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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies The Infrastructure Challenge of...

2

Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is by way of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain where ...

Connell, Richard Perry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation given at the 2006 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Merit Review in Washington, D.C., May 16-19, 2006, discusses potential future hydrogen demand and the infrastructure needed to support hydrogen vehicles.

Melendez, M.

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

4

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

5

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

6

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

7

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel suggests that infrastructure development was not a major limitation. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has

8

Smart Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Demand Response Pilot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses a unique pilot project to evaluate electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) capable of demand response (DR) and its integration into the utility smart metering infrastructure.BackgroundThere is an immediate need to research grid interface compatibility of public charging apparatus and to develop requirements and reference design blueprints for the entire plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructure—from the vehicle ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the long- established corn processing infrastructure. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has a target of 21Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Infrastructure of biofuel sustainability. #12;

10

Geographically-Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis.

Melendez, M.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact Now it is Britain's turn to think harder, says Brian both are true. Most predict that fossil fuels must remain a significant part of our energy supply, Britain has had a comfortable and profitable respite from anxieties about security of energy supply. Now

Cambridge, University of

12

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Volatile coal prices reflect supply, demand uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Coal mine owners and investors say that supply and demand are now finally in balance. But coal consumers find that both spot tonnage and new contract coal come at a much higher price.

Ryan, M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel leveraged the long-established corn processing infrastructure. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has is being integrated into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Point of Contact: Michael R

16

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rollout Scenario Analysis January 31, 2007 Margo Melendez 2 ObjectiveOverview Lay out several scenarios for infrastructure deployment in the 2012-2025 timeframe 2012-2015: Initial...

17

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Project Summary Full Title: Geographically-Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Deployment Scenario Analysis Project ID: 189 Principal Investigator: Margo Melendez Keywords: Hydrogen fueling; infrastructure; fuel cell vehicles (FCV) Purpose This analysis estimates the spatial distribution of hydrogen fueling stations necessary to support the 5 million fuel cell vehicle scenario, based on demographic demand patterns for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and strategy of focusing development on specific regions of the U.S. that may have high hydrogen demand. Performer Principal Investigator: Margo Melendez Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3393 Telephone: 303-275-4479

18

Building Energy Supply Infrastructures and Urban Sustained Development of Shenyang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban energy supply is a necessary infrastructure of civic development. Shenyang is an old industrial-based center in the northeast. Its development influences the economic development of the whole old northeast industry base. This paper analyses the present situation of Shenyang's infrastructure, especially the energy supply infrastructure. The current situation of problems with Shenyang's energy supply infrastructure are also analyzed. At the same time, the paper points out that defects in the current situation of Shenyang's building energy supply take a back seat to urban sustained development. Recent strategies and suggestions for Shenyang building energy consumption have been presented.

Feng, G.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A California Statewide Exploratory Analysis Correlating Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behaviorof employment and infrastructure supply are used togetherCalifonia. Land use and infrastructure have a significant,

Yoon, Seo Youn; Golob, Thomas F.; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9 Hydroelectric 7,759 6,861 -11.6 Natural Gas 48,007 54,680 13.9 Nuclear 36,231 38,361 5.9 Other (1) 9,186 9,063 -1.3 Total 115,559 123,210 6.6 Middle Atlantic Coal 121,873 129,935 6.6 Hydroelectric 28,793 26,463 -8.1 Natural Gas 89,808 104,341 16.2 Nuclear 155,140 152,469 -1.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05.pdf Edward Beimborn Center for Urban Transportation Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Presentation to the District IV Conference Institute of Transportation Engineers June, 2005, updated September

Saldin, Dilano

22

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand forand distribution facilities that supply electricity demand.55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand for

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Safeguards Education and Training: Short Term Supply vs. Demand  

SciTech Connect

Much has been written and discussed in the past several years about the effect of the aging nuclear workforce on the sustainability of the U.S. safeguards and security infrastructure. This paper discusses the 10-15 year supply and demand forecast for nuclear material control and accounting specialists. The demand side of the review includes control and accounting of the materials at U.S. DOE and NRC facilities, and the federal oversight of those MC&A programs. The cadre of experts referred to as 'MC&A Specialists' available to meet the demand goes beyond domestic MC&A to include international programs, regulatory and inspection support, and so on.

Mathews, Carrie E.; Crawford, Cary E.

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

25

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel The rapid limitation. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires almost

26

Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response in large facilities.was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center whichInteroperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure Ed

Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Distillate in Depth – The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Distillate in Depth – The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture John Hackworth Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration ... In Response to Price, ...

28

Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis: Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geographically Based Hydrogen Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Final Report M. Melendez and A. Milbrandt Technical Report NREL/TP-540-40373 October 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Final Report M. Melendez and A. Milbrandt Prepared under Task No. HF65.8310 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-40373 October 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

29

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Thai gas demand seen outstripping supply  

SciTech Connect

Thailand's demand for gas will outstrip supplies in the late 1990s as rapid economic growth continues. Gas will be a cornerstone for Thai energy policy throughout the growth, although sources in neighboring countries need development. Thai gas production will rise 25% from 1992 to average 1 bcfd by 1995. Including production from new discoveries, production could rise to 1.5 bcfd by 2000, up almost 90% from the 1992 level. Increased gas flow output in the mid-1990s will be due largely to development of Gulf of Thailand fields. By 1998, production from Gulf of Thailand fields will not be enough to offset the decline in today's fields. Thailand will need to import more than 1 bcfd by 2005 in the absence of future discoveries in the country. The paper discusses new pipelines and imports.

1993-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ous systems absorb large amounts of hydroelectric power.that snow melts and hydroelectric power supply increases andwater supplies from hydroelectric dams or discards renewable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Distillate in Depth - The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The presentation provides background on distillate supply and demand, and then focuses on how hurricanes Katrina and Rita impact on refining capacity might affect winter fuels.

Information Center

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

Understanding Democratic Congruence: A Demand-Supply Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is indeed a stunningly weak link between standard indicatorsstrongly because the link is indeed weak? If this were thelink between democratic supplies and demands is indeed as weak

Welzel, Christian; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Renewable Energy Integration . . . . . . . . . . .Impacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Limitations to Large-Scale Renewable EnergyImpacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Jump to: navigation, search Name Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Me Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections[1] "CEEESA and the team of experts from Mexico analyzed the country's entire energy supply and demand system using CEEESA's latest version of the popular ENPEP-BALANCE software. The team developed a system representation, a so-called energy network, using ENPEP's powerful graphical user

37

Demand management : a cross-industry analysis of supply-demand planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization increases product variety and shortens product life cycles. These lead to an increase in demand uncertainty and variability. Outsourcing to low-cost countries increases supply lead-time and supply uncertainty ...

Tan, Peng Kuan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of real-time electricity prices (left) and windinflexible) demand and real-time prices. The case study inas a special case. The real-time price process is modeled as

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Infrastructure Failure - Types and Frequency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Infrastructure Failure - Types and Frequency. Small events that have no impact on supplies Events that require supply/demand responses Events that result in a ...

40

Supply and demand of lube oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube oil consumption in the world has reached about 40 million tonnes per year, of which 24 million tonnes is used outside the communist areas. There are large regional differences in annual consumption per head from one kilogramme (kg) in India to 35 kg in North America. A statistical analysis of historical data over twenty years in about ninety countries has lead to the conclusion that national income, measured as GDP per head, is the key determinant of total lube oil consumption per head. The functional relationship, however, is different in different countries. Starting from GDP projections until the year 2000, regional forecasts of lube oil demand have been made which show that the share of developing nations outside the communist area in world demand will grow. This will increase the regional imbalance between base oil capacity and demand.

Vlemmings, J.M.L.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In FY 2004 and 2005, NREL developed a proposed minimal infrastructure to support nationwide deployment of hydrogen vehicles by offering infrastructure scenarios that facilitated interstate travel. This report identifies key metropolitan areas and regions on which to focus infrastructure efforts during the early hydrogen transition.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook Ashuckian, Manager Electricity Analysis Office Terrence O'Brien, Deputy Director Systems Assessment

43

Anticipated IT infrastructure and supply chain integration capabilities for RFID and their associated deployment outcomes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study looks at the perceived ability of components of IT infrastructure integration and supply chain process integration to predict specific radio frequency identification (RFID) system deployment outcomes-exploration, exploitation, operational ... Keywords: Data consistency, Exploitation, Exploration, IT infrastructure, Information sharing, Market knowledge creation, Operational efficiency, Radio frequency identification (RFID), Supply chain business processes, Supply chain management

Rebecca Angeles

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995 by Tancred Lidderdale* Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gaso- line in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. Refor- mulated motor gasoline is expected to constitute about one-third of total motor gasoline demand in 1995, and refiners will have to change plant opera- tions and modify equipment in order to meet the higher demand. The costs incurred are expected to create a wholesale price premium for reformu- lated motor gasoline of up to 4.0 cents per gallon over the price of conventional motor gasoline. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining

45

Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: This chart shows some critical differences in distillate supply and demand during this winter heating season, in comparison to the past two winters. Typically, distillate demand peaks during the winter months, but "new supply" (refinery production and net imports) cannot increase as much, so the remaining supply needed is drawn from inventories. This pattern is evident in each of the past two winter heating seasons. This winter, however, the pattern was very different, for several reasons: With inventories entering the season at extremely low levels, a "typical" winter stockdraw would have been nearly impossible, particularly in the Northeast, the region most dependent on heating oil. Demand reached near-record levels in December, as colder-than-normal

46

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review (Revised 5/6/2002) 1 by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration 1 This article has been revised, deleting 17.6 millions short tons of coal consumed by the manufacturers of synthetic coal from the consumption of coal by "other industrial plants." This change was made because the synthetic coal those plants produced was primarily consumed in the electric sector and reported as coal, resulting in an overstating of total coal consumption. Overview With the dawning of a new century came the beginning of a new era in the coal industry. Instead of the traditional prac- tice of only buying and selling produced coal in the United

47

United States energy supply and demand forecasts 1979-1995  

SciTech Connect

Forecasts of U.S. energy supply and demand by fuel type and economic sector, as well as historical background information, are presented. Discussion and results pertaining to the development of current and projected marginal energy costs, and their comparison with market prices, are also presented.

Walton, H.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Late January Cold Impacted Both Supply & Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of the low stocks. Cold weather increases demand, but it also can interfere with supply, as happened this past January. During the week ending January 22, temperatures in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic areas shifted from being15 percent and 17 percent warmer than normal, respectively, to 24 percent and 22 percent colder than normal. The weather change increased weekly heating requirements by about 40 percent. Temperature declines during the winter affect heating oil demand in a number of ways: Space heating demand increases; Electricity peaking demand increases and power generators must turn to distillate to meet the new peak needs; Fuel switching from natural gas to distillate occurs among large

49

Non-OPEC supply to fill global 1996 demand gain  

SciTech Connect

Excess capacity brought on by rapidly rising oil production from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, coupled with stabilization of output from the Commonwealth of Independent States, will hamper OPEC`s efforts to balance the oil market in 1996. World demand for oil is projected to move up sharply. But non-OPEC output will increase even more, challenging OPEC to reduce production quotas. This paper reviews data on supply, demand, and production from these non-OPEC countries and the overall effects it will have on OPEC operations and costs.

Beck, R.J.

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

Outlook for US lube oil supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the domestic demand for automotive and industrial lubricants to the year 2000 and evaluates the ability of U.S. refiners to meet the associated demand for base stocks. Changes in the supply/demand picture over the past several years are also reviewed. In the late 1970's, lube base stocks had been in short supply as healthy increases in demand pushed U.S. refiners to near maximum operating levels. Imports were increased to what were then record high levels and exports were reduced. This situation began to reverse itself in mid-1980 as marketers began to feel the impact of recession here and abroad. U.S. base stock consumption has since declined dramatically, to a level in 1982 estimated to be 17.5% below that of 1979's peak. In the meantime, refiners had added another 7.0 MB/CD to manufacturing capacity. 1982 lube plant operations are estimated to have dropped as low as 62% of nameplate capacity. The outlook for recovery is conservative. Due to continued depressed demand in certain market segments, 1983's increase in base oil demand is projected to be held to only 2%. Gains in 1984 and 1985 will be more robust, in the area of 6% per year. Thereafter, the overall rate of growth will drop to under 1% per year. The outlooks for automotive and industrial lubricants demand are summarized. Due to a forecast of greater relative growth in synthetic and water-based lubricants, base stock consumption is forecast to increase at a slower pace than that of the total finished lubricants volume.

Brecht, F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Western Interior Appalachian Energy Information Administration/ U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review 1 Figure 1. Coal-Producing Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Coal Industry Annual 1996, DOE/EIA-0584(96) (Washington, DC, November 1997). U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review by B.D. Hong Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Overview U.S. coal production totaled a record high of 1,088.6 million short tons in 1997, up by 2.3 percent over the 1996 production level, according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1). The electric power industry (utilities and independent power producers)-the dominant coal consumer-used a record 922.0 million short tons, up by 2.8 percent over 1996. The increase in coal use for

52

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: The price spike that initiated the flood of distillate imports last winter can be easily seen in this chart. The distillate supply/demand balance influences the spread between spot distillate and spot crude oil prices. For example, when stocks are higher than normal, the spread will be lower than usual. This spread is the price incentive that encourages or discourages changes in supply. The January/February 2000 price spike was shorter than the one last winter, largely due to the timing. Since last winter's price spike occurred early in the season, it took some time before prices receded substantially. Currently, the distillate fuel refining spread (the difference between the spot heating oil price and the WTI price) is more "typical". But as was

55

Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001 and into the beginning of 2002, as illustrated by the low OECD inventory levels. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels in order to avoid continued price volatility. While we saw some stocking in April and May, typical third quarter stock builds may not occur. Even with Iraqi oil exports resuming in early July, OPEC was going to need to increase its oil production to account for demand increases over the 2nd half of the year to prevent stocks from falling further. However, they not only haven't agreed to increase production, but agreed to cut production quotas by 1 million barrels per day beginning on September 1! EIA's forecast of a continued low stock cushion implies we not only

56

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation Title Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 -...

57

World Petroleum Supply/Demand Forecast - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... surplus supply over demand for spring and summer quarters compared with some other forecasters such as Oil Market Intelligence, ...

58

Modeling Structural Changes in Market Demand and Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic events may cause structural changes in markets. To know the effect of the economic event we should analyze the structural changes in the market demand and supply. The purpose of this dissertation is to analyze the effect of selected economic events on market demand and supply using econometric models. Structural changes can be modeled according to the types of changes. For an abrupt and instantaneous break, a dummy variable model can be used. For a smooth and gradual movement, proxy variables which represent the event can be applied, if we know the variables. If we don?t know the appropriate proxy variables, a smooth transition regression model can be employed. The BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) outbreak in the U.S. in 2003 is assumed to make abrupt and instantaneous changes in Korean meat consumption. To analyze the effect on Korean meat consumption, the Korean demands of beef, pork, chicken, and U.S. beef are estimated using an LA/AIDS (Linear Approximate Almost Ideal Demand System) model with the dummy variable specifying the time before and after the BSE. From the results we can confirm that food safety concerns caused by the BSE case changed Korean meat consumption structure. Korean beef and U.S. beef became less elastic, and pork and chicken got more elastic to budget. Korean beef became less price elastic, but pork and U.S. beef got more price elastic. The changes of U.S. natural gas supply caused by technology development and depletion in reserves are analyzed using a smooth transition regression model. From the results, we can confirm that the productivity improvement by technology development is greater than the labor cost increase by depletion, but not greater than the capital cost increase by depletion in mid-2000s. The effects of posting the winning bid in a repeated Vickrey auction are examined using a proxy variable. By applying an unobserved effect Tobit model to the experimental auction done by Corrigan and Rousu (2006) for a candy bar, we can confirm that the changes of bidding behavior are significant, especially when the winning bid is high. By extracting the bid affiliation effects, we showed that true willingness to pay can be estimated.

