Sample records for demand supply infrastructure

  1. Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connell, Richard Perry

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is by way of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain where ...

  2. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rollout Scenario Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for...

  3. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles...

  4. Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

  5. Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and Gas For Energy Infrastructure Summit September 15, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator 0 20 40 60...

  6. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  7. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  8. Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05 as a source of energy. Global supply and demand trends will have a profound impact on the ability to use our) Transportation energy demand in the U.S. has increased because of the greater use of less fuel efficient vehicles

  9. Lead -- supply/demand outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnull, T. [Noranda, Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Japan goes--so goes the world. That was the title of a recent lead article in The Economist that soberly discussed the potential of much more severe global economic problems occurring, if rapid and coordinated efforts were not made to stabilize the economic situation in Asia in general, and in Japan in particular. During the first 6 months of last year, commodity markets reacted violently to the spreading economic problems in Asia. More recent currency and financial problems in Russia have exacerbated an already unpleasant situation. One commodity after another--including oil, many of the agricultural commodities, and each of the base metals--have dropped sharply in price. Many are now trading at multiyear lows. Until there is an overall improvement in the outlook for these regions, sentiment will likely continue to be negative, and metals prices will remain under pressure. That being said, lead has maintained its value better than many other commodities during these difficult times, finding support in relatively strong fundamentals. The author takes a closer look at those supply and demand fundamentals, beginning with consumption.

  10. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

  11. SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK DRAFTSTAFFREPORT May ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B assessment of the capability of the physical electricity system to provide power to meet electricity demand

  12. Optimal Trading Strategy Supply/Demand Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    prices through the changes in their supply/demand.2 Thus, to study how market participants trade can have interesting implications on the observed behavior of intraday volume, volatility and prices: November 15, 2004. This Draft: April 8, 2006 Abstract The supply/demand of a security in the market

  13. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Arun Majumdar

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  14. Response to changes in demand/supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes operating by some Korean paper companies for acquiring needed pulpwood as a first step for the construction

  15. Turkey's energy demand and supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

  16. Geographically-Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis.

  17. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased...

  18. Seasonal demand and supply analysis of turkeys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blomo, Vito James

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEASONAL DEMAND AND SUPPLY ANALYSIS OF TURKEYS A Thesis by VITO JAMES BLOMO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1972 Ma)or Sub...)ect: Agricultural Economics SEASONAL DEMAND AND SUPPLY ANALYSIS OF TURKEYS A Thesis by VITO JAMES BLOMO Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of C mmittee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) ( ber) (Memb er) May 1972 ABSTRACT Seasonal...

  19. Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Building,” Report No.Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings MaryDemand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Mary

  20. Water supply and demand in an energy supply model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbey, D; Loose, V

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a tool for water and energy-related policy analysis, the development of a water supply and demand sector in a linear programming model of energy supply in the United States. The model allows adjustments in the input mix and plant siting in response to water scarcity. Thus, on the demand side energy conversion facilities can substitute more costly dry cooling systems for conventional evaporative systems. On the supply side groundwater and water purchased from irrigators are available as more costly alternatives to unappropriated surface water. Water supply data is developed for 30 regions in 10 Western states. Preliminary results for a 1990 energy demand scenario suggest that, at this level of spatial analysis, water availability plays a minor role in plant siting. Future policy applications of the modeling system are discussed including the evaluation of alternative patterns of synthetic fuels development.

  1. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  2. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  3. energy: Supply, Demand, and impacts CooRDinATinG LeAD AUThoR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    ;energy: supply, demand, and impacts 241 · Delivery of electricity may become more vulnerable is likely to have significant impacts. For example, a study found that electrical power blackouts and "sags, such as by increased peak electricity demand for cooling, damage to energy infrastructure by extreme events, disruption

  4. Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook 2008-2017 0 ST98-2008 Energy Resources RESOURCES CONSERVATION BOARD ST98-2008: Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook 2008: Reserves Andy Burrowes, Rick Marsh, Nehru Ramdin, and Curtis Evans; Supply/Demand and Economics

  5. Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy efficiency and demand response in large facilities.was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center whichInteroperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure Ed

  6. Building Energy Supply Infrastructures and Urban Sustained Development of Shenyang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban energy supply is a necessary infrastructure of civic development. Shenyang is an old industrial-based center in the northeast. Its development influences the economic development of the whole old northeast industry base. This paper analyses...

  7. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

  8. Supply Chain Networks, Electronic Commerce, and Supply Side and Demand Side Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Networks, Electronic Commerce, and Supply Side and Demand Side Risk Anna Nagurney as well as demand side risk are included in the formulation. The model consists of three tiers of decision chain network equilibrium model with electronic com- merce and with supply side and demand side risk

  9. How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 2 How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand Jean-Philippe Bouchaud Science-Holland, Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved. 57 #12;58 Chapter 2 · How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply

  10. Supply chain planning decisions under demand uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanfeng Anna

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sales and operational planning that incorporates unconstrained demand forecasts has been expected to improve long term corporate profitability. Companies are considering such unconstrained demand forecasts in their decisions ...

  11. Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services by Simon Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services by Simon Christopher Parkinson B highly-distributed sustainable demand- side infrastructure, in the form of heat pumps, electric vehicles

  12. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lattice model of renewable power supply and real-timerenewable power supply, by formulating a unit commitment model.model that can be used for assessing the impact of integrating renewable power

  13. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale Renewable Energy Integration . . . . . . . . . . .Impacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

  14. Demand management : a cross-industry analysis of supply-demand planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Peng Kuan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Globalization increases product variety and shortens product life cycles. These lead to an increase in demand uncertainty and variability. Outsourcing to low-cost countries increases supply lead-time and supply uncertainty ...

  15. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    order: cost comparison for the deep-simple, zero wind,expected wind supply, instead of averaging the cost savingsintegration of wind power. Cost, Utilization, Investment

  16. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems absorb large amounts of hydroelectric power. Duringthat snow melts and hydroelectric power supply increases andfrom hydroelectric dams or discards renewable power [53].

  17. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the dispatch of flexible loads and generation resources bothof controllable generation and flexible demand. In the casecontrollable generation resources and flexible loads in the

  18. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  19. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  20. Modeling Structural Changes in Market Demand and Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Beom Su

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic events may cause structural changes in markets. To know the effect of the economic event we should analyze the structural changes in the market demand and supply. The purpose of this dissertation is to analyze the effect of selected...

  1. Response to changes in demand/supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , distribution channels, differentiation of quality, price, specification, etc., of the products. Primary wood with the mill consuming 450 000 m3 , amounting to 30% of total plywood log demand in 1995. The composites board;112 distribution channels, differentiation of quality, price, specification, etc., of the products. Primary wood

  2. U.S. Coal Supply and Demand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zandofpoint motional%^ U N CU.S. Coal Supply

  3. Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland 2 Analysis of Market Demand and Supply...

  4. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of water cooling systems for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of water cooling systems for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

  5. Enron sees major increases in U. S. gas supply, demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, M.M.; Stram, B. (Enron Corp., Houston, TX (US))

    1991-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Enron Corp., Houston, in an extensive study of U.S. natural-gas supply and demand through the year 2000, has found that the U.S. gas-resource base is 1,200 tcf. Despite current weaknesses in natural-gas prices, demand growth will be strong although affected by oil-price assumptions. This paper reports on highlights in the areas of reserves and production which include gains in both categories in the Rockies/Wyoming, San Juan basin, and Norphlet trends (offshore Alabama). The Midcontinent/Hugoton area exhibits reserve declines in a period of flat production. In the U.S. Gulf Coast (USGC) offshore, both production and reserves decline over the forecast period. These projections are derived from a base-case price of $4.07/MMBTU by 2000. U.S. gas production exhibits a production decline in a low oil-price case from 19 to 16.4 tcf by 2000, if prices are 30% below the base case, that is, $2.93/MMBTU. Gains in commercial gas use are strong under either scenario of a base oil price of $29.80 in 1990 dollars in the year 2000 or a low oil price of $20.50 in 1990 dollars in 2000. Demand for natural gas for power generation grows as much as 1.5 tcf by 2000 in the Enron base case and by 300 bcf by 2000 in the low crude-oil price case.

  6. How markets slowly digest changes in supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we revisit the classic problem of tatonnement in price formation from a microstructure point of view, reviewing a recent body of theoretical and empirical work explaining how fluctuations in supply and demand are slowly incorporated into prices. Because revealed market liquidity is extremely low, large orders to buy or sell can only be traded incrementally, over periods of time as long as months. As a result order flow is a highly persistent long-memory process. Maintaining compatibility with market efficiency has profound consequences on price formation, on the dynamics of liquidity, and on the nature of impact. We review a body of theory that makes detailed quantitative predictions about the volume and time dependence of market impact, the bid-ask spread, order book dynamics, and volatility. Comparisons to data yield some encouraging successes. This framework suggests a novel interpretation of financial information, in which agents are at best only weakly informed and all have a similar and ...

  7. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel electricity demands, and generation from these plantplants .. 47 Additional generation .. 48 Electricityelectricity demand increases generation from NGCC power plants.

  8. Multi-period Optimal Procurement and Demand Responses in the Presence of Uncertain Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Smart Grid involves changes in both the demand side and supply side. On the supply side, more renewable energy will be integrated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution. On the demand side, smarter demand management systems will be available to respond to the electricity price and improve

  9. Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable AutomatedDemand Response Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automating demand response (DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation and improved reliability and repeatability of the demand response and customer facilities. Automated DR systems have been deployed for critical peak pricing and demand bidding and are being designed for real time pricing. The system is designed to generate, manage, and track DR signals between utilities and Independent System Operators (ISOs) to aggregators and end-use customers and their control systems.

  10. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and fuel-related electricity demands grow, so do the numberelectricity demands are unlikely to affect capacity additions and procurement decisions until they grow

  11. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No.4 Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario towe projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-relatedcrises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP ( T P E S / G D

  12. Building Energy Supply Infrastructures and Urban Sustained Development of Shenyang 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    store 300-thousand-cubemeter gases. The compressor is designed to distribute 63? 000m3/h gas. At present, in Shenyang there are oil gases, coal seam gases, mine gases, coke oven gases, liquefied petroleum gases with air, liquefied petroleum gases... Supply Selling Supply Selling kJ/Nm3 Oil gas 3507 2793 403 21767 Coke oven gas 5267 5323 4989 5039 5582 18487 Produced gas 857 7470 297 5870 3824 3592 4475 4916 Oil field gas 7986 6899 7249 6268 7008 6048 7758 6679 6938...

  13. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fossil fuel for thermal electric generation. This will beThermal-Electric Energy Supply The shortfall in hydroelectric energy supply will be made up prim- arily by greater reliance upon thermal generation

  14. A Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhunia, Swarup

    energy generation and consumption parameters. The system uses economics inspired supply-demand modelA Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy Utilization Western Reserve University, *Cleveland State University, +Rockwell Automation, Cleveland, OR, USA Email

  15. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of capacity factors of wind generation from a Vestas V112-demand is higher, while wind generation peaks at night andvalues of Tehachapi wind generation, Palm Springs solar

  16. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    49 Table 13. Vehicle and fuel efficiency and electricity14. Timing profiles and vehicle and fuel pathways includedand generation, Table 18. Vehicle demand and system load

  17. 39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Storage (6) 19638 (18618) Smart Grids & F. Elec. Eng Sys (12)TR910:20 19714 (12714) Env. Life Cycle Prep (3)MW34:20 12706 Civil Systems Invest. Plan & Pricing (12)MW10:3012:20 12745 AID Systems Project:20 12743 Comp. Search & Decision in Civil Infrastructure (6) Electrical & Computer Engineering 18618 Smart

  18. Microsoft Word - 20140415 Infrastructure Constraints in New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as well as decarbonizing New England's energy supply? * To what extent can electric demand-side management (DSM) reduce the need for additional infrastructure? * What are the...

  19. Design of Extended Warranties in Supply Chains under Additive Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kumpeg; Mallik, Suman; Chhajed, Dilip

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the design of extended warranties in a supply chain consisting of a manufacturer and an independent retailer. The manufacturer produces a single product and sells it exclusively through the retailer. The extended ...

  20. Supply and demand planning for crude oil procurement in refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nnadili, Beatrice N. (Beatrice Nne)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upstream petroleum supply chain is inefficient and uneconomical because of the independence of the four complex and fragmented functions which comprise it. Crude oil exploration, trading, transportation, and refining ...

  1. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

  2. Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand,Policy Papers 35- 37, Energy and Security in Northeast Asia,on Northeast Asian energy and security held in Seoul, Korea.

  3. Energy Demand and Fuel Supply in Developing Countries Brazil, Korea and the Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980. COUNTRY REPORT BRAZIL TRENDS OF ENERGY USE I N BRAZILBRAZIL KOREA PHILIPPINES INTRODUCTION During the 1970s, energyENERGY DEMAND AND FUEL SUPPLY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES BRAZIL,

  4. OPTIMIZING MONSANTO'S SUPPLY CHAIN UNDER UNCERTAIN DEMAND Stephen C. Graves*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Stephen C.

    product available for sale will not be good enough to compete in the future. In the agricultural inputs business that result from inadequate supply chain practices. Monsanto's past and present successes result production, distribution and marketing practices should be adapted to take full advantage of new channel

  5. Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Watson, David; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

  6. The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

    What would be the effect of CO2 pricing on global oil supply and demand? This paper introduces a model describing the interaction between conventional and non-conventional oil supply in a Hotelling framework and under CO2 constraints. The model...

  7. July 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    new #12;source of industrial demand in agricultural markets (Energy Information Agency 2010). To compound matters, water, a key input into agricultural production, is rapidly diminishing in availabilityJuly 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050: A Perfect Storm

  8. Future natural gas supply and demand balance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the future price and availability of natural gas as a boiler fuel in the United States. Analysis focuses on various forecasts for natural gas production and consumption through the year 2000. The forecasts reviewed predict that conventional lower-48 production will decline through the year 2000, but there is a wide divergence of opinion on the future availability of gas from unconventional sources of supply. Future gas prices are also uncertain, but as deregulation proceeds, the rolling-in of high cost sources of supply will diminish and gas will be priced more competitively with oil. Analysis presented in the report implies that it will be prudent to maintain the planning assumption that gas will be phased out as a boiler fuel. Gas should, however, remain attractive to utilities for a variety of specific uses. Fluctuating fuel prices may make it advantageous to use gas for short periods of time, and gas may also prove to be attractive in less price sensitive applications.

  9. Electric power supply and demand for the contiguous United States, 1980-1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A limited review is presented of the outlook for the electric power supply and demand during the period 1980 to 1989. Only the adequacy and reliability aspects of bulk electric power supply in the contiguous US are considered. The economic, financial and environmental aspects of electric power system planning and the distribution of electricity (below the transmission level) are topics of prime importance, but they are outside the scope of this report.

