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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Day with SecretaryDerivedof

2

Chapter 3 Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Day with SecretaryDerivedof MeetingEfficient0::2.:3.

3

Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix U.S.7685 Vol. 76, No. 29DoingSRS-WD-2010-001 Revision 0

4

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

DSM Program Development. The demand-side resource options were developed using a combination of internal engineering estimates and external consulting services. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the determination of the optimum program level to be included in the IRP. The demand-side management options wereDSM Program Development. The demand-side resource options were developed using a combination Practices Manual: Economic Analysis of Demand-side Programs and Projects.2 The proposed DSM programs

6

Industrial Demand-Side Management in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of programs result in lower consumption and/or lower peak demand, and ultimately reduce the need to build new capacity. Hence demand-side management can be used as a resource option to be considered alongside more traditional supply-side resources in a...INDUSTRIAL DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT IN TEXAS Danielle Jaussaud Economic Analysis Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The industrial sector in Texas is highly energy intensive and represents a large share...

Jaussaud, D.

7

Local government involvement in long term resource planning for community energy systems. Demand side management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program was developed to coordinate governmental, research, utility, and business energy savings efforts, and to evaluate future potential actions, based on actual field data obtained during the implementation of Phase I of the State Resource Plan. This has lead to the establishment of a state conservation and energy efficiency fund for the purpose of establishing a DSM Program. By taking a state wide perspective on resource planning, additional savings, including environmental benefits, can be achieved through further conservation and demand management. This effort has already blossomed into a state directive for DSM programs for the natural gas industry.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Public involvement in integrated resource planning: A study of demand-side management collaboratives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many utilities and nonutility parties (NUPs) across the country have tried a new approach to reaching agreement on Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design and policy issues. Through this, which is called the DSM collaborative process, parties who have often been adversaries in the past attempt to reach consensus rather than using traditional litigation to resolve differences. We examined nine cases of DSM collaboration involving 24 utilities and approximately 50 NUPs in 10 states. This is the first comprehensive, in-depth review and assessment of collaboratives and it allows conclusions to be drawn about the collaborative process and the factors that contribute to successful efforts of this type. Collaboratives are described in terms of four major contextual and organizational characteristics: regulatory and legal history, parties involved and parties excluded, collaborative scope, and the collaborative process itself.

Raab, J. [Raab (J.), Boston, MA (United States); Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Marketing Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand-Side Management is an organizational tool that has proven successful in various realms of the ever changing business world in the past few years. It combines the multi-faceted desires of the customers with the increasingly important...

O'Neill, M. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analysis of Michigan's demand-side electricity resources in the residential sector: Volume 3, End-use studies: Revised final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the ''Analysis of Michigan's Demand-Side Electricity Resources in the Residential Sector'' contains end-use studies on various household appliances including: refrigerators, freezers, lighting systems, water heaters, air conditioners, space heaters, and heat pumps. (JEF)

Krause, F.; Brown, J.; Connell, D.; DuPont, P.; Greely, K.; Meal, M.; Meier, A.; Mills, E.; Nordman, B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

South Korea-ANL Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side Management |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa,HomeIndiana:Rhode Island References:

13

Report: Impacts of Demand-Side Resources on Electric Transmission Planning  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015Department of Energy onACQUISITIONReport: IG-0449|

14

Fuse Control for Demand Side Management: A Stochastic Pricing Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a service contract for load curtailment. Index Terms--Demand side management, aggregated demand response

Oren, Shmuel S.

15

Micro economics for demand-side management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper aims to interpret Demand-Side Management (DSM) activity and to point out its problems, adopting microeconomics as an analytical tool. Two major findings follow. first, the cost-benefit analysis currently in use ...

Kibune, Hisao

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management Annelize Victor Michael Brodkorb Sr. Business Consultant Business Development Manager Aspen Technology, Inc. Aspen Technology España, S.A. Houston, TX Barcelona, Spain ABSTRACT To remain... competitive, manufacturers must capture opportunities to increase bottom-line profitability. The goal of this paper is to present a new methodology for reducing energy costs – “Demand-Side Energy Management.” Learn how process manufacturers assess energy...

