ Retrofit Type of Operation ❑ Research/development ❑ Manufacturing ❑ Teaching ❑ Chemistry ❑ Biology ❑ Electronics Service Option ❑ Suspended ceiling ❑ Utility service corridor ❑ Interstitial space Featured Technologies ❑ Fume hoods ❑ Controls ❑ Mechanical systems ❑ Electrical loads ❑ Water conservation ❑ Renewables ❑ Sustainable design/ planning ❑ On-site generation ❑ Daylighting ❑ Building commissioning Other Topics ❑ Diversity factor

399

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings save power through automated demand response technology and advanced "Smart Grid" development. From left: Sila Kiliccote, Girish Ghatikar, and Mary Ann Piette. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cross-border transfer of climate change mitigation technologies : the case of wind energy from Denmark and Germany to India.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigated the causal factors and processes of international development and diffusion of wind energy technology by examining private sector cross-border technology transfer from… (more)

Mizuno, Emi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Implementation of Technology Integration in Higher Education: A Case Study of the University of Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of technology in education is one of the major trends in educational reforms all over the world. Integrating technology into the learning and… (more)

Kajuna, Laxford W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

SAO network analysis of patents for technology trends identification: a case study of polymer electrolyte membrane technology in proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper suggests a method for Subject---Action---Object (SAO) network analysis of patents for technology trends identification by using the concept of function. The proposed method solves the shortcoming of the keyword-based approach to identification ... Keywords: Actor network theory, C63, C82, Co-word analysis, Function, Patent analysis, Patent mining, Technology Subject-Action-Object (SAO), Technology trends analysis

Sungchul Choi; Janghyeok Yoon; Kwangsoo Kim; Jae Yeol Lee; Cheol-Han Kim

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

405

Renewable energy and its potential for carbon emissions reductions in developing countries: Methodology for technology evaluation. Case study application to Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many projects have been proposed to promote and demonstrate renewable energy technologies (RETs) in developing countries on the basis of their potential to reduce carbon emissions. However, no uniform methodology has been developed for evaluating RETs in terms of their future carbon emissions reduction potential. This study outlines a methodology for identifying RETs that have the potential for achieving large carbon emissions reductions in the future, while also meeting key criteria for commercialization and acceptability in developing countries. In addition, this study evaluates the connection between technology identification and the selection of projects that are designed to demonstrate technologies with a propensity for carbon emission reductions (e.g., Global Environmental Facility projects). Although this report applies the methodology to Mexico in a case study format, the methodology is broad based and could be applied to any developing country, as well as to other technologies. The methodology used in this report is composed of four steps: technology screening, technology identification, technology deployment scenarios, and estimates of carbon emissions reductions. The four technologies with the highest ranking in the technology identification process for the on-grid category were geothermal, biomass cogeneration, wind, and micro-/mini-hydro. Compressed natural gas (CNG) was the alternative that received the highest ranking for the transportation category.

Corbus, D.; Martinez, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Mark, J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Biometrics Technology and the New Economy: A Review of the Field and the Case of the United Arab Emirates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, biometrics technology has evolved from a technology used primarily in forensics and a narrow scientific and technological field to an indispensable technology in public and private sectors expanding into areas calling for advanced ... Keywords: Biometrics, Digital Economy, Digital Society, Identity Management, United Arab Emirates