  10. 1.0 Motivation............................................................................................................2 1.1Overview of Energy Supply and Demand in the 21st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................2 1.1Overview of Energy Supply and Demand in the 21st Century..........................2 1.2 UK Energy ...................................................................................24 6.6 Correlation between Wind Strength and Demand for Electricity..................24 6

  11. A cooperation model and demand-oriented ICT Infrastructure for SME Development and Production Networks in the field of Microsystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A cooperation model and demand-oriented ICT Infrastructure for SME Development and Production of Small Medium Enterprises (SME) in this branch refers to organizational issues, arising from the specific SME´s lack of sufficient human resources and an effective management of cross company knowledge about

  12. The Differential Effects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Maziar; Raissi, Mehdi

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ a set of sign restrictions on the generalized impulse responses of a Global VAR model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2.2011Q2, to discriminate between supply-driven and demand-driven oil-price shocks and to study...

  13. Bottom-Up Self-Organization of Unpredictable Demand and Supply under Decentralized Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedde, Horst F.

    level of granularity, with short-term power balance fluctuation, in terms of a peak demand and supply, distributed power production at lower voltage levels (through wind turbines or solar panels) is considered, as this depends on external environmental conditions (e.g. solar and wind power). In Electrical Engineering

  14. Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities. CEC-Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Management and Demand Response in Commercial Building. ,

  15. Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is manual demand response -- where building staff receives aand Demand Response in Commercial Building. ,April, LBNL-Keywords: Demand response, automation, commercial buildings,

  16. Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is manual demand response -- where building staff receives aKeywords: Demand response, automation, commercial buildings,buildings, especially as it applies to Demand Response

  17. The addition of a US Rare Earth Element (REE) supply-demand model improves the characterization and scope of the United States Department of Energy's effort to forecast US REE Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancco, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the development of a new US Rare Earth Element (REE) Supply-Demand Model for the explicit forecast of US REE supply and demand in the 2010 to 2025 time period. In the 2010 Department of Energy (DOE) ...

  18. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure

  19. Proposal to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract for the supply and installation of an HVAC system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract for the supply and installation of an HVAC system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

  20. Identifying Challenges for Sustained Adoption of Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struben, Jeroen J.R.,

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops a dynamic, behavioral model with an explicit spatial structure to explore the co-evolutionary dynamics between infrastructure supply and vehicle demand. Vehicles and fueling infrastructure are ...

  1. Estimation of a supply and demand model for the hired farm labor market in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turley, Keith Pool

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    labor in Texas increased from -0. 8 in 1951 to -2. 8 in 1975, while the long run wage elasticity of demand increased from -1. 0 to -3. 5 during the same time period. The hypothesis that Mexican immigration has had a direct influence on the supply... be expected to cause a 0. 3 per- cent short-run increase in the supply of hired farm labor in Texas, and a 0. 1 percent short-run decrease in the farm wage rate, while the long-run effect on the wage rate would be a 0. 4 percent decrease from the 1975...

  2. Comfort demand leading the optimization to energy supply from the Smart Grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aduba,K.; Zeiler,W.; Boxem,G.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stochastic behaviour, which necessitates for a change in the the management of the grid Slootweg et al., 2011 statedthe increase in decentralised active loads such as, micro Combined Heat and Power (µCHP), Electrical-vehicles, heat pumps which can... of uncertainty within Smart Energy Systems by applying offices as LVPP with different types of energy storage on different systems levels, connecting energy demand and supply within offices (nano Grid) with micro Grid (field or street) and public Smart Grid...

  3. Matching supply to demand: relating local structural adaptation to global function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Ketaki Vimalchandra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MATCHING SUPPLY TO DEMAND: RELATING LOCAL STRUCTURAL ADAPTATION TO GLOBAL FUNCTION A Dissertation by KETAKI VIMALCHANDRA DESAI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Christopher M. Quick Committee Members, Glen A. Laine Randolph...

  4. Hydrogen Infrastructure Expansion: Consumer Demand and Cost-Reduction Potential (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation summarizes key challenges in financing hydrogen infrastructure and reviews analysis tools available to inform investment decisions and reduce financial risks.

  5. Factors that will influence oil and gas supply and demand in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holditch, S.A.; Chianelli, R.R. [Texas A& amp; M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent report published by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) in the United States predicted a 50-60% growth in total global demand for energy by 2030. Because oil, gas, and coal will continue to be the primary energy sources during this time, the energy industry will have to continue increasing the supply of these fuels to meet this increasing demand. Achieving this goal will require the exploitation of both conventional and unconventional reservoirs of oil and gas in (including coalbed methane) an environmentally acceptable manner. Such efforts will, in turn, require advancements in materials science, particularly in the development of materials that can withstand high-pressure, high-temperature, and high-stress conditions.

  6. Supply and Demand of Helium-3| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » High School Rules,SubsurfaceSupply and Demand

  7. The Future of U.S. Natural Gas: Supply, Demand & Infrastructure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon2001 PowerofUse

  8. Materials used in new generation vehicles: supplies, shifts, and supporting infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexnayder, S.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program intends to develop new designs for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption by two thirds but otherwise have price, comfort, safety, and other measures of performance similar to the typical automobile now on the market. PNGV vehicle designs are expected to substitute lightweight materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, carbon-reinforced polymer composites, glass-reinforced polymer composites, and ultra- light steel, for heavier materials such as steel and iron in automobile components. The target mass of a PNGV vehicle is 1,960 pounds, as compared to the average current vehicle that weights 3,240 pounds. Other changes could include the use of different ferrous alloys, engineering changes, or incorporation of advanced ceramic components. Widespread adoption of these vehicle designs would affect materials markets and require concurrent development and adoption of supporting technologies to supply the materials and to use and maintain them in automobiles. This report identifies what would be required to bring about these changes and developments in materials substitution; identifies reasons that might make these substitutions difficult to accomplish within the overall objectives and timetable of the PNGV program; and identifies any issues arising from the substitution that could prompt consideration of policies to deal with them. The analysis in this paper uses scenarios that assume the production of new generation vehicles will begin in 2007 and that their market share will increase gradually over the following 25 years. The scenarios on which the analysis is based assume a maximum substitution of each potential replacement material considered. This maximum substitution of individual materials (i.e., the amount of replacement material by weight that would be added to the baseline vehicle`s composition) is as follows: ULSAB (high strength steel), 298 lbs.; glass-reinforced composites, 653 lbs.; carbon-reinforced composites, 379 lbs.; aluminum, 926 lbs.; and magnesium, 216 lbs. The substitutions (and the steel and iron they replace) are multiplied by the number of new generation vehicles produced on an annual basis out to 2030 to determine the total quantity of material used in new generation vehicles and the quantity of steel that would be displaced. We identified six stages in the life cycle of materials--mining or extraction of resources; smelting or other processing to produce the material from the resource; producing components from the material; assembling the components into vehicles, using, maintaining, and repairing vehicles; and disposing of the vehicle, including any recycling of materials for automotive or other use--and identified what might be required to supply and use the substitute materials at different life cycle stages. The variables considered are the mineral or material supply, the capital and equipment (including necessary capacity, technical changes, cost, and location), labor and employment, energy, material complements, and environmental emissions and impacts. The analysis shows that raw materials to produce each of the replacement materials are sufficiently available, and adequate mining or extraction capacity exists for each. However, challenges are possible at the material production stage for three of the four materials. For aluminum and magnesium the difficulties are associated with requirements for significant new production capacity, necessary for aluminum because new production equipment will be needed to produce the material in a cost-effective manner and for magnesium because current production capacity is inadequate. The required capacity investment for magnesium to meet demand in 2030 is $13.1 billion. Both materials also would sharply increase energy requirements, and both industries would likely develop mostly--if not entirely--outside the United States. To produce the carbon-based fiber to meet PNGV demand in 2015, an entire new industry must be developed--a $4.6 billion investment. Significant environmental concerns

  9. Utilizing the infrastructure to assist autonomous vehicles in a mobility on demand context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebsamen, B.

    In this paper we describe an autonomous vehicle that aims at providing shared transportation services in a mobility on demand context. As the service is limited to a known urban environment, prior knowledge of the environment ...

  10. Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    favorable economically, energy demand, and particularly oil3 Energy Policies and Energy Demand in Northeastissue of whether rising energy demand generates new security

  11. Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open,Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the technical and architectural issues associated with automating Demand Response (DR) programs. The paper focuses on a description of the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS), which is the main component used to automate the interactions between the Utilities and their customers for DR programs. Use cases are presented that show the role of the DRAS in automating various aspects of DR programs. This paper also describes the various technical aspects of the DRAS including its interfaces and major modes of operation. This includes how the DRAS supports automating such Utility/Customer interactions as automated DR bidding, automated DR event handling, and finally real-time pricing.

  12. Screening vulnerabilities in water supply networks : risk analysis of infrastructure systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaud, David, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extreme importance of critical infrastructures to modern society is widely known. Recognizing that society cannot afford the costs associated with absolute protection, it is necessary to prioritize the vulnerabilities ...

  13. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

  14. Reconciling the supply of and demand for carbon cycle science in the U.S. agricultural sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Science policy Decision-making Climate change Carbon sequestration a b s t r a c t When askingReconciling the supply of and demand for carbon cycle science in the U.S. agricultural sector's science programs by focusing on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) carbon cycle science programs

  15. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  16. Motor proteins traffic regulation by supply-demand balance of resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Ciandrini; I. Neri; Jean-Charles Walter; O. Dauloudet; A. Parmeggiani

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In cells and in vitro assays the number of motor proteins involved in biological transport processes is far from being unlimited. The cytoskeletal binding sites are in contact with the same finite reservoir of motors (either the cytosol or the flow chamber) and hence compete for recruiting the available motors, potentially depleting the reservoir and affecting cytoskeletal transport. In this work we provide a theoretical framework to study, analytically and numerically, how motor density profiles and crowding along cytoskeletal filaments depend on the competition of motors for their binding sites. We propose two models in which finite processive motor proteins actively advance along cytoskeletal filaments and are continuously exchanged with the motor pool. We first look at homogeneous reservoirs and then examine the effects of free motor diffusion in the surrounding medium. We consider as a reference situation recent in vitro experimental setups of kinesin-8 motors binding and moving along microtubule filaments in a flow chamber. We investigate how the crowding of linear motor proteins moving on a filament can be regulated by the balance between supply (concentration of motor proteins in the flow chamber) and demand (total number of polymerised tubulin heterodimers). We present analytical results for the density profiles of bound motors, the reservoir depletion, and propose novel phase diagrams that present the formation of jams of motor proteins on the filament as a function of two tuneable experimental parameters: the motor protein concentration and the concentration of tubulins polymerized into cytoskeletal filaments. Extensive numerical simulations corroborate the analytical results for parameters in the experimental range and also address the effects of diffusion of motor proteins in the reservoir.

  17. Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increased to 18 percent, nuclear power's to 15 percent, andgovernment is promoting nuclear power to meet the demand for

  18. Comfort demand leading the optimization to energy supply from the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aduba,K.; Zeiler,W.; Boxem,G.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The control of loads in the building, may also be a resource to the grid using the flexibilities in service of the grid in Demand Side Management (DSM) scenarios as so called Demand Response (DR) or Load Control (LC). (Callaway and Hiskens 2011) However... of energy management, building management, and comfort management have to be developed to anticipate on the coming possible changes on Demand Side Management by Demand Response (DR) and Load Control (LC). This study is a first step towards...

  19. Uniform-Format Solid Feedstock Supply System: A Commodity-Scale Design to Produce an Infrastructure-Compatible Bulk Solid from Lignocellulosic Biomass -- Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney; Erin M. Searcy

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Uniform-Format Solid Feedstock Supply System: A Commodity-Scale Design to Produce an Infrastructure-Compatible Bulk Solid from Lignocellulosic Biomass, prepared by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), acknowledges the need and provides supportive designs for an evolutionary progression from present day conventional bale-based supply systems to a uniform-format, bulk solid supply system that transitions incrementally as the industry launches and matures. These designs couple to and build from current state of technology and address science and engineering constraints that have been identified by rigorous sensitivity analyses as having the greatest impact on feedstock supply system efficiencies and costs.

  20. Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

  1. Study on Applications of Supply and Demand Theory of Microeconomics and Physics Field Theory to Central Place Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Chih-Chien Nien

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper attempts to analyze central place theory of spatial economics based on supply and demand theory in microeconomics and field theory in physics, and also discuss their relationship. Three most important research findings are described below. Firstly, the concept of market equilibrium could be expressed in the mathematical form of physics field theory under proper hypothesis. That is because the most important aspect of field theory model is that complex analysis is taken as a key mathematical tool. If assuming that imaginary part is neglected in this model, it is found that this model has the same mathematical structure as supply and demand theory of microeconomics. Secondly, the mathematical model of field theory can be applied to express clearly many concepts of central place theory, or even introduce many new concepts. Thirdly, it could also be taken as a study of combining the Hotelling Model and Moses Model for the location theory in another mathematic approach.

  2. California's Electricity Supply and Demand Balance Over the Next Five Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Northwest over the past two years by about 8,000 megawatts. Natural gas prices have declined from the high the resources of the system. The Commission's 2003 Baseline Demand forecast assumes the following assumptions September October 1 CEC 2003 Baseline Demand Forecast (1-in-2 Weather)1, 2 3

  3. Improving supply chain performance by implementing weekly demand planning processes in the consumer packaged goods industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rah, Myung-Hyun Elisa

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines how simple weekly demand planning process can improve inventory levels and customers service levels at the Gillette Company. The processes designed by the project team has been tested and executed in ...

  4. Optimal Allocation of Inventory and Demand for Managing Supply Chain Revenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katariya, Abhilasha

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    and liquidation de- cisions for a supplier who satisfies demand from a contractual and a spot market. The second problem extends this to investigate a supplier’s joint replenishment, allocation and pricing decisions under two markets. The third problem...

  5. New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

  6. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

  7. A Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to natural random variation, temperature effects, natural gas supply effects, or plant stoppages. However of the economics of the California market during the crisis of 2000. They explain market behavior and its prices is built on the basic economic principle that on each day, the price and quantity in a competitive market

  8. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings,Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings",demand response and energy efficiency functions into the design of buildings,

  9. Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and private sources, including the Department of Energy, manufacturers' groups, and the various academic and other research institutes. Although, these generally tend to be increasingly optimistic about the gas supply outlook and the contribution... that gas can make to U.S. energy needs in the future, questions about price deregulation continue to cloud the gas outlook in many minds. Given this, the purposes of this paper are (a) to describe briefly the prospects for natural and supplemental gas...

  10. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  11. A resilience assessment framework for infrastructure and economic systems : quantitative and qualitative resilience analysis of petrochemical supply chains to a hurricane.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vugrin, Eric D.; Warren, Drake E.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the nation has recognized that critical infrastructure protection should consider not only the prevention of disruptive events, but also the processes that infrastructure systems undergo to maintain functionality following disruptions. This more comprehensive approach has been termed critical infrastructure resilience (CIR). Given the occurrence of a particular disruptive event, the resilience of a system to that event is the system's ability to efficiently reduce both the magnitude and duration of the deviation from targeted system performance levels. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has developed a comprehensive resilience assessment framework for evaluating the resilience of infrastructure and economic systems. The framework includes a quantitative methodology that measures resilience costs that result from a disruption to infrastructure function. The framework also includes a qualitative analysis methodology that assesses system characteristics that affect resilience in order to provide insight and direction for potential improvements to resilience. This paper describes the resilience assessment framework. This paper further demonstrates the utility of the assessment framework through application to a hypothetical scenario involving the disruption of a petrochemical supply chain by a hurricane.