Victor, A.; Brodkorb, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiency Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPRI). 1984. ”Demand Side Management. Vol. 1:Overview of Key1993. ”Industrial Demand-Side Management Programs: What’sJ. Kulick. 2004. ”Demand side management and energy e?ciency

Auffhammer, Maximilian; Blumstein, Carl; Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-33887 UC-000 BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES Jonathan G. Koomey ............................................................................................... 2 Demand-Side Efficiency Technologies I. Energy Management Systems (EMSs

19

Incentives for demand-side management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first product of an ongoing project to monitor the efforts of states to remove regulatory barriers to, and provide financial incentives for, utility investment in demand-side management (DSM) resources. The project was commissioned by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) in response to growing interest among regulators for a comprehensive survey of developments in this area. Each state report beings with an overview of the state's progress toward removing regulatory barriers and providing incentives for DSM. Information is organized under five headings: status; IRP regulations and practice; current treatment of DSM, directions and trends; commission contact person. Where applicable, each overview is followed by one or more sections that report on specific incentive proposals or mechanisms within the state. Information on each proposal or mechanism is organized under eight headings. A notation on each page identifies the utility or other group associated with the proposal or mechanism. The eight headings are as follows: status; background; treatment of cost recovery; treatment of lost revenues/decoupling; treatment of profitability; other features; issues, and additional observations.

Reid, M.W.; Brown, J.B. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Incentives for demand-side management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first product of an ongoing project to monitor the efforts of states to remove regulatory barriers to, and provide financial incentives for, utility investment in demand-side management (DSM) resources. The project was commissioned by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) in response to growing interest among regulators for a comprehensive survey of developments in this area. Each state report beings with an overview of the state`s progress toward removing regulatory barriers and providing incentives for DSM. Information is organized under five headings: status; IRP regulations and practice; current treatment of DSM, directions and trends; commission contact person. Where applicable, each overview is followed by one or more sections that report on specific incentive proposals or mechanisms within the state. Information on each proposal or mechanism is organized under eight headings. A notation on each page identifies the utility or other group associated with the proposal or mechanism. The eight headings are as follows: status; background; treatment of cost recovery; treatment of lost revenues/decoupling; treatment of profitability; other features; issues, and additional observations.

Reid, M.W.; Brown, J.B. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

System Demand-Side Management: Regional results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the Bonneville Power Administration's (Bonneville's) ability to analyze the value and impacts of demand-side programs, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed and implemented the System Demand-Side Management (SDSM) model, a microcomputer-based model of the Pacific Northwest Public Power system. This document outlines the development and application of the SDSM model, which is an hourly model. Hourly analysis makes it possible to examine the change in marginal revenues and marginal costs that accrue from the movement of energy consumption from daytime to nighttime. It also allows a more insightful analysis of programs such as water heater control in the context of hydroelectric-based generation system. 7 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Englin, J.E.; Sands, R.D.; De Steese, J.G.; Marsh, S.J.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Assessment of Demand Response Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

23

Demand-Side Response from Industrial Loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a research study funded by the Department of Energy, Smart Grid solutions company ENBALA Power Networks along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have geospatially quantified the potential flexibility within industrial loads to leverage their inherent process storage to help support the management of the electricity grid. The study found that there is an excess of 12 GW of demand-side load flexibility available in a select list of top industrial facilities in the United States. Future studies will expand on this quantity of flexibility as more in-depth analysis of different industries is conducted and demonstrations are completed.

