National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for demand supply infrastructure

  1. The Future of U.S. Natural Gas: Supply, Demand & Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developments | Department of Energy The Future of U.S. Natural Gas: Supply, Demand & Infrastructure Developments The Future of U.S. Natural Gas: Supply, Demand & Infrastructure Developments This analysis forecasts natural gas supply, demand, and infrastructure developments through 2030 using an inventory and cell model. After introduction of methodology and market approach, the analysis describes expectations of production and supply and demand. This includes how production shifts in

  2. Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Final Report M. Melendez and A. Milbrandt Technical Report NRELTP-540-40373 October 2006 NREL is operated...

  3. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  4. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C. PDF icon melendez_geo_h2_demand.pdf More Documents & Publications 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting Agenda for August 9 - 10, 2006 Agenda for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and

  5. Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand *

  6. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector This...

  7. EIA projections of coal supply and demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, D.E.

    1989-10-23

    Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

  8. U.S. Coal Supply and Demand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9

  9. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2010-01-08

    July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  10. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scenario Analysis Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure meeting on January 31, 2007. PDF icon...

  11. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C....

  12. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  13. The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochlin, Cliff

    2009-11-15

    Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

  14. United States Fuel Resiliency: US Fuels Supply Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report: United States Fuel Resiliency – U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructure Study: (1) Infrastructure Characterization; (II) Vulnerability to Natural and Physical Threats; and (III) Vulnerability and Resilience This report assesses the U.S. fuels supply transportation, storage, and distribution (TS&D) infrastructure, its vulnerabilities (natural and physical threats), and its resiliency. The analysis employs a region-by-region perspective of U.S. fuels supply infrastructure, mirroring the Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) system that underpins liquid fuels commerce. The report also assesses the TS&D networks for crude oil and condensates, petroleum products (gasoline, diesel, natural gas liquids, biofuels, and natural gas. Key findings include:

  15. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis | Department of Energy Rollout Scenario Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure meeting on January 31, 2007. PDF icon scenario_analysis_melendez1_07.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Policy and Analyzing the Transition Hydrogen Transition Study Lessons and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling

  16. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2008-07-29

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  17. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  18. Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2006-10-01

    In FY 2004 and 2005, NREL developed a proposed minimal infrastructure to support nationwide deployment of hydrogen vehicles by offering infrastructure scenarios that facilitated interstate travel. This report identifies key metropolitan areas and regions on which to focus infrastructure efforts during the early hydrogen transition.

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Joe Rose.Providence.Propane Supply Infrastructure.pptx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Propane Supply & Infrastructure Prepared for Quadrennial Energy Review Home Heating Panel April 21, 2014 Crop Drying DemandGallon * Record Corn Crop - 13.9 billion bushels * Cooler than normal weather in July and August delayed the harvest. * Above-average rainfall in October * Grain drying season started late and finished late Colder than Normal Weather October to March Heating Degree Days The 2013/2014 winter was: - 7.5 percent colder than 30- year normal weather - 10.5 percent colder

  20. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use.

  1. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector U.S. Department of Energy Page i Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector U.S. Department of Energy Page iii Table of Contents Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction

  2. Hydrogen Infrastructure Expansion: Consumer Demand and Cost-Reduction Potential (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Expansion: Consumer Demand and Cost-Reduction Potential Hydrogen Infrastructure Investment Forum- Palo Alto, California Dr. Marc Melaina Senior Engineer April 16, 2014 NREL/PR-5400-61966 2 Presentation Overview * How much do consumers value hydrogen station availability? * How much will station costs decline with volume? * What kind of market growth is needed to ensure station cost reductions (and adequate return on investment, or ROI)? How much do consumers value hydrogen station

  3. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use. To perform this analysis, the U.S. Department of Energy commissioned Deloitte MarketPoint to examine scenarios in its North American Integrated Model (NAIM), which simultaneously models the electric power and the natural gas sectors. This study concludes that, under scenarios in which natural gas demand from the electric power sector increases, the incremental increase in interstate natural gas pipeline expansion is modest, relative to historical capacity additions. Similarly, capital expenditures on new interstate pipelines in the scenarios considered here are projected to be significantly less than the capital expenditures associated with infrastructure expansion over the last 15 years.

  4. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume I U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Volume I U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructure Infrastructure Characterization FINAL REPORT Prepared for: Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 INTEK Inc. Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees or contractors, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

  5. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gasoline in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining industry.

  6. Supply and Demand of Helium-3| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Supply and Demand of Helium-3 Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: Email Us More Information » Isotope Development & Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) Supply and Demand

  7. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume II U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Resiliency Volume II U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructure Vulnerability to Natural and Physical Threats FINAL REPORT Prepared for: Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 INTEK Inc. . Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees or contractors, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

  8. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume III U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Volume III U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructure Vulnerabilities and Resiliency FINAL REPORT Prepared for: Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 INTEK Inc. Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees or contractors, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

  9. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure The facility houses equipment such as glove box, fume hoods, oxygen-free nanopure water system and ultrasonic processors. Schlenk-type techniques are routinely used...

  10. Electric power supply and demand for the contiguous United States, 1980-1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    A limited review is presented of the outlook for the electric power supply and demand during the period 1980 to 1989. Only the adequacy and reliability aspects of bulk electric power supply in the contiguous US are considered. The economic, financial and environmental aspects of electric power system planning and the distribution of electricity (below the transmission level) are topics of prime importance, but they are outside the scope of this report.

  11. Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global LNG Trade

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    This article is adapted from testimony by Jay Hakes, Administrator of the Energy Information Administration, before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on July 23, 1997. The hearing focused on the examination of certain aspects of natural gas into the next century with special emphasis on world natural gas supply and demand to 2015.

  12. Hydrogen Infrastructure Expansion: Consumer Demand and Cost-Reduction Potential (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.

    2014-04-01

    The presentation summarizes key challenges in financing hydrogen infrastructure and reviews analysis tools available to inform investment decisions and reduce financial risks.

  13. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure (D2SA) Co-Chairs: Christopher Beggio, Sandia National Laboratories Robin Goldstone, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories 1 Contributors * Bill Allcock, Argonne Leadership Computing Facility * Chris Beggio, Sandia National Laboratories * Clay England, Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility * Doug Fuller, Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility * Robin Goldstone, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory * Jason Hick, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center * Kyle

  14. 2012 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) 12 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources NP Workforce Survey Results .pdf file (182KB) Links News Archives Databases Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  15. 2013 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) 3 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources NP Workforce Survey Results .pdf file (182KB) Links News Archives Databases Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  16. 2014 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) 4 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources NP Workforce Survey Results .pdf file (182KB) Links News Archives Databases Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  17. 2015 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) 5 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources NP Workforce Survey Results .pdf file (182KB) Links News Archives Databases Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  18. Factors that will influence oil and gas supply and demand in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holditch, S.A.; Chianelli, R.R.

    2008-04-15

    A recent report published by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) in the United States predicted a 50-60% growth in total global demand for energy by 2030. Because oil, gas, and coal will continue to be the primary energy sources during this time, the energy industry will have to continue increasing the supply of these fuels to meet this increasing demand. Achieving this goal will require the exploitation of both conventional and unconventional reservoirs of oil and gas in (including coalbed methane) an environmentally acceptable manner. Such efforts will, in turn, require advancements in materials science, particularly in the development of materials that can withstand high-pressure, high-temperature, and high-stress conditions.

  19. U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all

  20. renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply s

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And

  1. Workforce planning for DOE/EM: Assessing workforce demand and supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to bringing its facilities into regulatory compliance and restoring the environment of sites under its control by the year 2019. Responsibility for accomplishing this goal is vested with the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Concerns regarding the availability of workers with the necessary technical skills and the prospect of retraining workers from other programs within DOE or other industries are addressed in this report in several ways. First, various workforce projections relevant to EM occupations are compared to determine common findings and resolve inconsistencies. Second, case studies, interviews, and published data are used to examine the potential availability of workers for these occupations via occupational mobility, training/retraining options, and salary adjustments. Third, demand and supply factors are integrated in a framework useful for structuring workforce analyses. The analyses demonstrate that workforce skills are not anticipated to change due to the change in mission; science, engineering, and technician occupations tend to be mobile within and across occupational categories; experience and on-the-job training are more crucial to issues of worker supply than education; and, the clarity of an organization`s mission, budget allocation process, work implementation and task assignment systems are critical determinants of both workforce need and supply. DOE is encouraged to create a more stable platform for workforce planning by resolving organizational and institutional hindrances to accomplishing work and capitalizing on workforce characteristics besides labor {open_quotes}supply{close_quotes} and demographics.

  2. Estimated winter 1980-1981 electric demand and supply, contiguous United States. Staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the most recent data available concerning projected electrical peak demands and available power resouces for the 1980-1981 winter peak period, as reported by electric utilities in the contiguous United States. The data, grouped by Regional Reliability Council areas and by Electrical Regions within the Council areas, was obtained from the Form 12E-2 reports filed by utilities with the Department of Energy on October 15, 1980 (data as of September 30). In some instances the data were revised or verified by telephone. Considerations affecting reliability, arising from Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions based on lessons learned from the forced outage of Three Mile Island Nuclear Unit No. 2, were factored into the report. No widespread large-scale reliability problems are foreseen for electric power supply this winter, on the basis of the supply and demand projections furnished by the electric utilities. Reserve margins could drop in some electric regions to levels considered inadequate for reliable service, if historical forced-outage magnitudes recur.

  3. Materials used in new generation vehicles: supplies, shifts, and supporting infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program intends to develop new designs for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption by two thirds but otherwise have price, comfort, safety, and other measures of performance similar to the typical automobile now on the market. PNGV vehicle designs are expected to substitute lightweight materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, carbon-reinforced polymer composites, glass-reinforced polymer composites, and ultra- light steel, for heavier materials such as steel and iron in automobile components. The target mass of a PNGV vehicle is 1,960 pounds, as compared to the average current vehicle that weights 3,240 pounds. Other changes could include the use of different ferrous alloys, engineering changes, or incorporation of advanced ceramic components. Widespread adoption of these vehicle designs would affect materials markets and require concurrent development and adoption of supporting technologies to supply the materials and to use and maintain them in automobiles. This report identifies what would be required to bring about these changes and developments in materials substitution; identifies reasons that might make these substitutions difficult to accomplish within the overall objectives and timetable of the PNGV program; and identifies any issues arising from the substitution that could prompt consideration of policies to deal with them. The analysis in this paper uses scenarios that assume the production of new generation vehicles will begin in 2007 and that their market share will increase gradually over the following 25 years. The scenarios on which the analysis is based assume a maximum substitution of each potential replacement material considered. This maximum substitution of individual materials (i.e., the amount of replacement material by weight that would be added to the baseline vehicle`s composition) is as follows: ULSAB (high strength steel), 298 lbs.; glass-reinforced composites, 653 lbs.; carbon-reinforced composites, 379 lbs.; aluminum, 926 lbs.; and magnesium, 216 lbs. The substitutions (and the steel and iron they replace) are multiplied by the number of new generation vehicles produced on an annual basis out to 2030 to determine the total quantity of material used in new generation vehicles and the quantity of steel that would be displaced. We identified six stages in the life cycle of materials--mining or extraction of resources; smelting or other processing to produce the material from the resource; producing components from the material; assembling the components into vehicles, using, maintaining, and repairing vehicles; and disposing of the vehicle, including any recycling of materials for automotive or other use--and identified what might be required to supply and use the substitute materials at different life cycle stages. The variables considered are the mineral or material supply, the capital and equipment (including necessary capacity, technical changes, cost, and location), labor and employment, energy, material complements, and environmental emissions and impacts. The analysis shows that raw materials to produce each of the replacement materials are sufficiently available, and adequate mining or extraction capacity exists for each. However, challenges are possible at the material production stage for three of the four materials. For aluminum and magnesium the difficulties are associated with requirements for significant new production capacity, necessary for aluminum because new production equipment will be needed to produce the material in a cost-effective manner and for magnesium because current production capacity is inadequate. The required capacity investment for magnesium to meet demand in 2030 is $13.1 billion. Both materials also would sharply increase energy requirements, and both industries would likely develop mostly--if not entirely--outside the United States. To produce the carbon-based fiber to meet PNGV demand in 2015, an entire new industry must be developed--a $4.6 billion investment. Significant environmental concerns

  4. Convergence of Vehicle and Infrastructure Data for Traffic and Demand Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Stanley E.

    2015-11-16

    The increasing availability of highly granular, vehicle trajectory data combined with ever increasing stores of roadway sensor data has provided unparalleled observability into the operation of our urban roadway networks. These data sources are quickly moving from research and prototype environments into full-scale commercial deployment and data offerings. The observability gained allows for increased control opportunities to enhance transportation mobility, safety and energy efficiency. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is involved in three initiatives to leverage these data for positive outcomes: 1) In 2015 NREL, in cooperation with industry and university partners, was awarded an ARPA-E research grant to research a control architecture to incentivize individual travelers toward more sustainable travel behavior. Based on real-time data on the traveler's destination and state of the system, the traveler is presented with route and/or mode choices and offered incentives to accept sustainable alternatives over less-sustainable ones. The project tests the extent to which small incentives can influence, or tip the balance toward more sustainable travel behavior. 2) Although commercial sources of travel time and speed have emerged in recent years based on vehicle probe data, volume estimates continue to rely primarily on historical count data factored for the time of day, day of week, and season of year. Real-time volume flows would enable better tools, simulation in the loop, and ultimately more effective control outcomes. NREL in cooperation with the University of Maryland and industry traffic data providers (INRIX, HERE and TomTom), are attempting to accelerate the timeframe to a viable real-time vehicle volume data feed based on probe data. 3) Signal control on urban arterials for years has had to rely on models rather than measured data to assess performance. High-resolution controller data and low-cost re-identification data now allows for direct measurement of the quality of progression along a corridor. Though still requiring an investment in equipment and communications, these data sources are transforming traffic signal management to a data driven, performance management basis. Ever increasing availability of granular GPS trace data from automobiles may allow for assessment of traffic signal performance, allowing for signal optimization while minimizing the investment in additional sensors and communication infrastructure.

  5. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

  6. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  7. Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

  8. Technology and energy supply

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Donald L. Paul Executive Director, USC Energy Institute and William M. Keck Chair of Energy Resources 06 April 2010 EIA and SAIS 2010 Energy Conference Energy and the Economy Technology and Energy Transformation Science and Technology + Economics and Business + Society and Environment + Policy and Government Scale, time, and complexity 3 Existing supply and demand infrastructure New resources, infrastructures, and paradigms Multiple generations of technology History, the present, and the future

  9. SU-E-J-102: Separation of Metabolic Supply and Demand: From Power Grid Economics to Cancer Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, T; Xu, L; Gillies, R; Gatenby, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study a new model of glucose metabolism which is primarily governed by the timescale of the energetic demand and not by the oxygen level, and its implication on cancer metabolism (Warburg effect) Methods: 1) Metabolic profiling of membrane transporters activity in several cell lines, which represent the spectrum from normal breast epithelium to aggressive, metastatic cancer, using Seahorse XF reader.2) Spatial localization of oxidative and non-oxidative metabolic components using immunocytochemical imaging of the glycolytic ATP-producing enzyme, pyruvate kinase and mitochondria. 3) Finite element simulations of coupled partial differential equations using COMSOL and MATLAB. Results: Inhibition or activation of pumps on the cell membrane led to reduction or increase in aerobic glycolysis, respectively, while oxidative phosphorylation remained unchanged. These results were consistent with computational simulations of changes in short-timescale demand for energy by cell membrane processes. A specific model prediction was that the spatial distribution of ATP-producing enzymes in the glycolytic pathway must be primarily localized adjacent to the cell membrane, while mitochondria should be predominantly peri-nuclear. These predictions were confirmed experimentally. Conclusion: The results in this work support a new model for glucose metabolism in which glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation supply different types of energy demand. Similar to power grid economics, optimal metabolic control requires the two pathways, even in normoxic conditions, to match two different types of energy demands. Cells use aerobic metabolism to meet baseline, steady energy demand and glycolytic metabolism to meet short-timescale energy demands, mainly from membrane transport activities, even in the presence of oxygen. This model provides a mechanism for the origin of the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Here, the Warburg effect emerges during carcinogenesis is a physiological response to an increase in energy demands from membrane transporters, required for cell division, growth, and migration. This work is supported by the NIH Physical Sciences in Oncology Center grant 1U54CA143970-03 and NIH R01 CA077575-10.

  10. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

    2009-09-01

    In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

  11. A resilience assessment framework for infrastructure and economic systems : quantitative and qualitative resilience analysis of petrochemical supply chains to a hurricane.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vugrin, Eric D.; Warren, Drake E.