  12. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial sector, oil demand will decrease due particularlyand commercial sectors, oil demand will decline on a shifttransportation sector, oil demand will shrink on a fall in

  13. Global Infrastructures Abstract/Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahay, Sundeep

    facilities, electricity supply, state of the physical building etc. The socioeconomic and geopolitical in large hospitals (and other corporate infrastructures) and infrastructures supporting the governance the practical development of infrastructures supporting the governance of the health care sector in developing

  14. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

  15. Design for implementation : fully integrated charging & docking infrastructure used in Mobility-on-Demand electric vehicle fleets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jean Mario Nations

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the technology used in electric vehicles continues to advance, there is an increased demand for urban-appropriate electric charging stations emphasizing a modern user interface, robust design, and reliable functionality. ...

  16. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

  17. Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

  18. Infrastructure investments and resource adequacy in the restructured US natural gas market : is supply security at risk?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschhausen, Christian von

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the development of US natural gas infrastructure over the last two decades and to discuss its perspectives. In particular, we focus on the relationship between the regulatory ...

  19. Challenge # 2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure Throughout Supply Chain Challenge 2 Logistics and Compatibility with Existing Infrastructure Throughout Supply Chain...

  20. IEA Bioenergy Task 40Sustainable International Bioenergy Trade:Securing Supply and Demand Country Report 2014—United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Patrick Lamers; Mohammad S. Roni; Jacob J. Jacobson; Brendi Heath

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logistical barrier are tied to feedstock harvesting, collection, storage and distribution. Current crop harvesting machinery is unable to selectively harvest preferred components of cellulosic biomass while maintaining acceptable levels of soil carbon and minimizing erosion. Actively managing biomass variability imposes additional functional requirements on biomass harvesting equipment. A physiological variation in biomass arises from differences in genetics, degree of crop maturity, geographical location, climatic events, and harvest methods. This variability presents significant cost and performance risks for bioenergy systems. Currently, processing standards and specifications for cellulosic feedstocks are not as well-developed as for mature commodities. Biomass that is stored with high moisture content or exposed to moisture during storage is susceptible to spoilage, rotting, spontaneous combustion, and odor problems. Appropriate storage methods and strategies are needed to better define storage requirements to preserve the volume and quality of harvested biomass over time and maintain its conversion yield. Raw herbaceous biomass is costly to collect, handle, and transport because of its low density and fibrous nature. Existing conventional, bale-based handling equipment and facilities cannot cost-effectively deliver and store high volumes of biomass, even with improved handling techniques. Current handling and transportation systems designed for moving woodchips can be inefficient for bioenergy processes due to the costs and challenges of transporting, storing, and drying high-moisture biomass. The infrastructure for feedstock logistics has not been defined for the potential variety of locations, climates, feedstocks, storage methods, processing alternatives, etc., which will occur at a national scale. When setting up biomass fuel supply chains, for large-scale biomass systems, logistics are a pivotal part in the system. Various studies have shown that long-distance international transport by ship is feasible in terms of energy use and transportation costs, but availability of suitable vessels and meteorological conditions (e.g., winter time in Scandinavia and Russia) need to be considered. However, local transportation by truck (both in biomass exporting and importing countries) may be a high-cost factor, which can influence the overall energy balance and total biomass costs.

  1. Energy watchers IV. Energy, economics and environment: Imperatives realities, and balance and Pacific Basin Demand and downstream activities: Is Middle East supply the answer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mallakh, D.H. (ed.)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1974, the International Research Center for Energy and Economic Development (ICEED) has been holding annual international energy conferences that seek to bring together the public and private sectors from the United States and overseas in order to facilitate the exchange of views and information. The nineteenth annual international energy sessions on [open quotes]Energy, Economics, and Environment: Imperatives, Realities, and Balance,[close quotes] opened April 21, 1992. The goal was to look at the complex linkage between energy and the environment that cannot be decoupled in the near to medium future. The thirteenth annual international area conference, held from April 23-24, 1992, reflected appreciation and acknowledgement of the primacy of the Arabian/Persian Gulf in international energy trade. The area theme, [open quotes]Pacific Basin Demand and Downstream Activities: Is Middle East Supply the Answer ,[close quotes] was premised on the solidification of trade blocs globally and on these two regions which represent the major areas of growth in energy demand and petroleum supply, respectively. Issues addressed in the papers presented included the impact on the world oil sector of these demand and supply zones in the direction of upstream and downstream investment, the approaches and instruments that may be initiated or honed in terms of joint ventures and supply arrangements in the 1990s, and the possibility that the former USSR will become an energy land bridge between the Pacific Basin and Europe.

  2. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated  Demand  Response  in  Commercial  Buildings.  Demand  Response  Infrastructure  for   Commercial  Buildings.  

  3. Supply chain networks, consisting of manufacturers, distributors, retailers, and consumers, provide the critical infrastructure for the production of goods,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    developed in Part I to energy supply chains in the form of electric power generation and distri- bution not only in terms of the product flows but also in terms of pricing in order to satisfy the consumers competition as well as cooperation and yield the resulting product and ma- terial flows and prices

  4. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sjstems (ITS) Electricity Sector Promoting nuclear useindustrial and electricity generation sectors (Table 4-2).In the industrial sector, electricity demand will increase,

  5. Three essays in labor and health economics: individual decisions on occupation, labor supply, and demand for heatlh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Ja Eun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, I examine individual decisions in occupational choice, labor supply, and health care utilization. Occupational choice decisions of female college graduates on whether to teach or not are analyzed to ...

  6. Three essays in labor and health economics: individual decisions on occupation, labor supply, and demand for heatlh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Ja Eun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, I examine individual decisions in occupational choice, labor supply, and health care utilization. Occupational choice decisions of female college graduates on whether to teach or not are analyzed to understand the role...

  7. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of coal and LNG-fired power generation efficiency (to a drop in coal thermal power generation, and improvementsDemand for steaming coal for power generation is expected to

  8. Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Hyunju [Georgia Institute of Technology; Pandit, Arka [Georgia Institute of Technology; Crittenden, John [Georgia Institute of Technology; Xu, Ming [University of Michigan; Perrings, Charles [Arizona State University; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Li, Ke [University of Georgia; French, Steve [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The population growth coupled with increasing urbanization is predicted to exert a huge demand on the growth and retrofit of urban infrastructure, particularly in water and energy systems. The U.S. population is estimated to grow by 23% (UN, 2009) between 2005 and 2030. The corresponding increases in energy and water demand were predicted as 14% (EIA, 2009) and 20% (Elcock, 2008), respectively. The water-energy nexus needs to be better understood to satisfy the increased demand in a sustainable manner without conflicting with environmental and economic constraints. Overall, 4% of U.S. power generation is used for water distribution (80%) and treatment (20%). 3% of U.S. water consumption (100 billion gallons per day, or 100 BGD) and 40% of U.S. water withdrawal (340 BGD) are for thermoelectric power generation (Goldstein and Smith, 2002). The water demand for energy production is predicted to increase most significantly among the water consumption sectors by 2030. On the other hand, due to the dearth of conventional water sources, energy intensive technologies are increasingly in use to treat seawater and brackish groundwater for water supply. Thus comprehending the interrelation and interdependency between water and energy system is imperative to evaluate sustainable water and energy supply alternatives for cities. In addition to the water-energy nexus, decentralized or distributed concept is also beneficial for designing sustainable water and energy infrastructure as these alternatives require lesser distribution lines and space in a compact urban area. Especially, the distributed energy infrastructure is more suited to interconnect various large and small scale renewable energy producers which can be expected to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the case of decentralized water infrastructure, on-site wastewater treatment facility can provide multiple benefits. Firstly, it reduces the potable water demand by reusing the treated water for non-potable uses and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

  9. INFRASTRUCTURE Engineering and Physical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    the vital research that underpins this development. The UK Government Strategy for National Infrastructure and resilient infrastructure supplying water, energy, communications, transport systems and waste systems. Infrastructure is a broad topic and is relevant to other sectors including Healthcare, Renewable and Clean Energy

  10. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

  11. Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Ed

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.

  12. Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

  13. World gas supply and demand: 1980-2020. Based on a study by the International Gas Union Force II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, L.W.; Kalisch, R.B.; Wingenroth, J.L.; Kirk, S.R.; Meeder, J.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If world oil prices and economic growth rates rise moderately (2%/yr) as assumed by the International Gas Union's Task Force II, world natural gas demand could increase from 1980's level of 52 quadrillion Btu to 74 quads by 1990 and 90 quads by 2000. Gas demand growth rates will peak at 4.5%/yr during 1980-85, then fall to 3.3%/yr in 1985-90, 2%/yr in the 1990s, and 1% after 2000, although the rates will differ substantially for various countries, regions, and sectors. World gas production (53 quads in 1980) could reach 90-120 quads by 2000 and 92-100 by 2020. The North American/European share of world production, however, will decline from 55% in 1980 to 37% by 1990 and to 27% in 2000. Although North America's conventional production in 2020 will be only 60% of its current level, the expected growth in unconventional output should push overall production up 12%. The world reserves/production ratio, now at 45 years, will drop to 31 years by 2000 and 29 by 2020; the respective world reserves estimates are 2621 and 2350 trillion CF.

  14. A Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    in an uncertain world. Robert Johns (CTS director), Rebecca Jasper (Council of Supply Chain ManagementA Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host, transportation infrastructure, ports, railroads, biofuels and agricultural byproducts, and transportation

  15. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  16. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  17. Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400,Information55,035OAK GROVE C OAL D EGASPresented to the

  18. Scanning the Technology Energy Infrastructure Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    , and algorithmic develop- ments. Keywords--Critical infrastructure protection, electric power grid, emergency, the United Kingdom, and Italy in 2003 underscored electricity infrastructure's vulnerabilities [1 infrastructures and increased demand for high-quality and reliable electricity for our digital economy is becoming

  19. MFC Communications Infrastructure Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

  20. Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling optimal hydrogen infrastructure from biomass. Theoptimal biomass to hydrogen infrastructure Sets fields sitesto supply that hydrogen and the infrastructure is built to

  1. Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling optimal hydrogen infrastructure from biomass. Theoptimal biomass to hydrogen infrastructure Sets fields sitesto supply that hydrogen and the infrastructure is built to

  2. A Mul&-Scale Design and Control Framework for Dynamically Coupled Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructures,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Samantha

    electricity. -RedistribuRng power demand over Rme in both infrastructures with the electric power infrastructure. This is the project's test bed applicaRon. 0 FUEL PUMP PHEV BATTERY Outlet Personal TransportaRon Infrastructure Electric

  3. Social infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurlbaum, Ryan E. (Ryan Edward)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current urbanization patterns and aging transportation infrastructures have marginalized millions of US citizens. The result is that 4 .5 million US residents live within 100 meters of a four-lane highway' and have become ...

  4. Lively Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Ash

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    and slack within and across the city’s infrastructural networks (Lahoud, 2010; Vale and Campanella, 2005; Batty, 2013). Importantly, this writing shows that there is nothing purely technical or mechanical about even the most digitised infrastructures... given to, and commanded by, building a house piece by piece when time and resource allow, the measures taken to pirate water and electricity, build sanitary pits, and make indoor or outdoor showers and kitchens, making a house into a home...

  5. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003Not MeasurementDeep GeologicDepartment

  6. In the near future, Switzerland is predicted to be affected by climate change, that is bound to impact both water demand and water supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and agriculture increases, water supply decreases (ProClim and OcCC, 2007) as climate change alters the hydrologic of the economic impact of climate change and different adaptation strategies in the water sector is essential in Switzerland, mandated by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN). 4) Climate change and water resources

  7. Deadline Extended for RFI Regarding Hydrogen Infrastructure and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for a robust market introduction of hydrogen supply, infrastructure, and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs). This input will augment financing strategies that DOE...

  8. Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting #13: Energy Infrastructure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Carnavos Director of Gas Supply Consolidated Edison Opportunities and Challenges for Natural Gas and Liquid Fuels Transmission, Storage and Distribution Infrastructure Good...

  9. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

  10. Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes. Developing novel schemes for demand response in smart electric gird is an increasingly active research area/SCADA for demand response in smart infrastructures face the following dilemma: On one hand, in order to increase

  11. Estimating the supply and demand for deep geologic CO2 storage capacity over the course of the 21st Century: A meta-analysis of the literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Whether there is sufficient geologic CO2 storage capacity to allow CCS to play a significant role in mitigating climate change has been the subject of debate since the 1990s. This paper presents a meta- analysis of a large body of recently published literature to derive updated estimates of the global deep geologic storage resource as well as the potential demand for this geologic CO2 storage resource over the course of this century. This analysis reveals that, for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation scenarios that have end-of-century atmospheric CO2 concentrations of between 350 ppmv and 725 ppmv, the average demand for deep geologic CO2 storage over the course of this century is between 410 GtCO2 and 1,670 GtCO2. The literature summarized here suggests that -- depending on the stringency of criteria applied to calculate storage capacity – global geologic CO2 storage capacity could be: 35,300 GtCO2 of “theoretical” capacity; 13,500 GtCO2 of “effective” capacity; 3,900 GtCO2, of “practical” capacity; and 290 GtCO2 of “matched” capacity for the few regions where this narrow definition of capacity has been calculated. The cumulative demand for geologic CO2 storage is likely quite small compared to global estimates of the deep geologic CO2 storage capacity, and therefore, a “lack” of deep geologic CO2 storage capacity is unlikely to be an impediment for the commercial adoption of CCS technologies in this century.

  12. Modelling the Role of Software in the Propagation of Failures Across National Critical Infrastructures Chris. W. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    infrastructures as the uninterruptible power supplies (UPS') that protect mobile phone base stations fail over critical infrastructure. For example, the separation of responsibility for maintaining electricity Infrastructures Chris. W. Johnson Department of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK, Johnson

  13. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

  14. Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Year-in-Review: 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S....

  15. HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM date ­ November 23, 2004 · Contract end date ­ March 31, 2006 #12;Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania · Objectives ­ Capture

  16. Propane Supply & Infrastructure Suggested Slides

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice8.PDFThousand7. ConsumptionNov-14698

  17. Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    Demand Side Management in Industry Rangan Banerjee Talk at Baroda in Birla Corporate Seminar August 31,2007 #12;Demand Side Management Indian utilities ­ energy shortage and peak power shortage. Supply for Options ­ Demand Side Management (DSM) & Load Management #12;DSM Concept Demand Side Management (DSM) - co

  18. Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link toInfluenceInfrared MappingInfrastructure

  19. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Dale, Larry; Larsen, Peter; Fitts, Gary; Koy, Kevin; Lewis, Sarah; Lucena, Andre

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the results of a study of the impact of climate change on the energy infrastructure of California and the San Francisco Bay region, including impacts on power plant generation; transmission line and substation capacity during heat spells; wildfires near transmission lines; sea level encroachment upon power plants, substations, and natural gas facilities; and peak electrical demand. Some end-of-century impacts were projected:Expected warming will decrease gas-fired generator efficiency. The maximum statewide coincident loss is projected at 10.3 gigawatts (with current power plant infrastructure and population), an increase of 6.2 percent over current temperature-induced losses. By the end of the century, electricity demand for almost all summer days is expected to exceed the current ninetieth percentile per-capita peak load. As much as 21 percent growth is expected in ninetieth percentile peak demand (per-capita, exclusive of population growth). When generator losses are included in the demand, the ninetieth percentile peaks may increase up to 25 percent. As the climate warms, California's peak supply capacity will need to grow faster than the population.Substation capacity is projected to decrease an average of 2.7 percent. A 5C (9F) air temperature increase (the average increase predicted for hot days in August) will diminish the capacity of a fully-loaded transmission line by an average of 7.5 percent.The potential exposure of transmission lines to wildfire is expected to increase with time. We have identified some lines whose probability of exposure to fire are expected to increase by as much as 40 percent. Up to 25 coastal power plants and 86 substations are at risk of flooding (or partial flooding) due to sea level rise.