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Letto, Daryl [Enbala Power Networks; Johnson, Brandon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dowling, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); George, Raoule [Enbala Power Networks; Khan, Saqib [University of Texas, Austin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Supply Chain Networks, Electronic Commerce, and Supply Side and Demand Side Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain Networks, Electronic Commerce, and Supply Side and Demand Side Risk Anna Nagurney as well as demand side risk are included in the formulation. The model consists of three tiers of decision chain network equilibrium model with electronic com- merce and with supply side and demand side risk

Nagurney, Anna

25

Paying for demand-side response at the wholesale level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent FERC Notice of Public Rulemaking regarding the payment to demand-side resources in wholesale markets has engendered a great deal of comments including FERC's obligation to ensure just and reasonable rates in the wholesale market and criteria for what FERC should do (on grounds of economic efficiency) without any real focus on what that commitment would really mean if FERC actually pursued it. (author)

Falk, Jonathan

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Industrial demand side management: A status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of and rationale for industrial demand side management (DSM) programs. Benefits and barriers are described, and data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey are used to estimate potential energy savings in kilowatt hours. The report presents types and examples of programs and explores elements of successful programs. Two in-depth case studies (from Boise Cascade and Eli Lilly and Company) illustrate two types of effective DSM programs. Interviews with staff from state public utility commissions indicate the current thinking about the status and future of industrial DSM programs. A comprehensive bibliography is included, technical assistance programs are listed and described, and a methodology for evaluating potential or actual savings from projects is delineated.

Hopkins, M.F.; Conger, R.L.; Foley, T.J. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing Jin Xiao, Jae--In this paper, we present demand-side energy manage- ment under real-time demand-response pricing as a task, demand-response, energy management I. INTRODUCTION The growing awareness of global climate change has

Boutaba, Raouf

29

Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlled Electric Springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of demand-side management for electricand simulation of demand-side management potential in urbanin smart grids, demand side management has been a keen topic

Soni, Jayantika; Krishnanand, KR; Panda, Sanjib

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Agreement for Energy Conservation and Demand Side Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

agreement between a U.S. Federal agency and a utility company for the implementation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) and demand side management (DSM) services....

31

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Photovoltaics for demand-side management: Opportunities for early commercialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, interest in utilizing photovoltaics (PV) in a demand-side management (DSM) role has been increasing. Research has shown that many utilities across the US have a good match between peak loads and the availability of the solar resource. Maximum value for PV in DSM applications can be achieved by incorporating a dispatching capability to PV systems (through the addition of storage). This enables utilities to evaluate PV systems as a peak-shaving technology. To date, peak-shaving has been a high-value DSM application for US utilities. The authors analysis of the value of dispatchable PV-DSM systems indicates that small-scale, customer-sited systems are approaching competitive cost levels in several regions of the US that have favorable load matching and high demand charges. This paper presents the results of an economic analysis for high-value PV-DSM systems located in the service territories of five case study utilities. The results suggest that PV is closer to commercialization when viewed as a DSM technology relative to analyses that focus on the technology as a supply-side option.

Byrne, J.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C.; Wang, Y.D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power, Newark, DE (United States); Wallace, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

integration of energy efficiency, distributed generation, renewable energy resources and energy storage technologies, both locally and globally, to maximize the value of the...

34

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Demand Side Dispatching, Part 2: An Industrial Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEMAND SIDE DISPATCHING, Part 2: AN INDUSTRIAL APPUCATION Ravi Nath Donald A. Cerget Edward T. Henderson Sr. Consultant Sr. Account Executive Sr. Engineer Linnhoff March, Inc. Detroit Edison Detroit Edison Houston, TX Detroit, M1 Detroit, M1...

Nath, R.; Cerget, D. A.; Henderson, E. T.

36

POWERTECH 2009, JUNE 28 -JULY 2, 2009, BUCHAREST, ROMANIA 1 Incorporation of Demand Response Resources in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POWERTECH 2009, JUNE 28 - JULY 2, 2009, BUCHAREST, ROMANIA 1 Incorporation of Demand Response, IEEE, Abstract--The use of demand-side resources, in general, and demand response resources (DRRs concerns. Integration of demand response resources in the competitive electricity markets impacts resource

Gross, George

37

A Demand-Side Management Experience in Existing Building Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As part of a suite of demand-side management (DSM) program offerings, Xcel Energy provides a recommissioning program to its Colorado commercial customers. The program has a summer peak-demand savings goal of 7.8 MW to be achieved by 2005. Commenced...