Park, Beom Su

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

played a role during the crisis period. 1 Introduction The energy industry provides electrical powerA Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu , Anthony E. Brockwell of supply and demand equilibrium. The model includes latent supply and demand curves, which may vary over

60

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions rate from natural gas supply that occurs upstreamassociated with natural gas supply to the power plant weresuggest natural gas-fired power plants will supply

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric Energy Supply Thermal-question. Data on PG&E's hydroelectric resources and Pacific27 Table 28 Table 29 Hydroelectric Supply in California Fuel

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statewide California Electricity Demand. [accessed June 22,fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electricity and Power Peak Demand . . • . . ELECTRICITYby Major Utility Service Area Projected Peak Demand for1977 Historical Peak Demand by Utility Service Area Weather-

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

65

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

serves to partially fill off-peak demand troughs. If passivehigher before or after the peak demand hour when hydro powerare highest during off-peak demand hours, and are low at

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-vehicle demand load factor Natural gas price Carbon tax89). They increase with demand (and gross natural gas-firedelectricity demand and by changing natural gas price and CO

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

energy: Supply, Demand, and impacts CooRDinATinG LeAD AUThoR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

240 chapter 12 energy: Supply, Demand, and impacts CooRDinATinG LeAD AUThoR Vincent C. Tidwell;energy: supply, demand, and impacts 241 · Delivery of electricity may become more vulnerable) in 2009, equal to 222 million BTUs per person (EIA 2010). Any change or disruption to the supply of energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

68

Domestic Institutions and the Supply and Demand of Remittances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many countries are dependent upon capital flows for their balance of payments accounts. Sources of expenditures include foreign direct investment (FDI), portfolio investment (PI) and remittances. While the determinants of FDI and PI have been extensively analyzed, the analyses of remittance flows from host to home countries are largely lacking and wide-ranging. Factors predominantly not considered are domestic institutions which support or encourage international remittance exchange. Nations routinely desire to control international immigration and capital movement. Consequently they adopt domestic policies which create and enforce institutions that manage both capital and labor mobility across borders. Additionally, researchers commonly neglect to consider the impact of both the supply and demand factors simultaneously, or in other words, the domestic condition (home and host) which both push and pull migrants to migrate and remit. Further, given the non-dyadic nature of the data, there arises a need to "regionalize" the data. To test the effects of variations in immigration institutional attributes, I employ a pooled data set of approximately 104 nations from 1990 to 2004. Controlling for existing explanations and regional influences, I find that domestic institutions have a significant impact on the ability of an individual to migrate to a host country and to eventually remit back to their country of origin.

Hicks, Brian N.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers

70

EIA forecasts increased oil demand, need for additional supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

World oil demand is forecast to increase by 1.7 million barrels per day (bbl/d) ... Cooling demand in the Middle East is expected to rise to record levels this summer.

71

Electricity demand patterns matter for valuing electricity supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PJM's hourly real-time energy prices corresponding to the week of hourly demand values are shown below. Prices also vary by hour and are much more volatile than demand.

72

Propane Demand is Highly Seasonal, But Fresh Supply is Not  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Propane, like heating oil, has a highly seasonal demand pattern. Demand increases about 50% from its low point to its peak. Production and net imports, on the other hand,...

73

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

availability, operational limits, ramp rates, and start-up costs Reliability requirements Transmission andavailability, electricity demand, and dispatches power plants based on operating costs and transmission

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Watson, David; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Sustainable ecosystems: enabled by supply and demand management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continued population growth, coupled with increased per capita consumption of resources, poses a challenge to the quality of life of current and future generations. We cannot expect to meet the future needs of society simply by extending existing infrastructures. ... Keywords: IT, available energy, data center, ecosystems, energy, exergy, sustainability, sustainable

Chandrakant D. Patel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Supply chain network equilibrium with revenue sharing contract under demand disruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contract is a common and effective mechanism for supply chain coordination, which has been studied extensively in recent years. For a supply chain network model, contracts can be used to coordinate it because it is too ideal to obtain the network equilibrium ... Keywords: Supply chain network, coordination, demand disruptions, equilibrium, revenue sharing contract

A. -Ting Yang; Lin-Du Zhao

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Survey and Forecast of Marketplace Supply and Demand for Energy-Efficient Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility incentive programs have placed significant demands on the suppliers of certain types of energy-efficient lighting products--particularly compact fluorescent lamps and electronic ballasts. Two major federal programs may soon place even greater demands on the lighting industry. This report assesses the program-induced demand for efficient lighting products and their likely near-term supply.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the availability of hydro power has the greatest impact oncontribute to a redesigned hydro power supply system in thein 2050 (like all non-hydro power plants in this analysis,

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

World Petroleum Supply/Demand Forecast - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

With the major problem being price, what does EIA expect for the rest of this year? After two relatively mild winters with growing crude oil supplies and the Asian ...

80

Supply and demand planning for crude oil procurement in refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upstream petroleum supply chain is inefficient and uneconomical because of the independence of the four complex and fragmented functions which comprise it. Crude oil exploration, trading, transportation, and refining ...

Nnadili, Beatrice N. (Beatrice Nne)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hourly distribution of hydro energy does change with demand,drawn down, non-baseload hydro energy is assumed to be load-the spread of annual hydro energy has varied by more than a

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Non-OPEC oil supply gains to outpace demand in 1997  

SciTech Connect

Rising oil supplies in 1997 will relax some of the market tightness that drove up crude prices last year. Worldwide demand for petroleum products in 1996 rose faster than anticipated and faster than supply from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This increased demand for OPEC oil and pushed up prices for crude. At year end, the world export price of crude was up more than 25% from the same period a year earlier. Market conditions will change in 1997. While worldwide economic growth will continue to boost demand for energy and petroleum, non-OPEC petroleum supply will grow even more. Increases in North Sea and Latin American production will help boost non-OPEC output by 1.9 million b/d. And revenues from 1996 production gains will make additional investment possible in exploration and production. The paper discusses world economic growth, world oil demand, worldwide supply, supply outlook, prices and international drilling.

Beck, R.J.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

84

Estimating relative confidence of conditional world oil supply and demand equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

This paper draws from the survey by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) of industry representatives and consulting/forecasting organizations on the likely market configuration under two different world oil price scenarios. The pseudo-data approach treats the forecast price and quantity variables from the various forecasts as pooled time-series, cross-sectional data, and applies traditional econometric techniques to estimate supply and demand curves. We focus on estimating US domestic supply and demand curves and respondent-specific shift factors from a subsample of the NPC survey. We find that all respondents in the survey are more confident about demand than supply forecasts. The underlying differences in individual GNP forecasts account for much of the uncertainty in demand for most respondents, but are still 2 to 6 times more confident of demand than supply. 4 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Boyd, G.A.; Hanson, D.A.; Hochheiser, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Distillate Imports Surged to Meet Supply/Demand Imbalance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

receded when weather moderated and new supply began to receded when weather moderated and new supply began to arrive. Imports were the largest source of new supply that arrived to relieve the imbalance that was behind the price spike. This graph shows the dramatic increase on a calendar monthly average basis. During the three weeks ending February 25, distillate fuel oil imports averaged 566 thousand barrels per day. During the prior four weeks, imports only averaged 162 thousand barrels per day. Refinery production on the East Coast also increased. For the three weeks ending February 25, East Coast distillate production averaged 478 thousand barrels per day, which was an increase of about 91 thousand barrels per day or 24% over the prior four weeks. (During the same time period, national distillate production only rose 7 percent.)

86

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

340E 340E Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings M.A. Piette, G. Ghatikar, S. Kiliccote, D. Watson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory E. Koch, D. Hennage Akuacom June 2009 Journal of Computing Science and Information Engineering, Vol. 9, Issue 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

87

Two-stage Models and Algorithms for Optimizing Infrastructure ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 20, 2012 ... Abstract: This paper models an infrastructure as a network with sets of supply, transshipment, and demand nodes. A subset of potential arcs ...

88

Supply/Demand Forecasts Begin to Show Stock Rebuilding  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: During 1999, we saw stock draws during the summer months, when we normally see stock builds, and very large stock draws during the winter of 1999/2000. Normally, crude oil production exceeds product demand in the spring and summer, and stocks build. These stocks are subsequently drawn down during the fourth and first quarters (dark blue areas). When the market is in balance, the stock builds equal the draws. During 2000, stocks have gradually built, but following the large stock draws of 1999, inventories needed to have been built more to get back to normal levels. As we look ahead using EIA's base case assumptions for OPEC production, non-OPEC production, and demand, we expect a more seasonal pattern for the next 3 quarters. But since we are beginning the year with

89

World uranium supply and demand: Buyer`s banquet?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This articule reviews the present (end of 1993) world-wide uranium market and attempts to focus on the 1994-2004 market. Market forces discussed include: (1) reactor uranium demand, (2) natural uranium production (3) utility inventory drawdown, (4) reprocessing products, (5) the Russian stockpile, (6) loans, and (7) inventories of HEU. The following conclusions were reached: (1) reactor demand will be satisfied during this period, (2) Russia could be the single most important influence on the world uranium market, (3) there would be no need for new mine development is the Russian material is allowed into the market, and (4) the market will be in oversupply, so price increases will be limited.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Supply, demand and ICT-based services: A local level perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While much of the economic development literature urges greater emphasis on demand-based strategies, policies designed to create economic development advantage by leveraging telecommunications investment continue to be supply side oriented. The rationale ... Keywords: Information technology utilization, Municipal telecommunications service, Public broadband network, Rural economic development, Supply side policies, Technology transfer

Jan Youtie; Philip Shapira; Greg Laudeman

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power "on demand"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power "on demand time ever, a utility-scale solar power plant can supply elec- tricity when the utility needs it most achievement. The design is based on lessons learned at Solar One, this country's first power tower. Solar One

Laughlin, Robert B.

92

Agent-based coordination techniques for matching supply and demand in energy networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a lot of effort directed toward realizing the power network of the future. The future power network is expected to depend on a large number of renewable energy resources connected directly to the low and medium voltage power network. Demand ... Keywords: Supply and demand matching, market and non-market algorithms, multi-agent systems

Rashad Badawy; Benjamin Hirsch; Sahin Albayrak

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Multi-period Optimal Procurement and Demand Responses in the Presence of Uncertain Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional power on the real-time market, if necessary, to balance supply and demand. We derive the optimal and variability of renewable generation on these optimal decisions and on social welfare. I. INTRODUCTION Future and solar is their uncertainty. Furthermore, there is also randomness in user demand. Despite the uncer

Low, Steven H.

94

Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the demand for renewable electricity has accelerated as a consequence of state and federal policies and the growth of voluntary green power purchase markets, along with the generally improving economics of renewable energy development. This paper reports on a preliminary examination of the supply and demand balance for renewable electricity in the United States, with a focus on renewable energy projects that meet the generally accepted definition of "new" for voluntary market purposes, i.e., projects installed on or after January 1, 1997. After estimating current supply and demand, this paper presents projections of the supply and demand balance out to 2010 and describe a number of key market uncertainties.

Swezey, B.; Aabakken, J.; Bird, L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below. Fig. 4 Automated demand response general features Thearchitecture Automated Demand Response System ArchitectureCould Bene?t for Demand Response Programs, But Challenges

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities. CEC-Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Management and Demand Response in Commercial Building. ,

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

architecture and is a comprehensive technical framework that links communications infrastructure and electricity markets into a “smart grid”

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Second Price Component: Spread Impacted by Distillate Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: While crude oil prices will be a major factor impacting distillate prices this winter, another important factor is the U.S. distillate supply/demand balance, as measured by distillate stocks. The distillate supply/demand balance influences the spread between spot distillate and spot crude oil prices. For example, when stocks are higher than normal, the spread will be lower than usual. This spread is the price incentive that encourages or discourages changes in supply. While high stocks in the distillate market are good news for consumers, an excess is bad news for refiners. Distillate spreads during the winter of 1998-99 and throughout most of 1999 were well below average. Distillate stocks were very high during this period, partially as a result of warm weather keeping demand down.

100

Description of the global petroleum supply and demand outlook updated for the 1993 edition of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand, December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategic planning of the research and development program carried out by Gas Research Institute (GRI) is supported by an annual GRI baseline projection of U.S. energy supply and demand. Because petroleum products compete in a wide variety of energy uses, oil prices serve as a market clearing force for the entire energy system. A significant portion of the U.S. petroleum supply is imported, and the price of crude oil to U.S. refiners is determined by the international oil trade. Any projection of the U.S. energy situation, therefore, requires the evaluation of the global oil market and the impact of oil price changes on the supply/demand balances of market participants. The 1992 edition of the projection completed in August 1991 assumed that in the aftermath of the war in the Middle East the fundamentals of oil trade would reassert their influence. This did indeed occur and with astonishing speed. In the face of this outlook, GRI has revised its 1993 oil price track downward.

Dreyfus, D.A.; Koklauner, A.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Consensus forecast of U. S. electricity supply and demand to the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

Recent forecasts of total electricity generating capacity and energy demand as well as for electricity produced from nuclear energy and hydroelectric power are presented in tables and graphs to the year 2000. A forecast of the distribution of type of fuel and energy source that will supply the future electricity demand is presented. Use of electricity by each major consuming sector is presented for 1975. Projected demands for electricity in the years 1985 and 2000, as allocated to consuming sectors, are derived and presented.

Lane, J.A.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Survey and forecast of marketplace supply and demand for energy- efficient lighting products  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in demand for energy-efficient lighting products has led to supply shortages for certain products. To understand the near-term (1- to 5-year) market for energy-efficient lighting products, a selected set of utilities and lighting product manufacturers were surveyed in early 1991. Two major U. S. government programs, EPA's Green Lights and DOE's Federal Relighting Initiative, were also examined to assess their effect on product demand. Lighting product manufacturers predicted significant growth through 1995. Lamp manufacturers indicated that compact fluorescent lamp shipments tripled between 1988 and 1991, and predicted that shipments would again triple, rising from 25 million units in 1991 to 72 million units in 1995. Ballast manufacturers predicted that demand for power-factorcorrected ballasts (both magnetic and electronic) would grow from 59.4 million units in 1991 to 71.1 million units in 1995. Electronic ballasts were predicted to grow from 11% of ballast demand in 1991 to 40% in 1995. Manufacturers projected that electronic ballast supply shortages would continue until late 1992. Lamp and ballast producers indicated that they had difficulty in determining what additional supply requirements might result due to demand created by utility programs. Using forecasts from 27 surveyed utilities and assumptions regarding the growth of U. S. utility lighting DSM programs, low, median, and high forecasts were developed for utility expenditures for lighting incentives through 1994. The projected median figure for 1992 was $316 million, while for 1994, the projected median figure was $547 million. The allocation of incentive dollars to various products and the number of units needed to meet utility-stimulated demand were also projected. To provide a better connection between future supply and demand, a common database is needed that captures detailed DSM program information including incentive dollars and unit-volume mix by product type.

Gough, A. (Lighting Research Inst., New York, NY (United States)); Blevins, R. (Plexus Research, Inc., Donegal, PA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

105

Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global LNG Trade  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is adapted from testimony by Jay Hakes, Administrator of the Energy Information Administration, before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on July 23, 1997. The hearing focused on the examination of certain aspects of natural gas into the next century with special emphasis on world natural gas supply and demand to 2015.

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Telecommunications, Public Health, and Demand for Health-Related Information and Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper investigates the proposition that complementarities exist between information technologies and public health promotion. The results of the cross-country analysis indicate that an increase in the stock of telecommunications infrastructure is ...

Maja Micevska

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Future world oil supply and demand-the impact on domestic exploration  

SciTech Connect

Current world oil consumption (demand) of about 68 million B/D will increase to over 81 million B/D in 10 years. World oil production capacity (supply), currently 6-8% over current demand, cannot meet this demand without adequate investments to boost capacity, particularly in the Middle East. Because of low oil prices these investments are not being made. In 10 years the Middle East needs to supply over 50% of the worlds oil; the Far East will by then surpass North America in demand. It is very possible that there will soon be a period of time when the supply/demand balance will be, or will perceived to be failing. This may cause rapid rises in crude oil prices until the balance is again achieved. Crude oil prices are actually quite volatile; the steadiness and abnormally low prices in recent years has been due to several factors that probably won`t be present in the period when the supply/demand situation is seen to be unbalanced. Domestic oil exploration is strongly affected by the price of crude oil and domestic producers should soon benefit by rising oil prices. Exploration will be stimulated, and small incremental amounts of new oil should be economically viable. Oil has been estimated to be only 2% of the total cost of producing all U.S. goods and services-if so, then oil price increase should not create any real problems in the total economic picture. Nevertheless, certain industries and life styles heavily dependent on cheap fuel will have problems, as the days of cheap oil will be gone. Future undiscovered oil in the Earth could be one trillion barrels or more, equal to the amount now considered as proved reserves. There will soon be more of a challenge to find and produce this oil in sufficient quantity and at a competitive cost with other sources of energy. This challenge should keep us busy.

Townes, H.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The addition of a US Rare Earth Element (REE) supply-demand model improves the characterization and scope of the United States Department of Energy's effort to forecast US REE Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a new US Rare Earth Element (REE) Supply-Demand Model for the explicit forecast of US REE supply and demand in the 2010 to 2025 time period. In the 2010 Department of Energy (DOE) ...

Mancco, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Preliminary Examination A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. WF6N.1015 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

110

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

111

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply s  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be forced to embrace energy efficiencies - those that are within our reach today, and those that will be developed tomorrow. Precisely when they come lo grips with that reality - this year, 10 years from now, or 20 years from now - will determine bow smooth the transition will be for consumers and industry alike.