  20. RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES Roadmap 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, David

    RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR FRANCE Roadmap 2008 #12;INTRODUCTION European research infrastructures and development, benefiting to Europe's economy and competitiveness. This roadmap for the research infrastructures....................................................................................................6 3. The roadmap: existing and already decided RIs and others at the planning stage

  1. INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY RESTORATION OFFICE of ELECTRICITY DELIVERY & ENERGY RELIABILITY Delivery and Energy Reliability #12;INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY RESTORATION OFFICE of ELECTRICITY Federal agencies to support waivers and specific response legal authorities #12;INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY

  2. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    optimal management of wind generation. In Proceedings of thethe fluctuations of wind generation at the time when morningmoments of hourly wind generation. Due to the predominant

  3. SUMMER 2006 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Average Forced and Planned)............................................ 15 Line 11: Zonal Transmission ............................................................................. 16 Line 14: High Zonal Transmission Limitation ................................................... 16, contractors, and subcontractors make no warrant, express or implied, and assume no legal liability

  4. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the impacts of renewable resource integration, as we demon-Integration of renewable resources: Transmission andfor integrating renewable resources on the California ISO-

  5. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8.1.1 The WECC Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Generation mix of the WECC model . . . . . . . . . . . .Net load of WECC for each day type (not including wind power

  6. Balancing Forage Demand with Forage Supply (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Troxel, Tom R.

    2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    consumo diario de materia seca (CDMS) del ganado, debe regularse para cosechar la producci?n de forraje del a?o en curso sin da?ar el crecimiento futuro y su calidad. El CDMS es el consumo actual de forraje requerido (demanda de forraje) por un animal... los requerim- ientos de materia seca (MS) o volumen. Los cambios estacionales en la cantidad y cal- idad de forraje son determinantes para que el ganado pueda completar sus requerimientos nutricionales. En ocasiones la calidad de la dieta puede ser...

  7. Balancing Forage Demand with Forage Supply (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Troxel, Tom R.

    2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Experto en Pastizales, El Servicio de Extensi?n Agr?cola de Texas y Extensionista Experto en Ganado Vacuno Servicio de Extensi?n Cooperativo de Arkansas. Figura 1. El sobreuso continuo por una excesiva carga animal deteriora los recursos de los pastizales... consumo diario de materia seca (CDMS) del ganado, debe regularse para cosechar la producci?n de forraje del a?o en curso sin da?ar el crecimiento futuro y su calidad. El CDMS es el consumo actual de forraje requerido (demanda de forraje) por un animal...

  8. Reduce Demand Rather than Increase Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2) parking cash out, and (3) car sharing. TRANSIT PASSES INis a good investment. CAR SHARING Another possible in-lieua car when needed. The car-sharing organization would also

  9. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    load profile for each type of day, that needs to be served by thermal generators and wind power,power production. We then generate a multi-period load response profile

  10. Rice Supply, Demand and Related Government Programs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kincannon, John A.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surpluses of U. S. rice. The flow of U. S. rice through foreign import channels improved again in 1950 because the Korean War -again disrupted production in the Orient. Rice production since 1952 has reached a normal level in Asia and South America..., and the U. S. has suffered a considerable loss in foreign outlets for surplus rice stocks. Although increased rice production during and after the war, combined with high rice prices, has Figure 7. Rice, milled. including broken rice used by brewers...

  11. Vulnerability assessment of water supply systems for insufficient fire flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanta, Lufthansa Rahman

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    supply systems are vulnerable to many forms of terrorist acts, most of the vulnerability analysis studies on these systems have been for chemical and biological threats. Because of the interdependency of water supply infrastructure and emergency fire...

  12. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

  13. Our Nation's Energy Infrastructure: Toward Stronger and Smarter Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    prior authorization. Material from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and support from EPRI electrical energy infrastructure ­ Transforming the Network into a Smart Grid ­ Developing an Expanded and Using Alternative Transportation Fuels · Greening the electric power supply ­ Expanding the Use

  14. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure -...

  15. Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    of fuel demands 30% of the natural gas demand (over 50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand. #12;Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply ChainsIntroduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples

  16. Utility and infrastructure needs for private tank waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, B.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supports the development of the Draft TWRS Privatization RFP. The document provides summaries of a wide variety of utility infrastructure and support services that are available at the Hanford Site. The needs of the privatization contractors are estimated and compared to the existing infrastructure. Recommendations are presented on the preferred and alternate routes of supplying the identifies requirements.

  17. 1 INTRODUCTION Critical infrastructures (CIs) like the electricity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 INTRODUCTION Critical infrastructures (CIs) like the electricity, oil & gas supply, rail, road when electric power disruptions at various times curtailed natural gas production (first order ef and An All-Hazard Approach for the Vulnerability Analysis of Critical Infrastructures E.Zio Ecole Centrale

  18. Urban Studies, Vol. 40, No. 7, 000000, 2003 Induced Demand: A Microscopic Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    . Introduction Transport forecasts often assume limited or no response of demand to changes in supply of the response of demand to supply, also referred to as induced or latent demand. According to the induced demand demand hypoth- esis to date has mostly been carried out at the aggregate level, considering state, metro

  19. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ���¢��������real-world���¢������� retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation���¢��������s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products���¢�������� Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user���¢��������s fueling experience.

  20. Estimating business and residential water supply interruption losses from catastrophic events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunding, David

    . In particular, studies have focused on water supply, electric power, and transportation infrastructure [Chang and spatial extent, water supply infrastructure in many urban areas is particularly vulnerable to interruption and residential lifeline users. As a result, the total economic losses caused by infrastructure damage may be much

  1. An Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    An Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control Michael LeMay, Rajesh for the MGA and ZigBee wireless communications. Index Terms Demand Response, Advanced Meter Infrastructure. In principle this can be done with demand response techniques in which electricity users take measures

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Hydrogen Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Infrastructure Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of H2FIRST Project On June 4, 2014, in Capabilities, Center for Infrastructure Research and...

  3. Sandia Energy - Water Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Security Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Decision Models for Integrating EnergyWater Water Infrastructure Security Water Infrastructure...

  4. Understanding Failures in International Safety-Critical Infrastructures: A Comparison of European and North American Power Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    of Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Keywords: Critical Infrastructures, Blackouts, Power Distribution, V2 Analysis. Abstract The increasing integration of safety-critical infrastructures introduces vulnerabilities-critical systems creates vulnerabilities across the power distribution, water supply and transportation industries

  5. Sharing local energy infrastructure : organizational models for implementing microgrids and district energy systems in urban commercial districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Genevieve Rose

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing trend in cities toward establishing localized, shared energy infrastructure. As existing energy infrastructure ages and demand increases, cities face rising energy costs and security risks combined with ...

  6. Energy Transmission and Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathison, Jane

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: • improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; • identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); • analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; • enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; • identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and • improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers in developing transportation policies; energy audits and efficiency studies for Oberlin-area businesses and Oberlin College; identification of barriers to residential energy efficiency and development of programming to remove these barriers; mapping of the solar-photovoltaic and wind-energy supply chains in northwest Ohio; and opportunities for vehicle sharing and collaboration among the ten organizations in Lorain County from the private, government, non-profit, and educational sectors. With non-grant funds, organizations have begun or completed projects that drew on the findings of the studies, including: creation of a residential energy-efficiency program for the Oberlin community; installation of energy-efficient lighting in Oberlin College facilities; and development by the City of Oberlin and Oberlin College of a 2.27 megawatt solar photovoltaic facility that is expected to produce 3,000 megawatt-hours of renewable energy annually, 12% of the College’s yearly power needs. Implementation of these and other projects is evidence of the economic feasibility and technical effectiveness of grant-supported studies, and additional projects are expected to advance to implementation in the coming years. The public has benefited through improved energydelivery systems and reduced energy use for street lighting in Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; new opportunities for assistance and incentives for residential energy efficiency in the Oberlin community; new opportunities for financial and energy savings through vehicle collaboration within Lorain County; and decreased reliance on fossil fuels and expanded production of renewable energy in the region. The dissemination conference and the summary report developed for the conference also benefited the public, but making the findings and recommendations of the regional studies broadly available to elected officials, city managers, educators, representatives of the private sector, and the general public.

  7. Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

  8. Hydrogen Fueling Systems and Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Projects Hydrogen Infrastructure Development · Turnkey Commercial Hydrogen Fueling Station · Autothermal

  9. Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving , D. Craigie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Michael J.

    Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving G. Zakeri , D. Craigie , A. Philpott , M. Todd for the demand response of such a consumer. We will establish a monotonicity result that indicates fuel supply

  10. A Network Efficiency Measure with Applications to Critical Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Satellite and Undersea Cable Networks British Electricity Grid Some Critical Infrastructure Networks #12 by Beckmann, McGuire, and Winsten (1956), that electric power generation and distribution networks can Reformulation of Electric Power Supply Chain Networks Electric Power Supply Transportation Chain Network Network

  11. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebrock, Lorie M. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

  12. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  13. Evaluation of forecasting techniques for short-term demand of air transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wickham, Richard Robert

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forecasting is arguably the most critical component of airline management. Essentially, airlines forecast demand to plan the supply of services to respond to that demand. Forecasts of short-term demand facilitate tactical ...

  14. Industrial Demand-Side Management in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaussaud, D.

    of programs result in lower consumption and/or lower peak demand, and ultimately reduce the need to build new capacity. Hence demand-side management can be used as a resource option to be considered alongside more traditional supply-side resources in a...INDUSTRIAL DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT IN TEXAS Danielle Jaussaud Economic Analysis Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The industrial sector in Texas is highly energy intensive and represents a large share...

  15. United States Fuel Resiliency Volume II U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructu...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Resiliency Volume II U.S. Fuels Supply Infrastructure Vulnerability to Natural and Physical Threats FINAL REPORT Prepared for: Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis...

  16. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  17. Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Options Analysis Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis Presentation on hydrogen production and infrastructure options presented at the DOE Transition...

  18. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: long-term water supply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. water supply and demand and explored potential "transformational" solutions from the perspectives of technology and policy (or both) and discussed ... Last Updated: October...

  20. A Stochastic Unit Commitment Model for Integrating Renewable Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    -optimization of generation and demand by the system operator, demand bids and coupling renewable resources with deferrable-optimizes the dispatch of demand- side resources, renewable supplies and generators. This is unrealistic in practice is coupling the operations of renewable resources with deferrable demand. The motivation of coupling renewable

  1. Sandia Energy - Resilient Electric Infrastructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resilient Electric Infrastructures Home Stationary Power Grid Modernization Resilient Electric Infrastructures Resilient Electric Infrastructuresashoter2015-04-29T22:16:42+00:00...

  2. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infrastructure Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Option Analysis Option Analysis DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop...

  3. Outline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    .S., electric power generation accounts for significant portions of fuel demands 30% of the natural gas demand (over 50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand #12;OutlineOutline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions

  4. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    natural gas prices, the combination of favorable economics and the lower conventional air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with natural gas relative to other...

  5. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003Not MeasurementDeep

  6. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department ofEM Communications August 24,U.S.Report:the

  7. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports by Pipeline

  8. Geographically Based Hydrogen Consumer Demand and Infrastructure Analysis: Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffrey F.

  9. Polynomial policies in supply chain networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Liwei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to solve the periodic-reviewed inventory control problem in supply chain networks with uncertain demand so as to minimize the overall cost of the system over a fixed planning time horizon. In such problems, ...

  10. Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks Lijun Chen, Na Li, Steven H. Low and John C-- In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models

  11. INVENTORY SYSTEMS WITH ADVANCE DEMAND INFORMATION AND RANDOM REPLENISHMENT TIMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karaesmen, Fikri

    INVENTORY SYSTEMS WITH ADVANCE DEMAND INFORMATION AND RANDOM REPLENISHMENT TIMES Fikri Karaesmen@ku.edu.tr Abstract: Advance demand information, when used effectively, improves the performance of produc- tion/inventory of random supply lead times on a single-stage inventory system with advance demand information. It is found

  12. TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-085 TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN CALIFORNIA, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING** Abstract This study analyzes state and regional electricity supply and demand trends for the eleven states

  13. Modeling of Supply Chain Risk Under Disruptions with Performance Measurement and Robustness Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    . The model formulation captures supply- side risk as well as demand-side risk, along with uncertainty supply-side disruption risks, transportation and other cost risks, and demand-side uncertainty within, the focus of research has been on "demand-side" risk, which is related to fluctuations in the demand

  14. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fuelin

  15. Final Report on National NGV Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GM Sverdrup; JG DeSteese; ND Malcosky

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work fimded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to (1) identi& barriers to establishing sustainable natural gas vehicle (NGV) infrastructure and (2) develop planning information that can help to promote a NGV infrastructure with self-sustaining critical maw. The need for this work is driven by the realization that demand for NGVS has not yet developed to a level that provides sufficient incentives for investment by the commercial sector in all necessary elements of a supportive infrastructure. The two major objectives of this project were: (1) to identifi and prioritize the technical barriers that may be impeding growth of a national NGV infrastructure and (2) to develop input that can assist industry in overcoming these barriers. The approach used in this project incorporated and built upon the accumulated insights of the NGV industry. The project was conducted in three basic phases: (1) review of the current situation, (2) prioritization of technical infrastructure btiiers, and (3) development of plans to overcome key barriers. An extensive and diverse list of barriers was obtained from direct meetings and telephone conferences with sixteen industry NGV leaders and seven Clean Cities/Clean Corridors coordinators. This information is filly documented in the appendix. A distillation of insights gained in the interview process suggests that persistent barriers to developing an NGV market and supporting infrastructure can be grouped into four major categories: 1. Fuel station economics 2. Value of NGVs from the owner/operator perspective 3. Cooperation necessary for critical mass 4. Commitment by investors. A principal conclusion is that an efficient and effective approach for overcoming technical barriers to developing an NGV infrastructure can be provided by building upon and consolidating the relevant efforts of the NGV industry and government. The major recommendation of this project is the establishment of an ad hoc NGV Infrastructure Working Group (NGV-I WG) to address the most critical technical barriers to NGV infrastructure development. This recommendation has been considered and approved by both the DOE and GRI and is the basis of continued collaboration in this area.