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the nation has recognized that critical infrastructure protection should consider not only the prevention of disruptive events, but also the processes that infrastructure systems undergo to maintain functionality following disruptions. This more comprehensive approach has been termed critical infrastructure resilience (CIR). Given the occurrence of a particular disruptive event, the resilience of a system to that event is the system's ability to efficiently reduce both the magnitude and duration of the deviation from targeted system performance levels. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has developed a comprehensive resilience assessment framework for evaluating the resilience of infrastructure and economic systems. The framework includes a quantitative methodology that measures resilience costs that result from a disruption to infrastructure function. The framework also includes a qualitative analysis methodology that assesses system characteristics that affect resilience in order to provide insight and direction for potential improvements to resilience. This paper describes the resilience assessment framework. This paper further demonstrates the utility of the assessment framework through application to a hypothetical scenario involving the disruption of a petrochemical supply chain by a hurricane.

  12. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric...

  13. Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2005-05-01

    Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

  14. IEA Bioenergy Task 40Sustainable International Bioenergy Trade:Securing Supply and Demand Country Report 2014—United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, J. Richard; Lamers, Patrick; Roni, Mohammad S.; Jacobson, Jacob J.; Heath, Brendi

    2015-01-01

    Logistical barrier are tied to feedstock harvesting, collection, storage and distribution. Current crop harvesting machinery is unable to selectively harvest preferred components of cellulosic biomass while maintaining acceptable levels of soil carbon and minimizing erosion. Actively managing biomass variability imposes additional functional requirements on biomass harvesting equipment. A physiological variation in biomass arises from differences in genetics, degree of crop maturity, geographical location, climatic events, and harvest methods. This variability presents significant cost and performance risks for bioenergy systems. Currently, processing standards and specifications for cellulosic feedstocks are not as well-developed as for mature commodities. Biomass that is stored with high moisture content or exposed to moisture during storage is susceptible to spoilage, rotting, spontaneous combustion, and odor problems. Appropriate storage methods and strategies are needed to better define storage requirements to preserve the volume and quality of harvested biomass over time and maintain its conversion yield. Raw herbaceous biomass is costly to collect, handle, and transport because of its low density and fibrous nature. Existing conventional, bale-based handling equipment and facilities cannot cost-effectively deliver and store high volumes of biomass, even with improved handling techniques. Current handling and transportation systems designed for moving woodchips can be inefficient for bioenergy processes due to the costs and challenges of transporting, storing, and drying high-moisture biomass. The infrastructure for feedstock logistics has not been defined for the potential variety of locations, climates, feedstocks, storage methods, processing alternatives, etc., which will occur at a national scale. When setting up biomass fuel supply chains, for large-scale biomass systems, logistics are a pivotal part in the system. Various studies have shown that long-distance international transport by ship is feasible in terms of energy use and transportation costs, but availability of suitable vessels and meteorological conditions (e.g., winter time in Scandinavia and Russia) need to be considered. However, local transportation by truck (both in biomass exporting and importing countries) may be a high-cost factor, which can influence the overall energy balance and total biomass costs.

  15. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (This page intentionally left blank) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy

  16. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West Executive Summary David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency &

  17. Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Hyunju; Pandit, Arka; Crittenden, John; Xu, Ming; Perrings, Charles; Wang, Dali; Li, Ke; French, Steve

    2010-10-01

    The population growth coupled with increasing urbanization is predicted to exert a huge demand on the growth and retrofit of urban infrastructure, particularly in water and energy systems. The U.S. population is estimated to grow by 23% (UN, 2009) between 2005 and 2030. The corresponding increases in energy and water demand were predicted as 14% (EIA, 2009) and 20% (Elcock, 2008), respectively. The water-energy nexus needs to be better understood to satisfy the increased demand in a sustainable manner without conflicting with environmental and economic constraints. Overall, 4% of U.S. power generation is used for water distribution (80%) and treatment (20%). 3% of U.S. water consumption (100 billion gallons per day, or 100 BGD) and 40% of U.S. water withdrawal (340 BGD) are for thermoelectric power generation (Goldstein and Smith, 2002). The water demand for energy production is predicted to increase most significantly among the water consumption sectors by 2030. On the other hand, due to the dearth of conventional water sources, energy intensive technologies are increasingly in use to treat seawater and brackish groundwater for water supply. Thus comprehending the interrelation and interdependency between water and energy system is imperative to evaluate sustainable water and energy supply alternatives for cities. In addition to the water-energy nexus, decentralized or distributed concept is also beneficial for designing sustainable water and energy infrastructure as these alternatives require lesser distribution lines and space in a compact urban area. Especially, the distributed energy infrastructure is more suited to interconnect various large and small scale renewable energy producers which can be expected to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the case of decentralized water infrastructure, on-site wastewater treatment facility can provide multiple benefits. Firstly, it reduces the potable water demand by reusing the treated water for non-potable uses and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

  18. Impacts of Rising Air Temperatures and Emissions Mitigation on Electricity Demand and Supply in the United States. A Multi-Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, James; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy S.; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit; Eom, Jiyon; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Schultz, Peter; Venkatesh, Boddu; Haydel, Juanita; Mack, Charlotte; Creason, Jared

    2015-06-10

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. Our present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effects of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. Moreover, the increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.

  19. Impacts of Rising Air Temperatures and Emissions Mitigation on Electricity Demand and Supply in the United States. A Multi-Model Comparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McFarland, James; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon; Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Jaglom, Wendy S.; Colley, Michelle; Patel, Pralit; Eom, Jiyon; Kim, Son H.; et al

    2015-06-10

    The electric power sector both affects and is affected by climate change. Numerous studies highlight the potential of the power sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Fewer studies have explored the physical impacts of climate change on the power sector. Our present analysis examines how projected rising temperatures affect the demand for and supply of electricity. We apply a common set of temperature projections to three well-known electric sector models in the United States: the US version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM-USA), the Regional Electricity Deployment System model (ReEDS), and the Integrated Planning Model (IPM®). Incorporating the effectsmore » of rising temperatures from a control scenario without emission mitigation into the models raises electricity demand by 1.6 to 6.5 % in 2050 with similar changes in emissions. Moreover, the increase in system costs in the reference scenario to meet this additional demand is comparable to the change in system costs associated with decreasing power sector emissions by approximately 50 % in 2050. This result underscores the importance of adequately incorporating the effects of long-run temperature change in climate policy analysis.« less

  20. Propane Supply & Infrastructure Suggested Slides

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... over reliability of rail for delivery. * Large Companies - campaigns for residential and crop dryers to fill over the summer reportedly successful. Less success with COD customers.

  1. HySA Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado, Feb 27-28, 2014 Current Initiatives for Electrolytic H 2 Production at HySA Infrastructure Dmitri Bessarabov DST HySA Infrastructure Center of Competence, NWU/CSIR http://www.hysainfrastructure.org/ South African Energy Profile Coal 72.1% *CR&W 10.2% Gas 2.8% Nuclear 2.2% Oil 12.6% Hydro 0.1% Current South Africa Total Primary Energy Supply  Coal supplies ~75 % of South Africa's primary energy and 90 % of its electricity

  2. Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  3. Demand Response | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in

  4. Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis (HyDRA) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cost and availability, hydrogen production potential, hydrogen production cost, resource consumption, hydrogen demand, infrastructure, and results from integration with other...

  5. Infrastructure and Logistics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development » Wind Manufacturing & Supply Chain » Infrastructure and Logistics Infrastructure and Logistics The United States wind industry is progressing from a period of experimentation and development to a period of wide scale demonstration and actualization, which is leading to advancements in infrastructure. As the wind industry continues to grow, logistical constraints must be identified and resolved in order to prevent bottlenecking in the supply chain and

  6. water infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    infrastructure - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  7. Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  8. Challenge # 2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Throughout Supply Chain | Department of Energy 2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure Throughout Supply Chain Challenge # 2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure Throughout Supply Chain Presentation on Challenge # 2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure Throughout Supply Chain on May 9, 2012, at the Pyrolysis Oil Workshop. PDF icon pyrolysis_challenge2.pdf More Documents & Publications Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels

  9. Estimating the supply and demand for deep geologic CO2 storage capacity over the course of the 21st Century: A meta-analysis of the literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2013-08-05

    Whether there is sufficient geologic CO2 storage capacity to allow CCS to play a significant role in mitigating climate change has been the subject of debate since the 1990s. This paper presents a meta- analysis of a large body of recently published literature to derive updated estimates of the global deep geologic storage resource as well as the potential demand for this geologic CO2 storage resource over the course of this century. This analysis reveals that, for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation scenarios that have end-of-century atmospheric CO2 concentrations of between 350 ppmv and 725 ppmv, the average demand for deep geologic CO2 storage over the course of this century is between 410 GtCO2 and 1,670 GtCO2. The literature summarized here suggests that -- depending on the stringency of criteria applied to calculate storage capacity global geologic CO2 storage capacity could be: 35,300 GtCO2 of theoretical capacity; 13,500 GtCO2 of effective capacity; 3,900 GtCO2, of practical capacity; and 290 GtCO2 of matched capacity for the few regions where this narrow definition of capacity has been calculated. The cumulative demand for geologic CO2 storage is likely quite small compared to global estimates of the deep geologic CO2 storage capacity, and therefore, a lack of deep geologic CO2 storage capacity is unlikely to be an impediment for the commercial adoption of CCS technologies in this century.

  10. Task Force on Biofuels Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the federal Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) adopted in 2005 and amended in 2007, the United States is committed to a substantial (five-fold) increase in its use of biofuels by 2022. The National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP) convened a Biofuels Infrastructure Task Force in 2008 to examine the infrastructure implications of this relatively swift and unprecedented shift in the composition of the nation’s transportation fuel supply. Specifically, the Task Force explored issues and developed recommendations for advancing the infrastructure investments needed to support timely and cost-effective implementation of the current biofuels mandate.

  11. Report to the Congress on the storage of refined petroleum products and on regional supply interruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    This report describes petroleum and petroleum products storage and supply disruption. Information is presented under the following topics: Historical Perspective; Current Patterns of Supply and Disposition of Petroleum Products in the Primary Distribution System; PADD I Clean Products Supply/Demand; 1990 Regional Petroleum Reserve Annual Computation; Market Infrastructure and Commercial Practices in the California Motor Gasoline Market, as Related to Potential Refined Petroleum Product Reserve Structures and Sales Procedures; Infrastructure and Commercial Practices in the Northeast Distillate Market, as Related to Potential Refined Petroleum Product Reserve Structures and Sales Procedures; Storage Stability Characteristics of Petroleum Products and Crude Oil; Effect of 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on Demand for Petroleum Product Storage Capacity; and Environmental Regulations on Tanks.

  12. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

    2013-08-01

    This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

  13. Transportation Infrastructure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infrastructure New Technologies * Potential need for dual-use casks * DOE should look toward industry & international communities for innovations * Industry unclear about delivery & receipt locations * Advances in physical & tracking technologies need to be factored in * Cost-benefit analysis of new technology Training & Dry Runs * Begin as soon as possible * Suggested order: #1-demonstrations, #2-training, #3-dry-runs * Don't re-invent the wheel- look at international programs *

  14. Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  15. Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to enhance the nation's security and prosperity through sustainable, transformative approaches to our most challenging energy, climate, and infrastructure problems. vision Important applications of these capabilities include performing assessment of facility vulnerabilities and resultant consequences of a range of attack scenarios related to nuclear facilities after 9/11. these comprehensive analyses were able to realistically represent the actual attack, the response of the facility to the

  16. Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to enhance the nation's security and prosperity through sustainable, transformative approaches to our most challenging energy, climate, and infrastructure problems. vision the capability set needed to address safe and secure management of these radioactive materials includes a broad set of engineering and scientific disciplines such as physics; nuclear, mechanical, civil, and systems engineering; and chemistry. In addition, Sandia has a tool set that enhances the ability to perform high level

  17. Infrastructure Assurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assurance - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  18. Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  19. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

    2009-02-28

    The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

  20. Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From a Department of Defense (DoD) perspective, SMrs offer great advantage for energy security with stable fuel cost profiles, a secure installation for meeting base-load power demands with a robust, secured reactor design (i.e., energy security), potential to provide potable water and synthetic fuels, and a means to exceed DoD greenhouse gases (GhG) reduction goals. While presently SMrs are being proposed based on various reactor technologies, SMrs based on light-water reactor (lWr)

  1. Fabricate-on-Demand Vacuum Insulating Glazings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PPG is working to design a fabricate-on-demand process to overcome the cost and supply chain issues preventing widespread adoption of vacuum insulating glazings (VIGs).

  2. Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Previous and Ongoing * HYDS ME - Evaluates best infrastructure options * Interstate Infrastructure Analysis - Minimal infrastructure to facilitate interstate travel during ...

  3. Simulating Impacts of Disruptions to Liquid Fuels Infrastructure |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Simulating Impacts of Disruptions to Liquid Fuels Infrastructure Simulating Impacts of Disruptions to Liquid Fuels Infrastructure This report presents a methodology for estimating the impacts of events that damage or disrupt liquid fuels infrastructure. The impact of a disruption depends on which components of the infrastructure are damaged, the time required for repairs, and the position of the disrupted components in the fuels supply network. Impacts are estimated for

  4. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Dale, Larry; Larsen, Peter; Fitts, Gary; Koy, Kevin; Lewis, Sarah; Lucena, Andre

    2011-06-22

    This report outlines the results of a study of the impact of climate change on the energy infrastructure of California and the San Francisco Bay region, including impacts on power plant generation; transmission line and substation capacity during heat spells; wildfires near transmission lines; sea level encroachment upon power plants, substations, and natural gas facilities; and peak electrical demand. Some end-of-century impacts were projected:Expected warming will decrease gas-fired generator efficiency. The maximum statewide coincident loss is projected at 10.3 gigawatts (with current power plant infrastructure and population), an increase of 6.2 percent over current temperature-induced losses. By the end of the century, electricity demand for almost all summer days is expected to exceed the current ninetieth percentile per-capita peak load. As much as 21 percent growth is expected in ninetieth percentile peak demand (per-capita, exclusive of population growth). When generator losses are included in the demand, the ninetieth percentile peaks may increase up to 25 percent. As the climate warms, California's peak supply capacity will need to grow faster than the population.Substation capacity is projected to decrease an average of 2.7 percent. A 5C (9F) air temperature increase (the average increase predicted for hot days in August) will diminish the capacity of a fully-loaded transmission line by an average of 7.5 percent.The potential exposure of transmission lines to wildfire is expected to increase with time. We have identified some lines whose probability of exposure to fire are expected to increase by as much as 40 percent. Up to 25 coastal power plants and 86 substations are at risk of flooding (or partial flooding) due to sea level rise.

  5. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a “real-world” retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation’s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products’ Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user’s fueling experience.

  6. Demand Response

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Demand Response Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE

  7. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

  8. Supply contracts for Italy prompt expansions, new construction plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-02-23

    Italy`s natural-gas demand is growing faster than that of any other European country, according to Italian gas-transmission operator SNAM S.p.A., Milan. Gas demand in Italy, as a share of total energy demand, is likely to grow from slightly more than a quarter in 1996 to more than a third by 2010. As a result, SNAM is actively negotiating and signing new gas contracts with existing and new suppliers to ensure and diversify gas supply to the peninsula over that period. This article concludes a two-part series on gas supplies and pipeline infrastructure development for Europe`s two southern peninsulas. Part 1 set forth pipeline construction and gas-movement developments on the Iberian peninsula. For European supplies to Italy, expansions on two major cross-country pipelines will have been completed by 2001 along with a third new line in France that will tie into an existing line from The Netherlands. Additionally, early in the next decade, SNAM could be on its way to laying yet another pipeline across the Mediterranean Sea, setting again yet another deepwater pipelay record.

  9. Manufacturing Supply Chain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supply Chain - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  10. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  11. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure -...

  12. Energy Transmission and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathison, Jane

    2012-12-31

    The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers in developing transportation policies; energy audits and efficiency studies for Oberlin-area businesses and Oberlin College; identification of barriers to residential energy efficiency and development of programming to remove these barriers; mapping of the solar-photovoltaic and wind-energy supply chains in northwest Ohio; and opportunities for vehicle sharing and collaboration among the ten organizations in Lorain County from the private, government, non-profit, and educational sectors. With non-grant funds, organizations have begun or completed projects that drew on the findings of the studies, including: creation of a residential energy-efficiency program for the Oberlin community; installation of energy-efficient lighting in Oberlin College facilities; and development by the City of Oberlin and Oberlin College of a 2.27 megawatt solar photovoltaic facility that is expected to produce 3,000 megawatt-hours of renewable energy annually, 12% of the Colleges yearly power needs. Implementation of these and other projects is evidence of the economic feasibility and technical effectiveness of grant-supported studies, and additional projects are expected to advance to implementation in the coming years. The public has benefited through improved energydelivery systems and reduced energy use for street lighting in Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; new opportunities for assistance and incentives for residential energy efficiency in the Oberlin community; new opportunities for financial and energy savings through vehicle collaboration within Lorain County; and decreased reliance on fossil fuels and expanded production of renewable energy in the region. The dissemination conference and the summary report developed for the conference also benefited the public, but making the findings and recommendations of the regional studies broadly available to elected officials, city managers, educators, representatives of the private sector, and the general public.

  13. Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    long term strategies by analysing cost optimal energy mixes, investment needs and other costs for new infrastructure, energy supply security, energy resource utilization, rate of...