112

Identifying Challenges for Sustained Adoption of Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a dynamic, behavioral model with an explicit spatial structure to explore the co-evolutionary dynamics between infrastructure supply and vehicle demand. Vehicles and fueling infrastructure are ...

Struben, Jeroen J.R.,

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

Engineering manpower supply and demand in the petroleum industry as affected by engineering salary trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the changes that occur periodically in engineering manpower supply/demand trends in the petroleum industry, it is desirable to have an awareness of some of the major activity factors affecting such trends, of starting Petroleum Engineering salaries relating to that background, of the on-going engineering salary status which developed from these activities and of the large effect that high starting and on-going salaries do have in attracting and retaining engineers within the petroleum industry.

Brown, D.C.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Policy implications of the GRI Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand to 2010; 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1991 edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand is summarized. Three broad implications for the future of the natural gas industry are highlighted: the impact of the Middle East turmoil on the expected price of crude oil and the potentional for increased interfuel price competition between natural gas and petroleum in the mid-1990s if world oil prices return to lower levels.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Consensus forecast of U. S. energy supply and demand to the year 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods used in forecasting energy supply and demand are described, and recent forecasts are reviewed briefly. Forecasts to the year 2000 are displayed in tables and graphs and are used to prepare consensus forecasts for each form of fuel and energy supply. Fuel demand and energy use by consuming sector are tabulated for 1972 and 1975 for the various fuel forms. The distribution of energy consumption by use sector, as projected for the years 1985 and 2000 in the ERDA-48 planning report (Scenario V), is normalized to match the consensus energy supply forecasts. The results are tabulated listing future demand for each fuel and energy form by each major energy-use category. Recent estimates of U.S. energy resources are also reviewed briefly and are presented in tables for each fuel and energy form. The outlook for fossil fuel resources to the year 2040, as developed by the Institute for Energy Analysis at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, is also presented.

Lane, J.A.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

On the energy sources of Mozambican households and the demand-supply curves for domestic electricity in the northern electrical grid in Mozambique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of electrical infrastructure to supply rural households is considered economically unfeasible because of the high cost of capital investment required to expand the… (more)

Arthur, Maria de Fatima Serra Ribeiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexico’s energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexico’s crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexico’s electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario – investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario – analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martínez; Autónoma México; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martínez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Materials used in new generation vehicles: supplies, shifts, and supporting infrastructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program intends to develop new designs for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption by two thirds but otherwise have price, comfort, safety, and other measures of performance similar to the typical automobile now on the market. PNGV vehicle designs are expected to substitute lightweight materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, carbon-reinforced polymer composites, glass-reinforced polymer composites, and ultra- light steel, for heavier materials such as steel and iron in automobile components. The target mass of a PNGV vehicle is 1,960 pounds, as compared to the average current vehicle that weights 3,240 pounds. Other changes could include the use of different ferrous alloys, engineering changes, or incorporation of advanced ceramic components. Widespread adoption of these vehicle designs would affect materials markets and require concurrent development and adoption of supporting technologies to supply the materials and to use and maintain them in automobiles. This report identifies what would be required to bring about these changes and developments in materials substitution; identifies reasons that might make these substitutions difficult to accomplish within the overall objectives and timetable of the PNGV program; and identifies any issues arising from the substitution that could prompt consideration of policies to deal with them. The analysis in this paper uses scenarios that assume the production of new generation vehicles will begin in 2007 and that their market share will increase gradually over the following 25 years. The scenarios on which the analysis is based assume a maximum substitution of each potential replacement material considered. This maximum substitution of individual materials (i.e., the amount of replacement material by weight that would be added to the baseline vehicle`s composition) is as follows: ULSAB (high strength steel), 298 lbs.; glass-reinforced composites, 653 lbs.; carbon-reinforced composites, 379 lbs.; aluminum, 926 lbs.; and magnesium, 216 lbs. The substitutions (and the steel and iron they replace) are multiplied by the number of new generation vehicles produced on an annual basis out to 2030 to determine the total quantity of material used in new generation vehicles and the quantity of steel that would be displaced. We identified six stages in the life cycle of materials--mining or extraction of resources; smelting or other processing to produce the material from the resource; producing components from the material; assembling the components into vehicles, using, maintaining, and repairing vehicles; and disposing of the vehicle, including any recycling of materials for automotive or other use--and identified what might be required to supply and use the substitute materials at different life cycle stages. The variables considered are the mineral or material supply, the capital and equipment (including necessary capacity, technical changes, cost, and location), labor and employment, energy, material complements, and environmental emissions and impacts. The analysis shows that raw materials to produce each of the replacement materials are sufficiently available, and adequate mining or extraction capacity exists for each. However, challenges are possible at the material production stage for three of the four materials. For aluminum and magnesium the difficulties are associated with requirements for significant new production capacity, necessary for aluminum because new production equipment will be needed to produce the material in a cost-effective manner and for magnesium because current production capacity is inadequate. The required capacity investment for magnesium to meet demand in 2030 is $13.1 billion. Both materials also would sharply increase energy requirements, and both industries would likely develop mostly--if not entirely--outside the United States. To produce the carbon-based fiber to meet PNGV demand in 2015, an entire new industry must be developed--a $4.6 billion investment. Significant environmental concerns

Das, S.; Curlee, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexnayder, S.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydro. International Hydro Power and Dam Construction.suggested) Supply of hydro-electric power * Supply of waterrights ? Supply of hydro-electric power ? Supply of water

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Factors that will influence oil and gas supply and demand in the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report published by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) in the United States predicted a 50-60% growth in total global demand for energy by 2030. Because oil, gas, and coal will continue to be the primary energy sources during this time, the energy industry will have to continue increasing the supply of these fuels to meet this increasing demand. Achieving this goal will require the exploitation of both conventional and unconventional reservoirs of oil and gas in (including coalbed methane) an environmentally acceptable manner. Such efforts will, in turn, require advancements in materials science, particularly in the development of materials that can withstand high-pressure, high-temperature, and high-stress conditions.

Holditch, S.A.; Chianelli, R.R. [Texas A& amp; M University, College Station, TX (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Workforce planning for DOE/EM: Assessing workforce demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to bringing its facilities into regulatory compliance and restoring the environment of sites under its control by the year 2019. Responsibility for accomplishing this goal is vested with the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Concerns regarding the availability of workers with the necessary technical skills and the prospect of retraining workers from other programs within DOE or other industries are addressed in this report in several ways. First, various workforce projections relevant to EM occupations are compared to determine common findings and resolve inconsistencies. Second, case studies, interviews, and published data are used to examine the potential availability of workers for these occupations via occupational mobility, training/retraining options, and salary adjustments. Third, demand and supply factors are integrated in a framework useful for structuring workforce analyses. The analyses demonstrate that workforce skills are not anticipated to change due to the change in mission; science, engineering, and technician occupations tend to be mobile within and across occupational categories; experience and on-the-job training are more crucial to issues of worker supply than education; and, the clarity of an organization`s mission, budget allocation process, work implementation and task assignment systems are critical determinants of both workforce need and supply. DOE is encouraged to create a more stable platform for workforce planning by resolving organizational and institutional hindrances to accomplishing work and capitalizing on workforce characteristics besides labor {open_quotes}supply{close_quotes} and demographics.

Lewis, R.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Policy implications of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand to 2015, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The summary of the 1997 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand discusses the implications of the projection that are important for GRI strategic planning and scenario development, and for the gas industry. The projection indicates that with adequate technology advances, natural gas will play a major role in an increasingly competitive energy mix well into the next century. It is expected that the expansion in gas markets experienced over the last decade will continue over the long term.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A supply-demand model for OPEC oil-pricing policies  

SciTech Connect

OPEC and its pricing policies have been subjected to constant international attention as well as criticism since 1973. Consumers find OPEC behavior irrational, while OPEC tries to justify its policies as rational and in accordance with the realities of the international oil market. The focus of this study is to contribute toward an analytical and empirical work on OPEC pricing behavior, and highlight the various factors believed to affect the future oil policies of OPEC member countries. After a survey of literature on the theoretical framework of world oil models in general, and OPEC models in particular, a linear econometric model for pricing OPEC oil is formulated which is a supply-demand equilibrium model comprising of supply, demand, and inflation-rate functions. Estimation of the behavioral equations are carried out by Ordinary and Two-Stage Least Square estimators. Econometric results from the estimation and simulation of the model seem to indicate that OPEC's pricing behavior is market-responsive and may best be explained by employing the theoretical framework of market-equilibrium condition.

Heiat, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

EPRG WORKING PAPER The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non-Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What would be the effect of CO2 pricing on global oil supply and demand? This paper introduces a model describing the interaction between conventional and non-conventional oil supply in a Hotelling framework and under CO2 constraints. The model assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set at the social cost of CO2 on oil price and demand and the uncertainty associated with the time when conventional oil production might become unable to meet demand. The results show that a tax on CO2 emissions associated with fuel use would reduce oil demand despite the effect of lower future rents, and would delay the time when conventional oil supply is unable to satisfy demand. More precisely, between 81 and 99 % of the CO2 tax is carried into the oil price despite the counter-balancing effect of the reduced rent. A CO2 tax on fuel use set at the social cost of CO2 would delay by 25 years the time when conventional oil production is unable to meet oil demand, from 2019 to 2044 (mean value). The results show that this date is very sensitive to the price elasticity of demand and the demand growth rate, which shows the great potential of demand-side measures to smooth the transition towards low-carbon liquid fuel alternatives. www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRG WORKING PAPER Keywords JEL Classification Oil supply and demand; Conventional and non-conventional oil; CO2 pricing; Social cost of CO2.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major analysis completed recently by the gas transmission and distribution industry concludes that available supplies of gas energy will fall into the range of 23-31 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) by the year 2000, as conventional gas production is increasingly supplemented by supplies from coal gasification, Alaska, unconventional sources, LNG, Canada, and Mexico. At the same time, however, gas demand is characterized by price-induced conservation in all markets, together with continuing gas demand constraints and financial burdens imposed by Government regulators at all levels. With these restrictions and burdens eased, the gas industry can rebuild its marketing acumen and capacity. Thus, gas demand may likely increase in both the traditional heating and industrial fuel and feedstock applications, as well as such new non-traditional uses as cogeneration, natural gas vehicles and select gas use with coal. With regard to impending gas price decontrol, analyses conducted by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.), as well as studies by the U.S. Department of Energy and other groups, concur in the important finding that natural gas will be able to compete with alternate fuels in the energy marketplace after decontrol, as long as indefinite price escalators and other rigidities in gas purchase contracts can be defused so as to enable the market system to operate successfully. A.G.A.'s analysis, indeed, concluded that gas prices are rising rapidly enough under the existing law between now and 1985, so that concerns of a sudden price increase after deregulation in that year may be somewhat overstated, as long as the indefinite price escalators are defused.

Schlesinger, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Parking Infrastructure and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A B O U T how parking infrastructure affects energy demand,the extensive parking infrastructure, including the costs ofdata on parking infrastructure. For example, consider the

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Aprad; Madanat, Samer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

An Automation System for Optimizing a Supply Chain Network Design under the Influence of Demand Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

threshold for the maximum variation in demand that can bethreshold for the maximum variation in demand that can bethreshold for the maximum variation in demand that can be

Polany, Rany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007-R-3 Water is an essential resource in the U.S. economy. It plays a crucial role in supporting many economic activities and ensuring the quality of human life and the health of ecological systems. Despite this, the value of water may not be widely appreciated because only some water resources and water uses are easily visible or noticed while others are not. Among the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) Future Directions program activities are the identification of emerging water challenges and opportunities and the tactical engagement of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) senior leaders on these issues. Such critical thinking is an essential prerequisite to strategy development and planning. IWR has developed this series of Water Resources Outlook papers, commissioned utilizing outside experts, to identify emerging issues and implications for the Nation. These issues and implications will be presented in the form of “provocation sessions ” with external and internal subject matter experts and stakeholders and will inform the USACE strategic planning process. U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook Given the overall importance of water, the long-term adequacy of water supply is a major national concern. This first in a series of Water Resources Outlook papers reviews future trends

Jack C. Kiefer, Ph.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charging Infrastructure Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design July 30, 2012 Lee Slezak Technology Manager, Vehicle Systems Vehicle Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue Washington DC 20585 eere.energy.gov Outline * Purpose - Establish Vision for Achieving EV Everywhere * Enable Strong Demand for EVs * Supply of Vehicles and Infrastructure * Current Status of Infrastructure and Vehicles * Desired Workshop Outputs * Approach - Design Candidate Infrastructure Strategies for 2022 10/12/2012 2 eere.energy.gov Achieving EV Everywhere - Enable Strong Demand for EVs 10/12/2012 3 EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance Electric Vehicles * Safe * Cost Competitive * Utility meets consumer needs * Range

131

Uniform-Format Solid Feedstock Supply System: A Commodity-Scale Design to Produce an Infrastructure-Compatible Bulk Solid from Lignocellulosic Biomass -- Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, Uniform-Format Solid Feedstock Supply System: A Commodity-Scale Design to Produce an Infrastructure-Compatible Bulk Solid from Lignocellulosic Biomass, prepared by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), acknowledges the need and provides supportive designs for an evolutionary progression from present day conventional bale-based supply systems to a uniform-format, bulk solid supply system that transitions incrementally as the industry launches and matures. These designs couple to and build from current state of technology and address science and engineering constraints that have been identified by rigorous sensitivity analyses as having the greatest impact on feedstock supply system efficiencies and costs.

J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney; Erin M. Searcy

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Di¤erential E¤ects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ a set of sign restrictions on the impulse responses of a Global VAR model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2–2011Q2, as well as bounds on impact price elasticities of oil supply and oil demand to discriminate between supply-driven and demand-driven oil-price shocks, and to study the time pro…le of their macroeconomic e¤ects across a wide range of countries and real/…nancial variables. We show that the above identi…cation scheme can greatly bene…t from the cross-sectional dimension of the GVAR — by providing a large number of additional cross-country sign restrictions and hence reducing the set of admissible models. The results indicate that the economic consequences of a supply-driven oil-price shock are very di¤erent from those of an oil-demand shock driven by global economic activity, and vary for oilimporting countries compared to energy exporters. While oil importers typically face a long-lived fall in economic activity in response to a supply-driven surge in oil prices, the impact is positive for energy-exporting countries that possess large proven oil/gas reserves. However, in response to an oil-demand disturbance, almost all countries in

Paul Cashin A; Kamiar Mohaddes B; Maziar Raissi C; Mehdi Raissi Ay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The energy water nexus : increasing water supply by desalination integrated with renewable power and reducing water demand by corporate water footprinting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Growing populations and periodic drought conditions have exacerbated water stress in many areas worldwide. Consequently, it would be valuable to manage both supply and demand… (more)

Clayton, Mary Elizabeth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring of Intelligent Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growth adds to the demands on the water supply infrastructure. Utilities are faced with increasing costs structural failures in aging pipes, particularly at joints. For water utility operators, the ability of Intelligent Infrastructure Hong Kong | 9-11 December 2013 SENSOR NETWORKS FOR MONITORING

Entekhabi, Dara

136

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

Information Center

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Design of bioethanol supply chains including commodity market dynamics and multiple demand scenarios.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The establishment of a bioethanol supply chain in northern Italy will be simulated in this work by evaluating its spatial explicit layout. The economic details… (more)

Mazzetto, Filippo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resulting in a rise in coal prices have been designed tooil prices and unstable oil supplies helped make coal andprices remain higher. In developing countries, growth of coal

Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The dynamics of electricity demand and supply in the low voltage distribution grid: a model study:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis a simulation study is executed that analyses how new developments of household electricity demand and decentralised electricity generation affect the low voltage… (more)

Van Zoest, P.L.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Energy Demand and Fuel Supply in Developing Countries Brazil, Korea and the Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased o f coke hydroelectricity. S u b s t a n t i a l roccurred of in industry, hydroelectricity, in the demand for

Sathaye, Jayant A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Resilient Everyday Infrastructure [To Rally Discussion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and redundant civic infrastructure. Opposite: Users at theand gardens are users of infrastructure, demanding more andResilient Everyday Infrastructure William R. Morrish When a