Ali M. Al-Khouri

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Density Forecasting for Long-Term Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term electricity demand forecasting plays an important role in planning for future generation facilities and transmission augmentation. In a long-term context, planners must adopt a probabilistic view of potential peak demand levels. Therefore density forecasts (providing estimates of the full probability distributions of the possible future values of the demand) are more helpful than point forecasts, and are necessary for utilities to evaluate and hedge the financial risk accrued by demand variability and forecasting uncertainty. This paper proposes a new methodology to forecast the density of long-term peak electricity demand. Peak electricity demand in a given season is subject to a range of uncertainties, including underlying population growth, changing technology, economic conditions, prevailing weather conditions (and the timing of those conditions), as well as the general randomness inherent in individual usage. It is also subject to some known calendar effects due to the time of day, day of week, time of year, and public holidays. A comprehensive forecasting solution is described in this paper. First, semi-parametric additive models are used to estimate the relationships between demand and the driver variables, including temperatures, calendar effects and some demographic and economic variables. Then the demand distributions are forecasted by using a mixture of temperature simulation, assumed future economic scenarios, and residual bootstrapping. The temperature simulation is implemented through a new seasonal bootstrapping method with variable blocks. The proposed methodology has been used to forecast the probability distribution of annual and weekly peak electricity demand for South Australia since 2007. The performance of the methodology is evaluated by comparing the forecast results with the actual demand of the summer 2007–2008.

Rob J. Hyndman; Shu Fan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Introduction to Commercial Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response -- Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are 3 appendices listed: (A) DR strategies for HVAC systems; (B) Summary of DR strategies; and (C) Case study of advanced demand response.

Motegi, N.; Piette, M.A.; Watson, D.S.; Kiliccote, S.; Xu, P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Power Technologies Data Book  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared by NREL's Energy Analysis Office, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts and comparisons, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, conversion factors, and selected congressional questions and answers.

Goldstein, L.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evaluating trade-offs between sustainability, performance, and cost of green machining technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA Institute for Production Science, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany Abstract The growing demand

Helu, Moneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Univariate modeling and forecasting of monthly energy demand time series using abductive and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neural networks have been widely used for short-term, and to a lesser degree medium and long-term, demand forecasting. In the majority of cases for the latter two applications, multivariate modeling was adopted, where the demand time series is related ... Keywords: Abductive networks, Energy demand, Medium-term load forecasting, Neural networks, Time series forecasting, Univariate time series analysis

R. E. Abdel-Aal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985, 2000, and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands and impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration are forecast using a set of energy technology assumptions.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

416

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

417

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

419

A dynamic model of industrial energy demand in Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyses the effects of input price movements, technology changes, capacity utilization and dynamic mechanisms on energy demand structures in the Kenyan industry. This is done with the help of a variant of the second generation dynamic factor demand (econometric) model. This interrelated disequilibrium dynamic input demand econometric model is based on a long-term cost function representing production function possibilities and takes into account the asymmetry between variable inputs (electricity, other-fuels and Tabour) and quasi-fixed input (capital) by imposing restrictions on the adjustment process. Variations in capacity utilization and slow substitution process invoked by the relative input price movement justifies the nature of input demand disequilibrium. The model is estimated on two ISIS digit Kenyan industry time series data (1961 - 1988) using the Iterative Zellner generalized least square method. 31 refs., 8 tabs.

Haji, S.H.H. [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

422

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover,138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW” by 2030, or 14–

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential ofneed to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demandcustomers and a system peak demand of over 43,000 MW. SPP’s

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with total Statewide peak demand and on peak days isto examine the electric peak demand related to lighting inDaily) - TOU Savings - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -Low

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...

427

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

428

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

429

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast

430

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

431

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

433

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC) 2006. “Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2007. “Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

435

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Title Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Eto, Joseph H.,...

436

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 – 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Equity Capital Flows and Demand for REITs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the shape of the market demand curve for ... Our results do not support a downward demand curve for ... Charleston, IL 61920, USA e-mail: ...

439

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland CA, December. PJM Demand Side Response WorkingPrice Response Program a PJM Economic Load Response ProgramLoad Response Statistics PJM Demand Response Working Group

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29 5.6. Peak and hourly demand43 6.6. Peak and seasonal demandthe average percent of peak demand) significantly impact the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Demand-Side Management Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, demand-side management (DSM) programs have grown in significance within the U.S. electric power industry. Such rapid growth has resulted in new terms, standards, and vocabulary used by DSM professionals. This report is a first attempt to provide a consistent set of definitions for the expanding DSM terminology.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cross-border transfer of climate change mitigation technologies : the case of wind energy from Denmark and Germany to India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigated the causal factors and processes of international development and diffusion of wind energy technology by examining private sector cross-border technology transfer from Denmark and Germany to India ...