  16. Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

  17. EXOTIC OPTIONS FOR INTERRUPTIBLE ELECTRICITY SUPPLY CONTRACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with different strike prices. Such options allow hedging and valuation of supply curtailment risk, while demand side participation in the mitigation of supply shortages for energy and reserves. Newly curtailment can provide an efficient substitute for generation capacity in providing balancing energy

  18. Flexible design : an innovative approach for planning water infrastructure systems under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Melanie Kathleen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a framework for a flexible design approach to support decision-making in water supply infrastructure planning. It contrasts with a conventional, deterministic planning approach that uses past data or ...

  19. An MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Demand control systems can be divided functionally into supply-side and load-side control/management systems. Supply-side demand management systems, implemented by the utilities, choose between maintainingAn MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar* , Joseph Sottile

  20. LNG infrastructure and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forgash, D.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sound engineering principals have been used by every company involved in the development of the LNG infrastructure, but there is very little that is new. The same cryogenic technology that is used in the manufacture and sale of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen infrastructure is used in LNG infrastructure. The key component of the refueling infrastructure is the LNG tank which should have a capacity of at least 15,000 gallons. These stainless steel tanks are actually a tank within a tank separated by an annular space that is void of air creating a vacuum between the inner and outer tank where superinsulation is applied. Dispensing can be accomplished by pressure or pump. Either works well and has been demonstrated in the field. Until work is complete on NFPA 57 or The Texas Railroad Commission Rules for LNG are complete, the industry is setting the standards for the safe installation of refueling infrastructure. As a new industry, the safety record to date has been outstanding.

  1. ESTABLISHING PUBLIC POLICY AS A PRIMARY CAUSE OF ENGINEERING FAILURE IN NATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    and longer term vulnerabilities led to a domino-effect in which 50 million people had their power supplies disruptions to a national power distribution network. The causes of this infrastructure failure includedESTABLISHING PUBLIC POLICY AS A PRIMARY CAUSE OF ENGINEERING FAILURE IN NATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURES

  2. Water Supply Planning Using an Expert Geographic Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinney, Daene C.; Burgin, John F.; Maidment, David R.

    supply and demand data; and a network flow solver, to balance the flows in networks developed by the expert GIS with input from a water resource analyst. Commonly available water demand forecasts and water supply data are used in this new planning tool...

  3. Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D.V. Jr.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

  4. A Scalable Digital Library Infrastructure Expands Search and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    A Scalable Digital Library Infrastructure Expands Search and Beyond Min Song1 , Shuyuan Mary Ho a challenge as the number of digital libraries increases, and so does the demand of sophisticated users for searching requirements over several digital libraries and search engines before getting to the desired book

  5. The 3He Supply Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

  6. Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    % in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand. #12;Introduction LiteratureIntroduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling

  7. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CA Control Areas CO 2 Carbon Dioxide CHP Combined Heat and Power CPP Critical Peak Pricing DG Distributed Generation DOE Department of Energy DR Demand Response DRCC Demand...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Center for Infrastructure Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Research and Innovation Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of H2FIRST Project On June 4, 2014, in Capabilities, Center for Infrastructure...

  9. Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1846P CustomTraining Sandia providesPRAsandhowtheycanbemanaged to increase levels of safety and security. Like othertrainings,Sandiaexpertsdesigncoursesto beasbroadorin

  10. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solar energy (8). ME Ketul Popat and John Williams in the Department of Mechanical EngineeringCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Infrastructure #12;2 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING This publication focuses on just a few of the incredible College of Engineering faculty and students who are conducting research related

  11. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

  12. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

  13. Electricity Supply Infrastructure Improvements: Final Technical Status Report, December 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarski, D.; Brad, D.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is about a work effort where the overall objectives were to establish a methodology and approach for selected transmission and distribution (T&D) grid modernization; monitor the results; and report on the findings, recommendations, and lessons learned. The work reported addressed T&D problems and solutions, related reliability issues, equipment and operation upgrades, and respective field testing.

  14. United States Fuel Resiliency: US Fuels Supply Infrastructure | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E AmbassadorsUS-EU-Japan-Japan JointGreen Property Funds ) )BSHof

  15. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  16. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% ? 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  17. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

  18. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission's preliminary forecasts for 2014­2024 electricity consumption and peak: Electricity Demand by Utility Planning Area MAY 2013 CEC-200-2013-004-SD-V2 Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION Robert P. Oglesby Executive

  19. In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

  20. Infrastructure for distributed enterprise simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.M.; Yoshimura, A.S.; Goldsby, M.E. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional discrete-event simulations employ an inherently sequential algorithm and are run on a single computer. However, the demands of many real-world problems exceed the capabilities of sequential simulation systems. Often the capacity of a computer`s primary memory limits the size of the models that can be handled, and in some cases parallel execution on multiple processors could significantly reduce the simulation time. This paper describes the development of an Infrastructure for Distributed Enterprise Simulation (IDES) - a large-scale portable parallel simulation framework developed to support Sandia National Laboratories` mission in stockpile stewardship. IDES is based on the Breathing-Time-Buckets synchronization protocol, and maps a message-based model of distributed computing onto an object-oriented programming model. IDES is portable across heterogeneous computing architectures, including single-processor systems, networks of workstations and multi-processor computers with shared or distributed memory. The system provides a simple and sufficient application programming interface that can be used by scientists to quickly model large-scale, complex enterprise systems. In the background and without involving the user, IDES is capable of making dynamic use of idle processing power available throughout the enterprise network. 16 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Real-Time Demand Response with Uncertain Renewable Energy in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Real-Time Demand Response with Uncertain Renewable Energy in Smart Grid Libin Jiang and Steven Low manages user load through real-time demand response and purchases balancing power on the spot market and demand response in the presence of uncertain renewable supply and time-correlated demand. The overall

  2. Climate change mitigation and co-benefits of feasible transport demand policies in Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    i n f o Keywords: Climate change mitigation Transport demand management External costs Urban and potential impacts of travel demand management help to define policy instruments that mitigate the damaging. The paper investi- gates the role of demand elasticities and demonstrates that joint demand and supply-side

  3. Outline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chains and Fuel Markets In the U.S., electric power generation accounts for 30% of the natural gas demand (over 50% in the summer), 90% of the coal demand, and over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand, the wholesale electricity price in New England decreased by 38% mainly because the delivered natural gas price

  4. Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

  5. Uranium 2007 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on official information received from 40 countries, Uranium 2007 provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1st January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. It finds that with rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of underinvestment.

  6. Uranium 2005 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

  7. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Solicitation Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project...

  8. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project 2009 DOE...

  9. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Utilization Data Base Evaluate Infrastructure Effectiveness Develop Sustainable Business Models Develop Models For Future Infrastructure Deployments Relevance MILESTONES...

  10. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection...

  11. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop: Preliminary Results Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary Results Preliminary results from the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop...

  12. Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen Infrastructure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges NOW, DOE, and NEDO Upcoming Webinar December 16: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges...

  13. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K Castle

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  14. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

  15. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for July 1984. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. This issue also presents IEA's winter 1984-1985 distillate fuel outlook and an overview of distillate fuel oil. These articles focus on the respective roles of production, imports, and stocks in meeting distillage fuel oil demand. Regional supply patterns, especially for the East Coast are also discussed. 33 tables. (DMC)

  16. Why Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why supply chain explains the importance of supply chains. It includes an introduction to ERP as designed by SAP.

  17. FORECASTING WATER DEMAND USING CLUSTER AND REGRESSION ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    resources resulting in water stress. Effective water management ­ a solution Supply side management Demand side management #12;Developing a regression equation based on cluster analysis for forecasting waterFORECASTING WATER DEMAND USING CLUSTER AND REGRESSION ANALYSIS by Bruce Bishop Professor of Civil

  18. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  19. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more than 40% of end-use energy demand. It is important toin terms of building energy supply and demand. Additionally,to evaluate energy performance and demand response. Accurate

  20. Satisfiability of Elastic Demand in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomozei, Dan-Cristian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a stochastic model of electricity production and consumption where appliances are adaptive and adjust their consumption to the available production, by delaying their demand and possibly using batteries. The model incorporates production volatility due to renewables, ramp-up time, uncertainty about actual demand versus planned production, delayed and evaporated demand due to adaptation to insufficient supply. We study whether threshold policies stabilize the system. The proofs use Markov chain theory on general state space.

  1. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

  2. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan [Navigant Consulting, Inc.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development agencies, to assist in identifying policies with low effort and high impact (Chapter 3). Section 3.3 provides specific policy examples that have been demonstrated to be effective in removing barriers to development. (c) Current and potential domestic suppliers in the offshore wind market, in evaluating areas of opportunity and understanding requirements for participation (Chapter 4). Section 4.4 provides a step-by-step description of the qualification process that suppliers looking to sell components into a future U.S. offshore wind market will need to follow.

  3. Infrastructure Projects | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link toInfluenceInfrared MappingInfrastructure

  4. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  5. Logistical and transportation infrastructure in Asia : potential for growth and development to support increasing trade with Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deonás, Nikolaos, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the implications of the rapid growth in demand for trade between Europe and Asia for the existing transportation network and logistical infrastructure. In general terms, technologies need to improve ...

  6. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DECC aggregator managed portfolio automated demand responseaggregator designs their own programs, and offers demand responseaggregator is responsible for designing and implementing their own demand response

  7. Perspective: The Climate-Population-Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation Fertile Area for New Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing the risks posed by climate change and extreme weather to energy production and delivery is a challenge to communities worldwide. As climate conditions change, populations will shift, and demand will re-locate; and networked infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers, and, hopefully, minimize vulnerability to natural disaster. Climate effects such as sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, force populations to move locations. Displaced population creates new demand for built infrastructure that in turn generates new economic activity that attracts new workers and associated households to the new locations. Infrastructures and their interdependencies will change in reaction to climate drivers as the networks expand into new population areas and as portions of the networks are abandoned as people leave. Thus, infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Forecasting the location of these vulnerabilities by combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for defining these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. By combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory it has been only recently possible to examine electricity demand response to increased climactic temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. These emerging results suggest a research agenda of coupling these disparate modelling approaches to understand the implications of climate change for protecting the nation s critical infrastructure.

  8. Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Topic OverviewFinancing green infrastructure is critical to taking projects from planning to implementation and beyond, including sustaining operations and maintenance. This 90-minute webcast will...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    regulation, ... Portable Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Unit to Provide Green, Sustainable Power to Honolulu Port On March 13, 2014, in Center for Infrastructure Research and...

  10. Analysis of a Dedicated Outdoor Air System and Low Temperature Supply Air Conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang, L.; Li, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the principles and the characteristics of a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) and low temperature supply air system. DOAS is offered based on the demands of indoor air quality and the low temperature supply air system...

  11. The Supply Chain as a Dynamical System CAPD EWO Seminar, Feb. 28 3, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Chain for Solar Cells 3. Supply Chain as a Dynamical System Inventory control Feedback scheduling Load motivated by Paul Maurath,P&G, Cincinnati Customer demand #12;13 Demand Amplification and loss of Orders

  12. Operation of water supply reservoirs for flood mitigation : hydrologic and institutional considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craney, Patrick Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional demands are being placed upon reservoirs to meet a variety of diverse needs. These demands require efficient management of the limited storage through reservoir operations. This efficiency is most critical with water supply reservoirs...

  13. Optimal recovery sequencing for critical infrastructure resilience assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Turnquist, Mark Alan (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the identification of optimal recovery strategies that maximize resilience. To this goal, we formulate a bi-level optimization problem for infrastructure network models. In the 'inner' problem, we solve for network flows, and we use the 'outer' problem to identify the optimal recovery modes and sequences. We draw from the literature of multi-mode project scheduling problems to create an effective solution strategy for the resilience optimization model. We demonstrate the application of this approach to a set of network models, including a national railroad model and a supply chain for Army munitions production.

  14. QER- Comment of Natural Gas Supply Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TO: Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force In response to the Department of Energy’s August 25, 2014 Federal Register Notice seeking input on the Quadrennial Energy Review, attached are comments from the Natural Gas Supply Association. Thank you for this opportunity to share our views on the important issue of energy infrastructure. If we can be of further assistance, please let me know. Regards,

  15. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

  16. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generator in California Power Plant Generating Costsplants in California and 1195 power plants collectively inbe banned in California, and they those power plants are not

  17. ISOTOPESuses, demand, and supply NIST Center for Neutron Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimeo, Robert M.

    .S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing #12;CENTER FOR NANOSCALE SCIENCE ANDTECHNOLOGY NIST incremental loss of storage capacity significant loss of storage capacity 1 2, 3, ... #12;Li-ion battery Laboratory Neutron reflectometry study of the conformation of HIV Nef bound to lipid membranes #12;Ultra Cold

  18. Trends in Gulf Coast Power Supply, Demand, and Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posey, L. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rate' ? Granting industrial rate increases above cost-o" service level ' ? Delays in granting rate increases. For each utility company, we examine past history a assess the regulatory climate to predict the likely effect these issues. Power...

  19. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that additional natural gas combustion would completelyAny additional natural gas combustion by the southern A

  20. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas combined-cycle NGCT Natural gas combustion turbine NGSTfrom NGCC and natural gas combustion turbine (NGCT) powerthan that from average natural gas combustion turbine (NGCT)

  1. Advance Booking Programs for Managing Supply, Demand, and Price Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.-H.; Tang, C. S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the manufacturer sets his wholesale price and the retailerto Yadav (2009), the wholesale price for pre-book orderscan be lower but the wholesale price for regular orders can

  2. Understanding Democratic Congruence: A Demand-Supply Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzel, Christian; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ireland Philippines India Croatia France Argentina Luxemb.S. Korea Domin. R. Jordan Croatia Latvia Morocco BrazilSlovenia Uruguay Mexico Croatia Brazil Domin. R. Cyprus

  3. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation from wind and solar power plants can be highlygrid. When wind stops blowing, another power plant must bethan intermittent wind availability or uncertain power plant

  4. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    global warming potentials of 23 and 296, respectively. Marginal electricityelectricity sector. State policies relevant to this dissertation are summarized below: Global Warming

  5. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    global warming potentials of 23 and 296, respectively. Marginal electricity GHG emissions rates for vehicle recharging and hydrogen production

  6. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al Scott et al (2007) [97] EPRI and NRDC (2007) [6, StephanAir Resources Board. EPRI and NRDC (2007) Environmentalin the hydrogen-electric economy, EPRI. Lemoine, D.M. , D.M.

  7. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high fraction of coal generation, greenhouse gas emissionsimports in 2005 from [111]; instate coal generation adjustedaccordingly Instate coal generation set equal to 2005 value,

  8. Domestic Institutions and the Supply and Demand of Remittances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Brian N.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    routinely desire to control international immigration and capital movement. Consequently they adopt domestic policies which create and enforce institutions that manage both capital and labor mobility across borders. Additionally, researchers commonly neglect...

  9. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from existing power plants without CCS technology declines.from existing NGCC and NGCT plants without CCS technology.Mixed technology grid profiles, existing nuclear plants are

  10. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases, Energy InformationDatabase (U.S. EPA database) EIA U.S. Energy Information

  11. California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be 750 megawatts (MW) lower because of ongoing repairs to the Pacific Northwest DC transmission line, 2, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulation

  12. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    management in the US electricity sector, Energy Policy, 23(deep reductions in electricity sector GHG emissions requireson the electricity sector. 19 Table 3.