Morrish, William R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Quarterly update. [Oil supply and demand data for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report presents detailed statistics on oil supply and demand in the countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. The information consists of complete balances of production, trade, refinery intake/output, final consumption, stock levels, and changes for crude oil, natural gas liquids, refinery feedstocks, and 9 product groups; separate trade data for main product groups, LPG, and naphtha; imports for 48 origins; exports for 31 destinations; international marine bunkers and deliveries by product group; aggregates of quarterly data to annual totals; and natural gas supply and consumption. The information supplied is for Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, UK, European Economic Community, Austria, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, OECD Europe, Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the US.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Structuring energy supply and demand networks in a general equilibrium model to simulate global warming control strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming control strategies which mandate stringent caps on emissions of greenhouse forcing gases can substantially alter a country's demand, production, and imports of energy products. Although there is a large degree of uncertainty when attempting to estimate the potential impact of these strategies, insights into the problem can be acquired through computer model simulations. This paper presents one method of structuring a general equilibrium model, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program/Global Climate Change (ENPEP/GCC), to simulate changes in a country's energy supply and demand balance in response to global warming control strategies. The equilibrium model presented in this study is based on the principle of decomposition, whereby a large complex problem is divided into a number of smaller submodules. Submodules simulate energy activities and conversion processes such as electricity production. These submodules are linked together to form an energy supply and demand network. Linkages identify energy and fuel flows among various activities. Since global warming control strategies can have wide reaching effects, a complex network was constructed. The network represents all energy production, conversion, transportation, distribution, and utilization activities. The structure of the network depicts interdependencies within and across economic sectors and was constructed such that energy prices and demand responses can be simulated. Global warming control alternatives represented in the network include: (1) conservation measures through increased efficiency; and (2) substitution of fuels that have high greenhouse gas emission rates with fuels that have lower emission rates. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Hamilton, S.; Veselka, T.D.; Cirillo, R.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Republic pipeline grid Source: “Oil and Gas in the Russianin stabilizing Middle East oil supply sources and shippingChina’s Oil Exports and Imports, 1980-1995 Source: East-West

Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Geographically Based Infrastructure Margo Melendez & Keith Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagram Geographically-based Infrastructure Analysis GIS Transportation Technologies & Systems Electric resulting H2 demand and changing demand ­ Estimate infrastructure needs and usage ­ Predict transition

146

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets; Opportunities for liquefied natural gas supply infrastructure and demand growth in United States and International markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is… (more)

Connell, Richard Perry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A resilience assessment framework for infrastructure and economic systems : quantitative and qualitative resilience analysis of petrochemical supply chains to a hurricane.  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the nation has recognized that critical infrastructure protection should consider not only the prevention of disruptive events, but also the processes that infrastructure systems undergo to maintain functionality following disruptions. This more comprehensive approach has been termed critical infrastructure resilience (CIR). Given the occurrence of a particular disruptive event, the resilience of a system to that event is the system's ability to efficiently reduce both the magnitude and duration of the deviation from targeted system performance levels. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has developed a comprehensive resilience assessment framework for evaluating the resilience of infrastructure and economic systems. The framework includes a quantitative methodology that measures resilience costs that result from a disruption to infrastructure function. The framework also includes a qualitative analysis methodology that assesses system characteristics that affect resilience in order to provide insight and direction for potential improvements to resilience. This paper describes the resilience assessment framework. This paper further demonstrates the utility of the assessment framework through application to a hypothetical scenario involving the disruption of a petrochemical supply chain by a hurricane.

Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vugrin, Eric D.; Warren, Drake E.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Design for implementation : fully integrated charging & docking infrastructure used in Mobility-on-Demand electric vehicle fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the technology used in electric vehicles continues to advance, there is an increased demand for urban-appropriate electric charging stations emphasizing a modern user interface, robust design, and reliable functionality. ...

Martin, Jean Mario Nations

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Financing infrastructure projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure is of great importance to the development and economic growth of communities. Due to the increased demand on sophisticated infrastructure, governments' budgets are not anymore able to satisfy this growing ...

Eid, Serge Emile

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Integration of supply and demand for water in central Illinois urban areas. Research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water demand functions were estimated using two sets of data for Central Illinois -- community-wide data and household data. The community-wide data consist of total residential consumption for each of four pre-selected medium-sized cities in Central Illinois. The household data consist of residents from five cities who responded to a mail survey. The study investigates comparability of parameter estimates from the two approaches. If the parameter estimates are comparable, it would suggest water demand estimates need not require costly and time-consuming household surveys. Estimates of price elasticity are negative and less than unitary based on the two data sets used. The estimated price elasticity based on community-wide data is -.037, while using household data estimated price elasticities are in the range from -.14 to -.16. The reasons for these differences are not immediately apparent and warrant further investigation.

Miranda, C.S.; Braden, J.B.; Martin, W.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Infrastructure investments and resource adequacy in the restructured US natural gas market : is supply security at risk?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to analyze the development of US natural gas infrastructure over the last two decades and to discuss its perspectives. In particular, we focus on the relationship between the regulatory ...

Hirschhausen, Christian von

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Demand Reductions from the Application of Advanced Metering Infrastructure, Pricing Programs, and Customer-Based Systems - Intial Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy | December 2012 Table of Contents Executive Summary ................................................................................................................. ii 1. Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose and Scope.................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Organization of this Report....................................................................................... 3 2. Overview of Demand-Side Devices, Systems, Programs, and Expected Benefits ............... 4 2.1 Communications Networks Associated with AMI .................................................... 4

155

Infrastructure for Integrated Electronics Design & ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrastructure for Integrated Electronics Design & Manufacturing (IIEDM) Project. ... designed to support distributed supply chain integration and e ...

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalent and its electricity demand at 19 Mtoe. If wastemeet water heating and electricity demand in the residentialJournal Vol.4, No.4 electricity demand, fuel requirements

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the present level. Natural gas demand is expected to avoid2030 to 2050, however, natural gas demand will fall slowly

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Water and Sustainability (Volume 2): An Assessment of Water Demand, Supply, and Quality in the U.S. -- The Next Half Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast growing demand for clean, fresh water -- coupled with the need to protect and enhance the environment -- has made many areas of the United States and the rest of the world vulnerable to water shortages for various human uses. As they interact with the electricity industry, these uses encompass agricultural irrigation, thermoelectric generation, municipal water/wastewater treatment and distribution, and industrial processes. The dependency of electricity supply and demand on water availability ca...

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

World Supply and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Gallium arsenide ingot, wafer, and device manufacturers...X Sweden Semitronics AB X United Kingdom General Electricity Company (U.K.) X X X X X MCP Electronic Materials Ltd. X United States Airtron Division of Litton Industries X Anadigics Inc. X X X Applied Solar Energy Corporation X X AT & T Bell Laboratories X X X X Bertram Laboratories X Crystal Specialties,...

163

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Improving Utilization of Infrastructure Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key advantage of infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) clouds is providing users on-demand access to resources. To provide on-demand access, however, cloud providers must either significantly overprovision their infrastructure (and pay a high price for ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Infrastructure-as-a-Service, High Throughput Computing

Paul Marshall; Kate Keahey; Tim Freeman

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Demand-Side and Supply-Side Load Management: Optimizing with Thermal Energy Storage (TES) for the Restructuring Energy Marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current and future restructuring energy marketplace represents a number of challenges and opportunities to maximize value through the management of peak power. This is true both on the demand-side regarding peak power use and on the supply-side regarding power generation. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can provide the flexibility essential to the economical management of power. In large industrial applications, the added value of TES has been demonstrated, not only in managing operating costs, but also in delivering a net saving in capital cost versus conventional, non-storage approaches. This capital cost saving is often realized in situations where investments in chiller plant capacity, or in on-site power generating capacity, are required. On the demand-side, TES has long been used to shift air-conditioning loads and process cooling loads from on-peak to off-peak periods. In today's and tomorrow's restructuring energy markets, price spikes are increasingly likely during periods of peak power demand. TES is performing an important role, especially when coupled with a proper understanding of modern TES technology options. The inherent advantages and limitations of the available TES technology options are briefly reviewed and discussed. Examples of existing large TES installations are presented, identifying the TES technology types they utilize. The applications include industrial facilities, as well as universities, hospitals, government, and District Cooling utility systems. The power management impact and the economic benefits of TES are illustrated through a review of several TES case studies. Combustion Turbines (CTs) are a common choice for modern on-site and utility power generation facilities. Inlet air cooling of CTs enhances their hot weather performance and has been successfully accomplished for many years, using a variety of technologies. In many instances, TES can and does provide a uniquely advantageous method of optimizing the economics of CT Inlet Cooling (CTIC) systems. TES systems can achieve low inlet air temperatures, with resulting high levels of power augmentation. The TES approach also minimizes the installed capacity (and capital cost) of cooling systems, as well as limiting the parasitic loads occurring during periods of peak power demand and peak power value. Chilled water, ice, and low temperature fluid TES systems are all applicable to CTIC. The inherent pros and cons of each TES type are discussed. Sensitivity analyses are presented to explore the impact of cooling hours per day on capital cost per kW of power enhancement. Case histories illustrate the beneficial impact of TES-based CTIC on both capital cost and operating cost of CT power plants. TES-based CTIC is advantageous as an economical, peaking power enhancement for either peaking or base-load plants. It is applied to both new and existing CTs. TES is projected to have even greater value in future restructuring energy markets.

Andrepont, J. S.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Analysis Margo Melendez & Keith Parks January 26, 2006 Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis (GIA) Utilizes GIS, geographically segregated data, and transition expertise to add the spatial component to infrastructure analysis NREL Core Competencies * Geographic data, tools, and expertise * Flexibility to address a wide array of transition issues NREL Capability Diagram Geographically-based Infrastructure Analysis GIS Transportation Technologies & Systems Electric & Hydrogen Technologies Energy Analysis Office GIA Activities Previous and Ongoing * HYDS ME - Evaluates best infrastructure options * Interstate Infrastructure Analysis - Minimal infrastructure to facilitate interstate travel during transition New Analyses * Quantifying transitional hydrogen demand

168

1.0 Motivation............................................................................................................2 1.1Overview of Energy Supply and Demand in the 21st  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................24 6.6 Correlation between Wind Strength and Demand for Electricity..................24 6 important. These variations can then be compared to the fluctuations of electricity demand on similar of electricity demand (Figure 19), which can be compared to the corresponding fluctuations of wind power shown

169

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency and in the coke manufacturing efficiency in thesystems and next-generation coke ovens. Demand for steamingsystems and next-generation coke ovens. Steaming coal

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The population growth coupled with increasing urbanization is predicted to exert a huge demand on the growth and retrofit of urban infrastructure, particularly in water and energy systems. The U.S. population is estimated to grow by 23% (UN, 2009) between 2005 and 2030. The corresponding increases in energy and water demand were predicted as 14% (EIA, 2009) and 20% (Elcock, 2008), respectively. The water-energy nexus needs to be better understood to satisfy the increased demand in a sustainable manner without conflicting with environmental and economic constraints. Overall, 4% of U.S. power generation is used for water distribution (80%) and treatment (20%). 3% of U.S. water consumption (100 billion gallons per day, or 100 BGD) and 40% of U.S. water withdrawal (340 BGD) are for thermoelectric power generation (Goldstein and Smith, 2002). The water demand for energy production is predicted to increase most significantly among the water consumption sectors by 2030. On the other hand, due to the dearth of conventional water sources, energy intensive technologies are increasingly in use to treat seawater and brackish groundwater for water supply. Thus comprehending the interrelation and interdependency between water and energy system is imperative to evaluate sustainable water and energy supply alternatives for cities. In addition to the water-energy nexus, decentralized or distributed concept is also beneficial for designing sustainable water and energy infrastructure as these alternatives require lesser distribution lines and space in a compact urban area. Especially, the distributed energy infrastructure is more suited to interconnect various large and small scale renewable energy producers which can be expected to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the case of decentralized water infrastructure, on-site wastewater treatment facility can provide multiple benefits. Firstly, it reduces the potable water demand by reusing the treated water for non-potable uses and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

Jeong, Hyunju [Georgia Institute of Technology; Pandit, Arka [Georgia Institute of Technology; Crittenden, John [Georgia Institute of Technology; Xu, Ming [University of Michigan; Perrings, Charles [Arizona State University; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Li, Ke [University of Georgia; French, Steve [Georgia Institute of Technology

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy sources (excluding hydro and geothermal)C O ; Hydro and 4 Po geothermal energies I Nuclear Gas I OilNuclear Hydro/geothermal Renewables Primary energy supply

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higlily efficient natural gas power generation) Developing Ccoal natural gas thermal power generation Sources : Preparednatural gas demand will fall slowly because of improvements in L N G thermal power generation

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Infrastructural Optimism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

means envisioning a new mobility network that incorporatesproposed plans for new public mobility infrastructure. Among2 For them, New Orleans’ damaged mobility infrastructure was

Samuels, Linda C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Assessing Reliability In Hydrogen Supply Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but increasing portion of natural gas supply – As percentagehighly dependent on natural gas supply infrastructure LNGpercentage of natural gas supply Dependence of other systems

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A BEP analysis of energy supply for sustainable urban microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper shows the use of GIS and other program to identify the technical and economic feasibility of a self-sufficient community in energy supply/demand, through the integration of ICT, intelligent infrastructure (smart grid) and the economic analysis ... Keywords: BEP, BIPV, distributed generation, geographic information systems, microgrids, urban energy consumption

Pasquale Balena; Giovanna Mangialardi; Carmelo Maria Torre

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee  

SciTech Connect

The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Poster Abstract: Acxiom's Capacity On Demand Framework For the past five years Acxiom Corporation has be transitioning its IT infrastructure from a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poster Abstract: Acxiom's Capacity On Demand Framework For the past five years Acxiom Corporation, distributed Grid model. Because Acxiom's internal processing needs are somewhat different from traditional Grid applications custom monitoring and control software, called the Apiary, was written in house

Melbourne, University of

179

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West Executive Summary David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

183

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(This page intentionally left blank) (This page intentionally left blank) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

184

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

185

Critical infrastructure security curriculum modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical infrastructures have succumbed to the demands of greater connectivity. Although the scheme of connecting these critical equipment and devices to cyberspace has brought us tremendous convenience, it also enabled certain unimaginable risks and ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, course modules, critical infrastructures, cybersecurity, programmable logic controllers, security, vulnerability

Guillermo A. Francia, III

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Electric power supply and demand 1979 to 1988 for the contiguous United States as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1979 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning bulk electric power supply and demand is summarized and reviewed. Electric-utility power-supply systems are composed of power sources, transmission and distribution facilities, and users of electricity. In the United States there are three such systems of large geographic extent that together cover the entire country. Subjects covered are: energy forecasts, peak demand forecasts, generating-capacity forecasts, purchases and sales of capacity, and transmission. Extensive data are compiled in 17 tables. Information in two appendices includes a general description of the Regional Electric Reliability Councils and US generating capacity as of June 30, 1979. 3 figures, 17 tables.

Savage, N.; Graban, W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Built Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Built Infrastructure Print E-mail Climate change and its associated impacts, including thawing permafrost, changing sea-levels, rising temperatures, shifts in species distribution...

188

Infrastructure as Landscape [Infrastructure as Landscape, Landscape as Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for appropriating infrastructure as landscape offersPress, 1991). PLACES10:3 STRANG: INFRASTRUCTURE AS LANDSCAPEInfrastr Infrastructure and Landscape In 1964, cultural

Strang, Gary L

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

MFC Communications Infrastructure Study  

SciTech Connect

Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Social infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current urbanization patterns and aging transportation infrastructures have marginalized millions of US citizens. The result is that 4 .5 million US residents live within 100 meters of a four-lane highway' and have become ...

Kurlbaum, Ryan E. (Ryan Edward)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Systems Infrastructure (SYS 18)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Systems Infrastructure John Hicks, Karencomponents The Systems Infrastructure team assembles, tests,

Richard Guy; John Hicks; Karen Weeks

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

SYS 5: Systems Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Systems Infrastructure Kevin Chang, Johnnents The Systems Infrastructure team assembles, tests, and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Prepared for: 2010-2025 H2 Scenario Analysis Meeting Margo Melendez - NREL 2 Disclaimer and Government License This work has been authored by Midwest Research Institute (MRI) under Contract No. DE-AC36- 99GO10337 with the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"). The United States Government (the "Government") retains and the publisher, by accepting the work for publication, acknowledges that the Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow others to do so, for Government purposes. Neither MRI, the DOE, the Government, nor any other agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any liability

195

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;7 Identify Key Policy Attributes · Air quality · State incentives · Clean Cities coalitions · Hybrid Medium State incentives Medium Clean Cities Coalitions Medium Air quality Medium Hybrid vehicle by Midwest Research Institute (MRI) under Contract No. DE-AC36- 99GO10337 with the U.S. Department of Energy

196

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Analysis of Energy Infrastructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Energy Infrastructures Analysis of Energy Infrastructures Project Summary Full Title: Analysis of Energy Infrastructures and Potential Impacts from an Emergent Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Project ID: 250 Principal Investigator: David Reichmuth Brief Description: Sandia National Laboratories is using a system dynamics approach to simulate the interaction of vehicle adoption and infrastructure for hydrogen, electricity, natural gas, and gasoline. Purpose It is envisioned that the transition to hydrogen vehicles will begin by taking advantage of the existing infrastructure for natural gas. This project will study the impact of hydrogen vehicles on demand for natural gas, electricity, and gasoline. The impact of existing energy infrastructures on hydrogen infrastructure growth will also be considered.