  14. HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis | Department of Energy HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis Presentation by NREL's Cory Welch at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C. PDF icon welch_hydive.pdf More Documents & Publications Discrete Choice Analysis: Hydrogen FCV Demand Potential Technical Workshop:

  15. Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (April 2013) | Department of Energy Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure (April 2013) Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure (April 2013) Two major hurricanes, Irene in 2011 and Sandy in 2012, have impacted the Northeastern United States over the past 2 years, devastating coastal communities and causing widespread impacts to the region's energy infrastructure, supply, and markets. Although Sandy was weaker than Irene at landfall, Sandy brought

  16. DOE Has Issued Request for Information Regarding Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and FCEVs | Department of Energy Has Issued Request for Information Regarding Hydrogen Infrastructure and FCEVs DOE Has Issued Request for Information Regarding Hydrogen Infrastructure and FCEVs December 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued a request for information (RFI) seeking feedback from interested stakeholders regarding strategies for a robust market introduction of hydrogen supply, infrastructure, and fuel cell

  17. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Information on the supply and distribution of petroleum and petroleum products in the US as of March 1983 is presented. Data include statistics on crude oil, motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases, imports, exports, stocks, and transport. This issue also features 2 articles entitled: Summer Gasoline Overview and Principal Factors Influencing Motor Gasoline Demand. (DMC)

  18. Lab Supplies | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Supplies

  19. California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, Marc; Helwig, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Assessment conveys to interested parties the Energy Commission’s conclusions, recommendations, and intentions with respect to plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) infrastructure development. There are several relatively low-risk and high-priority electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) deployment options that will encourage PEV sales and

  20. Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting #13: Energy Infrastructure Finance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting #13: Energy Infrastructure Finance Monday, October 6, 2014 Opening Remarks of Peter Carnavos Director of Gas Supply Consolidated Edison Opportunities and Challenges for Natural Gas and Liquid Fuels Transmission, Storage and Distribution Infrastructure Good afternoon. I am Peter Carnavos, Director of Gas Supply for Consolidated Edison. I am honored to have been invited by the Department of Energy to share my perspective today. Con Edison provides natural

  1. Transmission Infrastructure Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TRANSMISSION INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM DOE Tribal Energy Summit 2015 SECRETARYOF ENERGY'S FINANCING ROUNDTABLE Tracey A. LeBeau Senior Vice President & Transmission Infrastructure Program Manager 1 Program Description Western's Loan Authority * $3.25 billion permanent authority (revolving) * Goal: Attract investment in infrastructure & address market needs * Commercial underwriting standards TIP Portfolio Management Fundamentals * Reflective of Market Need(s) * Ensure Funds Revolve 2 Recent

  2. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... includes portions of Canada and Northern Baja Mexico, as well as all of the lower 48 ... the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic and the California Global Warming Solutions Act (AB32). 25 ...

  3. Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to model supply over time * Then look at the impact of various demand scenarios * Pellet demand scenarios and carbon consequences dominate current research - biofuels not so...

  4. Supply Forecast and Analysis (SFA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Matthew Langholtz Science Team Leader Oak Ridge National Laboratory DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Supply Forecast and Analysis (SFA) 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Goal Statement * Provide timely and credible estimates of feedstock supplies and prices to support - the development of a bioeconomy; feedstock demand analysis of EISA, RFS2, and RPS mandates - the data and analysis of other projects in Analysis and Sustainability, Feedstock Supply and Logistics,

  5. Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research shows that changes in infrastructure prompt changes in behavior (for better or worse). Federal agencies can modify their infrastructure to promote sustainability-oriented behavior change, ideally in ways that make new behaviors easier and more desirable to follow than existing patterns of behavior.

  6. Global GPS Phones Market Size, Segmentation, Demand Forecast...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    we deeply analyzed the world's main region market conditions that including the product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and industry...

  7. Discrete Choice Analysis: Hydrogen FCV Demand Potential | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Discrete Choice Analysis: Hydrogen FCV Demand Potential Discrete Choice Analysis: Hydrogen FCV Demand Potential Presentation by Cory Welch at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure meeting on January 31, 2007. PDF icon scenario_analysis_welch1_07.pdf More Documents & Publications HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis Hydrogen Policy and Analyzing the Transition Status and Prospects of the Global

  8. Transportation Fuel Supply | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SheetsTransportation Fuel Supply content top Transportation Fuel Supply

  9. Modernizing Infrastructure Permitting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 14, 2014, the Obama Administration released a comprehensive plan to accelerate and expand Federal infrastructure permitting reform government-wide. The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability is actively engaged in this process for transmission development.

  10. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fuelin

  11. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method ofmore » Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.« less

  12. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  13. PNNL Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Name Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center...

  14. PNNL Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PNNL Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (Redirected from Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Electricity Infrastructure...

  15. Water Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Security - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  16. Infrastructure Improvements - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Improvements As the designated Community Reuse Organization for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), our 22-member citizen-led Board of Directors has undertaken a study to point out the critical need for improving the deteriorating infrastructure at SRS. Priority attention needs to be made now to maximize SRS contributions and potential in the years ahead. SRS has all the assets required in people, land, expertise and community support to continue to play a

  17. Location and Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facts, Figures » Location and Infrastructure Location and Infrastructure The Lab's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 Aerial View of Los Alamos National Laboratory The central LANL technical area is featured in this aerial view. Boundary Peak, separating the Santa Fe National Forest and

  18. Infrastructure Projects | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Projects June 3, 2010 What do you think of the TEDF? How about the UIM project? What would have happened if we had not got the ARRA funding for the NP GPP projects last year? Gobbledegook!? Acronymia? Certainly different from the usual PREx, or QWeak, or DVCS that we hear from the physics side of the house! TEDF, UIM and the others are acronyms used by the facilities people, those trying to build, modernize and maintain our infrastructure. TEDF (Technology and Engineering

  19. National Infrastructure Protection Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infrastructure Protection Plan 2006 Preface Preface i The ability to protect the critical infrastructure and key resources (CI/KR) of the United States is vital to our national security, public health and safety, economic vitality, and way of life. U.S. policy focuses on the importance of enhancing CI/KR protection to ensure that essential governmental missions, public services, and economic functions are maintained in the event of a terrorist attack, natural disaster, or other type of

  20. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  1. LNG infrastructure and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forgash, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Sound engineering principals have been used by every company involved in the development of the LNG infrastructure, but there is very little that is new. The same cryogenic technology that is used in the manufacture and sale of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen infrastructure is used in LNG infrastructure. The key component of the refueling infrastructure is the LNG tank which should have a capacity of at least 15,000 gallons. These stainless steel tanks are actually a tank within a tank separated by an annular space that is void of air creating a vacuum between the inner and outer tank where superinsulation is applied. Dispensing can be accomplished by pressure or pump. Either works well and has been demonstrated in the field. Until work is complete on NFPA 57 or The Texas Railroad Commission Rules for LNG are complete, the industry is setting the standards for the safe installation of refueling infrastructure. As a new industry, the safety record to date has been outstanding.

  2. California Statewide PEV Infrastructure Assessment; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, Marc; Eichman, Joshua

    2015-06-10

    This presentation discusses how the California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Infrastructure Assessment provides a framework for understanding the potential energy (kWh) and demand (MW) impacts of PEV market growth; how PEV travel simulations can inform the role of public infrastructure in future market growth; and how ongoing assessment updates and Alternative Fuels Data Center outreach can help coordinate stakeholder planning and decision making and reduce uncertainties.

  3. Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rollout in Southern California | Department of Energy a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern California Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern California Presentation at the Renewable Hydrogen Workshop, Nov. 16, 2009, in Palm Springs, CA PDF icon renewable_hydrogen_workshop_nov16_nicholas.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January

  4. Final Report on National NGV Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GM Sverdrup; JG DeSteese; ND Malcosky

    1999-01-07

    This report summarizes work fimded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to (1) identi& barriers to establishing sustainable natural gas vehicle (NGV) infrastructure and (2) develop planning information that can help to promote a NGV infrastructure with self-sustaining critical maw. The need for this work is driven by the realization that demand for NGVS has not yet developed to a level that provides sufficient incentives for investment by the commercial sector in all necessary elements of a supportive infrastructure. The two major objectives of this project were: (1) to identifi and prioritize the technical barriers that may be impeding growth of a national NGV infrastructure and (2) to develop input that can assist industry in overcoming these barriers. The approach used in this project incorporated and built upon the accumulated insights of the NGV industry. The project was conducted in three basic phases: (1) review of the current situation, (2) prioritization of technical infrastructure btiiers, and (3) development of plans to overcome key barriers. An extensive and diverse list of barriers was obtained from direct meetings and telephone conferences with sixteen industry NGV leaders and seven Clean Cities/Clean Corridors coordinators. This information is filly documented in the appendix. A distillation of insights gained in the interview process suggests that persistent barriers to developing an NGV market and supporting infrastructure can be grouped into four major categories: 1. Fuel station economics 2. Value of NGVs from the owner/operator perspective 3. Cooperation necessary for critical mass 4. Commitment by investors. A principal conclusion is that an efficient and effective approach for overcoming technical barriers to developing an NGV infrastructure can be provided by building upon and consolidating the relevant efforts of the NGV industry and government. The major recommendation of this project is the establishment of an ad hoc NGV Infrastructure Working Group (NGV-I WG) to address the most critical technical barriers to NGV infrastructure development. This recommendation has been considered and approved by both the DOE and GRI and is the basis of continued collaboration in this area.

  5. Electricity Supply Infrastructure Improvements: Final Technical Status Report, December 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarski, D.; Brad, D.

    2011-02-01

    This report is about a work effort where the overall objectives were to establish a methodology and approach for selected transmission and distribution (T&D) grid modernization; monitor the results; and report on the findings, recommendations, and lessons learned. The work reported addressed T&D problems and solutions, related reliability issues, equipment and operation upgrades, and respective field testing.

  6. Positioning the electric utility to build information infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    In two particular respects (briefly investigated in this study from a lawyer`s perspective), electric utilities appear uniquely well-positioned to contribute to the National Information Infrastructure (NII). First of all, utilities have legal powers derived from their charters and operating authorities, confirmed in their rights-of-way, to carry out activities and functions necessary for delivering electric service. These activities and functions include building telecommunications facilities and undertaking information services that have become essential to managing electricity demand and supply. The economic value of the efficiencies made possible by telecommunications and information could be substantial. How great remains to be established, but by many estimates electric utility applications could fund a significant share of the capital costs of building the NII. Though utilities` legal powers to pursue such efficiencies through telecommunications and information appear beyond dispute, it is likely that the effort to do so will produce substantial excess capacity. Who will benefit from this excess capacity is a potentially contentious political question that demands early resolution. Will this windfall go to the utility, the customer, or no one (because of political paralysis), or will there be some equitable and practical split? A second aspect of inquiry here points to another contemporary issue of very great societal importance that could very well become the platform on which the first question can be resolved fortuitously-how to achieve universal telecommunications service. In the effort to fashion the NII that will now continue, ways and means to maximize the unique potential contribution of electric utilities to meeting important social and economic needs--in particular, universal service--merit priority attention.

  7. Power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Hamilton, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO)

    2007-12-04

    A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

  8. Cross-sector Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  9. STEO November 2012 - natural gas supply

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    natural gas supplies plentiful to help meet higher demand this winter As Americans move deeper into the winter heating season, the amount of U.S. natural gas in underground storage...

  10. Infrastructure Impacts | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACInfrastructure Impacts content top National Population, Economic, and Infrastructure Impacts of Pandemic Influenza with Strategic Recommendations Posted by Admin on Mar 2, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Results of NISAC's two-year study on the potential impacts of pandemic influenza in the United States were published in October 2007 and released to the public in 2008. The summary report and supplemental analysis reports can be downloaded from the column to the right. Pandemic Influenza

  11. E15 and Infrastructure

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    E15 and Infrastructure K. Moriarty National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Yanowitz Ecoengineering, Inc. Produced under direction of Renewable Fuels Association by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Technical Services Agreement No. TSA 14-665 and Task No. WTJZ.1000. Strategic Partnership Project Report NREL/TP-5400-64156 May 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for

  12. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% − 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  13. Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 24, 2015, from 1:00pm – 2:30pm EDT, EPA's Green Infrastructure Program will launch our 2015 Webcast Series with the webinar Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities. This webinar aims to...

  14. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuels | Department of Energy Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities

  15. Residential Demand Sector Data, Commercial Demand Sector Data, Industrial Demand Sector Data - Annual Energy Outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing consumption and prices by sector and census division for 2006 - includes residential demand, commercial demand, and industrial demand

  16. Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

    2005-09-01

    Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

  17. Northeast Gasoline Supply Reserve | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northeast Gasoline Supply Reserve Northeast Gasoline Supply Reserve The Northeast region of the U.S. is particularly vulnerable to gasoline disruptions as a result of hurricanes and other natural events. Hurricane Sandy in 2012 caused widespread issues related to the availability of gasoline. In response to help build a more secure and resilient energy infrastructure, the Energy Department established the first federal regional refined petroleum product reserve containing gasoline. To help

  18. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be used by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.

  19. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be usedmore » by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.« less

  20. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response. International Experiences and Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Ghatikar, Girish; Ni, Chun Chun; Dudley, Junqiao; Martin, Phil; Wikler, Greg

    2012-06-01

    Demand response (DR) is a load management tool which provides a cost-effective alternative to traditional supply-side solutions to address the growing demand during times of peak electrical load. According to the US Department of Energy (DOE), demand response reflects “changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.” 1 The California Energy Commission (CEC) defines DR as “a reduction in customers’ electricity consumption over a given time interval relative to what would otherwise occur in response to a price signal, other financial incentives, or a reliability signal.” 2 This latter definition is perhaps most reflective of how DR is understood and implemented today in countries such as the US, Canada, and Australia where DR is primarily a dispatchable resource responding to signals from utilities, grid operators, and/or load aggregators (or DR providers).

  1. Chapter VII: Addressing Environmental Aspects of TS&D Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    36 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter VII: Addressing Environmental Aspects of TS&D Infrastructure QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 8-1 Chapter VIII This chapter gives an overview of current and projected employment in and related to the energy sector and discusses programs to assist in meeting the demand for new workers going forward. The first section provides estimates of jobs

  2. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  3. Financing Tribal Energy Infrastructure & Energy Optimization Infrastructure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Kilpatrick Townsend Financing Tribal Energy Infrastructure & Energy Optimization Infrastructure (EOI) Matt Ferguson National Tribal Energy Summit: A Path to Economic Sovereignty September 2015 OPPORTUNITY Regulations and market influences have created an opportunity to provide service in ways that transcend business as usual Energy Optimization Infrastructure (EOI) www.projectseastar.org WHERE WHAT Tribe's role? * Entrepreneur * Investor * Government WHO Want's the money: * Private Entity

  4. Presidential Proclamation: Critical Infrastructure Security and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presidential Proclamation: Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 Presidential Proclamation: Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 A ...

  5. Kerala Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation Kinfra...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kerala Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation Kinfra Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kerala Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation (Kinfra) Place:...

  6. Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities ...

  7. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Place: California Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: String...

  8. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Solicitation Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project...

  9. Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming...

  10. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized...

  11. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-04-29

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

  12. An overview of energy supply and demand in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

    1992-05-01

    Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world's largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China's energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China's energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

  13. An overview of energy supply and demand in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

    1992-05-01

    Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world`s largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China`s energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China`s energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

  14. Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Softwaremodeling tools Website http:...

  15. Impacts to the ethylene supply chain from a hurricane disruption.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Downes, Paula Sue; Heinen, Russell; Welk, Margaret Ellen

    2010-03-01

    Analysis of chemical supply chains is an inherently complex task, given the dependence of these supply chains on multiple infrastructure systems (e.g., the petroleum sector, transportation, etc.). This effort requires data and information at various levels of resolution, ranging from network-level distribution systems to individual chemical reactions. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has integrated its existing simulation and infrastructure analysis capabilities with chemical data models to analyze the chemical supply chains of several nationally critical chemical commodities. This paper describes how Sandia models the ethylene supply chain; that is, the supply chain for the most widely used raw material for plastics production including a description of the types of data and modeling capabilities that are required to represent the ethylene supply chain. The paper concludes with a description of Sandia's use the model to project how the supply chain would be affected by and adapt to a disruptive scenario hurricane.

  16. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K Castle

    2011-02-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  17. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that ...

  18. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced regional GHG emissions by 375 tons in the first year of station deployment.

  19. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you...

  20. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and deep debate on Demand Dispatch led by the National Action Plan (NAP) Coalition ... new policy and regulation to value the price difference between the "point of ...

  1. Residential Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in-home displays with controllable home area network capabilities and thermal storage devices for home heating. Goals and objectives: Reduce the City's NCP demand above...

  2. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the ... Etiquette 4 Workplace Charging Challenge Carrie Giles carrie.giles@icfi.com Learn More: ...

  3. CHP Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Critical Facilities * Provides context for CHP in critical infrastructure ... Employees were not even aware of the blackout at first because they saw no interruption in ...