  13. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cycle NGCT Natural gas combustion turbine NGST Natural gasfrom NGCC and natural gas combustion turbine (NGCT) powerfrom average natural gas combustion turbine (NGCT) plants.

  14. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics, I. (2007) Wind Resources, Cost, and Performance (to higher generation costs than the Wind-heavy profile. The20% RPS, or Wind-heavy renewable profiles – cost increases

  15. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July - August - Rancho Seco 1 PG&E hydroelectric power -PG&E hydroelectric powerPG&E hydroelectric power - PG&E hydroelectric power

  16. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power plants without carbon capture and sequestration. iiSystem Operator CCS Carbon capture and sequestration CECnew nuclear power or carbon capture and sequestration (CCS)

  17. NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES SUPPLY VERSUS DEMAND APPROACHES TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the oil crisis and related events had a lot to do with this upsurge in prices and that the breakdown downward after the input price shock. A simulation model shows that fuel inputs are sufficiently important in production that a large part of the worldwide recession may he attributed to the change in the relative price

  18. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the state come renewable resources by 2010 [26]. Thegeneration to come from renewable resources by 2020 [27].loads until the renewable resource is available. Tehachapi

  19. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shortfalls could be addressed through price signals that may accelerate development of renewable energy resources that are currently uneconomic. This is particularly true in...

  20. Understanding Democratic Congruence: A Demand-Supply Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzel, Christian; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uganda Tanzania Venezuela Kyrgyzstan Moldova Russia GeorgiaUganda Belarus Russia Kyrgyzstan Macedonia Nigeria Indonesia

  1. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    turbine NGST Natural gas steam turbine NWPP Northwest Powerfrom natural gas steam turbine (NGST) and natural gasNGST = Natural gas steam turbine; NWPP = Northwest Power

  2. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model simulates grid response to a number of scenarios relating to increased levels of vehicle recharging or renewable power

  3. Money, Prices and Liquidity Effects: Separating Demand from Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chadha, Jagjit S; Corrado, Luisa; Sun, Qi

    ?nance premium, such as long term corporate spreads over benchmark government bond rates and ?nd little di¤erence in the results. These results are omitted from this paper but are available on request. 18 setting of Uhlig (2005). However...

  4. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coal), $2.50/MMBtu (biomass) No capital cost component for plantscosts $7/MMBtu, IGCC plants are not competitive, and no new coal-coal prices in LEDGE-CA .. 112 Figure 58. Comparison of dispatchable plant capacity using costs

  5. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    103 Figure 52. Relative solar thermal generation foris obscured. Future solar thermal power plants may have theThe SEGS facility is a solar thermal facility that can be

  6. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the grid. Carbon capture and sequestration technology is notor carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology. The

  7. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic Parabolic Small hydro Wind Hydro 1 Steam turbine and conventional hydro costs estimated from [144] Natural gas price

  8. 39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Control Systems (12) 18418 Electric Energy Processing (12ugTR34:20 ) 18472 Fund. in Elec. Power Systems (12UG see notes) 18875 Econ+Engr Elec Energy Sys(12 TR4:305:50) 18819B Solar Arrays: Model, Analysis:305:20) Mechanical Engineering 24722 Energy System Modeling (12) 24640 Special Topics: Climate Mitigation (12) 24616

  9. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plant dispatched – a nuclear plant, for example – ratherCalifornia’s two nuclear plants represent 8% of capacity,are coal facilities, one is a nuclear plant, and one is

  10. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System Operator. WECC (2006) Information Summary, Westernx SDG&E SMR SMUD TID v VMT WECC San Diego Gas & ElectricCoordinating Council (WECC) differ somewhat from the CEC and

  11. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the boom: a simulation study of power plant constructionLEDGE-CA simulations, about 22 GW of NGCT power plants arepower plant type (by prime mover), location, and ownership. Simulation

  12. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will not be used under a partial load condition. Ie If Scat-the partial outage. Table 26 Parameters Used in Loss of Load

  13. Understanding Democratic Congruence: A Demand-Supply Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzel, Christian; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Austria Denmark Portugal Uruguay Iceland Spain SlovakiaCyprus Italy Estonia Malta Uruguay Taiwan Hungary Greece S.Slovakia Argentina Slovenia Uruguay Mexico Croatia Brazil

  14. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass Geothermal Small Hydro Solar Wind Statewide CA-N CA-with a relatively small hydro resource require additionaldairy Photovoltaic Parabolic Small hydro Wind Hydro 1 Steam

  15. How USDA Forecasts Production and Supply/Demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; O'Brien, Daniel; Welch, Mark

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimate of planted and harvested acres. This survey uses two different samples, called frames. The first is the area frame, which is the land area of the United States. This ensures that the population of farmers is covered by the survey. The second....? National Agricultural Statistics Service and Office of the Chief Economist, World Agricultural Outlook Board. Miscellaneous Publication No. 1554, March 1999. Educational programs of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without...

  16. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    competition between gas turbines and compressed air energyby fuel type, prime mover (gas turbine versus steam turbine,cycle NGCT Natural gas combustion turbine NGST Natural gas

  17. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    came from combustion turbines and steam turbines in 2005.hydro Wind Hydro 1 Steam turbine and conventional hydrogeneration from steam turbine and combustion turbine plants,

  18. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of one foot Bonneville Power Administration California Air600 MWe from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This

  19. 39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Engineering 18618 Smart Grids & Fut. Elec. Energy Sys (12) TBA 18771 Linear Systems (12)MW2:304:20,F2 to Sustainable Engr (12)MW34:20 19472 Fund. Electric Pwr Sys (12/note MW3:304:20) 19638 (18618) Smart Grids & F 12706 Civil Systems Invest. Plan & Pricing (12)MW10:3012:20 12741 Data Management & Analysis (A26)TR121

  20. 39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    . Search & Decision Civil Infrastruc (6A3 TR121:20) Electrical & Computer Engineering 18618 Smart Grids Science & Policy (12 TR121:20) 19638 (18618) Smart Grids & F. Elec. 19653 (24640) S.T. Climate Change Mit) 12706 Civil Systems Investment Planning & Pricing (12) 12745 AIS Systems Project Course (12 TR34

  1. Trends in Gulf Coast Power Supply, Demand, and Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posey, L. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 1980s, both the cost and availability of industrial electric power will become critical to corporations contemplating expansions and new sites along the Gulf Coast. Fuel costs have grown rapidly, and the shift to coal and nuclear power...

  2. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy Policy,wind energy: modeling the competition between gas turbines and compressed air energy storage for supplemental generation, Energy Policy,wind or solar power will singularly provide a majority of renewable generation in a future with energy policies

  3. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Figure 63. Average electricity costs are noticeably lowerprofile has lower average electricity costs, because fossiland generation, average electricity costs, and GHG emissions

  4. Understanding Democratic Congruence: A Demand-Supply Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzel, Christian; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luxemb. Mexico G.B. El Salv. Malta Italy Peru NL SloveniaSlovenia Cyprus Italy Estonia Malta Uruguay Taiwan HungaryBrazil Domin. R. Cyprus Chile Malta Portugal Peru Venezuela

  5. Consumer demand and labor supply : goods, monetary assets, and time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, William A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Locally integrable models 319 X Contents Appendix G Appendix to Chapter 4 323 CL Eisenpress nonlinear FIML program 323 C2. Chapter 4 proofs 331 Appendix D. Appendix to Chapter 5 347 Dl. Data sources 34 Appendix E. Appendix to Chapter 7 351 E1. Other.... Part I was initiated in my Ph.D. thesis research at Carnegie-Mellon University. My thesis adviser, whose assistance was ex tensive, was Paul Shaman. 1 am. particularly indebted to Henri Theil for his valuable and extensive comments on each draft...

  6. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fractions of coal power, marginal emissions rates could beon coal power in LADWP leads to higher average emissionscoal-fired power plants, respectively, median hourly GHG emissions

  7. An overview of energy supply and demand in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world's largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China's energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China's energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

  8. An overview of energy supply and demand in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world`s largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China`s energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China`s energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

  9. Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : 42Q)2Q)6)2k(STEO)

  10. Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon Capture andsoftwareAsianEnergy Information Assisting

  11. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appen, Jan von

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive Power from Distributed Energy”, The Electricityvoltage. Electricity consumers’ demand for reactive power ison electricity supply security, the costs of local reactive

  12. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  13. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

  14. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

  15. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

  16. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced regional GHG emissions by 375 tons in the first year of station deployment.

  17. Roadmap for Agriculture Biomass Feedstock Supply in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Thomas D. Foust; Reed Hoskinson; David Thompson

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee established a goal that biomass will supply 5% of the nation’s power, 20% of its transportation fuels, and 25% of its chemicals by 2030. These combined goals are approximately equivalent to 30% of the country’s current petroleum consumption. The benefits of a robust biorefinery industry supplying this amount of domestically produced power, fuels, and products are considerable, including decreased demand for imported oil, revenue to the depressed agricultural industry, and revitalized rural economies. A consistent supply of highquality, low-cost feedstock is vital to achieving this goal. This biomass roadmap defines the research and development (R&D) path to supplying the feedstock needs of the biorefinery and to achieving the important national goals set for biomass. To meet these goals, the biorefinery industry must be more sustainable than the systems it will replace. Sustainability hinges on the economic profitability of all participants, on environmental impact of every step in the process, and on social impact of the product and its production. In early 2003, a series of colloquies were held to define and prioritize the R&D needs for supplying feedstock to the biorefinery in a sustainable manner. These colloquies involved participants and stakeholders in the feedstock supply chain, including growers, transporters, equipment manufacturers, and processors as well as environmental groups and others with a vested interest in ensuring the sustainability of the biorefinery. From this series of colloquies, four high-level strategic goals were set for the feedstock area: • Biomass Availability – By 2030, 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock is needed annually to achieve the power, fuel, and chemical production goals set by the Biomass Research and Development Technology Advisory Production Committee • Sustainability – Production and use of the 1 billion dry tons annually must be accomplished in a sustainable manner • Feedstock Infrastructure – An integrated feedstock supply system must be developed and implemented that can serve the feedstock needs of the biorefinery at the cost, quality, and consistency of the set targets • System Profitability – Economic profitability and sustainability need to be ensured for all required participants in the feedstock supply system. For each step in the biomass supply process—production, harvesting and collection, storage, preprocessing, system integration, and transportation—this roadmap addresses the current technical situations, performance targets, technical barriers, R&D needs, and R&D priorities to overcome technical barriers and achieve performance targets. Crop residue biomass is an attractive starting feedstock, which shows the best near-term promise as a biorefinery feedstock. Because crop residue is a by-product of grain production, it is an abundant, underutilized, and low cost biomass resource. Corn stover and cereal straw are the two most abundant crop residues available in the United States. Therefore, this roadmap focuses primarily on the R&D needed for using these biomass sources as viable biorefinery feedstocks. However, achieving the goal of 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock will require the use of other biomass sources such as dedicated energy crops. In the long term, the R&D needs identified in this roadmap will need to accommodate these other sources of biomass as well.

  18. Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure – Optimizingdevelopment of a hydrogen infrastructure has been identifiedrecent studies of hydrogen infrastructure have assessed

  19. Presented by Petascale System Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented by Petascale System Infrastructure Galen M. Shipman Group Leader, Technology Integration National Center for Computational Sciences #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy and analysis cluster #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Shipman_Infrastructure_SC10

  20. Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

  1. Energy Demand Staff Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 2007 USChina #12;Overview:Overview: Key Energy Demand DriversKey Energy Demand Drivers · 290 million new urban residents 1990-2007 · 375 million new urban residents 2007

  2. Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

  3. Demand Response In California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

  4. A hybrid inventory management system respondingto regular demand and surge demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammad S. Roni; Mingzhou Jin; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a hybrid policy for a stochastic inventory system facing regular demand and surge demand. The combination of two different demand patterns can be observed in many areas, such as healthcare inventory and humanitarian supply chain management. The surge demand has a lower arrival rate but higher demand volume per arrival. The solution approach proposed in this paper incorporates the level crossing method and mixed integer programming technique to optimize the hybrid inventory policy with both regular orders and emergency orders. The level crossing method is applied to obtain the equilibrium distributions of inventory levels under a given policy. The model is further transformed into a mixed integer program to identify an optimal hybrid policy. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of parameters on the optimal inventory policy and minimum cost. Numerical results clearly show the benefit of using the proposed hybrid inventory model. The model and solution approach could help healthcare providers or humanitarian logistics providers in managing their emergency supplies in responding to surge demands.

  5. Researcher explores economics of U.S. urban water demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 24 Researcher explores economics of U.S. urban water demand Photo by: Danielle Supercinski tx H2O | pg. 25 With projected demands for future water supplies becoming more critical, understand- ing urban... contributing to urban water demand in the United States. They analyzed how water use is affected by water prices in nearly 200 U.S. cities. ?It?s interesting that many people still buy into the myth that water demand is not price- sensitive, even though...

  6. The Regional Impact of Climate Change on Public Infrastructure and Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjune, Stephen; Briscoe, H. Dorrell; Cruickshanks, Brian; McElroy, Amy; Nickeson, Daniel; Richardson, Adam; Schmid, Matt; Wang, Fangfang "Jessie"

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studying the impact of climate change on public infrastructure. The following section summarizes some of the reports that outline public infrastructure vulnerabilities to climate change impacts, as well as some of their general findings that might also... decreasing estimated costs (Hazleton, 2008). Increased demand is not the only vulnerability in the H-GAC electricity grid; storms have costly impacts on energy systems as well. From 1994 to 2004, the average cost of storm damage to electric utilities...

  7. ELECTRIC INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGY, TRAINING, AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TREMEL, CHARLES L

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Electric Infrastructure Technology, Training and Assessment Program was to enhance the reliability of electricity delivery through engineering integration of real-time technologies for wide-area applications enabling timely monitoring and management of grid operations. The technologies developed, integrated, tested and demonstrated will be incorporated into grid operations to assist in the implementation of performance-based protection/preventive measures into the existing electric utility infrastructure. This proactive approach will provide benefits of reduced cost and improved reliability over the typical schedule-based and as needed maintenance programs currently performed by utilities. Historically, utilities have relied on maintenance and inspection programs to diagnose equipment failures and have used the limited circuit isolation devices, such as distribution main circuit breakers to identify abnormal system performance. With respect to reliable problem identification, customer calls to utility service centers are often the sole means for utilities to identify problem occurrences and determine restoration methodologies. Furthermore, monitoring and control functions of equipment and circuits are lacking; thus preventing timely detection and response to customer outages. Finally, the two-way flow of real-time system information is deficient, depriving decision makers of key information required to effectively manage and control current electric grid demands to provide reliable customer service in abnormal situations. This Program focused on advancing technologies and the engineering integration required to incorporate them into the electric grid operations to enhance electrical system reliability and reduce utility operating costs.

  8. CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

  9. Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Analysis: Milestone Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This milestone report identifies a minimum infrastructure that could support the introduction of hydrogen vehicles and develops and evaluates transition scenarios supported by this infrastructure.

  10. Sandia Energy - Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Home Stationary Power Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructureashoter2015...