197

Increased demand spurs gas compression industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing demand for natural gas in the last five years has led to dynamic development in the gas compression industry as producers and transmission companies expand operations to supply gas. To handle the increase, for example, transmission companies have been steadily adding new lines to the pipeline infrastructure--3,437 miles in 1995 and an estimated 4,088 miles in 1997. New compression for pipelines has also increased from 212,637 horsepower added in 1989 to an estimated 311,685 horsepower to be added in 1997. Four key trends which influence the gas compression business have developed since the mid 1980s: first, a steady resurgence of demand for natural gas each year; second, a phenomenal number of mergers and buyouts among gas compression companies; third, an alarming drop in average daily gas production per well since 1972; and fourth, high drilling activity in the Gulf of Mexico.

Honea, M. [Weatherford Enterra, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport and its infrastructure Coordinating Lead Authors:5 Transport and its infrastructure Chandler, K. , E. Eberts,5 Transport and its infrastructure Sausen, R. , I. Isaksen,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Transportation Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Infrastructure New Technologies * Potential need for dual-use casks * DOE should look toward industry & international communities for innovations * Industry unclear about delivery & receipt locations * Advances in physical & tracking technologies need to be factored in * Cost-benefit analysis of new technology Training & Dry Runs * Begin as soon as possible * Suggested order: #1-demonstrations, #2-training, #3-dry-runs * Don't re-invent the wheel- look at international programs * Allows DOE to test POC info/training * Standardization of training & materials * DOE should consider centralized training center * Use real equipment in dry- runs * Need for regionalized dry runs Packages * Full-scale Testing - Funds requested in 2003, potential use of

200

Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Year-in-Review: 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

White Paper Smart Grid Leveraging Intelligent Communications to Transform the Power Infrastructure Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart grid is the term generally used to describe the integration of the elements connected to the electrical grid with an information infrastructure to offer numerous benefits for both the providers and consumers of electricity. It is an intelligent future electricity system that connects all supply, grid, and demand elements through an intelligent communication system. The backbone of a successful smart grid operation is a reliable, resilient, secure, and manageable standards-based open communication infrastructure that provides for intelligent linkages between the elements of the grid while participating in the decision making that delivers value to the utility and supply and demand entities connected to it. The ability of a utility to create ubiquitous connectivity between all of its current data sources and decision-making points is critical to the success of smart grid. A communication infrastructure that can efficiently move disparate types of data with varying degrees of transport, security, and reliability requirements is indeed a central requirement. However, it is the ability of the communication infrastructure to participate and work together with the data providers, the decision-making entities, and the actuators to achieve the goals of the smart grid environment that truly brings about the business transformation utilities are aiming for. Smart grid is a paradigm-shifting transition for utilities. Cisco’s ability to transform a utility’s environment from end to end through a converged intelligent network platform that becomes the fabric that optimally brings together all the

Venkat Pothamsetty; Saadat Malik

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in: U.S. energy infrastructure Energy flows within and into the United States Oil and gas exploration, production, movement, and demand worldwide Published daily, excluding Federal...

203

Assessing Reliability in Transportation Energy Supply Pathways: A Hydrogen Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term prospects for natural gas supply. Washington DC: SR/worldwide, subjecting natural gas supply to many of the samenatural gas and petroleum infrastructure: (1) primary energy supply, (

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Utilization of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response as Resources for Transmission and Distribution Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI began its Energy Efficiency Initiative in early 2007. Initiative research, which covers numerous topics associated with energy efficiency and demand management, is categorized into three areas: analytics, infrastructure, and devices. The project described in this report details the Initiative’s analytics element, which deals with methods and tools for analyzing aspects of the use of energy efficiency as supply resource, including measurement and verification, inclusion in generation planning, emissi...

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Economic Impact of Inadequate Infrastructure for Supply ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Agent-based simulations of these phenomena and ... the five manufacturing models, the tradeoff ... the virtual enterprise model relinquishes significant ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

206

Gas Storage for Power Generation -- Critical New Bridge Between Power Demand and Gas Supply: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas storage is a "sleeper" issue for the power industry that will demand a great deal of attention very soon as the building boom of gas-fired capacity draws to a close and these plants begin to operate. While an entire industry has emerged in recent years to develop high-deliverability gas storage, the new facilities are likely the tip of an iceberg. Pipelines will be taxed to meet fluctuating requirements of new units, and companies will turn to gas storage for reliability at an affordable cost...

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

207

Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Infrastructure AND Sustainable Developmentnext two decades, urban infrastructure will be under immenseboth expansions in infrastructure that supports automobile

Boarnet, Marlon G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Infrastructure sectors and the information infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The protection of Critical Information Infrastructures (CIIs) is usually framed in the larger context of protecting all the Critical Infrastructures (CIs) that a Nation or a group of Nations (as is the case of the European Union) consider as essential ...

Andrea Glorioso; Andrea Servida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

212

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

213

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

214

Location and Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facts, Figures Location and Infrastructure Location and Infrastructure LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and...

215

Microelectronics Manufacturing Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... But the manufacturing infrastructure is aging. ... to create an integrated infrastructure for manufacturing ... will enhance the value and utility of portable ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

216

East Coast Infrastructure  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast Infrastructure. Uncheck or check an item to hide or show it in the map. ... Infrastructure—Energy Information Administration (GasTran System), ...

217

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Practices for Advanced Metering, Demand Response, andGuidance for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure BusinessDemand Response through Advanced Metering Roger Levy, Levy

Levy, Roger; Herter, Karen; Wilson, John

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The 'Supply-of-Storage' for Natural Gas in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (2002). “Natural Gas Supply and Infrastructure013 “THE ‘SUPPLY-OF-STORAGE’ FOR NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA”THE “SUPPLY-OF-STORAGE” FOR NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA Rocío

Uria, Rocio; Williams, Jeffrey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

220

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Title Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced Energy Storage Infrastructure in UC San Diego's Microgrid Speaker(s): Byron Washom Date: August 14, 2008 -...

222

Cyber Infrastructure Group Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber Infrastructure Group. Welcome. The Cyber Infrastructure Group (775.04) addresses the integration and interoperability ...

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the results of a study of the impact of climate change on the energy infrastructure of California and the San Francisco Bay region, including impacts on power plant generation; transmission line and substation capacity during heat spells; wildfires near transmission lines; sea level encroachment upon power plants, substations, and natural gas facilities; and peak electrical demand. Some end-of-century impacts were projected:Expected warming will decrease gas-fired generator efficiency. The maximum statewide coincident loss is projected at 10.3 gigawatts (with current power plant infrastructure and population), an increase of 6.2 percent over current temperature-induced losses. By the end of the century, electricity demand for almost all summer days is expected to exceed the current ninetieth percentile per-capita peak load. As much as 21 percent growth is expected in ninetieth percentile peak demand (per-capita, exclusive of population growth). When generator losses are included in the demand, the ninetieth percentile peaks may increase up to 25 percent. As the climate warms, California's peak supply capacity will need to grow faster than the population.Substation capacity is projected to decrease an average of 2.7 percent. A 5C (9F) air temperature increase (the average increase predicted for hot days in August) will diminish the capacity of a fully-loaded transmission line by an average of 7.5 percent.The potential exposure of transmission lines to wildfire is expected to increase with time. We have identified some lines whose probability of exposure to fire are expected to increase by as much as 40 percent. Up to 25 coastal power plants and 86 substations are at risk of flooding (or partial flooding) due to sea level rise.

Sathaye, Jayant; Dale, Larry; Larsen, Peter; Fitts, Gary; Koy, Kevin; Lewis, Sarah; Lucena, Andre

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

225

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

226

Today's Energy Supply - Yesterday's Grid Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Today's Energy Supply - Yesterday's Grid Webinar Today's Energy Supply - Yesterday's Grid Webinar Today's Energy Supply - Yesterday's Grid Webinar May 30, 2012 11:00AM MDT Online This webinar will include an informative session and discussion on how utilities' generation portfolios are changing, often faster than the grid infrastructure that supports them, and the challenges utilities currently face in integrating new generation and demand (load) response technologies into a grid that was designed to operate a different way. Discussions will include transmission studies from the Western Grid Group and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This webinar is sponsored by the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, Western Area Power Administration, DOE Federal Energy Management Program,

227

Fermilab | Recovery Act | General Infrastructure Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Infrastructure Projects General Infrastructure Projects High Availability Computing Center The Computing Division provides administrative, technical and physical support of central computing, storage and networking equipment critical to the success of the labÂ’s scientific mission. Before the renovation, Feynman Computing Center housed the only high availability computing center on the Fermilab campus, which operated at its electrical capacity. The requirements for a high availability computing center include backup infrastructure support for computing equipment that operates continuously, such as networking, web and email services, experiment databases and file serving. Electrical service must be backed up by both an uninterrupted power supply system and a standby electrical generator.

228

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand-response programs and technologies that tend to reduce the variability of hourly electric demand and the resulting supply requirement would reduce the need ...

229

Electric grid planners: demand response and energy efficiency to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Form EIA-411, Coordinated Bulk Power Demand and Supply Report Note: All data are reported for time of summer peak, rather than overall demand.

230

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because supply and demand for electricity must balance in real-time, rapid changes in demand create operational challenges for the electric system and generating unit ...

231

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ���¢��������real-world���¢������� retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation���¢��������s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products���¢�������� Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user���¢��������s fueling experience.

Edward C. Heydorn

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

Improving California’s Infrastructure Services: The California Infrastructure Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the US to improve infrastructure planning, provision andtool for improving infrastructure planning, provision andBuilding Canada: Modern infrastructure for a Strong Canada (

David E. Dowall; Robin Ried

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Strategy for Infrastructure: The California Infrastructure Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has an enormous backlog of infrastructure investment needs,proposed two critical infrastructure policy institutions:and the Performance- Based Infrastructure Initiative (PBI

Dowall, David E.; Ried, Robin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Propane Demand by Sector - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order to understand markets you also have to look at supply and demand. First, demand or who uses propane. For the most part, the major components of propane ...

235

Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure -...

236

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

237

Russia's sorry infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The loss of the nuclear submarine Kursk and the fire in Moscow's TV tower are indications of an infrastructure in grievous disrepair. The outlook for Russia's technological infrastructure remains grim, experts insist. Almost 70 percent of the population ...

J. Oberg

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Supply Related Electricity Demand in California. CEC33 percent of our electricity demand in 2020 from renewablebuildings, heating electricity demand is not included in

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Reduce Demand Rather than Increase Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

floor area) 8. Annual cost per square foot for Eco Passes (square fe 6. Annual cost per square foot for cash ou $0.10parking cash out costs 10˘ a year per square foot of office

Shoup, Donald C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy storage fundamentally decouples supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MARKET PRICE 10 – 50 mills Frequency Regulation average market clearing price ... 14 Wind Challenge: Persistent Cycling Intermittency ...

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.2 Wind Integration in a System without Transmission8.3 Wind Integration in a System with Transmissionmulti-area wind integration case study. . . . . . . . . . .

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with significant wind power generation. IEEE Transactions oncommitment with wind power generation. IEEE Transactions onto scheduling in power-generation systems. Operations

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy spillage, operating costs and capacityfocused on renewable energy utilization, cost of operationssystem operating costs, • renewable energy utilization,

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China, Europe (Denmark, Germany, Greece) and the United States (PJM, NYISO, CAISO, Ontario IMO) accept renewable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Global Energy Demand, Supply, Consequences, Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Joule Population-Energy Equation Power = N x (GDP/N) x (Watts/GDP) C Emission Rate = Power x (Carbon/J) #12;d HVAC Onsite Power & Heat Natural Ventilation, Indoor Environment Building Materials Appliances Thermal · Building Materials Tenants · Lease space from Developer or Property Manager · Professional firms, retailers

Knowles, David William

246

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power system operations, as if the system operator had full controlpower system operations and power market mechanisms, and we describe the optimal control

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of locational renewable energy production in each renewableto total renewable energy production, although accountingproduction data from the 2006 data set of the National Renewable Energy

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term variability of solar power. Technical Report LBNL-sources such as wind and solar power is advancing rapidly inresources such as wind and solar power in power systems is

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasting for wind energy: Temperature dependence andlarge amounts of wind energy with a small electric system.Large scale integration of wind energy in the european power

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current and projected capacity of wind power installations (electricity prices (left) and wind power production (right)of wind speed (left) and wind power pro- duction (right) for

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

253

Energy Transmission and Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: • improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; • identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); • analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; • enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; • identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and • improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers in developing transportation policies; energy audits and efficiency studies for Oberlin-area businesses and Oberlin College; identification of barriers to residential energy efficiency and development of programming to remove these barriers; mapping of the solar-photovoltaic and wind-energy supply chains in northwest Ohio; and opportunities for vehicle sharing and collaboration among the ten organizations in Lorain County from the private, government, non-profit, and educational sectors. With non-grant funds, organizations have begun or completed projects that drew on the findings of the studies, including: creation of a residential energy-efficiency program for the Oberlin community; installation of energy-efficient lighting in Oberlin College facilities; and development by the City of Oberlin and Oberlin College of a 2.27 megawatt solar photovoltaic facility that is expected to produce 3,000 megawatt-hours of renewable energy annually, 12% of the College’s yearly power needs. Implementation of these and other projects is evidence of the economic feasibility and technical effectiveness of grant-supported studies, and additional projects are expected to advance to implementation in the coming years. The public has benefited through improved energydelivery systems and reduced energy use for street lighting in Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; new opportunities for assistance and incentives for residential energy efficiency in the Oberlin community; new opportunities for financial and energy savings through vehicle collaboration within Lorain County; and decreased reliance on fossil fuels and expanded production of renewable energy in the region. The dissemination conference and the summary report developed for the conference also benefited the public, but making the findings and recommendations of the regional studies broadly available to elected officials, city managers, educators, representatives of the private sector, and the general public.

Mathison, Jane

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Market Impacts of Changing Natural Gas Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is in the midst of a multifaceted and rapid expansion of its natural gas supply infrastructure, spanning every segment of the industry from drilling and production to transportation, storage, and capabilities to import liquefied natural gas (LNG). This report takes stock of these many developments at a time of great change, pointing to their implications for the gas and electric industries.

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Challenges Concerning the Energy-Dependency of the Telecom Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industry worldwide depends on Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Through large-scale blackouts of the public electricity supply ... Keywords: Blackouts, decentralized generation, interdependencies power and information infrastructure, islanded operation, sensitivity analysis, smart grid

Lothar Fickert; Helmut Malleck; Christian Wakolbinger

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

Liebrock, Lorie M. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Duggan, David Patrick

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

Minnesota, University of

259

Extending client-server infrastructure using middleware components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Embracing inapt infrastructure technology is a major threat in developing extensive and efficient Web-based systems. The architectural strength of all business models demands an effective integration of various technological components. Middleware, the ...

Qiyang Chen; John Wang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Analysis of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Needed to Enable Commercial Introduction of Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper for the 2005 National Hydrogen Association conference analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

In Summary: Risk of Infrastructure Failure in the Natural Gas Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In Summary: Risk of Infrastructure Failure in the Natural Gas Industry. Increasing demand could put additional stress on capacity-constrained areas

262

ICME Infrastructure Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industrial-standard, robust infrastructure. Challenges and opportunities relative to an ICME infrastructure will be presented. Proceedings Inclusion? Undecided ...

263

Fluxnet Synthesis Dataset Collaboration Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dataset Collaboration Infrastructure Deb Agarwal (LBNL),for the support infrastructure. As a result of this effort,

Agarwal, Deborah A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: ChargePoint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOgIES PROgRAM Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: ChargePoint EVSE Features WiFi, cellular communications Automated meter infrastructure Vacuum florescent...

265

Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by analysing cost optimal energy mixes, investment needs and other costs for new infrastructure, energy supply security, energy resource utilization, rate of introduction...