Franconi, E.; Selch, M.; Bradford, J.; Gruen, B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-technologies used for demand- side management (DSM) on mini-can provide additional demand-side management based on the

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mul$-scale Demand-Side Management for Con$nuous Power-intensive Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mul$-scale Demand-Side Management for Con$nuous Power-intensive Processes Response Energy Efficiency Demand-Side Management (DSM)1 Integra on Demand-Side Management, with an emphasis on price responsive programs", CRA No

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

40

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Incorporating Demand Resources into ISO New England’s Forward Capacity Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 2007 that defined 6,102 megawatts (MW) of new demand- and supply-side resources now eligible to compete in the market. Approximately 40 percent—or 2,483 MW—of the new, qualified projects are demand-side resources such as demand response, energy...

Winkler, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

US electric utility demand-side management, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

NONE

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlled Electric Springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlleddemand side management has been a keen topic of interest. Buildings,

Soni, Jayantika; Krishnanand, KR; Panda, Sanjib

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Emerging Technologies for Industrial Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as demand-side management strategies for industrial consumers of electricity. An alternative strategy to replacing aging electric motors with high efficiency or ASD motors is a turbine let-down. A turbine letdown is a turbine which uses pressure reduction...

Neely, J. E.; Kasprowicz, L. M.

47

Demand Side Management (DSM) Through Absorption Refrigeration Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEMAND SIDE MANAGEMENT (DSM) TIIROUGH ABSORPTION REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS Peter Y. Chao, PhD, Deepak Shukla, PhD, Sr. Process Engineers, TENSA Services, Inc. Ammi Amarnath, Sr. Project Manager, Electrical Power Research Institute Ed. Mergens.... They are Peak Clipping, Valley filling, Load Shifting, Strategic Conservation, Strategic Load Growth, and Flexible Load Shaping. Absorption Refrigeration from waste heat offers a viable option for DSM. This will either reduce the peak load (peak clipping...

Chao, P. Y.; Shukla, D.; Amarnath, A.; Mergens, E.

48

Division of IT Convergence Engineering Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of IT Convergence Engineering Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand of appliance specific adapters. Designed and implemented GHS Modeled the demand-side energy management problem (NP-hard) Designed a scheduling algorithm for demand side energy management Showed that our

Boutaba, Raouf

49

An MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand control systems can be divided functionally into supply-side and load-side control/management systems. Supply-side demand management systems, implemented by the utilities, choose between maintainingAn MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar* , Joseph Sottile

Kumar, Ratnesh

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment demand-side energy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Demand Response (DR) and Energy Efficiency (EE... Collaborators: Jose M. Pinto, Praxair Inc., Danbury, CT Nikhil Arora, Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY 12;DemandSide......

51

Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management Programs Supervisory Committee Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management of Environmental Studies) Departmental Member For energy utilities faced with expanded jurisdictional energy

Victoria, University of

52

Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services by Simon Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services by Simon Christopher Parkinson B highly-distributed sustainable demand- side infrastructure, in the form of heat pumps, electric vehicles

Victoria, University of

54

CSEM WP 165R Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSEM WP 165R Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiency Revisited Maximilian Auffhammer, Carl, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiency Revisited Maximilian associated with energy efficiency demand side management (DSM) programs. This claim is based on point

Auffhammer, Maximilian

55

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES BY ANUPAMA SUNIL KOWLI B of consumers - called demand response resources (DRRs) - whose role has become increasingly important

Gross, George

56

Opportunities and prospects for demand-side efficiency improvements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantial progress has been made over the last 20 years in improving energy efficiency in all sectors of the US economy. Although there remains a large potential for further efficiency gains, progress in improving energy efficiency has slowed recently. A combination of low energy prices, environmental challenges, and life-style changes have caused energy consumption to resume rising. Both new policies and technologies will be necessary to achieve cost-effective levels of energy efficiency. This paper describes some of the promising new demand-side technologies that are currently being implemented, nearing commercialization, or in advanced stages of development. The topics discussed include finding replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), new building equipment and envelope technologies, lessons learned about conservation program implementation, and the role of utilities in promoting the efficient use of energy.