Mizuno, Emi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Encouraging technology transition through value creation, capture and delivery strategies : the case of data link in the North Atlantic airspace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies the problem of data link in the NAT under a technology transition framework of value creation, capture, and delivery. Creating value through a new technology, such as data link, refers to designing ...

Campos, Norma Viviana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Case History of a Clean Water Act Compliance Agreement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Golden, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major Clean Water Act (CWA) Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement was signed on March 25, 1991 by the US Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Field Office (DOE, RFFO) and the Water Enforcement Division of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VIII. The agreement revised the Rocky Flats Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and arose from pemittee-requested changes in effluent monitoring points and permit violations, most notably the February 22, 1989 Chromic Acid Incident. The Rocky Flats Plant, now called the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) near Golden Colorado was operated at that time by Rockwell International Corporation, who later plead guilty to six misdemeanor and felony counts of the CWA (the aforementioned NPDES permit violations) and paid a $4 million fine on March 26, 1992. The Compliance Agreement, hereafter referred to as the NPDES FFCA, called for three separate remedial action plans and contained a schedule for their submittal to the EPA. The compliance plans focussed on: (1) Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) performance upgrades, (2) source control and surface water protection, and (3) characterization of the impacts from past sludge disposal practices. Projects that implemented the compliance plans were initiated soon after submittal to the EPA and are forecast to complete in 1997 at a total cost of over $35 million. This paper presents a case history of NPDES FFCA compliance projects and highlights the successes, failures, and lessons learned.

Thompson, J.S.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

447

Lighting Business Case -- A Report Analyzing Lighting Technology Opportunities with High Return on Investment Energy Savings for the Federal Sector  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes lighting technology opportunities with high return on investment energy savings for the Federal sector.

Jones, Carol C.; Richman, Eric E.

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Demand Dispatch — Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. Demand Dispatch: Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid

Keith Dodrill

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

450

LNG demand, shipping will expand through 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990s, especially the middle years, have witnessed a dramatic turnaround in the growth of liquefied-natural-gas demand which has tracked equally strong natural-gas demand growth. This trend was underscored late last year by several annual studies of world LNG demand and shipping. As 1998 began, however, economic turmoil in Asian financial markets has clouded near-term prospects for LNG in particular and all energy in general. But the extent of damage to energy markets is so far unclear. A study by US-based Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL, reveals that LNG imports worldwide have climbed nearly 8%/year since 1980 and account for 25% of all natural gas traded internationally. In the mid-1970s, the share was only 5%. In 1996, the most recent year for which complete data are available, world LNG trade rose 7.7% to a record 92 billion cu m, outpacing the overall consumption for natural gas which increased 4.7% in 1996. By 2015, says the IGT study, natural-gas use would surpass coal as the world`s second most widely used fuel, after petroleum. Much of this growth will occur in the developing countries of Asia where gas use, before the current economic crisis began, was projected to grow 8%/year through 2015. Similar trends are reflected in another study of LNG trade released at year end 1997, this from Ocean Shipping Consultants Ltd., Surrey, U.K. The study was done too early, however, to consider the effects of the financial problems roiling Asia.

True, W.R.

1998-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Technology flexibility as enabler of robust application development in community source: The case of Kuali and Sakai  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology flexibility has been an important topic in software engineering since the start of computerized business applications, which require frequent changes to system specifications due to ever changing business requirements. Achieving a higher degree ... Keywords: Agile enterprise, Community source, Open source, Service oriented architecture, Technology flexibility, Workflow technology

Manlu Liu; Harry Jiannan Wang; J. Leon Zhao

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Energy prices and the adoption of energy-saving technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the link between factor prices, technology and factor demands. I estimate the effect of price-induced technology adoption on energy demand in the U.S. manufacturing sector, using plant data from the ...