266

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

267

Sharing local energy infrastructure : organizational models for implementing microgrids and district energy systems in urban commercial districts; Organizational models for implementing microgrids and district energy systems in urban commercial districts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is a growing trend in cities toward establishing localized, shared energy infrastructure. As existing energy infrastructure ages and demand increases, cities face rising energy… (more)

Sherman, Genevieve Rose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Univariate Modeling and Forecasting of Monthly Energy Demand Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this report. #12;i ABSTRACT These electricity demand forms and instructions ask load-serving entities and Instructions for Electricity Demand Forecasts. California Energy Commission, Electricity Supply Analysis.................................................................................................................................7 Form 1 Historic and Forecast Electricity Demand

Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

269

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group D Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure infrastructure Group D Charging Infrastucture Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Limited infrastructure * PHEVs (110V infrastructure suitable) * AEVs (tethered to home) * Make commercial charging free (to consumers) - Google model * Utilities are compensated * Value proposition for site host? Infrastructure provider? * Parking garage - put EVSEs on high floors * Free parking for EVs * Fast charging - needs to be worked from the vehicle OEMs * Premature to discuss at this point - "you gotta sell cars" - chicken & egg * Issues: installation costs, standards, vehicle availability, energy costs/demand costs * Electrification and automation * Wireless charging, platooning, let the grid be the energy carrier

270

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Group E Charging Infrastructure Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Domicile & Workplace Charging: Being available were vehicles spend a lot of time (Level 1/2) * Gas Station model * Fast charging * Battery Swap * Flow Batteries: Electrolyte swap for long distance traveling * Dynamic Wireless Charging * Strategically placed and visible * Widespread and visible Charging Infrastructure (Group E) July 30, 2012 Breakout Session #2 - Refine Consumer Acceptance Concepts and Infrastructure Scenarios * DOE Actions for Fast Charging Scenario: * R&D on power transfer rates for batteries * Energy storage research to minimize grid impacts and demand charges

271

National Infrastructure Protection Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Infrastructure Protection Plan 2006 Preface Preface i The ability to protect the critical infrastructure and key resources (CI/KR) of the United States is vital to our national security, public health and safety, economic vitality, and way of life. U.S. policy focuses on the importance of enhancing CI/KR protection to ensure that essential governmental missions, public services, and economic functions are maintained in the event of a

272

ICME: Informatics and Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2010... interfaces and data management systems that can be read by computers are important to enable a cyber infrastructure, their use in materials ...

273

Infrastructure Operation Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e-Infrastructures for scientific communitiesD4Science – No. 212488 www.d4science.eu DOCUMENT INFORMATION Project Project acronym: Project full title:

Dsa. B; Pedro Andrade; Pedro Andrade; Pasquale Pagano; Andrea Manieri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Physical Infrastructure: Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Due to years of limited investment and maintenance, the US transportation infrastructure network (including approximately 6.5 million kilometers of ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of supply when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1...

276

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imbalance between natural gas supply and demand will clearlywell the shape of the natural gas supply curve (measured byprice elasticity of natural gas supply, or the percentage

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Lab Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reference materials, bleaching clay, activated bleaching earth and refining cups. Lab Supplies Lab Supplies Lab Supplies Laboratory Services analysis analytical methods aocs certified Certified Reference Materials (CRM) chemist chemists fats lab

279

The UNICORE Grid infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UNICORE (Uniform Interface to Computer Resources) is a software infrastructure supporting seamless and secure access to distributed resources. UNICORE allows uniform access to different hardware and software platforms as well as different organizational ... Keywords: Abstract Job, HPC portal, Java, UNICORE, grid infrastructure, seamless access

Mathilde Romberg

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Defending Critical Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We apply new bilevel and trilevel optimization models to make critical infrastructure more resilient against terrorist attacks. Each model features an intelligent attacker (terrorists) and a defender (us), information transparency, and sequential actions ... Keywords: bilevel program, critical infrastructure protection, homeland defense, homeland security, mixed-integer program, trilevel program

Gerald Brown; Matthew Carlyle; Javier Salmerón; Kevin Wood

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sharing local energy infrastructure : organizational models for implementing microgrids and district energy systems in urban commercial districts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a growing trend in cities toward establishing localized, shared energy infrastructure. As existing energy infrastructure ages and demand increases, cities face rising energy costs and security risks combined with ...

Sherman, Genevieve Rose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

283

Institute sees possible uranium supply shortages after 2000  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes factors pertaining to the supply and demand for uranium. Forecasts described in a report titled {open_quotes}The Global Nuclear Fuel Market: Supply and Demand 1995-2015{close_quotes} are discussed.

Newman, P.

1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010 Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010 The Year-in-Review provides an overview of the events that occurred in 2010: disruptions and additions to energy infrastructure in the United States as well as international events of importance to U.S. energy supplies. The report is the culminating analysis of all of the 2010 issues of the Energy Assurance Daily (EAD). Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011 Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons - August 2010 Comparing the Impacts of the 2005 and 2008 Hurricanes on U.S. Energy

285

The impact of assured supply inventory policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study is presented of a successful quick serve fast food restaurant chain that uses inventory throughout the supply chain as a buffer against uncertainty in supply and demand. This is a common operational strategy ...

Stanton, Daniel Jonathon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Net Demand3 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) 1. In addition, US DOE has issued a second Request For Information regarding uses of and markets for these critical materials (RFI;(USDOE 2011)). This report examines how critical materials demand for SOFC applications could impact markets for these materials and vice versa, addressing categories 1,2,5, and 6 in the RFI. Category 1 – REE Content of SOFC Yttria (yttrium oxide) is the only critical material (as defined for the timeframe of interest for SOFC) used in SOFC 2. Yttrium is used as a dopant in the SOFC’s core ceramic cells.. In addition, continuing developments in SOFC technology will likely further reduce REE demand for SOFC, providing credible scope for at least an additional 50 % reduction in REE use if desirable. Category 2 – Supply Chain and Market Demand SOFC developers expect to purchase

J. Thijssen Llc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

PNNL Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Name Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center...

288

Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada, British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Focus Area: Vehicles Topics: Best Practices Website: www.bchydro.com/etc/medialib/internet/documents/environment/EVcharging A major component of winning public acceptance for plug-in vehicles is the streamlining of the private electric vehicle charging or supply equipment permitting and installation process as well as the public and commercial availability of charging locations. These guidelines are intended to anticipate the questions and requirements to ensure customer satisfaction.

289

Aluminum Scrap Supply and Environmental Impact Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... It has been applied to the USA to forecast sources of aluminum scrap ... good balance between supply and demand on average over the years.

290

Building the supply chain of the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... supply chains: McKinsey Global Survey results,” mckinseyquarterly ... In response, the company examined its portfolio ... the volatility of demand for each ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

292

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

293

H. R. 4604: a bill to promote competition in the natural gas market, to ensure open access to transportation service, to encourage production of natural gas, to provide natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices, to eliminate demand restraints, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Policy Act Amendments of 1986 promotes competition in the natural gas market. Title I ensures open access to transportation service by requiring that interstate pipelines not discriminate in providing transportation services. Title II encourages production of natural gas by removing wellhead price controls and repealing jurisdiction over first sales. Title III provides natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices and eliminates demand restraints. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling Hydrogen Scenario Meeting August 9-10, 2006 Keith Parks, NREL GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling * Station Analysis - Selection Criteria - Los...

295

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

296

IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fuelin

297

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure JOHN DAVIS: Nearly everyone who owns a plug-in electric vehicle has some capacity to replenish the battery at home, either with a dedicated 220-volt charger, or by...

298

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1670P Thermal thermal environments different from regulatory standards. Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security

299

Guidelines for Infrastructure Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are already over 60,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) on the road, and PEVs sales are rapidly growing. Although several hundred million dollars have been invested in infrastructure to support PEVs, additional investment will be needed as the number of non-petroleum-fueled vehicles increases. This project attempted to answer the question: how much charging infrastructure is really required for PEVs? This question is difficult to answer due to significant differences between the way PEVs and ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Cyber Security Risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deployment of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) systems is introducing millions of components to the electric grid that support two-way communication for next-generation grid applications. Although these systems can increase operational efficiencies and enable new capabilities such as demand-response, they also increase the attack surface for potential adversaries. Utilities must address these new cyber security risks as part of their overall enterprise risk management strategy. These ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas - Energy Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Natural Gas Supply Oil and Natural Gas Supply Energy Infrastructure NETL's Energy Infrastructure and Security Research Group (EISRG) has a key supporting role in emergency preparedness and response. The EISRG develops high-level analytical visualizations that are used to study critical U.S. energy infrastructures and their inter-relationships during natural and manmade emergencies. By deploying resources and providing vital information in a timely manner, EISRG improves the ability of government agencies and the energy sector to prevent, prepare for, and respond to hazards, emergencies, natural disasters, or any other threat to the nation's energy supply. NETL coordinated and provided information on an ongoing basis during every major landfall event of the 2005 hurricane season , including Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as during Hurricanes Charley, Frances, and Ivan in 2004. NETL also has participated in exercises to prepare for events with varying degrees of impact, such as pipeline disruptions, local power outages, and transportation interruptions, such as the 2005 Powder River Basin rail service suspension, which resulted in curtailment of coal deliveries to major customers over a six-month period.

302

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure (April 2013) Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure (April 2013) Two major hurricanes, Irene in 2011 and Sandy in 2012, have impacted the Northeastern United States over the past 2 years, devastating coastal communities and causing widespread impacts to the region's energy infrastructure, supply, and markets. Although Sandy was weaker than Irene at landfall, Sandy brought tropical storm conditions to a larger area of the East Coast, and blizzard conditions as far west as the Central and Southern Appalachians. Ultimately, Sandy had a larger and longer-lasting impact on the region's energy infrastructure and supply than Irene, and these impacts necessitated a greater response from Federal, State, and

304

Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. CRITICAL FOUNDATIONS PROTECTING AMERICA'S INFRASTRUCTURES The Report of the President's Commission ...

305

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

306

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 5 Typical medium-frequency induction power supply incorporating (a) a parallel inverter and (b) a series inverter...

307

EV Charging Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charging Infrastructure Charging Infrastructure JOHN DAVIS: Virtually anywhere in the U.S. you can bring light to a room with the flick of a finger. We take it for granted, but creating the national electric grid to make that possible took decades to accomplish. Now, in just a few years, we've seen the birth of a new infrastructure that allows electric vehicles to quickly recharge their batteries at home, work, or wherever they may roam. But this rapid growth has come with a few growing pains. Starting with less than 500 in 2009, there are now over 19,000 public-access charging outlets available to electric vehicles owners at commuter lots, parking garages, airports, retail areas and thousands of

308

The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Final Report on National NGV Infrastructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work fimded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to (1) identi& barriers to establishing sustainable natural gas vehicle (NGV) infrastructure and (2) develop planning information that can help to promote a NGV infrastructure with self-sustaining critical maw. The need for this work is driven by the realization that demand for NGVS has not yet developed to a level that provides sufficient incentives for investment by the commercial sector in all necessary elements of a supportive infrastructure. The two major objectives of this project were: (1) to identifi and prioritize the technical barriers that may be impeding growth of a national NGV infrastructure and (2) to develop input that can assist industry in overcoming these barriers. The approach used in this project incorporated and built upon the accumulated insights of the NGV industry. The project was conducted in three basic phases: (1) review of the current situation, (2) prioritization of technical infrastructure btiiers, and (3) development of plans to overcome key barriers. An extensive and diverse list of barriers was obtained from direct meetings and telephone conferences with sixteen industry NGV leaders and seven Clean Cities/Clean Corridors coordinators. This information is filly documented in the appendix. A distillation of insights gained in the interview process suggests that persistent barriers to developing an NGV market and supporting infrastructure can be grouped into four major categories: 1. Fuel station economics 2. Value of NGVs from the owner/operator perspective 3. Cooperation necessary for critical mass 4. Commitment by investors. A principal conclusion is that an efficient and effective approach for overcoming technical barriers to developing an NGV infrastructure can be provided by building upon and consolidating the relevant efforts of the NGV industry and government. The major recommendation of this project is the establishment of an ad hoc NGV Infrastructure Working Group (NGV-I WG) to address the most critical technical barriers to NGV infrastructure development. This recommendation has been considered and approved by both the DOE and GRI and is the basis of continued collaboration in this area.

GM Sverdrup; JG DeSteese; ND Malcosky

1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric DemandDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ ReturnDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining...

312

Demand response can lower electric power load when needed - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

February 15, 2011 Demand response can lower electric power load when needed . Consumers can play a major role in ensuring reliable electricity supply by reducing ...

313

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

314

National Infrastructure Protection Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this context, our critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) may be directly exposed to the event themselves or indirectly exposed as a result of the dependencies and interde- pendencies among CIKR. Within the CIKR protection mission area, national priorities must include preventing catastrophic loss of life

Sen, Pradeep

315

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1846P CustomTraining Sandia providesPRAsandhowtheycanbemanaged to increase levels of safety and security. Like othertrainings,Sandiaexpertsdesigncoursesto beasbroadorin

316

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-0987P Transportation of the safe and secure transport of radioactive and hazardous materials. AWaytoEnsureSafeTransport Sandia

317

Forecasting Electricity Demand by Time Series Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity demand is one of the most important variables required for estimating the amount of additional capacity required to ensure a sufficient supply of energy. Demand and technological losses forecasts can be used to control the generation and distribution of electricity more efficiently. The aim of this paper is to utilize time series model

E. Stoimenova; K. Prodanova; R. Prodanova

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

An agent-based microsimulation of critical infrastructure systems  

SciTech Connect

US infrastructures provide essential services that support the economic prosperity and quality of life. Today, the latest threat to these infrastructures is the increasing complexity and interconnectedness of the system. On balance, added connectivity will improve economic efficiency; however, increased coupling could also result in situations where a disturbance in an isolated infrastructure unexpectedly cascades across diverse infrastructures. An understanding of the behavior of complex systems can be critical to understanding and predicting infrastructure responses to unexpected perturbation. Sandia National Laboratories has developed an agent-based model of critical US infrastructures using time-dependent Monte Carlo methods and a genetic algorithm learning classifier system to control decision making. The model is currently under development and contains agents that represent the several areas within the interconnected infrastructures, including electric power and fuel supply. Previous work shows that agent-based simulations models have the potential to improve the accuracy of complex system forecasting and to provide new insights into the factors that are the primary drivers of emergent behaviors in interdependent systems. Simulation results can be examined both computationally and analytically, offering new ways of theorizing about the impact of perturbations to an infrastructure network.

BARTON,DIANNE C.; STAMBER,KEVIN L.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Supply Implications  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Supply Implications. European export gasoline volumes likely to remain unchanged Uncertainties are weighted towards less availability But the quality of the available ...

320

Strategic Spot Trading in Supply Chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a variety of industries ranging from agriculture to electronics and oil, procurement takes place through a combination of bilateral fixed-price contracts and open market trading among supply chain participants, which allows them to improve supply ... Keywords: demand and cost information, fixed-price contracts, procurement and supply chain, spot trading

Haim Mendelson; Tunay I. Tunca

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Asset Management of Critical Infrastructure ur critical infrastructure--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asset Management of Critical Infrastructure O ur critical infrastructure-- roads, bridges, transit-of-the-art approach to asset management of public infrastructure. ORNL's Capabilities · Simulation-based, optimization. · Innovative optimization tools to assess tradeoffs between construction, maintenance, and demolition over

322

Firm performance impacts of digitally enabled supply chain integration capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Best practice exemplars suggest that digital platforms play a critical role in managing supply chain activities and partnerships that generate performance gains for firms. However, there is limited academic investigation on how and why information technology ... Keywords: IT infrastructure, customer relationships, operational excellence, revenue growth, supply chain integration, supply chain management

Arun Rai; Ravi Patnayakuni; Nainika Seth

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Underground Infrastructure Research and Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

productivity, environmental improvement and renewal of the aging underground infrastructure. OrganizationalCenter for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education CUIRE Board Members Sam Arnaout Pipe Association Tim Kennedy, AMERON NOV Chad Kopecki, Dallas Water Utilities David Marshall, Tarrant

Texas at Arlington, University of

324

Positioning the electric utility to build information infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

In two particular respects (briefly investigated in this study from a lawyer`s perspective), electric utilities appear uniquely well-positioned to contribute to the National Information Infrastructure (NII). First of all, utilities have legal powers derived from their charters and operating authorities, confirmed in their rights-of-way, to carry out activities and functions necessary for delivering electric service. These activities and functions include building telecommunications facilities and undertaking information services that have become essential to managing electricity demand and supply. The economic value of the efficiencies made possible by telecommunications and information could be substantial. How great remains to be established, but by many estimates electric utility applications could fund a significant share of the capital costs of building the NII. Though utilities` legal powers to pursue such efficiencies through telecommunications and information appear beyond dispute, it is likely that the effort to do so will produce substantial excess capacity. Who will benefit from this excess capacity is a potentially contentious political question that demands early resolution. Will this windfall go to the utility, the customer, or no one (because of political paralysis), or will there be some equitable and practical split? A second aspect of inquiry here points to another contemporary issue of very great societal importance that could very well become the platform on which the first question can be resolved fortuitously-how to achieve universal telecommunications service. In the effort to fashion the NII that will now continue, ways and means to maximize the unique potential contribution of electric utilities to meeting important social and economic needs--in particular, universal service--merit priority attention.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NextEnergy (Detroit) Station Infrastructure Lessons Learned 4 UNITED STATES Department of Energy Infrastructure Lessons Learned Infrastructure Legal Contracts Legal agreements take...