  4. Resilient Infrastructure | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presidential Policy Directive (PPD) 21 - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience. Its objective is to advance "a national unity of effort to strengthen and maintain...

  5. Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Topic OverviewFinancing green infrastructure is critical to taking projects from planning to implementation and beyond, including sustaining operations and maintenance. This 90-minute webcast will...

  6. Distributed Data Integration Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Critchlow, T; Ludaescher, B; Vouk, M; Pu, C

    2003-02-24

    The Internet is becoming the preferred method for disseminating scientific data from a variety of disciplines. This can result in information overload on the part of the scientists, who are unable to query all of the relevant sources, even if they knew where to find them, what they contained, how to interact with them, and how to interpret the results. A related issue is keeping up with current trends in information technology often taxes the end-user's expertise and time. Thus instead of benefiting from this information rich environment, scientists become experts on a small number of sources and technologies, use them almost exclusively, and develop a resistance to innovations that can enhance their productivity. Enabling information based scientific advances, in domains such as functional genomics, requires fully utilizing all available information and the latest technologies. In order to address this problem we are developing a end-user centric, domain-sensitive workflow-based infrastructure, shown in Figure 1, that will allow scientists to design complex scientific workflows that reflect the data manipulation required to perform their research without an undue burden. We are taking a three-tiered approach to designing this infrastructure utilizing (1) abstract workflow definition, construction, and automatic deployment, (2) complex agent-based workflow execution and (3) automatic wrapper generation. In order to construct a workflow, the scientist defines an abstract workflow (AWF) in terminology (semantics and context) that is familiar to him/her. This AWF includes all of the data transformations, selections, and analyses required by the scientist, but does not necessarily specify particular data sources. This abstract workflow is then compiled into an executable workflow (EWF, in our case XPDL) that is then evaluated and executed by the workflow engine. This EWF contains references to specific data source and interfaces capable of performing the desired actions. In order to provide access to the largest number of resources possible, our lowest level utilizes automatic wrapper generation techniques to create information and data wrappers capable of interacting with the complex interfaces typical in scientific analysis. The remainder of this document outlines our work in these three areas, the impact our work has made, and our plans for the future.

  7. Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

  8. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R; Fernandez, Steven J; Fu, Joshua S; Walker, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  9. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-06-20

    This paper describes strategies that can be used in commercial buildings to temporarily reduce electric load in response to electric grid emergencies in which supplies are limited or in response to high prices that would be incurred if these strategies were not employed. The demand response strategies discussed herein are based on the results of three years of automated demand response field tests in which 28 commercial facilities with an occupied area totaling over 11 million ft{sup 2} were tested. Although the demand response events in the field tests were initiated remotely and performed automatically, the strategies used could also be initiated by on-site building operators and performed manually, if desired. While energy efficiency measures can be used during normal building operations, demand response measures are transient; they are employed to produce a temporary reduction in demand. Demand response strategies achieve reductions in electric demand by temporarily reducing the level of service in facilities. Heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are the systems most commonly adjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The goal of demand response strategies is to meet the electric shed savings targets while minimizing any negative impacts on the occupants of the buildings or the processes that they perform. Occupant complaints were minimal in the field tests. In some cases, ''reductions'' in service level actually improved occupant comfort or productivity. In other cases, permanent improvements in efficiency were discovered through the planning and implementation of ''temporary'' demand response strategies. The DR strategies that are available to a given facility are based on factors such as the type of HVAC, lighting and energy management and control systems (EMCS) installed at the site.

  10. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

    2010-01-29

    This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

  11. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01

    This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

  12. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce

    2013-02-22

    This report seeks to provide an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding uncertainties around offshore wind manufacturing and supply chain capabilities; projecting potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios; and identifying key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market and current suppliers of the nation’s landbased wind market.

  13. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  14. Demand Response- Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use customers, designed to induce lower electricity use typically at times of high market prices or when grid reliability is jeopardized.

  15. Demand for superpremium needle cokes on upswing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acciarri, J.A.; Stockman, G.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors discuss how recent supply shortages of super-premium quality needle cokes, plus the expectation of increased shortfalls in the future, indicate that refiners should consider upgrading their operations to fill these demands. Calcined, super-premium needle cokes are currently selling for as much as $550/metric ton, fob producer, and increasing demand will continue the upward push of the past year. Needle coke, in its calcined form, is the major raw material in the manufacture of graphite electrodes. Used in steelmaking, graphite electrodes are the electrical conductors that supply the heat source, through arcing electrode column tips, to electric arc steel furnaces. Needle coke is commercially available in three grades - super premium, premium, and intermediate. Super premium is used to produce electrodes for the most severe electric arc furnace steelmaking applications, premium for electrodes destined to less severe operations, and intermediate for even less critical needs.

  16. Demand Response Dispatch Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-31

    The Demand Response (DR) Dispatch Tool uses price profiles to dispatch demand response resources and create load modifying profiles. These annual profiles are used as inputs to production cost models and regional planning tools (e.g., PROMOD). The tool has been effectively implemented in transmission planning studies conducted by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council via its Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee. The DR Dispatch Tool can properly model the dispatch of DR resources for both reliability and economic conditions.

  17. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demand Dispatch-Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid 10 August 2011 DOE/NETL- DE-FE0004001 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Prepared by: National Energy Technology Laboratory Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

  18. Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Year-in-Review: 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy August 2011 OE/ISER Report 8/31/11 i For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about information in this report

  19. Optimal recovery sequencing for critical infrastructure resilience assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Turnquist, Mark Alan

    2010-09-01

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the identification of optimal recovery strategies that maximize resilience. To this goal, we formulate a bi-level optimization problem for infrastructure network models. In the 'inner' problem, we solve for network flows, and we use the 'outer' problem to identify the optimal recovery modes and sequences. We draw from the literature of multi-mode project scheduling problems to create an effective solution strategy for the resilience optimization model. We demonstrate the application of this approach to a set of network models, including a national railroad model and a supply chain for Army munitions production.

  20. A hybrid inventory management system respondingto regular demand and surge demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammad S. Roni; Mingzhou Jin; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid policy for a stochastic inventory system facing regular demand and surge demand. The combination of two different demand patterns can be observed in many areas, such as healthcare inventory and humanitarian supply chain management. The surge demand has a lower arrival rate but higher demand volume per arrival. The solution approach proposed in this paper incorporates the level crossing method and mixed integer programming technique to optimize the hybrid inventory policy with both regular orders and emergency orders. The level crossing method is applied to obtain the equilibrium distributions of inventory levels under a given policy. The model is further transformed into a mixed integer program to identify an optimal hybrid policy. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of parameters on the optimal inventory policy and minimum cost. Numerical results clearly show the benefit of using the proposed hybrid inventory model. The model and solution approach could help healthcare providers or humanitarian logistics providers in managing their emergency supplies in responding to surge demands.

  1. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

  2. ELECTRIC INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGY, TRAINING, AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TREMEL, CHARLES L

    2007-06-28

    The objective of this Electric Infrastructure Technology, Training and Assessment Program was to enhance the reliability of electricity delivery through engineering integration of real-time technologies for wide-area applications enabling timely monitoring and management of grid operations. The technologies developed, integrated, tested and demonstrated will be incorporated into grid operations to assist in the implementation of performance-based protection/preventive measures into the existing electric utility infrastructure. This proactive approach will provide benefits of reduced cost and improved reliability over the typical schedule-based and as needed maintenance programs currently performed by utilities. Historically, utilities have relied on maintenance and inspection programs to diagnose equipment failures and have used the limited circuit isolation devices, such as distribution main circuit breakers to identify abnormal system performance. With respect to reliable problem identification, customer calls to utility service centers are often the sole means for utilities to identify problem occurrences and determine restoration methodologies. Furthermore, monitoring and control functions of equipment and circuits are lacking; thus preventing timely detection and response to customer outages. Finally, the two-way flow of real-time system information is deficient, depriving decision makers of key information required to effectively manage and control current electric grid demands to provide reliable customer service in abnormal situations. This Program focused on advancing technologies and the engineering integration required to incorporate them into the electric grid operations to enhance electrical system reliability and reduce utility operating costs.

  3. Energy and Infrastructure Future Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rush Robinett Energy &Infrastructure Future Group Sandia National Laboratories rdrobin@sandia.gov Energy & Infrastructure Future Overview 2 Sandia's Core Purpose "Helping our Nation Secure a Peaceful and Free World through Technology" * National Security Laboratory * Broad mission in developing science and technology applications to meet our rapidly changing, complex national security challenges * Safety, security and reliability of our nation's nuclear weapon stockpile 3

  4. infrastructure | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Infrastructure The Storage Infrastructure Technology Area research effort is carrying out regional characterization and small- and large-scale field projects to demonstrate that different storage types in various formation classes, distributed over different geographic regions, both onshore and offshore, have the capability to permanently store CO2 and provide the basis for commercial-scale CO2 projects. Research is needed to prove adequate injectivity, available storage resource, and

  5. Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  6. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  7. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Research and Station Technology Webinar Slides Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology Webinar Slides Download presentation slides from the...

  8. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities Workshop Agenda Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Agenda Agenda for the Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

  9. Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth...

  10. Clean Cities Recovery Act: Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery Act: Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment Clean Cities Recovery Act: Vehicle & Infrastructure Deployment 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit...

  11. California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  12. NISAC | National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interdependent national infrastructure, including process-based systems dynamics models, mathematical network optimization models, physics-based models of existing infrastructure,...

  13. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure...

  14. Sandia Energy - Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of H2FIRST Project Home Infrastructure Security Energy Transportation Energy Facilities Partnership Capabilities News News &...

  15. Office of Infrastructure Planning & Analysis | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home Office of Infrastructure Planning & Analysis Office of Infrastructure Planning & Analysis...

  16. Infrastructure and Operations | National Nuclear Security Administrati...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    term needs. The Associate Administrator for Infrastructure and Operations develops and executes NNSA's infrastructure investment, maintenance, and operations programs and policies....

  17. Perspective: The Climate-Population-Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation Fertile Area for New Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R; Fernandez, Steven J; Walker, Kimberly A; Fu, Joshua S

    2014-01-01

    Managing the risks posed by climate change and extreme weather to energy production and delivery is a challenge to communities worldwide. As climate conditions change, populations will shift, and demand will re-locate; and networked infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers, and, hopefully, minimize vulnerability to natural disaster. Climate effects such as sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, force populations to move locations. Displaced population creates new demand for built infrastructure that in turn generates new economic activity that attracts new workers and associated households to the new locations. Infrastructures and their interdependencies will change in reaction to climate drivers as the networks expand into new population areas and as portions of the networks are abandoned as people leave. Thus, infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Forecasting the location of these vulnerabilities by combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for defining these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. By combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory it has been only recently possible to examine electricity demand response to increased climactic temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. These emerging results suggest a research agenda of coupling these disparate modelling approaches to understand the implications of climate change for protecting the nation s critical infrastructure.

  18. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  19. Demand Response Dispatch Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-31

    The Demand Response (DR) Dispatch Tool uses price profiles to dispatch demand response resources and create load modifying profiles. These annual profiles are used as inputs to production cost models and regional planning tools (e.g., PROMOD). The tool has been effectively implemented in transmission planning studies conducted by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council via its Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee. The DR Dispatch Tool can properly model the dispatch of DR resources for bothmore » reliability and economic conditions.« less

  20. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan

    2013-02-22

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development agencies, to assist in identifying policies with low effort and high impact (Chapter 3). Section 3.3 provides specific policy examples that have been demonstrated to be effective in removing barriers to development. (c) Current and potential domestic suppliers in the offshore wind market, in evaluating areas of opportunity and understanding requirements for participation (Chapter 4). Section 4.4 provides a step-by-step description of the qualification process that suppliers looking to sell components into a future U.S. offshore wind market will need to follow.

  1. QER- Comment of Natural Gas Supply Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TO: Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force In response to the Department of Energy’s August 25, 2014 Federal Register Notice seeking input on the Quadrennial Energy Review, attached are comments from the Natural Gas Supply Association. Thank you for this opportunity to share our views on the important issue of energy infrastructure. If we can be of further assistance, please let me know. Regards,

  2. supply chain | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supply chain | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog

  3. maritime supply chain | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    maritime supply chain | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at

  4. Supply Chain | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model informs analyses of the availability of transportation fuel in the event the fuel supply chain is disrupted. The portion of the fuel supply system represented by the...

  5. School Supply Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    backpacks filled with school supplies. September 16, 2013 Del Norte Credit Union's Baxter Bear takes a moment to pose with some of the backpacks filled with school supplies...

  6. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ...

  7. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ...

  8. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ...

  9. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ...

  10. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ...

  11. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ...

  12. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ...

  13. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ...

  14. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ...

  15. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum ... Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ...

  16. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    29 November 2015 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, November 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

  17. Demand Charges | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demand Charges Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDemandCharges&oldid488967" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  18. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01

    This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

  19. 2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Morrell

    2012-11-01

    The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

  20. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Infrastructure Technology Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glickman, Joan

    2007-09-01

    This document details the accomplishments of the Biomass Program Infrastructure Technoloy Area in 2007.

  1. Vulnerability and Mitigation Studies for Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, L; Noble, C; Morris, J

    2007-08-02

    The summary of this presentation is that: (1) We do end-to-end systems analysis for infrastructure protection; (2) LLNL brings interdisciplinary subject matter expertise to infrastructure and explosive analysis; (3) LLNL brings high-fidelity modeling capabilities to infrastructure analysis for use on high performance platforms; and (4) LLNL analysis of infrastructure provides information that customers and stakeholders act on.

  2. Chapter V: Improving Shared Transport Infrastructures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    38 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter V: Improving Shared Transport Infrastructures QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 6-1 Chapter VI This chapter takes a broader look at the current energy trade and the continuing integration of energy markets and infrastructure in the North American region. Its discussion includes cross-border infrastructure with Canada and Mexico, impacts of climate

  3. Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations The purpose of this report is to provide utilities implementing Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) with the knowledge necessary to secure that implementation appropriately. We intend that utilities use this report to guide their planning, procurement, roll-out, and assessment of the security of Advanced Metering Infrastructure. PDF icon Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security

  4. UC Davis Models: Geospatial Station Network Design Tool and Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout Economic Analysis Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UC Davis Models Geospatial Station Network Design Tool & Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout Economic Analysis Model (University of California-Davis) Objectives Analyze regional strategies for early rollout of hydrogen infrastructure in support of fuel cell vehicle commercialization. Estimate how many hydrogen fueling stations would be needed and how much it will cost to develop cost competitive hydrogen supply. Compare the cost of hydrogen from different types and sizes of hydrogen stations

  5. QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 NG-1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NG-1 Chapter VII Appendix B NATURAL GAS NG-2 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Appendix B: NATURAL GAS Highlights Increasing Supply. The U.S. natural gas industry has undergone changes of unprecedented magnitude and pace. U.S. natural gas production increased 33 percent between 2005 and 2013. Production has shifted from traditional regions, such as the Gulf of Mexico, toward onshore shale gas regions. Most important for infrastructure has been

  6. travel-demand-modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Demand Modeling for a Small sized MPO Using TRANSIMS Mohammad Sharif Ullah Champaign County Regional Planning Commission 1776 E Washington Street, Urbana, IL 61802 Phone: 217 328 3313 Ext 124 Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ================ Mohammad Sharif Ullah, Senior Transportation Engineer, CCRPC, Urbana, IL Asadur Rahman, PhD student, IIT, Chicago, IL Rita Morocoima-Black, Planning & Comm.

  7. Biomass Feedstock Supply Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6, 2015 Feedstock Supply and Logistics PI: Erin Webb Shahab Sokhansanj Michael Hilliard Craig Brandt Anthony Turhollow Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1.2.3.1 Biomass Feedstock Supply Modeling 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Perform experiments to test equipment designs and supply chain configurations Characterize impacts of variability and uncertainty Identify risk-reduction strategies Optimize feedstock supply logistics Goal Statement Build and apply simulations of biomass supply chains

  8. Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes The Expert Panel has concluded that the Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health must develop the capability to produce a diverse supply of radioisotopes for medical use in quantities sufficient to support research and clinical activities. Such a capability would prevent shortages of isotopes, reduce American dependence on foreign radionuclide sources and

  9. ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense

  10. infrastructure

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    insulated roofs and more energy efficient HVAC systems. The cool roof has high solar reflectance, so it emits absorbed solar radiation back into the atmosphere, which...

  11. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Significance Approach (cont.) Sandia National Laboratories Anthony Lentine, Jeff Nelson, Scott Kuszmaul, Sig Gonzales , Steven Goldsmith, Dave Schoenwald , Shannon Spires,...

  12. LPG export growth will exceed demand by 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1994-08-08

    LPG supplies for international trade will increase sharply through 2000 and begin to outstrip demand by 1997 or 1998. This outlook depends on several production projects proceeding as planned. Leading the way to increased volumes are projects in Algeria, Nigeria, and Australia, among others. Purvin and Gertz, Dallas, projected this trend earlier this year at an international LPG seminar near Houston. Representatives from LPG-supplying countries also presented information to support this view and subsequently supplied more specifics to OGJ in response to questions. This paper discusses this information. Trends in Africa, Australia, North America, and South America are forecast.