Linn, Joshua

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

044E 044E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Charles Goldman, Michael Reid, Roger Levy and Alison Silverstein Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2010 The work described in this report was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes

455

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LBNL-1470E LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2009 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of

456

Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ  

SciTech Connect

Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

458

Organizing technologies of vision: Making the invisible visible in media-laden observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sociomaterial practices produce, in many cases, opportunities for different modes of vision that further structure social practices. The very organization of the technologies of vision, or visual media, thus demands scholarly attention. Drawing on media ... Keywords: Matter, Media theory, Media-laden vision, Vision

Alexander Styhre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

460

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand technology case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

462

Demand Trading: Measurement, Verification, and Settlement (MVS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With this report, EPRI's trilogy of publications on demand trading is complete. The first report (1006015), the "Demand Trading Toolkit," documented how to conduct demand trading based on price. The second report (1001635), "Demand Trading: Building Liquidity," focused on the problem of liquidity in the energy industry and developed the Demand Response Resource Bank concept for governing electricity markets based on reliability. The present report focuses on the emerging price/risk partnerships in electr...

2004-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Trends in Energy Management Technologies - Part 5: Effectiveness of Energy Management Systems: What the Experts Say and Case Studies Reveal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies Division, LBNL. Trends in Energy ManagementLBNL. Webster, T, 2002. “Trends Affecting Building ControlPrincipal, Facility Dynamics. Trends in Energy Management

Webster, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

How do firms promote stability in an evolving technological system? : - The case of second generation biofuels in Norway.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis aims to increase the understanding of the formative phase of an evolving technological innovation system (TIS) related to second generation (2G) biofuels in… (more)

Blomberg, Line Elisabeth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : Demand Response Quick...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Back to Tool Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick...

469

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the amount of electricity demand that is settled forward.unresponsive demand side, electricity demand has to be metxed percentage of overall electricity demand. The ISO, thus,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingthe average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricityuse charges, demand ratchets, peak demand charges, and other

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Demand Response Design based on a Stackelberg Game in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Design based on a Stackelberg Game in Smart Grid Sung-Guk Yoon, Young-June Choi and communications technology (ICT), that is, smart grid. With help of a two-way communication infrastructure, a real- time demand response can be applied. A smart grid network consisting of one retailer and many customers

Bahk, Saewoong

473

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. Figure 7. Industrial Demand Module Structure Industrial energy demand is projected as a combination of “bottom up” characterizations of the energy-using technology and “top down” econometric estimates of behavior. The influence of energy prices on industrial energy consumption is modeled in terms of the efficiency of use of existing capital, the efficiency of new capital acquisitions, and the mix of fuels utilized, given existing capital stocks. Energy conservation from technological change is represented over time by trend-based “technology possibility curves.” These curves represent the aggregate efficiency of all new technologies that are likely to penetrate the future markets as well as the aggregate improvement in efficiency of 1994 technology.

474

Saving Energy and Enabling Auto-Demand Response in Existing Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Saving Energy and Enabling Auto-Demand Response in Existing Buildings and Plants Using Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies Speaker(s): Harry Sim Date: April 7, 2011 - 12:00pm...

475

Incorporating endogenous demand dynamics into long-term capacity expansion power system models for Developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops a novel approach to long-term power system capacity expansion planning for developing countries by incorporating endogenous demand dynamics resulting from social processes of technology adoption. ...

Jordan, Rhonda LeNai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes The Expert Panel has concluded that the Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health must develop the capability to produce a diverse supply of radioisotopes for medical use in quantities sufficient to support research and clinical activities. Such a capability would prevent shortages of isotopes, reduce American dependence on foreign radionuclide sources and stimulate biomedical research. The expert panel recommends that the U.S. government build this capability around either a reactor, an accelerator or a combination of both technologies as long as isotopes for clinical and research applications can be supplied reliably, with diversity in adequate

477

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

478

Evolution of the Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evolution of the Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid Evolution of the Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid Speaker(s): Nathan Ota Date: October 20, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page Smart grid technology has rapidly evolved over the course of the last five years. From a demand side management perspective this includes consumer-owned Home Area Networks (HAN), network-centric HAN gateways, and a leveraging of a multitier smart grid for a variety of DSM applications. In particular, smart meters enable the consumer with electricity price information and near-real time energy usage data, but they also are the devices that consumers will most often interact. The success or failure of the in-home device is therefore critical to the larger Smart Grid success. Today, distinct DSM product categories are leading to a variety of new