326

Integrating Infrastructure Planning: The Role of Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating Infrastructure Planning: The Role of Schools B Ypolice protection, and infrastructure that makes citiesplan to upgrade critical infrastructure. The plan calls for

McKoy, Deborah; Vincent, Jeffrey M.; Makarewicz, Carrie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mobile element into the networking infrastructure.Our fluid infrastructure design saves significant energy inIntelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks Aman

Kansal, Aman; Somasundara, Arun; Jea, David C; Srivastava, Mani B; Estrin, D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Re-imagining Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Re-imagining Infrastructure Re-imagining Infrastructure Document was provided during March 4, 2011 DOE-QTR meeting Re-imagining Infrastructure More Documents & Publications INL...

329

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks Amanto develop a fluid infrastructure: mobile components arebuilt into the system infrastructure for enabling specific

Aman Kansal; Arun Somasundara; David Jea; Mani Srivastava; Deborah Estrin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Transit Infrastructure Finance Through Station Location Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the primary transit infrastructure finance method.Paper 2009-04 Transit Infrastructure Finance Through StationWP-2009-04 Transit Infrastructure Finance Through Station

Ian Carlton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Middleware for Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooperative vehicle-infrastructure systems." COM Safety:of Transportation. Vehicle-Infrastructure Integration (VII).for Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure Systems Christian

Manasseh, Christian; Sengupta, Raja

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revenue security is a major concern for utilities. Theft of electric service in the United States is widespread. In 2006, the revenue estimate for non-technical losses was 6.5 billion. Non-technical losses are associated with unidentified and uncollected revenue from pilferage, tampering with meters, defective meters, and errors in meter reading. In this report, revenue security describes the use of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) technology to minimize non-technical losses.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

Synchrophasor Communication Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details ongoing work begun in 2011 evaluating benefits of various wide-area communications approaches for transport of synchrophasor measurements, with a focus on latency. Recent discussions on synchrophasor use in the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI) community have included consideration of automated closed-loop control over an Internet protocol (IP) network infrastructure.The project’s focus in 2012 has been twofold: NASPInet architecture design and ...

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Impact of Natural Gas Infrastructure on Electric Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--Combined-cycle unit, electricity market, natural gas infrastructure, pipeline contingency, pumped-storage hydro, renew gas utilities typically rely on the natural gas storage to augment supplies flowing through) in the natural gas system, deliver natural gas from city gate stations, underground storage facilities, and other

Fu, Yong

335

Intermediate-Term Uranium Supply Curve Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to estimate U.S. natural uranium supply capacities and associated production costs over the period 1979-1990 and to develop the general supply outlook to 2000. Annual supply capacity schedules were estimated on an individual mill and mine family basis. Future production schedules were estimated by balancing estimated supply capacity with DOE's future demand projections; the impact of private-sector inventory levels was accounted for.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electricity Supply Infrastructure Improvements: Final Technical Status Report, December 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report is about a work effort where the overall objectives were to establish a methodology and approach for selected transmission and distribution (T&D) grid modernization; monitor the results; and report on the findings, recommendations, and lessons learned. The work reported addressed T&D problems and solutions, related reliability issues, equipment and operation upgrades, and respective field testing.

Piekarski, D.; Brad, D.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Flexible design : an innovative approach for planning water infrastructure systems under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a framework for a flexible design approach to support decision-making in water supply infrastructure planning. It contrasts with a conventional, deterministic planning approach that uses past data or ...

Wong, Melanie Kathleen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Detecting Intrusive Activity in the Smart Grid Communications Infrastructure Using Self-Organizing Maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Smart Grid Infrastructure (SGI) provides for sustainable, affordable and uninterrupted electricity supply to consumers. The communications infrastructure of the SGI is prone to several malicious attacks identified in the recent past. Customer-specific ... Keywords: Smart Grid Communications, Anomaly Detection, Self-Organizing Maps, Intrusion Detection

Zubair Ahmed Baig, Saif Ahmad, Sadiq Mohammed Sait

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Are they equal yet. [Demand side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is considered an important tool in meeting the load growth of many utilities. Northwest regional and utility resource plans forecast demand-side resources to meet from one-half to two-thirds of additional electrical energy needs over the next 10 years. Numerous sources have stated that barriers, both regulatory and financial, exist to utility acquisition of demand-side resources. Regulatory actions are being implemented in Oregon to make demand-side investments competitive with supply-side investments. In 1989, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) took two actions regarding demand-side investments. The PUC's Order 89-1700 directed utilities to capitalize demand-side investments to properly match amortization expense with the multiyear benefits provided by DSM. The PUC also began an informal investigation concerning incentives for Oregon's regulated electric utilities to acquire demand-side resources.

Irwin, K.; Phillips-Israel, K.; Busch, E.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Type Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Development Program The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation provides funding for alternative fueling infrastructure...

342

Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee...

343

Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure...

344

Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate...

345

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations The purpose of this report is to provide utilities implementing Advanced...

346

Civil Infrastructure - Advanced Sensing Technologies and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Municipal utilities are not able to ... will complete the infrastructure manager's toolkit ... more effectively the challenges presented by aging infrastructure. ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program The Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program (EVITP) provides training and certification for people installing electric...

348

Infrastructure and Operations | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Infrastructure and Operations develops and executes NNSA's infrastructure investment, maintenance, and operations programs and policies. Printer-friendly version...

349

Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

350

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Place California Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product String representation...

351

AMI and Demand Response Evaluator, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AMI and Demand Response Evaluator software, Version 2.0, permits a utility to discover the possible functions of an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) or demand response (DR) system, and to determine the benefits and requirements arising from selecting particular functions. The tool also enables a utility to evaluate various communications technologies that may be appropriate for implementing such an AMI or DR system. Description AMI and Demand Response Evaluator is a Microsoft® Access databa...

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CTC Team CTC Team 1 Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project Presentation by: The Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Team January 6, 2004 The CTC Team 2 Presentation Outline Introduction of CTC Team CTC Background Technical Approach - CTC Team Member Presentations Conclusions The CTC Team 3 The CTC Project Team Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program Management and Coordination Hydrogen Delivery and Storage Material Development Hydrogen Sensors Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program Management and Coordination Hydrogen Delivery and Storage Material Development Hydrogen Sensors Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Hydrogen Separation Hydrogen Sensors Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Hydrogen Separation Hydrogen Sensors Resource Dynamics Corp. Tradeoff Analyses of Hydrogen

353

Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the perspective of `peak oil', that is from the pers- pective of the supply of crude, and price#12;2 #12;Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func- tion is given on the problems within the value chain, with an explanation of the reasons why the price of oil

Langendoen, Koen

354

NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

Brian K Castle

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Demand Response- Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's electricity delivery infrastructure to assure consumers a robust,...

356

Managing risk in premium fruit and vegetable supply chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production planning in premium fresh produce supply chains is challenging due to the uncertainty of both supply and demand. A two-stage planning algorithm using mixed integer linear programming and Monte Carlo simulation ...

Merrill, Joshua Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

NREL: Energy Analysis: Transmission Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Infrastructure Transmission Infrastructure Grid expansion and planning to allow large scale deployment of renewable generation Large scale deployment of renewable electricity generation will require additional transmission to connect renewable resources, which are wide-spread across the US, but regionally-constrained, to load centers. Long-term transmission planning, based on potential future growth in electric loads and generation resource expansion options, is critical to maintaining the necessary flexibility required for a reliable and robust transmission system. NREL's analyses support transmission infrastructure planning and expansion to enable large-scale deployment of renewable energy in the future. NREL's transmission infrastructure expansion and planning analyses show

358

IT Infrastructure for Strategic Agility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nvesting in IT infrastructure is one of the most challenging tasks facing senior managers who often feel ill equipped to make these decisions. Investing in the right ...

Weill, Peter

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

Materials for Infrastructure Applications - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2008 ... This presentation was given as part of the special Materials in Society session " Materials for Infrastructure: Building Bridges in the Global ...

360

Data Infrastructure - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software Infrastructure for First-Principles Electronic Structure Computations: Francois Gygi1; 1University of California Davis First-Principles simulations play an ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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361

ADVANCE TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE INFRASTRUCTURE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... relationship to a public utility operation is ... place an added stress on this aging infrastructure. ... management approaches by utilities, and is supporting ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

Second Cybersecurity Infrastructure Framework Workshop ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... framework to reduce cybersecurity risks for critical infrastructure from May 29 ... industry experts in all sectors—such as energy, finance, transportation ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Michigan E85 Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced regional GHG emissions by 375 tons in the first year of station deployment.

Sandstrom, Matthew M.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

365

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

366

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

367

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

368

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

369

Polynomial policies in supply chain networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to solve the periodic-reviewed inventory control problem in supply chain networks with uncertain demand so as to minimize the overall cost of the system over a fixed planning time horizon. In such problems, ...

He, Liwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25 Metering and ControlSmart Meter and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) andAMP Auto-DR BRA advanced metering infrastructure C&I CAP CEC

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Hamilton, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of developing the infrastructure to produce and deliver recycled water, so it seems logical and fair because unlike recycled water, the water produced is considered to be of drinking water quality or better CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY: Reconfiguring Groundwater Management to Reduce

373

A Systems-Integration Approach to the Optimal Design and Operation of Macroscopic Water Desalination and Supply Networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the escalating levels of water demand, there is a need for expansion in the capacity of water desalination infrastructure and for better management and… (more)

Atilhan, Selma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPM), efficiency, advanced metering infrastructure (AMI),rate base advanced metering and load control infrastructureinfrastructure is the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI)

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cyberwarfare on the Electricity Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The report analyzes the possibility of cyberwarfare on the electricity infrastructure. The ongoing deregulation of the electricity industry makes the power grid all the more vulnerable to cyber attacks. The report models the power system information system components, models potential threats and protective measures. It therefore offers a framework for infrastructure protection.

Murarka, N.; Ramesh, V.C.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions

379

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

380

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Power supply  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

Hart, Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Leeman, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); MacDougall, Hugh R. (Albuquerque, NM); Marron, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Calvin C. (Amarillo, TX)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Distributed Data Integration Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The Internet is becoming the preferred method for disseminating scientific data from a variety of disciplines. This can result in information overload on the part of the scientists, who are unable to query all of the relevant sources, even if they knew where to find them, what they contained, how to interact with them, and how to interpret the results. A related issue is keeping up with current trends in information technology often taxes the end-user's expertise and time. Thus instead of benefiting from this information rich environment, scientists become experts on a small number of sources and technologies, use them almost exclusively, and develop a resistance to innovations that can enhance their productivity. Enabling information based scientific advances, in domains such as functional genomics, requires fully utilizing all available information and the latest technologies. In order to address this problem we are developing a end-user centric, domain-sensitive workflow-based infrastructure, shown in Figure 1, that will allow scientists to design complex scientific workflows that reflect the data manipulation required to perform their research without an undue burden. We are taking a three-tiered approach to designing this infrastructure utilizing (1) abstract workflow definition, construction, and automatic deployment, (2) complex agent-based workflow execution and (3) automatic wrapper generation. In order to construct a workflow, the scientist defines an abstract workflow (AWF) in terminology (semantics and context) that is familiar to him/her. This AWF includes all of the data transformations, selections, and analyses required by the scientist, but does not necessarily specify particular data sources. This abstract workflow is then compiled into an executable workflow (EWF, in our case XPDL) that is then evaluated and executed by the workflow engine. This EWF contains references to specific data source and interfaces capable of performing the desired actions. In order to provide access to the largest number of resources possible, our lowest level utilizes automatic wrapper generation techniques to create information and data wrappers capable of interacting with the complex interfaces typical in scientific analysis. The remainder of this document outlines our work in these three areas, the impact our work has made, and our plans for the future.

Critchlow, T; Ludaescher, B; Vouk, M; Pu, C

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

383

Transparency in complex dynamic food supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food supply chains are increasingly complex and dynamic due to (i) increasing product proliferation to serve ever diversifying and globalising markets as a form of mass customisation with resulting global flows of raw materials, ingredients and products, ... Keywords: Consumer and governmental demands, Food supply chain, Governance, Information systems, Quality and safety standards, Transparency

J. H. Trienekens; P. M. Wognum; A. J. M. Beulens; J. G. A. J. van der Vorst

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Two market models for demand response in power networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply and shape power demand, respectively. We characterize the resulting equilibria in competitive as well as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models serve as a starting point to include the appliance-level details and constraints for designing practical demand response schemes for smart power grids. I.

Lijun Chen; Na Li; Steven H. Low; John C. Doyle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

RFID data analysis using tensor calculus for supply chain management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In current trends of consumer products market, there is a growing significance of the role of retailers in the governance of supply chains. RFID is a promising infrastructure-less technology, allowing to connect an object with its virtual counterpart, ... Keywords: algebraic models, multidimensional analysis, supply chain

Roberto De Virgilio; Franco Milicchio

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advanced Metering Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the development of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Metering has historically served as the cash register for the utility industry. It measured the amount of energy used and supported the billing of customers for that usage. However, utilities are starting to look at meters in a whole different way, viewing them as the point of contact with customers in supporting a number of operational imperatives. The combination of smart meters and advanced communications has opened up a variety of methods for utilities to reduce operating costs while offering new services to customers. A concise look is given at what's driving interest in AMI, the components of AMI, and the creation of a business case for AMI. Topics covered include: an overview of AMI including the history of metering and development of smart meters; a description of the key technologies involved in AMI; a description of key government initiatives to support AMI; an evaluation of the current market position of AMI; an analysis of business case development for AMI; and, profiles of 21 key AMI vendors.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Infrastructure Time: Long-term Matters in Collaborative Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creating information infrastructure through communitymythology and infrastructure. In L. Bud-Frierman (Ed. ),Towards information infrastructure studies: Ways of knowing

Karasti, Helena; Baker, Karen S.; Millerand, Florence

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Planning a sustainable community: infrastructure development and natural areas management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with county infrastructure projects. Despiteby transportation infrastructure. Field-investigationfor innovative design of infrastructure, land-acquisition

Swanson, Sherri R.; Kurz, Raymond C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Networks, deregulation, and risk : the politics of critical infrastructure protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RMStandards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RM2- 13; GAO. ?Critical Infrastructure Protection: Multiple

Ellis, Ryan Nelson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optimal recovery sequencing for critical infrastructure resilience assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the identification of optimal recovery strategies that maximize resilience. To this goal, we formulate a bi-level optimization problem for infrastructure network models. In the 'inner' problem, we solve for network flows, and we use the 'outer' problem to identify the optimal recovery modes and sequences. We draw from the literature of multi-mode project scheduling problems to create an effective solution strategy for the resilience optimization model. We demonstrate the application of this approach to a set of network models, including a national railroad model and a supply chain for Army munitions production.

Vugrin, Eric D.; Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Turnquist, Mark Alan (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The 3He Supply Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Designing and embedding reliable virtual infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a virtualized infrastructure where physical resources are shared, a single physical server failure will terminate several virtual servers and crippling the virtual infrastructures which contained those virtual servers. In the worst case, more failures ... Keywords: infrastructure virtualization

Wai-Leong Yeow; Cédric Westphal; Ula? Kozat

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution (HyDIVE) Model Project ID: 200 Principal Investigator: Cory J. Welch Keywords: Costs; vehicle characteristics Purpose HyDIVE permits rigorous analysis of the interdependence between hydrogen fuel vehicle demand growth and hydrogen fueling station coverage. Performer Principal Investigator: Cory J. Welch Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-275-4436 Email: cory_welch@nrel.gov Additional Performers: PA Government Services Period of Performance Start: October 2006 End: December 2007 Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Vehicle Options

395

The Fermilab data storage infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab, in collaboration with the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, has created a petabyte scale data storage infrastructure to meet the requirements of experiments to store and access large data sets. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure consists of the following major storage and data transfer components: Enstore mass storage system, DCache distributed data cache, ftp and Grid ftp for primarily external data transfers. This infrastructure provides a data throughput sufficient for transferring data from experiments' data acquisition systems. It also allows access to data in the Grid framework.

Jon A Bakken et al.

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases

397

Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrastructure Associates Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.offinf.com Region...

398

State Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Infrastructure in California Gerhard H Achtelik Jr. February 17, 2011 Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop California Environmental Protection Agency Air...

399

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Infrastructure Costs Associated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal Project Summary Full Title: Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production...

400

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Facilities and Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities and Infrastructure Facilities and Infrastructure Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate Approvals Documents and...

402

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE Infrastructure Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IPHE Infrastructure Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE Infrastructure Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE...