  13. Simulating Impacts of Disruptions to Liquid Fuels Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Michael; Corbet, Thomas F.; Baker, Arnold B.; O'Rourke, Julia M.

    2015-04-01

    This report presents a methodology for estimating the impacts of events that damage or disrupt liquid fuels infrastructure. The impact of a disruption depends on which components of the infrastructure are damaged, the time required for repairs, and the position of the disrupted components in the fuels supply network. Impacts are estimated for seven stressing events in regions of the United States, which were selected to represent a range of disruption types. For most of these events the analysis is carried out using the National Transportation Fuels Model (NTFM) to simulate the system-level liquid fuels sector response. Results are presented for each event, and a brief cross comparison of event simulation results is provided.

  14. Feedstock Supply System Logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-01

    Feedstock supply is a significant cost component in the production of biobased fuels, products, and power. The uncertainty of the biomass feedstock supply chain and associated risks are major barriers to procuring capital funding for start-up biorefineries.

  15. infrastructure | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home /

  16. Climate Change and Infrastructure, Urban Systems, and Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, Thomas J; Fernandez, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Report on Climate Change and Infrastructure, Urban Systems, and Vulnerabilities has been prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA). It is a summary of the currently existing knowledge base on its topic, nested within a broader framing of issues and questions that need further attention in the longer run. The report arrives at a number of assessment findings, each associated with an evaluation of the level of consensus on that issue within the expert community, the volume of evidence available to support that judgment, and the section of the report that provides an explanation for the finding. Cross-sectoral issues related to infrastructures and urban systems have not received a great deal of attention to date in research literatures in general and climate change assessments in particular. As a result, this technical report is breaking new ground as a component of climate change vulnerability and impact assessments in the U.S., which means that some of its assessment findings are rather speculative, more in the nature of propositions for further study than specific conclusions that are offered with a high level of confidence and research support. But it is a start in addressing questions that are of interest to many policymakers and stakeholders. A central theme of the report is that vulnerabilities and impacts are issues beyond physical infrastructures themselves. The concern is with the value of services provided by infrastructures, where the true consequences of impacts and disruptions involve not only the costs associated with the clean-up, repair, and/or replacement of affected infrastructures but also economic, social, and environmental effects as supply chains are disrupted, economic activities are suspended, and/or social well-being is threatened. Current knowledge indicates that vulnerability concerns tend to be focused on extreme weather events associated with climate change that can disrupt infrastructure services, often cascading across infrastructures because of extensive interdependencies threatening health and local economies, especially in areas where human populations and economic activities are concentrated in urban areas. Vulnerabilities are especially large where infrastructures are subject to multiple stresses, beyond climate change alone; when they are located in areas vulnerable to extreme weather events; and if climate change is severe rather than moderate. But the report also notes that there are promising approaches for risk management, based on emerging lessons from a number of innovative initiatives in U.S. cities and other countries, involving both structural and non-structural (e.g., operational) options.

  17. Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-12-01

    DRQAT (Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool) is the tool for assessing demand response saving potentials for large commercial buildings. This tool is based on EnergyPlus simulations of prototypical buildings and HVAC equipment. The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. The assessment tools will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfor impact for various demand responsive strategies.more » Users of the tools will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tools will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points adjustment.« less

  18. School Supply Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School Supply Drive School Supply Drive Each year, Laboratory employees donate school supplies and backpacks for Northern New Mexico students as they start the new school year. September 16, 2013 Del Norte Credit Union's Baxter Bear takes a moment to pose with some of the backpacks filled with school supplies that will help students start their school year off right. Contact Giving Drives Mike Martinez Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 699-3388 Email Providing students with good start

  19. Demand for oil and energy in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, C. Jr.; Relles, D.A.; Navarro, J.

    1980-05-01

    How much of the world's oil and energy supply will the non-OPEC less-developed countries (NOLDCs) demand in the next decade. Will their requirements be small and thus fairly insignificant compared with world demand, or large and relatively important. How will world demand be affected by the economic growth of the NOLDCs. In this report, we try to develop some reasonable forecasts of NOLDC energy demands in the next 10 years. Our focus is mainly on the demand for oil, but we also give some attention to the total commercial energy requirements of these countries. We have tried to be explicit about the uncertainties associated with our forecasts, and with the income and price elasticities on which they are based. Finally, we consider the forecasts in terms of their implications for US policies concerning the NOLDCs and suggest areas of future research on NOLDC energy issues.

  20. National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berscheid, Alan P.

    2012-07-30

    National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) mission is to: (1) Improve the understanding, preparation, and mitigation of the consequences of infrastructure disruption; (2) Provide a common, comprehensive view of U.S. infrastructure and its response to disruptions - Scale & resolution appropriate to the issues and All threats; and (3) Built an operations-tested DHS capability to respond quickly to urgent infrastructure protection issues.

  1. Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public ...

  2. Transmission Infrastructure Investment Projects (2009) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Transmission Infrastructure Investment Projects (2009) More Documents & Publications Financial Institution Partnership Program - Commercial Technology Renewable Energy Generation...

  3. Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Presentation by Fred Joseck, U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program, at the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop, February 17, 2011, in Washington, DC. PDF icon wkshp_market_readiness_joseck.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells: National Academy of Sciences March 2011 H2A Delivery Models and Results Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout

  4. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    tv03veenstra.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology Validation Controlled Hydrogen Fleet & Infrastructure Analysis HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS...

  5. NREL Alt Fuel Lessons Learned: Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Conference, April 2-3, 2008, Sacramento, California

  6. Agent-based Infrastructure Interdependency Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-10-01

    The software is used to analyze infrastructure interdependencies. Agent-based modeling is used for the analysis.

  7. Chapter V: Improving Shared Transport Infrastructures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter VI: Integrating ... including oil and refined products, gas, and electricity. ... The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported ...

  8. Transportation Infrastructure Requirement Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Requirement Resources Transportation Infrastructure Requirement Resources Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum reduction path as an alternative to the mandate. Find infrastructure requirement resources below. DOE Resource Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development. Other Resource National

  9. Energy Department, Arizona Utilities Announce Transmission Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Energization | Department of Energy Arizona Utilities Announce Transmission Infrastructure Project Energization Energy Department, Arizona Utilities Announce Transmission Infrastructure Project Energization February 12, 2015 - 2:30pm Addthis News Media Contact 202 586 4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov Energy Department, Arizona Utilities Announce Transmission Infrastructure Project Energization Transmission Line Increases Reliability, Access to Affordable Energy in Southwest States WASHINGTON

  10. Wind Power Project Repowering: History, Economics, and Demand (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation summarizes a related NREL technical report and seeks to capture the current status of wind power project repowering in the U.S. and globally, analyze the economic and financial decision drivers that surround repowering, and to quantify the level and timing of demand for new turbine equipment to supply the repowering market.

  11. Assessment of capital requirements for alternative fuels infrastructure under the PNGV program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stork, K.; Singh, M.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents an assessment of the capital requirements of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a new Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels include two petroleum-based fuels (reformulated gasoline and low-sulfur diesel) and four alternative fuels (methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen). This study develops estimates of cumulative capital needs for establishing fuels production and distribution infrastructure to accommodate 3X vehicle fuel needs. Two levels of fuel volume-70,000 barrels per day and 1.6 million barrels per day-were established for meeting 3X-vehicle fuel demand. As expected, infrastructure capital needs for the high fuel demand level are much higher than for the low fuel demand level. Between fuel production infrastructure and distribution infrastructure, capital needs for the former far exceed those for the latter. Among the four alternative fuels, hydrogen bears the largest capital needs for production and distribution infrastructure.

  12. Enhanced INL Power Grid Test Bed Infrastructure – Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, Carol Ann; West, Grayson Shawn; McBride, Scott Alan

    2014-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory, owns, operates, and maintains transmission and distribution power grid infrastructure to support the INL multi program mission. Sections of this power infrastructure, known as the INL Power Grid Test Bed, have been and are being used by government and industry to develop, demonstrate, and validate technologies for the modern grid, including smart grid, on a full scale utility test bed. INL’s power grid includes 61 miles of 140 MW, 138 kV rated electrical power transmission supplying seven main substations, each feeding a separate facility complex (or ‘city’) within the INL’s 890 square mile Site. This power grid is fed by three commercial utilities into the INL’s main control substation, but is operated independently from the commercial utility through its primary substation and command and control center. Within the INL complex, one of the seven complexes, the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC), has been designated as the INL complex for supporting critical infrastructure research and testing. This complex includes its own substation and 13.8kV distribution network, all configurable and controlled by the INL research and development programs. Through investment partnership with the DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE OE), INL is enhancing its existing distribution infrastructure to expand the types of testing that can be conducted and increase flexibility for testing configurations. The enhancement of the INL Power Grid Test Bed will enable development and full scale testing of smart-grid-related technologies and smart devices including testing interoperability, operational performance, reliability, and resiliency contribution at multiple distribution voltage classes, specifically 15kV, 25kV, and 35kV. The expected time frame for completion of the Phase I portion of the enhancement would be 4th quarter fiscal year (FY) 2015.

  13. Refiners react to changes in the pipeline infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, K.A.

    1997-06-01

    Petroleum pipelines have long been a critical component in the distribution of crude and refined products in the U.S. Pipelines are typically the most cost efficient mode of transportation for reasonably consistent flow rates. For obvious reasons, inland refineries and consumers are much more dependent on petroleum pipelines to provide supplies of crude and refined products than refineries and consumers located on the coasts. Significant changes in U.S. distribution patterns for crude and refined products are reshaping the pipeline infrastructure and presenting challenges and opportunities for domestic refiners. These changes are discussed.

  14. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development This report seeks to provide an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding uncertainties around offshore wind manufacturing and supply chain capabilities; projecting potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios; and identifying key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market and current

  15. Analyzing water/wastewater infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillette, J. L.; Fisher, R. E.; Peerenboom, J. P.; Whitfield, R. G.

    2002-03-26

    This paper describes four general categories of infrastructure interdependencies (physical, cyber, geographic, and logical) as they apply to the water/wastewater infrastructure, and provides an overview of one of the analytic approaches and tools used by Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate interdependencies. Also discussed are the dimensions of infrastructure interdependency that create spatial, temporal, and system representation complexities that make analyzing the water/wastewater infrastructure particularly challenging. An analytical model developed to incorporate the impacts of interdependencies on infrastructure repair times is briefly addressed.

  16. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California’s Dairy Processing Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homan, Gregory K.; Aghajanzadeh, Arian; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-30

    During periods of peak electrical demand on the energy grid or when there is a shortage of supply, the stability of the grid may be compromised or the cost of supplying electricity may rise dramatically, respectively. Demand response programs are designed to mitigate the severity of these problems and improve reliability by reducing the demand on the grid during such critical times. In 2010, the Demand Response Research Center convened a group of industry experts to suggest potential industries that would be good demand response program candidates for further review. The dairy industry was suggested due to the perception that the industry had suitable flexibility and automatic controls in place. The purpose of this report is to provide an initial description of the industry with regard to demand response potential, specifically automated demand response. This report qualitatively describes the potential for participation in demand response and automated demand response by dairy processing facilities in California, as well as barriers to widespread participation. The report first describes the magnitude, timing, location, purpose, and manner of energy use. Typical process equipment and controls are discussed, as well as common impediments to participation in demand response and automated demand response programs. Two case studies of demand response at dairy facilities in California and across the country are reviewed. Finally, recommendations are made for future research that can enhance the understanding of demand response potential in this industry.

  17. Demand Response Research Center and Open Automated Demand Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...penAutomatedDemandResponse Signaling-conInuous,2-way, ... Dedicated Display Cell Phone Web TV SmartMeter (ItronorSilverSpring) ...

  18. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-15

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  19. Cyber Threats to Nuclear Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Anderson; Paul Moskowitz; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Curtis St. Michel

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear facility personnel expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against both natural and man-made threats. Historically, most attention has been placed on physical security. Recently however, the threat of cyber-related attacks has become a recognized and growing world-wide concern. Much attention has focused on the vulnerability of the electric grid and chemical industries to cyber attacks, in part, because of their use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. Lessons learned from work in these sectors indicate that the cyber threat may extend to other critical infrastructures including sites where nuclear and radiological materials are now stored. In this context, this white paper presents a hypothetical scenario by which a determined adversary launches a cyber attack that compromises the physical protection system and results in a reduced security posture at such a site. The compromised security posture might then be malevolently exploited in a variety of ways. The authors conclude that the cyber threat should be carefully considered for all nuclear infrastructures.

  20. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2015 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 287,133 - - - - 244,915 -6,209 -6,054

  1. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 December 2015 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  2. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 December 2015 Table 11. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,802

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 December 2015 Table 12. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  4. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    19 December 2015 Table 13. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  5. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20 December 2015 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 December 2015 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................

  7. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 December 2015 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  8. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 December 2015 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  9. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 December 2015 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 715 -

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 December 2015 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 December 2015 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  12. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 December 2015 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  13. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    30 December 2015 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  14. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2015 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 9,262 - - - - 7,900 -200 -195 16,765 392 0 Natural

  15. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2015 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  16. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2015 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  17. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 December 2015 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-December 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  18. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 December 2015 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  19. AVTA: EVSE Testing - NYSERDA Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing - NYSERDA Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Reports AVTA: EVSE Testing - NYSERDA Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Reports The Vehicle Technologies Office's ...

  20. Supervisory Supply Systems Analyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This position is located in Materials Management Group, which is part of the Logistics Management operations of Supply Chain Services. The Logistics Management organization manages the warehousing...

  1. Supply Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Logistics Management organization (NSL), Supply Chain Services (NS), Chief Administrative Office (N). NSL manages the warehousing of materials; the investment...

  2. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2005 (Thousand Barrels) Field Production Refinery and Blender Net Production...

  3. Self Supplied Balancing Reserves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Self-Supplied-Balancing-Reserves Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  4. Demand Response Technology Roadmap A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meetings and workshops convened to develop content for the Demand Response Technology Roadmap. The project team has developed this companion document in the interest of providing...

  5. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure

  8. Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Accuracy of published data in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, the Petroleum Supply Monthly, and the Petroleum Supply Annual.

  9. DemandDirect | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DemandDirect Place: Woodbury, Connecticut Zip: 6798 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product: DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load...

  10. US DOE Hydrgoen Program- HyDRA (Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program Hydrogen Program Hydrogen Program HyDRA - Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool Presentation to the State and Regional Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Initiatives Call Group July 2008 Fred Joseck Technology Analyst 1 2 Overview Objective: Develop a web-based GIS tool to allow analysts, decision makers, and general users to view, download, and analyze hydrogen demand, resource, and infrastructure data spatially and dynamically.

  11. Resilient Infrastructure Publications | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Argonne National Laboratory researchers have published a wide range of resiliency-related reports, papers and articles, some of which are shown below. Analysis of Critical Infrastructure Dependencies and Interdependencies Petit, F., Verner, D., Brannegan, D., Buehring, W., Dickinson, D., Guziel, K., Haffenden, R., Phillips, J., Peerenboom, J., June 2015, Analysis of Critical Infrastructure Dependencies and Interdependencies. An Approach to Critical Infrastructure Resilience Petit,

  12. Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project Presentation by 11-Wang to DOE Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project Review Meeting held January 5-6, 2005 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. PDF icon 11_wang_infra.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Proceedings of the 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Pipeline and Pressure Vessel R&D under the Hydrogen Regional

  13. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary Results |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Workshop: Preliminary Results Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary Results Preliminary results from the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop held February 16-17, 2011. This presentation was disseminated to workshop attendees to convey the aggregate and "raw" feedback collected during the workshop. PDF icon wkshp_market_readiness_preliminary_results.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Infrastructure Market

  14. DOE Extends Portsmouth Infrastructure Support Services Contract |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Portsmouth Infrastructure Support Services Contract DOE Extends Portsmouth Infrastructure Support Services Contract July 17, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Brad Mitzelfelt, 859-219-4035 brad.mitzelfelt@lex.doe.gov LEXINGTON, Ky. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it is extending its contract for Infrastructure Support Services at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site for a period of six months. The contract period for the current

  15. National Infrastructure Protection Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Protection Plan National Infrastructure Protection Plan Protecting the critical infrastructure and key resources (CI/KR) of the United States is essential to the Nation's security, public health and safety, economic vitality, and way of life. Attacks on CI/KR could significantly disrupt the functioning of government and business alike and produce cascading effects far beyond the targeted sector and physical location of the incident. Direct terrorist attacks and natural, manmade,

  16. Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah | Department of Energy Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah Presentation from the 2015 DOE National Cleanup Workshop by William E. Murphie, Manager, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO). PDF icon Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities at Portsmouth

  17. Infrastructure Development - Building America Top Innovations | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Infrastructure Development - Building America Top Innovations Infrastructure Development - Building America Top Innovations August 25, 2014 - 11:23am Addthis Infrastructure Development - Building America Top Innovations Top Innovations in this category include research results that have influenced codes and standards and improvements in education and the transaction process. Educating Professionals Projects are underway in this category. Check back for profiles to be posted soon.

  18. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon groupereportoutcaci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere...

  19. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon groupareportoutcaci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere...