479

Customer Demand Issues in SmartGrids European Platform: Relevant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Customer Demand Issues in SmartGrids European Platform: Relevant Customer Demand Issues in SmartGrids European Platform: Relevant Initiatives Speaker(s): Carlos Alvarez-Bel Date: June 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette SmartGrids technological platform was created by the European Commission in order to develop and identify research topics and objectives to facilitate the implementation of future electric grids. Smart grid is, by definition, user-centric, which implies that enhancing and promoting customer participation in electricity markets and systems, from efficiency to demand response, is a key goal. Efficiency targets in Europe (20% energy reduction in 2020) will probably not be met and, on the contrary, the renewable generation share target of 20% for the same year seems affordable. These

480

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

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481

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. The “Utility or ISO Operator OpenADR Interface” lists1. The “Utility or ISO Operator OpenADR Interface” listsSheets List of Figures Figure 1. OpenADR Version 1.0 Utility

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Small Commercial, Residential Author: Haider Taha VII. Solar Domestic Water Heaters........................................................................... 59 End-Use: Water Heating Sector: Residential Author: Jim Lutz VIII. Heat Pump Water Heaters ................................................................................. 63 End-Use: Water Heating Sector: Residential Author: Jim Lutz IX. Energy-Efficient Motors

483

Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for overall levels of advanced metering in both the electricity and gas sectors (FERC, 2006). Comparing countries and regions is a difficult task, however, because there is no single definition of what it means for a meter or a metering system...

Brophy Haney, A; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

484

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aim to minimize energy costs over time. Note that becausedue to increased energy costs over time. Customers couldtime prices and price duration curves for a facility in Year 1 (low energy cost

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With such a large number of customers who are now on thebe to have customer-specified daily number of hours for eachnumber or percentage) based on historical prices and customer

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

left) and High (right) Electricity Price References..32 Listin response to dynamic electricity prices using the Opena variety of dynamic electricity price structures. In this

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In peak pricing tariffs, electricity prices on peak days areIn peak pricing tariffs, electricity prices on peak days areof California electricity pricing tariffs (including RTP,

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and time-of-use rates to commercial and industrial electricityprices to commercial and industrial facilities. 2. Evaluate if existing static electricity

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California utility retail electricity rates and independentCalifornia utility retail electricity rates and independenttime-of-use rates to commercial and industrial electricity

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for the Study of Energy Markets Paper CSEMWP-105.OASIS SDO. 2010b. “Energy Market Information Exchange (eMIX)charges. • Wholesale energy market prices are volatile, and

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Version 1.0). ” California Energy Commission, PIER Program.Markets. ” University of California Energy Institute: CenterSystem Communications. California Energy Commission, PIER

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lighting control systems that integrate with daylighting inlighting control systems that integrate with daylighting in

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energycost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperabilityaccessed: 6/16/2010. Open Smart Grid Users Group. “OpenADRactivities within the Smart Grid. Keywords: Commercial and

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within the emerging “Smart Grid” domain. With the ongoingwithin the emerging “Smart Grid” domain. With the ongoing

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

active within the emerging “Smart Grid” domain. With ongoingactive within the emerging “Smart Grid” domain. With ongoing

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OASIS SDO. 2010b. “Energy Market Information Exchange (eMIX)11 Wholesale Electricity Market InformationWholesale Electricity Market Information Systems Several

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s) and the energy management systems within the facilities.use of an energy management control system (EMCS) or energyor hardwire energy management control systems to curtail

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with hydro power and wind integration, more DR may be neededload growth, wind power integration, and fish operations are

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

link wholesale and retail real-time prices. 6.0 Referencesdynamic prices such as real-time prices and peak prices andFigure 5. Average Daily Real-Time Prices and Price Duration

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z