  11. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program: 2002 Annual Progress Report...

  12. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY2003 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program FY2003...

  13. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell...

  14. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen On April...

  15. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Evaluation to determine whether Infrastructure...

  16. California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  17. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities Workshop Agenda Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Agenda Agenda for the Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

  18. Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis...

  19. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" held on November 18, 2014. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and...

  20. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  1. State Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California Gerhard H Achtelik Jr. February 17, 2011 Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop California Environmental Protection...

  2. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design Presentation given at the EV Everywhere...

  3. Controlling electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eikenberry, J.

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, demand control has not been viewed as an energy conservation measure, its intent being to reduce the demand peak to lower the electric bill demand charge by deferring the use of a block of power to another demand interval. Any energy savings were essentially incidental and unintentional, resulting from curtailment of loads that could not be assumed at another time. This article considers a microprocessor-based multiplexed system linked to a minicomputer to control electric power demand in a winery. In addition to delivering an annual return on investment of 55 percent in electric bill savings, the system provides a bonus in the form of alarm and monitoring capability for critical processes.

  4. How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 How Increased Crude Oil Demand by China and India Affects the International Market. Abstract The global crude oil market is characterised by complex interactions between demand and supply. The question that we address in this paper is how increased demand for crude oil by China and India affects

  5. On Using Complex Event Processing for Dynamic Demand Response Optimization in Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    DR. Our focus is on demand-side management rather than supply-side constraints. Continuous data from that can benefit demand-side management in DR, an accessible means to define them at a higher level California Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA Email: {simmhan, prasanna}@usc.edu Abstract--Demand-side load reduction

  6. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  7. Uranium 2011 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24th edition of the “Red Book”, a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countri...

  8. An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    a critical infrastructure for the functioning of our modern economies and societies. Electric power lightsAn Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling Abstract: In this paper, we develop a novel electric power supply chain network model with fuel supply

  9. Instrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    of the elasticities of supply and demand from the relationship between price and quantity 1 See Goldberger (1972 and supply curves shift over time, the observed data on quantities and prices reflect a set of equilibrium points on both curves. Consequently, an ordinary least squares regression of quantities on prices fails

  10. Midterm Supply Chain Planning Under Demand Uncertainty : Customer Demand Satisfaction and Inventory Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    and Inventory Management Anshuman Gupta and Costas D. Maranas1 Department of Chemical Engineering inventory depletion at the production sites and excessive shortage at the customer. A chance constraint and standard deviation of the inventory are derived and used for setting the appropriate CDS level

  11. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

  12. Degree design of coupled infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hover, Franz S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent asymptotic model of cascading failure in two-domain, coupled infrastructures is used to pose and solve a specific degree-distribution design problem. Low-order non-linear analysis exposes the mechanisms by which ...

  13. Modeling hydrogen fuel distribution infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulido, Jon R. (Jon Ramon), 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis' fundamental research question is to evaluate the structure of the hydrogen production, distribution, and dispensing infrastructure under various scenarios and to discover if any trends become apparent after ...

  14. Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand. #12;Introduction, the wholesale electricity price in New England decreased by 38% mainly because the delivered natural gas priceIntroduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples

  15. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  16. 2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Morrell

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

  17. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes controlled hydrogen fleet & infrastructure analysis undertaken for the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

  18. Analytic Solutions for Supply Function Equilibria: Uniqueness and Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newbery, David

    realization of demand, 2 ruling out cases where the best supply response has a negative slope (and must therefore be constrained to a constant over an interval whose choice depends on the probability distribution of demand shocks). They characterise a strong... price cap of p demand function is again written as A(t) #0; p, then the least competitive SFE for the case n = 3 in (8) has K = A#0;2 p3pp and so aggregate supply Q = 3q: Q(p; ) = (A#0; 2 p) p p=p#0; 3 p: For any value of p, Q...

  19. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

  20. Capacity additions ease tight methanol supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greek, B.F. (C and EN, Houston, TX (US))

    1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two menthanol plants now in operation - one in the U.S., the other in Chile - will boost global supplies of methanol more than 375 million gal annually. This large capacity addition and smaller expansions in other parts of the world will exceed demand growth during 1988 and 1989, easing the squeeze on supplies. As the result of increased supplies, methanol prices could slip slightly in the fourth quarter. They are more likely to decline next year, however. The two plants, which started up in August, are owned and operated by Tenneco Oil Co. Processing and Marketing and by Cape Horn Methanol (CHM). The Tenneco plant, located in Pasadena, Tex., was restarted after a shutdown in 1982 when prices for methanol were low. It now is running at full capacity of 125 million gal per year. The plant uses the low-pressure process technology of Lurgi, reportedly requiring for feedstock and energy between 100,000 and 125,000 cu ft of methane per gallon. Global trade in methanol smooths out the supply and demand inconsistencies. Surging methanol demand in the U.S. and in Western Europe has been met by imports from areas where methanol production is most economical - that is, where natural gas is readily available and has no other application as high in value. Canada, Chile, and Trinidad are examples of those areas.

  1. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Exploration of Australian Petrol Demand: Unobserv- ableRelative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con- sumption Behavior.habit stock variable in a petrol demand regression, they

  2. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

  3. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    27 Smart Meter and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI)may be insufficient. Most smart meters and their supportingcommon for these new “smart” meters to read data every half-

  4. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  5. Assessment of capital requirements for alternative fuels infrastructure under the PNGV program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stork, K.; Singh, M.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an assessment of the capital requirements of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a new Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels include two petroleum-based fuels (reformulated gasoline and low-sulfur diesel) and four alternative fuels (methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen). This study develops estimates of cumulative capital needs for establishing fuels production and distribution infrastructure to accommodate 3X vehicle fuel needs. Two levels of fuel volume-70,000 barrels per day and 1.6 million barrels per day-were established for meeting 3X-vehicle fuel demand. As expected, infrastructure capital needs for the high fuel demand level are much higher than for the low fuel demand level. Between fuel production infrastructure and distribution infrastructure, capital needs for the former far exceed those for the latter. Among the four alternative fuels, hydrogen bears the largest capital needs for production and distribution infrastructure.

  6. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Program Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure.5Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program (EERE) President's Office of Science Berkeley, California #12;President Bush Launches the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative "Tonight I am proposing $1

  7. Towards Truly Ubiquitous and Opportunistic Trust Infrastructures: Position for Next Generation Cybersecurity Infrastructure Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    : Position for Next Generation Cybersecurity Infrastructure Workshop Stephen Nightingale Generation Cybersecurity Infrastructure workshop, we note that Federated Identities [1 ubiquitous and opportunistic, single rooted trust infrastructure is emerging. Its

  8. Compressed Air Supply Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, B.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPRESSED AIR SUPPLY EFFICENCY Babu Joseph, Ph.D., P.E. Engineer Southern California Edison Irwindale, CA ABSTRACT This project, under contract from California Energy Commission, developed the CASE (Compressed Air Supply Efficiency...

  9. Electric Drive Vehicle Infrastructure Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pricing encourages off-peak energy * Smart Grid Integration o Charging stations with Demand Response, Time-of-Use Pricing, and AMI compatible with the modern electric grid *...

  10. A Systems-Integration Approach to the Optimal Design and Operation of Macroscopic Water Desalination and Supply Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atilhan, Selma

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the escalating levels of water demand, there is a need for expansion in the capacity of water desalination infrastructure and for better management and distribution of water resources. This dissertation introduces a systems approach...

  11. A Systems-Integration Approach to the Optimal Design and Operation of Macroscopic Water Desalination and Supply Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atilhan, Selma

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the escalating levels of water demand, there is a need for expansion in the capacity of water desalination infrastructure and for better management and distribution of water resources. This dissertation introduces a systems approach...

  12. Travel Demand Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

  13. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Manager Kae Lewis Acting Manager Demand Analysis Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy

  14. Climate Change and Infrastructure, Urban Systems, and Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, Thomas J [ORNL] [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Report on Climate Change and Infrastructure, Urban Systems, and Vulnerabilities has been prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA). It is a summary of the currently existing knowledge base on its topic, nested within a broader framing of issues and questions that need further attention in the longer run. The report arrives at a number of assessment findings, each associated with an evaluation of the level of consensus on that issue within the expert community, the volume of evidence available to support that judgment, and the section of the report that provides an explanation for the finding. Cross-sectoral issues related to infrastructures and urban systems have not received a great deal of attention to date in research literatures in general and climate change assessments in particular. As a result, this technical report is breaking new ground as a component of climate change vulnerability and impact assessments in the U.S., which means that some of its assessment findings are rather speculative, more in the nature of propositions for further study than specific conclusions that are offered with a high level of confidence and research support. But it is a start in addressing questions that are of interest to many policymakers and stakeholders. A central theme of the report is that vulnerabilities and impacts are issues beyond physical infrastructures themselves. The concern is with the value of services provided by infrastructures, where the true consequences of impacts and disruptions involve not only the costs associated with the clean-up, repair, and/or replacement of affected infrastructures but also economic, social, and environmental effects as supply chains are disrupted, economic activities are suspended, and/or social well-being is threatened. Current knowledge indicates that vulnerability concerns tend to be focused on extreme weather events associated with climate change that can disrupt infrastructure services, often cascading across infrastructures because of extensive interdependencies threatening health and local economies, especially in areas where human populations and economic activities are concentrated in urban areas. Vulnerabilities are especially large where infrastructures are subject to multiple stresses, beyond climate change alone; when they are located in areas vulnerable to extreme weather events; and if climate change is severe rather than moderate. But the report also notes that there are promising approaches for risk management, based on emerging lessons from a number of innovative initiatives in U.S. cities and other countries, involving both structural and non-structural (e.g., operational) options.

  15. Notes and Proposed Guidelines on Updated Seismic Codes in Ethiopia -Implications for Large-Scale Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    such as dams, power-plants, highway roads, water reservoirs, and expansion of railways either coming online-scale engineering infrastructure works such as mass-housing, water-supply reservoirs, power-plants, dams, new cities,2,3]. In addition to a multitude of other threats that this population growth could bring, the issue of housing

  16. Ris Energy Report 8 The intelligent energy system infrastructure for the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø Energy Report 8 The intelligent energy system infrastructure for the future Reprint Petersen #12;Risø Energy Report 5 Renewable energy for power and transport Global energy policy today is dominated by three concerns: security of supply, climate change, and energy for development and poverty

  17. Call for Participation in a Workshop on Inter-Infrastructure Risks Due to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    that will help distribute renewable energy through to the SESAR proposals for European software integrationCall for Participation in a Workshop on Inter-Infrastructure Risks Due to Natural Hazards systems (e.g., transport, water supply and sewers, energy, communications). These interdependencies

  18. Electrical Demand Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bination of a 2200 ton, the 1200 ton and the 800 ton units or by two 2200 ton units. We sought to di sp 1ace the 1200 ton or part of a 2200 ton unit with two steam turbi ne chill ers duri ng peak hours at a total reduced cost for supplying all building...

  19. ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency and Demand Analysis Division Scott W. Matthews Acting Executive

  20. Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity demand forecast means that the region's electricity needs would grow by 5,343 average megawattsDemand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required in electricity demand is, of course, crucial to determining the need for new electricity resources and helping

  1. Networks, deregulation, and risk : the politics of critical infrastructure protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Ryan Nelson

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post, electric power, and rail, like most infrastructures,Post, electric power, and rail, like most infrastructuresElectric Power .. 349 Conclusion: The Politics of Critical Infrastructure

  2. Optimal Dynamic Strategy of Building a Hydrogen Infrastructure in Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Building a Hydrogen Infrastructure in Beijing Zhenhongthe on-going Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT)build up a regional hydrogen infrastructure while minimizing

  3. Participatory infrastructure monitoring : design factors and limitations of accountability technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offenhuber, Dietmar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates practices of participatory infrastructure monitoring and their implications for the governance of urban infrastructure services. By introducing the concept of infrastructure legibility, the ...

  4. BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

  5. Demand and Usage in Scotland Update Report to March 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stage on long term supply and demand in the sector, and the likely effects on long term markets for timber from the national forest and other potential sources of woodfuel. The report is part of the work, but there has been a major increase in operational projects as a result of the success of the Scottish Biomass

  6. Wind Power Project Repowering: History, Economics, and Demand (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes a related NREL technical report and seeks to capture the current status of wind power project repowering in the U.S. and globally, analyze the economic and financial decision drivers that surround repowering, and to quantify the level and timing of demand for new turbine equipment to supply the repowering market.

  7. Unexpected consequences of demand response : implications for energy and capacity price level and volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Tal Z. (Tal Ze'ev)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, electricity consumption has been largely insensitive to short term spot market conditions, requiring the equating of supply and demand to occur almost exclusively through changes in production. Large scale ...

  8. Incorporating Demand Resources into ISO New England’s Forward Capacity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New England states, and industry stakeholders to promote investment in demand- and supply-side resources. Under the new FCM design, ISO New England will project the needs...

  9. An exploration of automotive platinum demand and its impacts on the platinum market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitfield, Christopher George

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The platinum market is a material market of increasing interest, as platinum demand has grown faster than supply in recent years. As a result, the price of platinum has increased, causing end-user firms to experience ...

  10. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

  11. "Mapping" Nonprofit Infrastructure Organizations in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aho, Andrea; Harris, Amanda; Kessel, Kendall; Park, Jongsoo; Park, Jong Taek; Rios, Lisa; Swendig, Brett

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of the nonprofit sector and its ability to meet our nation‘s needs in an era of unprecedented challenges requires a solid nonprofit infrastructure (Brown, et al., 2008). These organizations that comprise this infrastructure system work...

  12. National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture Consultation Draft Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture: Consultation Draft Environmental Information Architecture: Consultation Draft, Bureau of Meteorology, Canberra, Australia, pp. 52. With the exception

  13. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zoia (2005). "Hydrogen infrastructure strategic planningITS—RR—06—05 The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing Zhenhong

  14. The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zoia (2005). "Hydrogen infrastructure strategic planningITS—RR—06—05 The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing Zhenhong

  15. Microsoft Word - 2014 Infrastructure - Intro.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy - National Energy Technology Laboratory The Infrastructure (Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships) Technology Area highlights DOE's awareness of the...

  16. Office of National Infrastructure & Sustainability | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Infrastructure & Sustainability | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Smart power infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Security, Materials Science, Partnership, Research & Capabilities, SMART Grid, Systems Engineering, Transmission Grid Integration Increasing consumer power...

  18. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop Refueling Infrastructure for...

  19. National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berscheid, Alan P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) mission is to: (1) Improve the understanding, preparation, and mitigation of the consequences of infrastructure disruption; (2) Provide a common, comprehensive view of U.S. infrastructure and its response to disruptions - Scale & resolution appropriate to the issues and All threats; and (3) Built an operations-tested DHS capability to respond quickly to urgent infrastructure protection issues.

  20. Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management...