  20. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon groupcreportoutcaci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere...

  1. International Symposium For Next Generation Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The International Symposium for Next Generation Infrastructure is designed to support the rapidly expanding international research community seeking to understand the interactions between...

  2. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Backsplash for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA...

  3. EV Everywhere ? Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop David Sandalow Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs U.S....

  4. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a critical commercialization barrier. With major automakers focused on ...

  5. Green Infrastructure Bonds | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    allowing the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism to issue Green Infrastructure Bonds to secture low-cost financing for clean energy installations,...

  6. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen (PDF 257 KB), Dean Fry, BP Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination Moderator: Stefan ...

  7. CHP: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure - Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHP: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure - Presentations from April 2013 Webinar Recognizing the benefits of combined heat and power (CHP) and its current underutilization as ...

  8. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities: Markets and Barriers to Growth Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets and Barriers to Growth Presentation by Matt Most, Encana Natural Gas,...

  9. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles...

  10. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF ...

  11. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF ...

  12. Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential for 'Novel' Financing Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Ways of Financing...

  13. Tarini Infrastructure Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip: 110024 Sector: Hydro Product: New Delhi-based small hydro project developer. References: Tarini Infrastructure Ltd.1 This article is a...

  14. National Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power lines like these make up our nation's power grid -- a critical component of our national critical infrastructure. Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, ...

  15. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from the DOE sponsored Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can...

  16. Wyoming Infrastructure Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Wyoming Infrastructure Authority Abbreviation: WIA Address: 200 E. 17th Street, Unit B Place: Cheyenne, WY Zip: 82001 Year Founded: 2004 Phone Number: (307) 635-3573...

  17. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO, and DOE Introduction to SAE Hydrogen Fueling Standardization Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling...

  18. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program FY2003 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and ... U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY ...

  19. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report The Department of Energy's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and ...

  20. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon fry.pdf More Documents & Publications HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS NREL Alt Fuel Lessons Learned: Hydrogen Infrastructure Safety Analysis of Type 4 Tanks in CNG Vehicles

  1. Acquasol Infrastructure Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Acquasol Infrastructure Limited Place: Adelaide, South Australia, Australia Zip: 5000 Sector: Solar Product: Adelaide based solar thermal project and...

  2. Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to enable widespread residentialMDU and workplace charging infrastructure * Include use case data collected to date and collect data not available * Work with DOT and planning...

  3. Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Also, it planned to explore incorporating provisions for sustainable building design in grants and loans targeted for infrastructure improvements at academic institutions, and to ...

  4. Hydrogen Infrastructure Strategies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California H2FIRST Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2-2 Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum ...

  5. Infrastructure Development and Financial Analysis | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resource Analysis Technological Feasibility & Cost Analysis Environmental Analysis Delivery Analysis Infrastructure Development & Financial Analysis Energy Market Analysis DOE H2A ...

  6. Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: ARCGIS Shape...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ARCGIS Shape File, all Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: ARCGIS Shape File, all Countries...

  7. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    were to convene industry and other stakeholders to share current status and state-of-the-art technologies for natural gas and hydrogen infrastructure; identify key challenges, both...

  8. Final Report- Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides in-depth analysis of various hydrogen delivery options to determine the most cost effective infrastructure and R&D efforts for the long term.

  9. Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  10. Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc Region: Puerto Rico Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  11. Resilient Infrastructure Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Power Network Modeling (EPfast) EPfast is an electric power infrastructure modeling tool used to examine the impacts of power outages on large electric grid systems. ...

  12. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Piette, Mary Ann; Fujita, Sydny; McKane, Aimee; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Radspieler, Anthony; Mares, K.C.; Shroyer, Dave

    2009-12-30

    This study examines data center characteristics, loads, control systems, and technologies to identify demand response (DR) and automated DR (Open Auto-DR) opportunities and challenges. The study was performed in collaboration with technology experts, industrial partners, and data center facility managers and existing research on commercial and industrial DR was collected and analyzed. The results suggest that data centers, with significant and rapidly growing energy use, have significant DR potential. Because data centers are highly automated, they are excellent candidates for Open Auto-DR. 'Non-mission-critical' data centers are the most likely candidates for early adoption of DR. Data center site infrastructure DR strategies have been well studied for other commercial buildings; however, DR strategies for information technology (IT) infrastructure have not been studied extensively. The largest opportunity for DR or load reduction in data centers is in the use of virtualization to reduce IT equipment energy use, which correspondingly reduces facility cooling loads. DR strategies could also be deployed for data center lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Additional studies and demonstrations are needed to quantify benefits to data centers of participating in DR and to address concerns about DR's possible impact on data center performance or quality of service and equipment life span.

  13. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-11

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframesincentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  14. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  15. Automating power supply checkout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, J.; Bruno, D.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drozd, J.; Marr, G.; Mi, C.

    2011-03-28

    Power Supply checkout is a necessary, pre-beam, time-critical function. At odds are the desire to decrease the amount of time to perform the checkout while at the same time maximizing the number and types of checks that can be performed and analyzing the results quickly (in case any problems exist that must be addressed). Controls and Power Supply Group personnel have worked together to develop tools to accomplish these goals. Power Supply checkouts are now accomplished in a time-frame of hours rather than days, reducing the number of person-hours needed to accomplish the checkout and making the system available more quickly for beam development. The goal of the Collider-Accelerator Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is to provide experimenters with collisions of heavy-ions and polarized protons. The Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) magnets are controlled by 100's of varying types of power supplies. There is a concentrated effort to perform routine maintenance on the supplies during shutdown periods. There is an effort at RHIC to streamline the time needed for system checkout in order to quickly arrive at a period of beam operations for RHIC. This time-critical period is when the checkout of the power supplies is performed as the RHIC ring becomes cold and the supplies are connected to their physical magnets. The checkout process is used to identify problems in voltage and current regulation by examining data signals related to each for problems in settling and regulation (ripple).

  16. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, ...

  17. Electric Power Infrastructure Reliability and Security (EPIRS) Reseach and Development Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Meeker; L. Baldwin; Steinar Dale; Alexander Domijan; Davild Larbalestier; Hui Li; Peter McLaren; Sastry Pamidi; Horatio Rodrigo; Michael Steurer

    2010-03-31

    Power systems have become increasingly complex and face unprecedented challenges posed by population growth, climate change, national security issues, foreign energy dependence and an aging power infrastructure. Increased demand combined with increased economic and environmental constraints is forcing state, regional and national power grids to expand supply without the large safety and stability margins in generation and transmission capacity that have been the rule in the past. Deregulation, distributed generation, natural and man-made catastrophes and other causes serve to further challenge and complicate management of the electric power grid. To meet the challenges of the 21st century while also maintaining system reliability, the electric power grid must effectively integrate new and advanced technologies both in the actual equipment for energy conversion, transfer and use, and in the command, control, and communication systems by which effective and efficient operation of the system is orchestrated - in essence, the 'smart grid'. This evolution calls for advances in development, integration, analysis, and deployment approaches that ultimately seek to take into account, every step of the way, the dynamic behavior of the system, capturing critical effects due to interdependencies and interaction. This approach is necessary to better mitigate the risk of blackouts and other disruptions and to improve the flexibility and capacity of the grid. Building on prior Navy and Department of Energy investments in infrastructure and resources for electric power systems research, testing, modeling, and simulation at the Florida State University (FSU) Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS), this project has continued an initiative aimed at assuring reliable and secure grid operation through a more complete understanding and characterization of some of the key technologies that will be important in a modern electric system, while also fulfilling an education and outreach mission to provide future energy workforce talent and support the electric system stakeholder community. Building upon and extending portions of that research effort, this project has been focused in the following areas: (1) Building high-fidelity integrated power and controls hardware-in-the-loop research and development testbed capabilities (Figure 1). (2) Distributed Energy Resources Integration - (a) Testing Requirements and Methods for Fault Current Limiters, (b) Contributions to the Development of IEEE 1547.7, (c) Analysis of a STATCOM Application for Wind Resource Integration, (d) Development of a Grid-Interactive Inverter with Energy Storage Elements, (e) Simulation-Assisted Advancement of Microgrid Understanding and Applications; (3) Availability of High-Fidelity Dynamic Simulation Tools for Grid Disturbance Investigations; (4) HTS Material Characterization - (a) AC Loss Studies on High Temperature Superconductors, (b) Local Identification of Current-Limiting Mechanisms in Coated Conductors; (5) Cryogenic Dielectric Research; and (6) Workshops, education, and outreach.

  18. GSA Wind Supply Opportunity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Supply Opportunity 1 2 3 Proposed Location * Size: 100-210 MegaWatts *Location: Bureau County, IL *Planned COD: December 2014 or 2015 *Site Control: 17,000 acres *Wind Resource Assessment: 7.4 m/s *Annual Production Estimate: 350,000 - 725,000 MWh * Interim 2013 renewable energy goal of 15% met and exceeded * Still short of 2020 goal to be 30% renewable * Renewable Power supply is an excellent method of meeting these goals 4 GSA's Renewable Mandate 5 Mechanics of Supply *MG2 would deliver

  19. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and implement a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of demand response resources and to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to assess economic value of the realizable potential of demand response for ancillary services.

  20. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Infrastructure - EAC 2011 | Department of Energy Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Recommendations from the Electricity Advisory Committee on actions to be taken by the Department of Energy given the interdependence of the Nation's electric infrastructure and natural gas infrastructure. PDF icon EAC - Interdependence of Electricity System

  1. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Research Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure The foundation of the Energy Systems Integration Facility is its research infrastructure. In addition to extensive fixed equipment, the facility incorporates electrical, thermal, fuels, and data acquisition bus work throughout. These research buses tie individual laboratories together and allow interconnection of equipment between laboratories as well as rapid reconfiguration of systems under test. The Energy Systems Integration Facility offers the following research

  2. NNSA Completes Successful Facilities and Infrastructure Recapitalization

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Successful Facilities and Infrastructure Recapitalization Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony

  3. Strategic Security Infrastructure Program | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Strategic Security Infrastructure Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  4. Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-26

    The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

  5. Fluxnet Synthesis Dataset Collaboration Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Deborah A.; Humphrey, Marty; van Ingen, Catharine; Beekwilder, Norm; Goode, Monte; Jackson, Keith; Rodriguez, Matt; Weber, Robin

    2008-02-06

    The Fluxnet synthesis dataset originally compiled for the La Thuile workshop contained approximately 600 site years. Since the workshop, several additional site years have been added and the dataset now contains over 920 site years from over 240 sites. A data refresh update is expected to increase those numbers in the next few months. The ancillary data describing the sites continues to evolve as well. There are on the order of 120 site contacts and 60proposals have been approved to use thedata. These proposals involve around 120 researchers. The size and complexity of the dataset and collaboration has led to a new approach to providing access to the data and collaboration support and the support team attended the workshop and worked closely with the attendees and the Fluxnet project office to define the requirements for the support infrastructure. As a result of this effort, a new website (http://www.fluxdata.org) has been created to provide access to the Fluxnet synthesis dataset. This new web site is based on a scientific data server which enables browsing of the data on-line, data download, and version tracking. We leverage database and data analysis tools such as OLAP data cubes and web reports to enable browser and Excel pivot table access to the data.

  6. Industrial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  7. Residential Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

  8. Advanced Feedstock Supply System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Feedstock Supply System Erin M Searcy, PhD November 27, 2012 Biomass Feedstock Logistics Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 * Technologies exist to supply biomass for energy production, but they have limits * Cost, quantity, quality * I'll present a potential solution: biomass commoditization Key Point Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 3 * There are a variety of lignocellulosic biomass sources that could be used for energy production -

  9. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 December 2015 Appendix D Northeast Reserves Reserves inventories are not considered to be in the commercial sector and are excluded from EIA's commercial motor gasoline and distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics, such as those reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve classifed as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) Terminal Operator Location Thousand Barrels Buckeye

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 December 2015 Table 25. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, December 2015 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 1,479 55,847 173,801 22,162 33,844 287,133 9,262 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 16,191 522 Lower 48 States ................................................ -

  11. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Procurement of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment This Guidance provides a description of the types of requirements to be included in an employer's workplace charging request for proposal (RFP). This Guidance is not intended to be a sample or manual for acquiring electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), but rather to serve as a reference for an employer to consider when acquiring EVSE as part of a workplace charging program. Contact the Workplace Charging Challenge at

  12. Drivers of Future Energy Demand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Energy Demand in China Asian Energy Demand Outlook 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 14, 2014 Valerie J. Karplus MIT Sloan School of Management 2 www.china.org.cn www.flickr.com www.wikimedia.org globalchange.mit.edu Global Climate Change Human Development Local Pollution Industrial Development & Resource Needs How to balance? 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 1981 1991 2001 2011 Non-material Sectors/Other Construction Commercial consumption Residential consumption Transportation

  13. Ligncellulosic feedstock supply systems with intermodal and overseas

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transportation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ligncellulosic feedstock supply systems with intermodal and overseas transportation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ligncellulosic feedstock supply systems with intermodal and overseas transportation With growing demand for biomass from industrial uses and international trade, the logistic operations required to economically move the biomass from the field or forest to the end users have become increasingly complex. In addition to

  14. Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You are here Home » Research & Development » Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works with wind technology suppliers to promote advanced manufacturing capabilities. Its goals are to increase reliability while lowering production costs, and to promote an industry that can meet all demands domestically while competing in the global market. The Wind Program supports industry partnerships and targeted R&D investments

  15. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by adjusting settings. In a sense the customer can choose between greater comfort and greater money savings during demand response circumstances. Finally a battery application was to be considered. Initially it was thought that a large battery (probably a sodium-sulfur type) would be installed. However, after the contract was awarded, it was determined that a single, centrally-located battery system would not be appropriate for many reasons, including that with the build out plan there would not be any location to put it. The price had risen substantially since the budget for the project was put together. Also, that type of battery has to be kept hot all the time, but its use was only sought for summer operation. Hence, individual house batteries would be used, and these are discussed at the end of this report. Many aspects of the energy use for climate control in selected houses were monitored before residents moved in. This was done both to understand the magnitude of the energy flows but also to have data that could be compared to the computer simulations. The latter would be used to evaluate various aspects of our plan. It was found that good agreement existed between actual energy use and computed energy use. Hence, various studies were performed via simulations. Performance simulations showed the impact on peak energy usage between a code built house of same size and shape compared to the Villa Trieste homes with and without the PV arrays on the latter. Computations were also used to understand the effect of varying orientations of the houses in this typical housing development, including the effect of PV electrical generation. Energy conservation features of the Villa Trieste homes decreased the energy use during peak times (as well as all others), but the resulting decreased peak occurred at about the same time as the code-built houses. Consideration of the PV generation decreases the grid energy use further during daylight hours, but did not extend long enough many days to decrease the peak. Hence, a demand response approach, as planned, was needed. With participation of the residents in the demand response program developed does enable the houses to reduce the peak demand between 66% and 72%, depending on the built years. This was addressed fully in the latter part the study and is described in the latter part of this report.

  16. Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Chinese Transportation Fuel Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, China has experienced tremendous growth in its transportation sector. By the end of 2010, China's road infrastructure had emerged as the second-largest transportation system in the world after the United States. Passenger vehicle sales are dramatically increasing from a little more than half a million in 2000, to 3.7 million in 2005, to 13.8 million in 2010. This represents a twenty-fold increase from 2000 to 2010. The unprecedented motorization development in China led to a significant increase in oil demand, which requires China to import progressively more petroleum from other countries, with its share of petroleum imports exceeding 50% of total petroleum demand since 2009. In response to growing oil import dependency, the Chinese government is adopting a broad range of policies, including promotion of fuel-efficient vehicles, fuel conservation, increasing investments in oil resources around the world, and many others.

  18. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar" held on March 10, 2015. PDF icon 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides More Documents & Publications International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling

  1. electricity supplied by Hickam's solar-powered electric grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supplied by Hickam's solar-powered electric grid - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  2. Supply Chain Management Center | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home / Supply

  3. HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget

  4. Supply Chain Management Center event highlights how small businesses can

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    help NNSA carry out its missions | National Nuclear Security Administration Supply Chain Management Center event highlights how small businesses can help NNSA carry out its missions | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our

  5. Y-12 donates school supplies to ADFAC | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration school supplies to ADFAC | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs

  6. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  7. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  8. Transforming the U.S. Energy Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible and economic in the world. On the other hand, the U.S. energy infrastructure is excessively reliant on foreign sources of energy, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gases (GHG). This report presents a Technology Based Strategy to achieve a full transformation of the U.S. energy infrastructure that corrects these negative factors while retaining the positives.

  9. Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R; Kirby, Brendan J; Kueck, John D; Todd, Duane; Caulfield, Michael; Helms, Brian

    2009-02-01

    Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

  10. Agenda: Energy Infrastructure Finance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sullivan, CEODirector of Investments, Grand River Dam Authority * Humayun Tai, Director, McKinsey Company * Steven J. Zucchet, SVP, Borealis Infrastructure 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. ...

  11. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review. Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindauer, Alicia

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Programs Infrastructure Platform Review meeting.