403

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

404

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Infrastructure and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure and Safety Photo - Aerial view of the klystron gallery. The Infrastructure and Safety directorate is committed to creating, operating and sustaining world-class,...

405

Department of Energy Cites Parsons Infrastructure & Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for Worker Safety...

406

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness...

407

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project ID: 273 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

408

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project ID: 268 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

409

Microsoft Word - Infrastructure_Introduction_2011.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Program - Infrastructure Element U.S. Department of Energy - National Energy Technology Laboratory The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Sequestration...

410

Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Analysis: Milestone Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This milestone report identifies a minimum infrastructure that could support the introduction of hydrogen vehicles and develops and evaluates transition scenarios supported by this infrastructure.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

IPHE Infrastructure Workshop - Workshop Proceedings, February...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plan *Identify risks and benefits *Allocate equity Responsible Parties *Program management office *All stakeholders E-16 IPHE INFRASTRUCTURE WORKSHOP E-17 IPHE INFRASTRUCTURE...

412

Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW, DOE, and NEDO Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW, DOE, and NEDO December 16, 2013 8:00AM...

413

Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Stochastic Unit Commitment Model for Integrating Renewable Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Stochastic Unit Commitment Model for Integrating Renewable Supply and Demand Response Anthony from the large-scale integration of renewable energy sources and deferrable demand in power systems. We- sorbing the uncertainty and variability associated with renewable supply: centralized co

Oren, Shmuel S.

415

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, it’s also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if it’s cold, consumers will use ...

416

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

417

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

418

Towards Manageable Mobile Agent Infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of managing distributed mobile agent infrastructures. First, the weaknesses of current mobile agent implementations will be discussed and identified from the manageability viewpoint. The solutions devised and experimented ...

Paulo Simőes; Paulo Marques; Luís Moura Silva; Joăo Gabriel Silva; Fernando Boavida

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Towards an Infrastructure for Authorization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been a great deal of debate about whether a large-scale "publickey infrastructure" is needed for electronic commerce and, if so, whether the technical difficulty of building and deploying such an infrastructure will impede the growth of electronic commerce. We argue here that much of the controversy is attributable to the fact that the term "public-key infrastructure" has not been clearly and correctly defined. We explain why the informal definition most often associated with the term, i.e., that of a global mapping between users' identities and public keys, is not the right definition for electronic commerce and hence that whether such a mapping can and will be built and deployed with available resources is not an especially pressing question. Finally, we describe an alternative type of infrastructural development that we believe really would enable electronic commerce. 1

Position Paper Joan; Joan Feigenbaum

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modeling hydrogen fuel distribution infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis' fundamental research question is to evaluate the structure of the hydrogen production, distribution, and dispensing infrastructure under various scenarios and to discover if any trends become apparent after ...

Pulido, Jon R. (Jon Ramon), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installed Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have been sold since December 2010. Critical to maintaining this upward trend is achievement of a diverse and available charging infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to analyze one key element of the charging infrastructure—the cost of installation. While the fuel cost of electricity to charge a PEV is significantly lower than the cost of gasoline, the cost to hire an electrician to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization  

SciTech Connect

This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

Donley, C.D.

1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

424

Logistical and transportation infrastructure in Asia : potential for growth and development to support increasing trade with Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the implications of the rapid growth in demand for trade between Europe and Asia for the existing transportation network and logistical infrastructure. In general terms, technologies need to improve ...

Deonás, Nikolaos, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Energy Consumption in California: Data Collection and Analysis,"analysis of electricity requirements for irrigated agri- electrical energy

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicles on Regional Power Generation, ORNL/TM-2007/150, Oakincrease renewable power generation, and reduce greenhouserecharging or renewable power generation, and the technical

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits of Concentrating Solar Power in California, NREL/I. (2007) Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Resources, Cost,in supplementing future solar power plants, as represented

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Emissions impacts of marginal electricity demand California hydrogen supply pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hicksian own-price elasticities for PV-cap in the weightedsigni?cant. Own-price elasticities for PV-cap in all otherprice. On the other hand, some positive, signi?cant results (PV

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy Policy,wind energy: modeling the competition between gas turbines and compressed air energy storage for supplemental generation, Energy Policy,wind or solar power will singularly provide a majority of renewable generation in a future with energy policies

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

competition between gas turbines and compressed air energyby fuel type, prime mover (gas turbine versus steam turbine,cycle NGCT Natural gas combustion turbine NGST Natural gas

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minimize fossil capacity requirements does not reduce costsCA does not necessarily reduce fossil capacity requirementsdoes little to change peak dispatchable capacity requirements,

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2006 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2006 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2006. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2007 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2007 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2007. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

An overview of energy supply and demand in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world's largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China's energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China's energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

An overview of energy supply and demand in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world`s largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China`s energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China`s energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Emissions impacts of marginal electricity demand California hydrogen supply pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charges, gasoline and motor oil, vehicle maintenance andcharges Gasoline and motor oil Vehicle maintenance andplanes). • Gasoline and motor oil. Gasoline, diesel fuel,

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 regions Illinois Colorado, Xcel Energy service area LADWPVehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Servicecomprised 30% of LDVs in Xcel Energy’s Colorado service

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California’

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Colorado service area, system electricity requirementsColorado from the Southwest. ) The definitions of the three regions used by the Western Electricity

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration. EPA (2008) eGRID Year 2005 Summary Tables,DSW Desert Southwest eGRID Emissions and Generation Resourceare based on those from the EPA’s eGRID database *47+, which

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND PARAMETERS A Wind turbine rotor-swept area (m 2 ) AEOm 3 ), A is rotor-swept area of the turbine (m 2 ), C p is

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Global crude oil supply disruptions and strong demand support high ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While Brent crude oil spot prices have increased as much as $7 per barrel (6%) since the chemical weapons incident in Syria on August 21, 2013, market fundamentals ...

443

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24. Renewable and nuclear power plant cost characteristicsnuclear power plantsgeothermal, and nuclear power plants are represented as

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas power plants and underestimates generation from

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

active natural gas generators and imports will decline, inadditional system imports and natural gas-fired generation66%) Natural gas (22%) Renewable (1.4%) DSW imports 3 Coal (

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100-2007-008-CMF, California Energy Commission. ARB (2007)400-2005-006-CMF, California Energy Commission. CEC (2006)400-2005-005-CMF, California Energy Commission. ICC (2009)

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by natural gas power plants. In fact, based onof dispatchable natural gas power plants, which can beefficiency among natural gas power plants and higher average

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P-5) for natural gas use in power plants. Any additionalpower plant to aid in meeting summer peak loads; and 4) use of natural gas

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional PowerTransmission Area, in Electric Vehicle Symposium, Anaheim,of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2, Argonne

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Environmental Economics, I. (2007) Wind Resources, Cost, andWind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

service area. With hydroelectricity severely curtailed byfor the ,reduction in hydroelectricity. Although the impactslargest contribution from hydroelectricity can be considered

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Global demand transparency in the ABB supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper attempts to provide a solution to a problem facing many multinational firms: the lack of an accessible and comprehensive database for up-to-date component part forecasts. We consider this problem in the context ...

Lee, Esther, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Implications forGas Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Implications forassessment of plug-in hybrid vehicles on electric utilities

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

109 Figure 57. Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-explored. Natural gas Energy price (2007$/MMBtu) Coal Figureassumed relative prices of natural gas and coal decades into

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the quantity of oil consumed to compensate forof fuel oil would reduce the quantity of air pollutants, thequantity of . air pollutants from power plants burning oil

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine NGST Natural gas steam turbine NWPP Northwest Powerfrom natural gas steam turbine (NGST) and natural gasNGST = Natural gas steam turbine; NWPP = Northwest Power

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The regional distribution of generation and average GHGin LEDGE-CA, and the distribution of generation among fossildistribution of hydro generation

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or off. (With future “smart grids,” utilities might controlsuch as deferring loads with a “smart grid”) on the results.available today, a “smart grid” connected to many active

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC Integrated gasification combined cycle IID ImperialCorporation NGCC Natural gas combined-cycle NGCT Natural gas79% from natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants, and

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Electricity demand patterns matter for valuing electricity supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Units serving baseload needs include nuclear generators; large, efficient coal-fired generators; natural gas combined-cycle generators ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Water Conservation and Sewage Flow ReductionMurray, Residential Water Conservation, California Water1976. c d Table 19 Water Conservation Measures Applicable to

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the coming sum- mer pumped storage potential should notThere are three pumped storage facilities in Californiais no reason to use pumped storage to meet But on days when

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R.H. Socolow (2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling theEfficiency Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems,to more highly-utilized baseload plants with lower operating

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

benzene extracted from the reformulated motor gasoline pool in their conventional motor gasoline. Importers lacking 1990 motor gasoline quality data with which to

465

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

daily or annual load profiles [70-78]. The EDGE-CA andleads to an adjusted load profile (illustrated in Step 2b)between the adjusted load profile and hydro generation

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Determining energy requirement for future water supply and demand alternatives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water and energy are two inextricably linked resources. Each has the potential to limit the development of the other. There is a substantial body of… (more)

Larsen, Sara Gaye

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Biodiesel demand estimates now provided in petroleum supply and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

468

Money, Prices and Liquidity Effects: Separating Demand from Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 2: VAR Model Estimation Models Lags Resid-ACF1 Resid-ACF12 Resid-N Total Draws US full sample 3 0:040 0:073 0:000 743 US late sample 2 0:000 0:090 0:000 959 UK full sample 5 0:079 0:115 0:000 1174 UK late sample 2 0:037 0:023 0:000 1318 Note... : The model is (#1;mt; efpwt) for each case. The column ?Lags?shows lags in VAR selected by several information criteria. ?Resid-ACF1?shows the p-value of a Null hypothesis that there is no serial correlation in residuals at lag 1. The next column show...

Chadha, Jagjit S; Corrado, Luisa; Sun, Qi

469

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the generation shares from coal-fired plants with high GHGof generation from coal-fired plants, marginal emissionsdemand in LADWP, where coal-fired plants may provide most of

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

109 Figure 57. Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-CA [152]. Itin Figure 57. The coal price stays relatively constant

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy (U.S.) DSIRE Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency EIA Energy Information Administration ERCOT Electric Reliability Council of Texas EPA...

472

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine marginal generation sources. Although electricity16. Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (TWh).

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................5-16 5.2.2 Natural Gas Storage........................................................5-25 5.9 Commercial natural gas storage pools as of December 31, 2007 .....................................................................................5-28 5.31 Alberta natural gas storage injection/withdrawal volumes

Laughlin, Robert B.

474

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliances such as dishwashers I and washing machines, forenergy savings are: and dishwashers with full loads and onfor washing machines and dishwashers, and reducing water

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas price .Figure 84. Effects of natural gas prices on screening curvesICE Month Ahead Natural Gas Price Report, Intercontinental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by natural gas power plants. In fact, based ondispatchable natural gas power plants, which can be rampedefficiency among natural gas power plants and higher average

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from biomass, geothermal, solar (PV and solar thermal), andof generation from wind, solar PV, and solar thermal powergeneration Solar thermal Solar PV Wind Geothermal Biomass

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling the competition betweenSystems Integrated with Wind Energy Resources in California,Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems, Environmental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas price .84. Effects of natural gas prices on screening curves inICE Month Ahead Natural Gas Price Report, Intercontinental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand supply infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs of natural gas co-firing ignored) Oil 10 plants withcome from natural gas co-firing in some biomass powergeneration from natural gas co-firing) has ranged from 26%

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

U.S. Natural Gas Supply Equation and Price Envelope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a composite assessment of U.S. natural gas supply and demand balance for the time period 2005 to 2011. The key elements in this outlook, or equation, are changes in supply (rapidly increasing LNG [liquefied natural gas] imports, modest U.S. supply growth, and declining imports from Canada) and in demand (notably, growth for electric power generation and small increases in other sectors). Uncertainties concerning each component are identified and analyzed. While LNG will account for t...

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

483

Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

benefitting the grid 3 Supply and Demand Tell the (short run) Basic Story Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets - US DOE Feb 2006 4 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000...

484

Interannual Variability of Water Demand and Summer Climate in Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of interannual climate variability on water demand in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are assessed. This city provides an ideal setting for examining the effects of climate on urban water demand, because at present the municipal water supply ...

David S. Gutzler; Joshua S. Nims

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes controlled hydrogen fleet & infrastructure analysis undertaken for the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

487

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

488

Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Infrastructure and Facilities Management Home > content > Infrastructure and Facilities Management Infrastructure and Facilities Management NNSA restores, rebuilds, and revitalizes the physical infrastructure of the

489

A distributed renewable energy system meeting 100% of electricity demand in Humboldt County: a feasibility study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A model of electricity supply and demand in Humboldt County, California over the course of one year is presented. Wind, ocean–wave, solar, and biomass electricity… (more)

Ross, Darrell Adam

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Why Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why supply chain explains the importance of supply chains. It includes an introduction to ERP as designed by SAP.

Datta, Shoumen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Funding The Ethanol Infrastructure Incentive Program provides funding to offset the cost of installing ethanol blender pumps at retail fueling stations

493

Optics Supply Planning System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system at a level of detail that can be used for construction and deployment. Test and quality assurance plans are also included to insure that the system delivers all requirements when it is built. The design is for an automated forecasting prototype that allocates inventory and processing resources in response to potentially daily changes in the forecasted optics exchanges required to operate NIF. It will automatically calculate future inventory levels and processing rates based on current inventory and projected exchanges, procurements, and capacities. It will include screens that allow users to readily assess the feasibility of the forecast, identify failures to meet the demand, revise input data, and re-run the automated forecast calculation. In addition, the system will automatically retrieve the current exchange demand from an external database. Approved forecasts from the system will automatically update work order plans and procurement plans in the existing inventory and production control database. The timing of optics exchanges affects the forecast of damage and future exchanges, so an approved exchange plan will be fed back to the demand database and be used to calculate the next demand projection. The system will read the demand data and update the forecast and output files daily. This specification has been divided into two parts. This document, Part 1 lays out the major design decisions and specifies the architectural, component, and data structure designs. Part 2 will add interface designs, quality assurance and testing plans, and deployment details.

Gaylord, J

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

494

Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Year-in-Review: 2010 Year-in-Review: 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy August 2011 OE/ISER Report 8/31/11 i For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about information in this report may be directed to Alice Lippert, Senior Technical Advisor (alice.lippert@hq.doe.gov). Contributors include Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Robert Laramey, Carleen Lewandowski, Max

495

Demand Response: An UntappedDemand Response: An Untapped Resource for Western ElectricityResource for Western Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Administration, Form EIA-861 Database. #12;Energy Analysis Department Significant cost@lbl.gov FERC Western Energy Infrastructure Conference Denver, Colorado July 30, 2003 #12;Energy Analysis value of demand-side for electricity markets - Short-term Load Management - Dynamic Pricing - Energy

496

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

497

Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions" Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions" August 31, 2011 - 10:43am Addthis The Department of Energy Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability announces the publication of a new report, Year-in-Review: 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions. The Year-in-Review provides an overview of the events that occurred in 2010: disruptions and additions to energy infrastructure in the United States as well as international events of importance to U.S. energy supplies. The report is organized like the Energy Assurance Daily. More information is available on the Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability's outreach efforts on the Analysis and Outreach Webpage

498

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. The Demand Response Quick Assessment Tools developed at LBNL will be demonstrated. The tool is built on EnergyPlus simulation and is able to evaluate and compare different DR strategies, such as global temperature reset, chiller cycling, supply air temperature reset, etc. A separate EnergyPlus plotting tool will also be demonstrated during this seminar. Users can use the tool to test EnergyPlus models, conduct parametric analysis, or compare multiple EnergyPlus simulation

499

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Development of Grid e-Infrastructure in South-Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the period of 6 years and three phases, the SEE-GRID programme has established a strong regional human network in the area of distributed scientific computing and has set up a powerful regional Grid infrastructure. It attracted a number of user communities and applications from diverse fields from countries throughout the South-Eastern Europe. From the infrastructure point view, the first project phase has established a pilot Grid infrastructure with more than 20 resource centers in 11 countries. During the subsequent two phases of the project, the infrastructure has grown to currently 55 resource centers with more than 6600 CPUs and 750 TBs of disk storage, distributed in 16 participating countries. Inclusion of new resource centers to the existing infrastructure, as well as a support to new user communities, has demanded setup of regionally distributed core services, development of new monitoring and operational tools, and close collaboration of all partner institution in managing such a complex infras...

Balaz, Antun; Vudragovic, Dusan; Slavnic, Vladimir; Liabotis, Ioannis; Atanassov, Emanouil; Jakimovski, Boro; Savic, Mihajlo; 10.1007/s10723-011-9185-0

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z