  1. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal DecisionRichlandDelegations,Demand

  2. Energy Theft in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Patrick Drew

    , with this infrastructure comes new risk. In this paper, we consider ad- versary means of defrauding the electrical gridEnergy Theft in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure Stephen McLaughlin, Dmitry Podkuiko, and Patrick McDaniel Systems and Internet Infrastructure Security Laboratory (SIIS) Pennsylvania State

  3. PROTECTING INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS FROM REAL-TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burmester, Mike

    to critical infrastructure assets. The paper defines a threat model, an- alyzes vulnerabilities, proposes in an electricity grid. Also, it discusses the impact of run-time attacks on TC-compliant critical infrastructure. The crucial nature of the services provided by critical infrastructure systems and the vulnerabilities found

  4. The X.509 Privilege Management Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Management Infrastructure (PMI) introduced in the 2000 edition of X.509. It describes the entities Management Infrastructure (PMI), and it enables privileges to be allocated, delegated, revoked and withdrawn in an electronic way. A PMI is to authorisation what a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is to authentication

  5. hen the legacy power infrastructure is aug-mented by a communication infrastructure, it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yan

    hen the legacy power infrastructure is aug- mented by a communication infrastructure, it becomes information among different components of the power infrastructure. As a result, the power grid can operate into the power infrastructure will introduce many security challenges. For example, it is estimated that the data

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    adjustments, minus stock change, minus refinery and blender net inputs, minus exports. Net receipts are added as a component of supply at the PAD District level. Crude oil...

  7. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEST PRACTICES AND RESULTS OF DR IMPLEMENTATION . 31 Encouraging End-User Participation: The Role of Incentives 16 Demand Response

  8. Electrolytic hydrogen production infrastructure options evaluation. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel-cell electric vehicles have the potential to provide the range, acceleration, rapid refueling times, and other creature comforts associated with gasoline-powered vehicles, but with virtually no environmental degradation. To achieve this potential, society will have to develop the necessary infrastructure to supply hydrogen to the fuel-cell vehicles. Hydrogen could be stored directly on the vehicle, or it could be derived from methanol or other hydrocarbon fuels by on-board chemical reformation. This infrastructure analysis assumes high-pressure (5,000 psi) hydrogen on-board storage. This study evaluates one approach to providing hydrogen fuel: the electrolysis of water using off-peak electricity. Other contractors at Princeton University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating the feasibility of producing hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas, probably the least expensive hydrogen infrastructure alternative for large markets. Electrolytic hydrogen is a possible short-term transition strategy to provide relatively inexpensive hydrogen before there are enough fuel-cell vehicles to justify building large natural gas reforming facilities. In this study, the authors estimate the necessary price of off-peak electricity that would make electrolytic hydrogen costs competitive with gasoline on a per-mile basis, assuming that the electrolyzer systems are manufactured in relatively high volumes compared to current production. They then compare this off-peak electricity price goal with actual current utility residential prices across the US.

  9. Direct Adaptive Control of Electricity Demand S. Keshav and C. Rosenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    Report CS-2010-17 ABSTRACT The legacy electrical grid upper-bounds a customer's en- ergy demand using An electrical grid supplies reliable power to residential, industrial, and commercial customers by dynamicallyDirect Adaptive Control of Electricity Demand S. Keshav and C. Rosenberg School of Computer Science

  10. THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY PROFESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY, Iowa State University ABSTRACT There is a tremendous imbalance between engineering workforce demand and supply in the world in general, and in the US, in particular. The electric power and energy industry

  11. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  12. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, End-User Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency The California Energy Demand 2014-2024 Preliminary Forecast, Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand

  13. Electrical Demand Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the reservoir. Util i ties have iiting for a number of years. d a rebate for reducing their When the utility needs to shed is sent to turn off one or mnre mer's electric water heater or equipment. wges have enticed more and more same strategies... an increased need for demand 1 imiting. As building zone size is reduced, total instal led tonnage increases due to inversfty. Each compressor is cycled by a space thermostat. There is no control system to limit the number of compressors running at any...

  14. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs...

  15. Demand Response: Load Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

  16. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

    2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

  17. Electric Power Infrastructure Reliability and Security (EPIRS) Reseach and Development Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Meeker; L. Baldwin; Steinar Dale; Alexander Domijan; Davild Larbalestier; Hui Li; Peter McLaren; Sastry Pamidi; Horatio Rodrigo; Michael Steurer

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Power systems have become increasingly complex and face unprecedented challenges posed by population growth, climate change, national security issues, foreign energy dependence and an aging power infrastructure. Increased demand combined with increased economic and environmental constraints is forcing state, regional and national power grids to expand supply without the large safety and stability margins in generation and transmission capacity that have been the rule in the past. Deregulation, distributed generation, natural and man-made catastrophes and other causes serve to further challenge and complicate management of the electric power grid. To meet the challenges of the 21st century while also maintaining system reliability, the electric power grid must effectively integrate new and advanced technologies both in the actual equipment for energy conversion, transfer and use, and in the command, control, and communication systems by which effective and efficient operation of the system is orchestrated - in essence, the 'smart grid'. This evolution calls for advances in development, integration, analysis, and deployment approaches that ultimately seek to take into account, every step of the way, the dynamic behavior of the system, capturing critical effects due to interdependencies and interaction. This approach is necessary to better mitigate the risk of blackouts and other disruptions and to improve the flexibility and capacity of the grid. Building on prior Navy and Department of Energy investments in infrastructure and resources for electric power systems research, testing, modeling, and simulation at the Florida State University (FSU) Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS), this project has continued an initiative aimed at assuring reliable and secure grid operation through a more complete understanding and characterization of some of the key technologies that will be important in a modern electric system, while also fulfilling an education and outreach mission to provide future energy workforce talent and support the electric system stakeholder community. Building upon and extending portions of that research effort, this project has been focused in the following areas: (1) Building high-fidelity integrated power and controls hardware-in-the-loop research and development testbed capabilities (Figure 1). (2) Distributed Energy Resources Integration - (a) Testing Requirements and Methods for Fault Current Limiters, (b) Contributions to the Development of IEEE 1547.7, (c) Analysis of a STATCOM Application for Wind Resource Integration, (d) Development of a Grid-Interactive Inverter with Energy Storage Elements, (e) Simulation-Assisted Advancement of Microgrid Understanding and Applications; (3) Availability of High-Fidelity Dynamic Simulation Tools for Grid Disturbance Investigations; (4) HTS Material Characterization - (a) AC Loss Studies on High Temperature Superconductors, (b) Local Identification of Current-Limiting Mechanisms in Coated Conductors; (5) Cryogenic Dielectric Research; and (6) Workshops, education, and outreach.

  18. An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    a critical infrastructure for the functioning of our modern economies and societies. Electric power lightsAn Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling; revised April 2008 Abstract: In this paper, we develop a novel electric power supply chain network model

  19. Assessment of Demand Response Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

  20. A Sustainable approach to large ICT Science based infrastructures; the case for Radio Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Domingos; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Aguiar, Rui; van Ardenne, Arnold; de Santander-Vela, Juande; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large sensor-based infrastructures for radio astronomy will be among the most intensive data-driven projects in the world, facing very high power demands. The geographically wide distribution of these infrastructures and their associated processing High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities require Green Information and Communications Technologies (ICT). A combination is needed of low power computing, efficient data storage, local data services, Smart Grid power management, and inclusion of Renewable Energies. Here we outline the major characteristics and innovation approaches to address power efficiency and long-term power sustainability for radio astronomy projects, focusing on Green ICT for science.

  1. Advanced Demand Side Management for the Future Smart Grid Using Mechanism Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    meter. All smart meters are connected to not only the power grid but also a communication infrastructure. This allows two-way communication among smart meters and the utility company. We analytically model each user1 Advanced Demand Side Management for the Future Smart Grid Using Mechanism Design Pedram Samadi

  2. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFPTri-Party AgreementInfrared Mapping

  3. infrastructure

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A0/%2Agtri

  4. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link toInfluenceInfrared Mapping HelpsMicro-grid

  5. Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link toInfluenceInfrared Mapping

  6. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  7. The Supply Chain Management MBA is one of the strategic concentrations at Rutgers Business School. Simply put, Supply Chain Management is how business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Chain Management Students in the supply chain management concentration also have opportunities to earn Venture Development in a SC Environment Demand Analysis and Management for Value Chains Lean SixThe Supply Chain Management MBA is one of the strategic concentrations at Rutgers Business School

  8. Sandia Energy - Water Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety Home StationaryUpperWakeInfrastructure

  9. Capacity planning in a general supply chain with multiple contract types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xin, 1978-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study capacity planning in a general supply chain that contains multiple products, processes, and resources. We consider situations with demand uncertainty, outsourcing contracts, and option contracts. ...

  10. Aftermarket vehicle hybridization : designing a supply network for a startup company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Causton, Marcus S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our thesis introduces a supply chain framework catered for startup companies. Startup companies face unique circumstances such as constraints on financial and human resources, and greater uncertainty in demand. From our ...

  11. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Piette, Mary Ann; Fujita, Sydny; McKane, Aimee; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Radspieler, Anthony; Mares, K.C.; Shroyer, Dave

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines data center characteristics, loads, control systems, and technologies to identify demand response (DR) and automated DR (Open Auto-DR) opportunities and challenges. The study was performed in collaboration with technology experts, industrial partners, and data center facility managers and existing research on commercial and industrial DR was collected and analyzed. The results suggest that data centers, with significant and rapidly growing energy use, have significant DR potential. Because data centers are highly automated, they are excellent candidates for Open Auto-DR. 'Non-mission-critical' data centers are the most likely candidates for early adoption of DR. Data center site infrastructure DR strategies have been well studied for other commercial buildings; however, DR strategies for information technology (IT) infrastructure have not been studied extensively. The largest opportunity for DR or load reduction in data centers is in the use of virtualization to reduce IT equipment energy use, which correspondingly reduces facility cooling loads. DR strategies could also be deployed for data center lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Additional studies and demonstrations are needed to quantify benefits to data centers of participating in DR and to address concerns about DR's possible impact on data center performance or quality of service and equipment life span.

  12. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  13. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

  14. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas demands are forecast for the four natural gas utilitythe 2006-2016 Forecast. Commercial natural gas demand isforecasts and demand scenarios. Electricity planning area Natural gas

  15. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

  16. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

  17. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  18. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  19. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

  20. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

  1. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

  2. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  3. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy and environmental benefits of demand controlledindicate the energy and cost savings for demand controlled24) (California Energy Commission 2008), demand controlled

  4. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy and environmental benefits of demand controlled indicate the energy and cost savings for  demand controlled 24) (California Energy  Commission 2008), demand controlled 

  5. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrating HECO and Hawaii Energy demand response relatedpotential. Energy efficiency and demand response efforts areBoth  energy  efficiency  and  demand  response  should  

  6. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

  7. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

  8. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and best practices to guide HECO demand response developmentbest practices for DR renewable integration – Technically demand responseof best practices. This is partially because demand response

  9. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

  10. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on Building

  11. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In terms of demand response capability, building operatorsautomated demand response and improve building energy andand demand response features directly into building design

  12. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEMAND RESPONSE .7 Wholesale Marketuse at times of high wholesale market prices or when systemenergy expenditure. In wholesale markets, spot energy prices

  13. Improving supply chain resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Elsa Hiu Man

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

  14. Compressed Air Supply Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, B.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, under contract from California Energy Commission, developed the CASE (Compressed Air Supply Efficiency) Index as a stand-alone value for compressor central plant efficiency. This Index captures the overall efficiency of a compressed...

  15. Supply chain dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Ricardo Wagner Lopes, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong bargaining power of major retailers and the higher requirements for speed, service excellence and customization have significantly contributed to transform the Supply Chain Management. These increasing challenges ...

  16. European supply chain study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puri, Mohitkumar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Supply chain management has been defined as, "..a set of approaches utilized to efficiently integrate suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and stores, so that merchandise is produced and distributed at the ...

  17. Cyber Threats to Nuclear Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Anderson; Paul Moskowitz; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Curtis St. Michel

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear facility personnel expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against both natural and man-made threats. Historically, most attention has been placed on physical security. Recently however, the threat of cyber-related attacks has become a recognized and growing world-wide concern. Much attention has focused on the vulnerability of the electric grid and chemical industries to cyber attacks, in part, because of their use of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. Lessons learned from work in these sectors indicate that the cyber threat may extend to other critical infrastructures including sites where nuclear and radiological materials are now stored. In this context, this white paper presents a hypothetical scenario by which a determined adversary launches a cyber attack that compromises the physical protection system and results in a reduced security posture at such a site. The compromised security posture might then be malevolently exploited in a variety of ways. The authors conclude that the cyber threat should be carefully considered for all nuclear infrastructures.

  18. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text version and video recording of the webinar titled "2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar," originally presented on March 10, 2015.

  19. Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis, Options and Trade-offs, Transition and Long-term Presentation on Hydrogen...

  20. Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: Interactive...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive MAP in PDF, all Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic Documents: Interactive MAP in PDF, all...

  1. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions. Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Station Technology Linde, Sandia Partnership Looks to Expand Hydrogen Fueling Network On February 26, 2015, in Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Energy,...

  3. Department of Energy Cites Parsons Infrastructure & Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for violations of DOE's worker safety and health regulations with a proposed civil penalty of 70,000. The violations are associated...

  4. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Convene industry and other stakeholders to share current statusstate-of-the art for natural gas and hydrogen infrastructure. * Identify key challenges (both technical and...

  5. Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    'Novel' Financing Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential for 'Novel' Financing Models...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: "smart water" infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "smart water" infrastructure Sandians Published in American Chemical Society's Environmental Science & Technology On December 11, 2014, in Analysis, Climate, Energy, Global Climate...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: accelerate hydrogen infrastructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerate hydrogen infrastructure technologies Energy Department Awards 7M to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems On June 12, 2014, in CRF, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage...

  8. Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia AgencyCompany Organization: Natural...

  9. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presented at Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Conference, April 2-3, 2008, Sacramento, California fry.pdf More Documents &...

  10. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings from the DOE sponsored Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can...

  11. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop - Workshop Proceedings, February...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles and Hydrogen Fuel Stations Moving toward a commercial market for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles and Hydrogen Infrastructure: Deployment and Issues...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: fueling infrastructure development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fueling infrastructure development New Report Describes Joint Opportunities for Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicle Markets On March 6, 2015, in Capabilities, Center for...

  13. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    methane reformer SOTA State-of-the-Art v Executive Summary Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a...

  14. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Evaluation to determine whether the...

  15. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities: Markets and Barriers to Growth Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets and Barriers to Growth Presentation by Matt Most, Encana Natural Gas,...

  16. Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Analysis given by Keith Parks of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory during the DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop on January 26,...

  17. International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Workshop Summary - NOW, NEDO, and DOE" held on December 16,...

  18. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation by Keith Wipke at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis Project.

  19. Optimization of Dispersed Energy Supply -Stochastic Programming with Recombining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    plant park can hardly be saved. In this context, electrical energy storage offers a possibility of storages have to be valued against market prices as established at the energy exchanges. Also the operation, seasonal, and other cyclic patterns in demand, supply, and prices, which require a valuation of storage

  20. Safe and Sustainable Seafood Supply Focus Team Report 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resulted in suppliers and retailers adopting new best management practices that save $4.86 million annually of safe seafood to meet public demand. Ensuring a sustainable supply of safe seafood requires responsible and productive use of these resources in the future. # 6399 CONNECTICUT SEA GRANT Connecticut