  12. Enforcement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site On July 13, 2009, the...

  13. Fuzzy architecture assessment for critical infrastructure resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, George

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an approach for the selection of alternative architectures in a connected infrastructure system to increase resilience of the overall infrastructure system. The paper begins with a description of resilience and critical infrastructure, then summarizes existing approaches to resilience, and presents a fuzzy-rule based method of selecting among alternative infrastructure architectures. This methodology includes considerations which are most important when deciding on an approach to resilience. The paper concludes with a proposed approach which builds on existing resilience architecting methods by integrating key system aspects using fuzzy memberships and fuzzy rule sets. This novel approach aids the systems architect in considering resilience for the evaluation of architectures for adoption into the final system architecture.

  14. Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-08-01

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

  15. Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-08-05

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

  16. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IPHE Infrastructure Workshop IPHE Infrastructure Workshop This interactive workshop, held February 25-26, 2010, in Sacramento, CA, focused on realistic, practical issues with the aim of producing information to help develop policies, technologies, and incentives that will contribute to the success of hydrogen fuel retailers. Organizers of the workshop include IPHE (International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy), the U.S. Department of Energy, California Fuel Cell

  17. "smart water" infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    smart water" infrastructure - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  18. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Research and Station Technology Erika Sutherland U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office 2 Question and Answer * Please type your question into the question box hydrogenandfuelcells.energy.gov Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology Chris Ainscough, Joe Pratt, Jennifer Kurtz, Brian Somerday, Danny Terlip, Terry Johnson November 18, 2014 Objective: Ensure that FCEV customers have a positive fueling experience relative to conventional

  19. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon tv_05_sell.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Accelerating Alternatives for Minnesota Drivers HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS Lean Gasoline System Development

  20. Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense

  1. California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt082_ti_bowen_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications The Future of Home Heating StateActivity.pdf Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Overview

  2. Public Meeting In Chicago - Rail Infrastructure Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    QER August 8 th Public Meeting In Chicago - Rail Infrastructure Presentation Dave Wanner - Wisconsin Public Service Corporation ____________________________________________________________________________ Page 1 of 3 First of all, I would like to thank the Department of Energy for allowing me to speak today about the importance of the nation's rail infrastructure to my company and to all of our customers. My name is Dave Wanner. I am the Manager of Fuel Services for Wisconsin Public Service

  3. Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Modernization Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization A researcher evaluates methane produced in a unique conservation process. Methane is both a potent greenhouse gas and valuable energy resource.| Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. A researcher evaluates methane produced in a unique conservation process. Methane is both a potent greenhouse gas and valuable energy resource.| Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. In order to help modernize the nation's natural gas

  4. Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure "A sustainable society is one which satisfies its needs without diminishing the prospects of future generations." - Lester R. Brown, Founder and President, Worldwatch Institute Department of Energy facilities managers have a significant role to play in achieving the goals of E.O. 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental Energy and Transportation Management and E.O. 13514, Federal Leadership in

  5. Facilities and Infrastructure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities and Infrastructure Facilities and Infrastructure Program Offices and Headquarters elements share the responsibility for management and overall stewardship of the Department's real property assets. Proper management and stewardship ensures real property assets are maintained in a manner that promotes operational readiness, safety, environmental protection, property preservation, and life-cycle cost-effectiveness while meeting the Department's missions. DOE Order 430.1B "Real

  6. Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed Gas Service Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed...

  7. Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure Development Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure Development Presented at ...

  8. SLT Power Infrastructure Projects Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SLT Power Infrastructure Projects Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SLT Power & Infrastructure Projects Pvt Ltd. Place: Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip: 500044 Sector:...

  9. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment (NA-50) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment (NA-50) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and ...

  10. FY 2014 Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA FY 2014 Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA The...

  11. Lessons and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Presented at Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Conference, April 2-3, 2008, Sacramento, California PDF icon...

  12. FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

  13. Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) The Year-in-Review (YIR): 2012 Energy...

  14. HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis Presentation by NREL's ...

  15. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues This presentation by Bill Elrick...

  16. SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY Based on the finding of a growing potential ...

  17. Technical Innovation in Management and Infrastructure | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Innovation in Management and Infrastructure The MFRC administers a program (TIMI) that addresses the application of new technology to the infrastructure and management of...

  18. Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern California Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern...

  19. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) Base Plan, a comprehensive risk management framework that defines critical infrastructure protection (CIP) roles and...

  20. Clean Energy Infrastructure Educational Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallinan, Kevin; Menart, James; Gilbert, Robert

    2012-08-31

    The Clean Energy Infrastructure Educational Initiative represents a collaborative effort by the University of Dayton, Wright State University and Sinclair Community College. This effort above all aimed to establish energy related programs at each of the universities while also providing outreach to the local, state-wide, and national communities. At the University of Dayton, the grant has aimed at: solidfying a newly created Master’s program in Renewable and Clean Energy; helping to establish and staff a regional sustainability organization for SW Ohio. As well, as the prime grantee, the University of Dayton was responsible for insuring curricular sharing between WSU and the University of Dayton. Finally, the grant, through its support of graduate students, and through cooperation with the largest utilities in SW Ohio enabled a region-wide evaluation of over 10,000 commercial building buildings in order to identify the priority buildings in the region for energy reduction. In each, the grant has achieved success. The main focus of Wright State was to continue the development of graduate education in renewable and clean energy. Wright State has done this in a number of ways. First and foremost this was done by continuing the development of the new Renewable and Clean Energy Master’s Degree program at Wright State . Development tasks included: continuing development of courses for the Renewable and Clean Energy Master’s Degree, increasing the student enrollment, and increasing renewable and clean energy research work. The grant has enabled development and/or improvement of 7 courses. Collectively, the University of Dayton and WSU offer perhaps the most comprehensive list of courses in the renewable and clean energy area in the country. Because of this development, enrollment at WSU has increased from 4 students to 23. Secondly, the grant has helped to support student research aimed in the renewable and clean energy program. The grant helped to solidify new research in the renewable and clean energy area. The educational outreach provided as a result of the grant included activities to introduce renewable and clean energy design projects into the Mechanical and Materials Engineering senior design class, the development of a geothermal energy demonstration unit, and the development of renewable energy learning modules for high school students. Finally, this grant supported curriculum development by Sinclair Community College for seven new courses and acquisition of necessary related instrumentation and laboratory equipment. These new courses, EGV 1201 Weatherization Training, EGV 1251 Introduction to Energy Management Principles, EGV 2301 Commercial and Industrial Assessment, EGV 2351 LEED Green Associate Exam Preparation, EGV 2251 Energy Control Strategies, EGV Solar Photovoltaic Design and Installation, and EGV Solar Thermal Systems, enable Sinclair to offer complete Energy Technology Certificate and an Energy Management Degree programs. To date, 151 students have completed or are currently registered in one of the seven courses developed through this grant. With the increasing interest in the Energy Management Degree program, Sinclair has begun the procedure to have the program approved by the Ohio Board of Regents.

  1. Commercial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  2. Promising Technology: Demand Control Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand control ventilation (DCV) measures carbon dioxide concentrations in return air or other strategies to measure occupancy, and accurately matches the ventilation requirement. This system reduces ventilation when spaces are vacant or at lower than peak occupancy. When ventilation is reduced, energy savings are accrued because it is not necessary to heat, cool, or dehumidify as much outside air.

  3. Supply Stores | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Base Supply Center and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is

  4. Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Generating...

  5. Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 (Text Version) Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 (Text...

  6. Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand Response - Policy Demand Response - Policy Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's ...

  7. Demand Management Institute (DMI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demand Management Institute (DMI) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Demand Management Institute (DMI) Address: 35 Walnut Street Place: Wellesley, Massachusetts Zip: 02481 Region:...

  8. Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Almeida, A.T.; Fisk, W.J.

    1997-07-01

    In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

  9. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume I U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructur...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Gulf States Utilities Co., Willow Glen Power Plant Wharf St. ... 42 TOM BEVILL LOCK AND DAM WILLAMETTE RIVER 15 ... 0.069 1065.3 0 0 CO Hay Canyon Treating Facility Encana ...

  10. NEUP Project Selections_September212011_IRP and Infrastructure Improvements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Projectsselections for NEUP 2011 under Integrated Research Projects and University Research Infrastructure Improvements.

  11. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for US hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  12. Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania. Objectives: Capture data pertinent to H2 delivery in PA PDF icon hpwgw_pa_reginfra_klingenberg.pdf More Documents & Publications Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues New Materials for Hydrogen Pipelines

  13. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized process for cyber vulnerability assessment in compliance with the Critical Infrastructure Protection standards adopted by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation in 2006. This guide covers the planning, execution, and reporting process. PDF icon Guide to Critical Infrastructure

  14. Presidential Proclamation: Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A proclamation from President Barack Obama declaring November 2013 Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month.

  15. PIA - EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System PIA - EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System PIA - EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System PDF icon PIA - EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - HSPD-12 Physical and Logical Access System PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline

  16. Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

    2008-04-01

    Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

  17. Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Public Meeting on “Enhancing Resilience in Energy Infrastructure and Addressing Vulnerabilities” On Friday, April 11, 2014, at 10 a.m. in room HVC-215 of the U.S. Capitol, the Department of Energy (DOE), acting as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, will hold a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). The meeting will focus on infrastructure vulnerabilities related to the electricity, natural gas and petroleum transmission, storage and distribution systems (TS&D). The meeting will consist of two facilitated panels of experts on identifying and addressing vulnerabilities within the nation’s energy TS&D infrastructure. Following the panels, an opportunity will be provided for public comment via an open microphone session. The meeting will be livestreamed at energy.gov/live

  18. Securing Infrastructure from High Explosive Threats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, L; Noble, C; Reynolds, J; Kuhl, A; Morris, J

    2009-03-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is working with the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the Transportation Security Administration, and several infrastructure partners to characterize and help mitigate principal structural vulnerabilities to explosive threats. Given the importance of infrastructure to the nation's security and economy, there is a clear need for applied research and analyses (1) to improve understanding of the vulnerabilities of these systems to explosive threats and (2) to provide decision makers with time-critical technical assistance concerning countermeasure and mitigation options. Fully-coupled high performance calculations of structural response to ideal and non-ideal explosives help bound and quantify specific critical vulnerabilities, and help identify possible corrective schemes. Experimental validation of modeling approaches and methodologies builds confidence in the prediction, while advanced stochastic techniques allow for optimal use of scarce computational resources to efficiently provide infrastructure owners and decision makers with timely analyses.

  19. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  20. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses. The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  1. Lessons and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Lessons and Challenges for Early Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Presented at Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Conference, April 2-3, 2008, Sacramento, California PDF icon lessons_melaina_final.pdf More Documents & Publications Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Hydrogen Infrastructure Strategies Technical

  2. GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling Presentation by NREL's Keith Parks at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C. PDF icon parks_gis_infrastructure_modeling.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California Hydrogen and FCV Implementation Scenarios, 2010 - 2025

  3. Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California Presentation by Joan Ogden of the University of California at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C. PDF icon ogden_geo_infrastructure_analysis.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Infrastructure Strategies EIS-0105: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Natural

  4. DOE EFFORTS TO REVITALIZE FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE AT DOE LABORATORIES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy DOE EFFORTS TO REVITALIZE FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE AT DOE LABORATORIES DOE EFFORTS TO REVITALIZE FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE AT DOE LABORATORIES Joseph McBrearty, Deputy Director for Field Operations, Office of Science presented gave a briefing on DOE efforts to revitalize facilities and infrastructure at DOE laboratories. Robert Haledman, Director of Infrastructure Operations and Modernization briefed the Commission on maintaining the infrastructure to support

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Ramps Up Biofuels Infrastructure

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    California Ramps Up Biofuels Infrastructure to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Ramps Up Biofuels Infrastructure on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Ramps Up Biofuels Infrastructure on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Ramps Up Biofuels Infrastructure on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Ramps Up Biofuels Infrastructure on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Ramps

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Development Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center:

  7. Securing energy assets and infrastructure 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-15

    This report describes in detail the energy industry's challenges and solutions for protecting critical assets including oil and gas infrastructure, transmission grids, power plants, storage, pipelines, and all aspects of strategic industry assets. It includes a special section on cyber-terrorism and protecting control systems. Contents: Section I - Introduction; U.S Energy Trends; Vulnerabilities; Protection Measures. Section II - Sector-wise Vulnerabilities Assessments and Security Measures: Coal, Oil and Petroleum, Natural Gas, Electric Power, Cybersecurity and Control Systems, Key Recommendations; Section III - Critical Infrastructure Protection Efforts: Government Initiatives, Agencies, and Checklists.

  8. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 th , 2015 2 Questions and Answers  Please type your question into the question box Agenda  Overview  Hydrogen Infrastructure by Region  Fueling  Quality  Metering  Station Hardware  Q&A 3 4 Overview The 2nd International Workshop on Hydrogen Infrastructure & Transportation continued the work of the first workshop that was held in Berlin on June 24th-26th, 2013. The workshop aimed to identify solutions, share experience, best practices and progress on four key

  9. Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Analysis: Milestone Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Analysis M. Melendez and A. Milbrandt Milestone Report NREL/TP-540-38351 January 2006 Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Analysis M. Melendez and A. Milbrandt Prepared under Task No. HY55.2200 Milestone Report NREL/TP-540-38351 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest

  10. LNG links remote supplies and markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avidan, A.A.; Gardner, R.E.; Nelson, D.; Borrelli, E.N.; Rethore, T.J.

    1997-06-02

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has established a niche for itself by matching remote gas supplies to markets that both lacked indigenous gas reserves and felt threatened in the aftermath of the energy crises of the 1970s and 1980s. It has provided a cost-effective energy source for these markets, while also offering an environmentally friendly fuel long before that was fashionable. The introduction of natural-gas use via LNG in the early years (mostly into France and Japan) has also allowed LNG to play a major role in developing gas infrastructure. Today, natural gas, often supplied as LNG, is particularly well-suited for use in the combined cycle technology used in independent power generation projects (IPPs). Today, LNG players cannot simply focus on monetizing gas resources. Instead, they must adapt their projects to meet the needs of changing markets. The impact of these changes on the LNG industry has been felt throughout the value chain from finding and producing gas, gas treatment, liquefaction, transport as a liquid, receiving terminals and regasification, and finally, to consumption by power producers, industrial users, and households. These factors have influenced the evolution of the LNG industry and have implications for the future of LNG, particularly in the context of worldwide natural gas.

  11. Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversifying Supply diagram for focus area 1 diversifying supply (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses of the leaders.)

  12. Office Supplies | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office Supplies The Ames Laboratory Storeroom has many office supplies available for purchase. Please see commodity number 10 in the storeroom catalog for all available products. Ames Laboratory has a pricing agreement with Pay-less Office Products, Inc. For the supplies not available for purchase in the Ames Laboratory Storeroom, please visit the Pay-Less Office website for other office supply needs. Pay-less Office Products generally delivers products within 2 to 4 days of order. Contact the

  13. Feedstock Supply | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supply Feedstock Supply The development of efficient, sustainable biomass feedstock supply systems supports a diversified energy portfolio and increased U.S. competitiveness in the global quest for clean energy technologies. This page provides information directly related to feedstock supply: Feedstock Types Feedstock Production Sustainability. Feedstock Types A variety of biomass feedstocks can be used to produce energy (including transportation fuels) and bio-based products. The Bioenergy

  14. STEO December 2012 - coal demand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in 2012 for the fourth year in a row. Domestic coal consumption is on track to total 829 million tons this year. That's the lowest level since 1992, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly energy forecast. Utilities and power plant operators are choosing to burn more lower-priced natural gas

  15. Enhancing the Security of the Maritime Supply Chain Gift Basket | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration Enhancing the Security of the Maritime Supply Chain Gift Basket | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  16. QER- Comment of Wyoming Infrastructure Authority

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis: Please accept the attached letter of comments pursuant to the above referenced meeting. I have also mailed the letter. We appreciate the scheduling of the meeting in Cheyenne and the opportunity to provide comments on permitting and siting of infrastructure on public lands. Regards,

  17. Infrastructure Constraints in New England Background Memo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Monday, April 21, 2014 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), acting in its capacity as the Secretariat for the QER Task Force, will convene a two-part public meeting to examine energy infrastructure constraints in New England and regional approaches to addressing them.

  18. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-05-01

    This is a presentation about the Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demo, a 7-year project and the largest single FCEV and infrastructure demonstration in the world to date. Information such as its approach, technical accomplishments and progress; collaborations and future work are discussed.

  19. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Tuesday, March 10, at 8 a.m. EDT, the Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a webinar to summarize the 2nd international information exchange on the hydrogen refueling infrastructure challenges and potential solutions to support the successful global commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles.