Kuliasha, M.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Uranium 2005 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The strategic use of renewables to achieve demand-side management impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to both the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), utilities in the United States are now spending about $2 billion per year on demand-side management (DSM) activities. By the year 2000, EPRI and EEI predict that utilities will be spending $10 to $15 billion per year on DSM. If this expenditure is matched by consumers, total expenditures -- $30 billion a year -- will equal what the nation spent on power plant construction during the peak 1970s power plant building era. Historically, DSM programs at utilities utilize technologies that reduce the demand for electricity and energy used by their customers. This is accomplished primarily by increasing the efficacy of lighting, improving the conversion efficiency of heating, cooling, and process equipment, and reducing thermal losses through the building envelope. A broader definition of DSM -- one that incorporates renewable energy resources -- will greatly enhance the opportunity to impact customer loads. Renewable energy technologies use resources that are not depleted, such as heat and light from the sun, the force of winds, falling water, biomass, and geothermal heat from the earth. As related to utility systems, renewable technologies can contribute in three main ways: (1) the more traditional ``supply-side`` role as central generating plants or independent power producers, (2) as distributed generation (supply-side variation), and (3) as demand-side options. Distributed generation is being seriously studied by several utilities as a means of serving remote loads and reducing transmission and distribution costs, but is not discussed further in this paper. Demand-side renewable technologies (DSR) are technologies that utilize renewable energy to reduce the end-use load of a customer. In this paper we will describe specific DSR options, characterize their potential load impact, and recommend a method for effectively integrating them into current DSM programs.

Carlisle, N.; Hauser, S.; Potter, T.; Westby, R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

588 IEEE SYSTEMS JOURNAL, VOL. 8, NO. 2, JUNE 2014 GTES: An Optimized Game-Theoretic Demand-Side  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Nei Kato, Fellow, IEEE, and Ivan Stojmenovic, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Demand-side management in smart]­[4]. For the successful deployment of the smart grid, demand-side management or demand response [5]­[7] is crucial. Demand-side in the shape of loads of the utility company. While demand-side management aims at producing a change

Stojmenovic, Ivan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Autonomous Demand Side Management Based on Game-Theoretic Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous Demand Side Management Based on Game-Theoretic Energy Consumption Scheduling distributed demand side energy management strategy requires each user to simply apply its best response-average ratio of the total energy demand, the total energy costs, as well as each user's individual daily

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

62

ECEEE 2005 SUMMER STUDY WHAT WORKS & WHO DELIVERS? 183 Local energy efficiency and demand-side  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECEEE 2005 SUMMER STUDY ­ WHAT WORKS & WHO DELIVERS? 183 1,202 Local energy efficiency and demand be the basis for local energy policies and energy efficiency/demand-side management activities1, have been) activities in 1. DSM: Demand-Side Management; EE: energy efficiency (here, does not include renewable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

A Hierarchical Framework for Demand-Side Frequency Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With large-scale plans to integrate renewable generation, more resources will be needed to compensate for the uncertainty associated with intermittent generation resources. Under such conditions, performing frequency control using only supply-side resources become not only prohibitively expensive but also technically difficult. It is therefore important to explore how a sufficient proportion of the loads could assume a routine role in frequency control to maintain the stability of the system at an acceptable cost. In this paper, a novel hierarchical decentralized framework for frequency based load control is proposed. The framework involves two decision layers. The top decision layer determines the optimal droop gain required from the aggregated load response on each bus using a robust decentralized control approach. The second layer consists of a large number of devices, which switch probabilistically during contingencies so that the aggregated power change matches the desired droop amount according to the updated gains. The proposed framework is based on the classical nonlinear multi-machine power system model, and can deal with timevarying system operating conditions while respecting the physical constraints of individual devices. Realistic simulation results based on a 68-bus system are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

Moya, Christian; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) presentation on demand response as power system resources before the Electicity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010 Demand Response as...