  20. ACRF Data Collection and Processing Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ACRF Data Collection and Processing Infrastructure December 2004 M.C. Macduff, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory R.C. Eagan Argonne National Laboratory Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research M.C. Macduff et al., November 2004, ARM TR-046 Contents 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2. Global

  1. Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs

  2. Portland, Oregon Climate-Friendly Infrastructure:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portland, Oregon Climate-Friendly Infrastructure: Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People A White House Climate Action Champions Case Study INDEX Executive Summary...............................2 Climate Action Champion.....................2 Project Spotlight.................................3-5 Co-benefits.............................................6 Challenges and lessons learned...........6 Resources & Contacts............................7 2 Executive Summary The City of Portland's 2015

  3. Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - NOW, NEDO, and DOE | Department of Energy Above is the webinar recording for the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, "International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO, and DOE," originally presented on December 16, 2013. In addition to this recording, you can access the presentation slides. A text version of this recording will be available soon

  4. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  5. Economics in Criticality and Restoration of Energy Infrastructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Gale A.; Flaim, Silvio J.; Folga, Stephen M.; Gotham, Douglas J.; McLamore, Michael R.; Novak, Mary H.; Roop, Joe M.; Rossmann, Charles G.; Shamsuddin, Shabbir A.; Zeichner, Lee M.; Stamber, Kevin L.

    2005-03-01

    Economists, systems analysts, engineers, regulatory specialists, and other experts were assembled from academia, the national laboratories, and the energy industry to discuss present restoration practices (many have already been defined to the level of operational protocols) in the sectors of the energy infrastructure as well as other infrastructures, to identify whether economics, a discipline concerned with the allocation of scarce resources, is explicitly or implicitly a part of restoration strategies, and if there are novel economic techniques and solution methods that could be used help encourage the restoration of energy services more quickly than present practices or to restore service more efficiently from an economic perspective. AcknowledgementsDevelopment of this work into a coherent product with a useful message has occurred thanks to the thoughtful support of several individuals:Kenneth Friedman, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance, provided the impetus for the work, as well as several suggestions and reminders of direction along the way. Funding from DOE/OEA was critical to the completion of this effort.Arnold Baker, Chief Economist, Sandia National Laboratories, and James Peerenboom, Director, Infrastructure Assurance Center, Argonne National Laboratory, provided valuable contacts that helped to populate the authoring team with the proper mix of economists, engineers, and systems and regulatory specialists to meet the objectives of the work.Several individuals provided valuable review of the document at various stages of completion, and provided suggestions that were valuable to the editing process. This list of reviewers includes Jeffrey Roark, Economist, Tennessee Valley Authority; James R. Dalrymple, Manager of Transmission System Services and Transmission/Power Supply, Tennessee Valley Authority; William Mampre, Vice President, EN Engineering; Kevin Degenstein, EN Engineering; and Patrick Wilgang, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance.With many authors, creating a document with a single voice is a difficult task. Louise Maffitt, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Engineering Research and Applications at New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology (on contract to Sandia National Laboratories) served a vital role in the development of this document by taking the unedited material (in structured format) and refining the basic language so as to make the flow of the document as close to a single voice as one could hope for. Louise's work made the job of reducing the content to a readable length an easier process. Additional editorial suggestions from the authors themselves, particularly from Sam Flaim, Steve Folga, and Doug Gotham, expedited this process.

  6. Switching power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalka, A.M.

    1984-06-05

    The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

  7. Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOEs ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

  8. NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrick, Steven; Cordaro, Joseph; Founds, Nanette; Chambellan, Curtis

    2013-08-21

    Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

  9. Energy demand and population changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.L.; Edmonds, J.A.

    1980-12-01

    Since World War II, US energy demand has grown more rapidly than population, so that per capita consumption of energy was about 60% higher in 1978 than in 1947. Population growth and the expansion of per capita real incomes have led to a greater use of energy. The aging of the US population is expected to increase per capita energy consumption, despite the increase in the proportion of persons over 65, who consume less energy than employed persons. The sharp decline in the population under 18 has led to an expansion in the relative proportion of population in the prime-labor-force age groups. Employed persons are heavy users of energy. The growth of the work force and GNP is largely attributable to the growing participation of females. Another important consequence of female employment is the growth in ownership of personal automobiles. A third factor pushing up labor-force growth is the steady influx of illegal aliens.

  10. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes existing research and discusses current practices, opportunities, and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response programs.

  11. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    toluene, and xy- lene (BTX). Catalytic Hydrocracking: A refining process that uses hydrogen and catalysts with relatively low tem- peratures and high pressures for...

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids Supply and Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The hydrocarbon gas liquids (ethane, propane, butanes, and natural gasoline) module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of U.S. production, consumption, refinery inputs, net imports, and inventories.

  13. Oil and natural gas supply and demand trends in North America...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TX By Adam Sieminski U.S. Energy Information Administration Historical and projected oil prices 2 crude oil price price per barrel (real 2010 dollars) Sources: U.S. Energy...

  14. Global Agricultural Supply and Demand: Factors Contributing to the Recent Increase in Food Commodity Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-05-01

    This report discusses the factors that have led to global food commodity price inflaction and addresses the resulting implications.

  15. 2013 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources NP ...

  16. 2015 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources NP ...

  17. 2014 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources NP ...

  18. 2012 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources NP ...

  19. Design and Optimization of Photovoltaics Recycling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.K.; Fthenakis, V.

    2010-10-01

    With the growing production and installation of photovoltaics (PV) around the world constrained by the limited availability of resources, end-of-life management of PV is becoming very important. A few major PV manufacturers currently are operating several PV recycling technologies at the process level. The management of the total recycling infrastructure, including reverse-logistics planning, is being started in Europe. In this paper, we overview the current status of photovoltaics recycling planning and discuss our mathematic modeling of the economic feasibility and the environmental viability of several PV recycling infrastructure scenarios in Germany; our findings suggest the optimum locations of the anticipated PV take-back centers. Short-term 5-10 year planning for PV manufacturing scraps is the focus of this article. Although we discuss the German situation, we expect the generic model will be applicable to any region, such as the whole of Europe and the United States.

  20. Summary of Characteristics and Energy Efficiency Demand-side Management Programs in the Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatt, Sandy

    2010-04-01

    This report is the first in a series that seeks to characterize energy supply and industrial sector energy consumption, and summarize successful industrial demand-side management (DSM) programs within each of the eight North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) regions.

  1. COMMON VULNERABILITIES IN CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CONTROL SYSTEMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COMMON VULNERABILITIES IN CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CONTROL SYSTEMS Jason Stamp, John Dillinger, and William Young Networked Systems Survivability and Assurance Department Jennifer DePoy Information Operations Red Team & Assessments Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185-0785 22 May 2003 (2 nd edition, revised 11 November 2003) Copyright © 2003, Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Permission is granted to display, copy, publish, and distribute this document in its

  2. International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO and DOE December 16th 2013 1 Partner: Timetable * Introduction to the Webinar (2 min) Erika Sutherland * Remarks (10 min) Sunita Satyapal, Klaus Bonhoff, Eiji Ohira * Speaker Introduction (3 min) Erika Sutherland * General country overview (15 min) Hanno Butsch * H2-Fueling (15 min) Jesse Schneider * H2 Quality (15 min) Jesse Schneider on behalf of Georgios Tsotridis * H2-Metering (15 min) Tetsuji Nakamura *

  3. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  4. Infrastructure at the Savannah River Site:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure at the Savannah River Site: Modernizing for 21 st Century Missions January 2011 Executive Summary As it has for more than 60 years, the Savannah River Site (SRS) remains one of the crown jewels in America's quest for national security, innovative technology and new energy sources. SRS is well-suited to continue to perform nuclear-related missions with every assurance of quality, safety and innovation. SRS is not a closure site. It has clearly defined future missions extending

  5. CU-ICAR Hydrogen Infrastructure Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Leitner; David Bodde; Dennis Wiese; John Skardon; Bethany Carter

    2011-09-28

    The goal of this project was to establish an innovation center to accelerate the transition to a 'hydrogen economy' an infrastructure of vehicles, fuel resources, and maintenance capabilities based on hydrogen as the primary energy carrier. The specific objectives of the proposed project were to: (a) define the essential attributes of the innovation center; (b) validate the concept with potential partners; (c) create an implementation plan; and (d) establish a pilot center and demonstrate its benefits via a series of small scale projects.

  6. Infrastructure and Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog

  7. infrastructure and operations | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and operations | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA

  8. Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG APPROVED MEMBERS Blue Lake Rancheria  Jana Ganion, BLR Energy Director Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon  Chief Delvis Health  Jim Manion, General Manager, Warm Springs Power Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians  William Micklin, CEO Gila River Indian Community  Robert Stone, District 5 Community Councilman Ho-Chunk Nation  Representative Susan Waukon Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians

  9. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise This study provides ...

  10. Year-in-Review: 2011 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (April 2012) Year-in-Review: 2011 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (April 2012) The 2011 Year-in-Review (YIR) provides a...

  11. Securing the United States' power infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Happenny, Sean F.

    2015-08-01

    The United States’ power infrastructure is aging, underfunded, and vulnerable to cyber attack. Emerging smart grid technologies may take some of the burden off of existing systems and make the grid as a whole more efficient, reliable, and secure. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is funding research into several aspects of smart grid technology and grid security, creating a software simulation tool that will allow researchers to test power distribution networks utilizing different smart grid technologies to determine how the grid and these technologies react under different circumstances. Demonstrating security in embedded systems is another research area PNNL is tackling. Many of the systems controlling the U.S. critical infrastructure, such as the power grid, lack integrated security and the networks protecting them are becoming easier to breach. Providing a virtual power substation network to each student team at the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition, thereby supporting the education of future cyber security professionals, is another way PNNL is helping to strengthen the security of the nation’s power infrastructure.

  12. The PHEV Charging Infrastructure Planning (PCIP) Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dashora, Yogesh [University of Texas, Austin; Barnes, J. Wesley [University of Texas, Austin; Pillai, Rekha S [ORNL; Combs, Todd E [ORNL; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Increasing debates over a gasoline independent future and the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has led to a surge in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) being developed around the world. The majority of PHEV related research has been directed at improving engine and battery operations, studying future PHEV impacts on the grid, and projecting future PHEV charging infrastructure requirements. Due to the limited all-electric range of PHEVs, a daytime PHEV charging infrastructure will be required for most PHEV daily usage. In this paper, for the first time, we present a mixed integer mathematical programming model to solve the PHEV charging infrastructure planning (PCIP) problem for organizations with thousands of people working within a defined geographic location and parking lots well suited to charging station installations. Our case study, based on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) campus, produced encouraging results, indicates the viability of the modeling approach and substantiates the importance of considering both employee convenience and appropriate grid connections in the PCIP problem.

  13. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  14. Africa's Infrastructure: A Time for Transformation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Available Website: siteresources.worldbank.orgINTAFRICAResourcesaicdoverviewenglish This article provides an extensive knowledge base of the African infrastructure...

  15. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Spirk, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-09-01

    Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2010.

  16. Biodiesel Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. biodiesel vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  17. Ethanol Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. ethanol vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  18. Propane Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. propane vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  19. Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. natural gas vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  20. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Agenda | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Workshop Agenda Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Agenda Agenda from the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, February 16-17, 2011, in Washington, DC. PDF icon wkshp_market_readiness_agenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions. Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market

  1. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for the Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop held October 18-19, 2011, in Lemont, Illinois.

  2. Facilities and Infrastructure Program At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Program includes EERE's capital investments, operations and maintenance, ... control at ESIF. Key Accomplishments * Capital Investments: Capital investments at NREL ...

  3. QER Public Meeting in New York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance QER Public Meeting in New York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance Meeting Date and Location New York University Kimmel Center for University Life Room 914 60 Washington Square South New York, New York 10010 Meeting Information Agenda: Energy Infrastructure Finance Click Here to comment on the Energy Infrastructure Finance public meeting. Click here to watch a video of the meeting. . See links below to download PDFs of the meeting

  4. Energy and Infrastructure Analysis Group: D-4, Decision Applications: LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Energy and Infrastructure Analysis, D-4 Energy & Infrastructure Analysis Home CONTACTS Group Leader Timothy McPherson Deputy Group Leader James Doyle Group Administrator Pauline Borrego (505) 667-2266 d division logo image Energy and Infrastructure Analysis Group Our mission is to perform basic and applied research focused on increasing the security of the nation's energy infrastructure. We specialize in the development and use of macromodels and microsimulations. These provide detailed,

  5. Energy Department Infrastructure Improvement Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department Infrastructure Improvement Plan Energy Department Infrastructure Improvement Plan AGENCY PLAN FOR IMPROVING PERFORMANCE OF FEDERAL PERMITTING AND REVIEW OF INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS On March 22, 2012, the President issued Executive Order 13604 (EO), which is intended to improve the performance of Federal agencies in the permitting and review of infrastructure projects. Among its many objectives, the EO describes the President's government-wide initiative to modernize Federal

  6. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charging Infrastructure Group D Breakout Report | Department of Energy D Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Charging Infrastructure Group D Breakout Report Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon group_d_report_out_caci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Consumer

  7. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Report | Department of Energy E Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Report Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon group_e_report_out_caci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Consumer

  8. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. electric vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  9. Advancing Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Advancing Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle January 13, 2015 - 11:31am Addthis H2USA, a public-private partnership, was co-launched by DOE and industry partners to promote advancing hydrogen infrastructure to support more transportation energy options for consumers. H2USA, a public-private partnership, was co-launched by DOE and industry partners to promote advancing hydrogen infrastructure to

  10. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) May 2007 Department of Energy Energy Sector Government Coordinating Council Letter of Support i ii Energy Sector-Specific Plan (Redacted) Energy Sector Coordinating Councils Letter of Concurrence The National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) provides the unifying structure for the integration of federal critical infrastructures and key resources (CI/KR)

  11. Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework Recognizing that the national and economic security of the United States depends on the reliable functioning of critical infrastructure, the President under Executive Order (EO) 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" of February 2013 directed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to work with stakeholders to

  12. LABORATORY EFFORTS TO REVITALIZE FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy LABORATORY EFFORTS TO REVITALIZE FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE LABORATORY EFFORTS TO REVITALIZE FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE Lanny Bates, Director of the Office of Campus Development, Brookhaven National Laboratory, presented Brookhaven's ten year strategic infrastructure plan in the session on lab efforts to revitalize facilities and infrastructure. Jeff Smith, Deputy Director of Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was unable to attend due to weather-related travel issues.

  13. Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Helping to Ensure a Secure and Reliable Flow of Energy to the Nation Applying the Department of Energy's technical expertise to help ensure the security, resiliency and survivability of key energy assets and critical energy infrastructure. We work with the Department of Homeland Security, the Federal Energy Regulatory

  14. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Infrastructure | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Infrastructure 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Infrastructure This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Biomass Program's Infrastructure Platform Review meeting, held on February 3, 2011, in Washington, D.C. PDF icon 2011_infrastructure_review.pdf More Documents & Publications 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer

  15. Microsoft Word - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    White House Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release October 31, 2013 Presidential Proclamation -- Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY AND RESILIENCE MONTH, 2013 - - - - - - - BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION Over the last few decades, our Nation has grown increasingly dependent on critical infrastructure, the backbone of our national and economic security. America's critical infrastructure is

  16. Distribution Infrastructure and End Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Distribution Infrastructure and End Use Distribution Infrastructure and End Use The expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) created under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 requires 36 billion gallons of biofuels to be blended into transportation fuel by 2022. Meeting the RFS2 target introduces new challenges for U.S. infrastructure, as modifications will be needed to transport and deliver renewable fuels that are not compatible with existing petroleum infrastructure. The

  17. Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management | Department of Energy Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management By: Drury Crawley, Office of Energy

  18. Fact #859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Crude Oil Prices | Department of Energy 59 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices Fact #859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices Crude oil prices have been extremely volatile over the past few decades. World events can disrupt the flow of oil to the market or cause uncertainty about future supply or demand for oil, leading to volatility in prices. Supply disruption caused by political events, such as

  19. US tda infrastructure opportunities in South America. Project profile updates, June-December 1995. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    This study, conducted by CG/LA Infrastructure, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report provides project profile updates to a study conducted for the TDA Conference on Infrastructure Opportunities held in June, 1995. The updates are organized first by sectors with specific project information including: Energy, Telecommunications, Environment, Industrial, and Transportation. The second section of the report contains an extensive profile of surface transportation projects related to Highways Tunnels and Bridges, Inland Waterways, Ports, Rail and Urban Mass Transit. Each profile provides a technical description, site information, timing, equipment and services demand, nature of demand, and a project assessment. Countries included in the study are: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

  20. Oil supply increase due in 1996`s second half

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1996-07-29

    The crucial oil-market issue for this year`s second half is new supply. Production will increase again outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. And Iraq has general approval to resume exports under limits set by the United Nations, although start of the exports has been delayed by at least 60 days. The big question is the market`s ability to absorb the supply gains. As usual, the market`s need for oil in the second half will depend on economies. So far in 1996, economic growth has pushed consumption to levels unexpected a year ago. Demand the rest of the year depends heavily on economic performances of the industrialized nations that make up the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the rapidly growing nations of the Asia-Pacific region. Growth in countries elsewhere in the developing world, especially Latin America, remains a wild card. The paper discusses the worldwide outlook, crude oil prices, US product prices, natural gas prices, US economy, US energy demand, natural gas in the US, US oil demand, gasoline prices, distillate gains, resid slumps, LPG, ethane, US supply, production patterns, rise in refinery capacity, imports, stocks, and stock coverage.