65

Review of demand-side bidding programs: Impacts, costs, and cost-effectiveness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1987, Central Maine Power (CMP) instituted the first competitive bidding program that allowed developers to propose installation of conservation measures. Since then, about 30 utilities in 14 states have solicited bids from energy service companies (ESCOs) and customers to reduce energy demand in residential homes and in commercial and industrial facilities. Interest in the use of competitive procurement mechanisms for demand-side resources continues to grow. In this study, the authors build upon earlier work conducted by LBL in collaboration with others (Goldman and Busch 1992; Wolcott and Goldman 1992). They have developed methods to compare bid prices and program costs among utilities. They also characterize approaches used by utilities and developers to allocate risks associated with DSM resources based on their review of a large sample of signed contracts. These contracts are analyzed in some detail because they provide insights into the evolving roles and responsibilities of utilities, customers, and third party contractors in providing demand-side management (DSM) services. The analysis also highlights differences in the allocation of risks between traditional utility rebate programs and DSM bidding programs.

Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Towards a systematic characterization of the potential of demand side management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With an increasing share of electric energy produced from non-dispatchable renewable sources both energy storage and demand side management might gain tremendously in importance. While there has been significant progress in general properties and technologies of energy storage, the systematic characterization of features particular to demand side management such as its intermittent, time-dependent potential seems to be lagging behind. As a consequence, the development of efficient and sustainable strategies for demand side management and its integration into large-scale energy system models are impeded. This work introduces a novel framework for a systematic time-resolved characterization of the potential for demand side management. It is based on the specification of individual devices both with respect to their scheduled demand and their potential of load shifting. On larger scales sector-specific profiles can straightforwardly be taken into account. The potential for demand side management is then specifie...

Kleinhans, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Low-Interest Loans for Customer-Side Distributed Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Long-term financing is available to retail end-use customers for the installation of customer-side distributed resources. Customer-side distributed resources are defined by Conn. Gen. Stat. § 16-1...

68

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources Anupama Kowli and George in the electricity industry. In particular, there is a new class of consumers, called demand response resources (DRRs

Gross, George

69

On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic;On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch Abstract Information asymmetry in retail electricity markets is one of the largest sources of inef

Chen, Yiling

70

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Demand Response Technology Development The objective ofin planning demand response technology RD&D by conductingNew and Emerging Technologies into the California Smart Grid

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Demand Side Management in the Smart Grid: Information Processing for the Power Switch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article we discuss the most recent developments in the area of load management, and consider possible interaction schemes of novel architectures with distributed energy resources (DER). In order to handle the challenges faced by tomorrow’s smart grid, which are caused by volatile load and generation profiles (from the large number of plug-in EVs and from renewable integration), the conventional grid operating principle of load-following needs to be changed into load-shaping or generation-following. Demand Side Management will be a most promising and powerful solution to the above challenges. However, many other issues such as load forecasting, pricing structure, market policy, renewable integration interface, and even the AC/DC implementation at the distribution side, need to be taken into the design in order to search for the most effective and applicable solution.

Alizadeh, Mahnoosh; LI, Xiao; Wang, Zhifang; Scagilone, Anna; Melton, Ronald B.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Demand-Side Load Scheduling Incentivized by Dynamic Energy Hadi Goudarzi, Safar Hatami, and Massoud Pedram  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand-Side Load Scheduling Incentivized by Dynamic Energy Prices Hadi Goudarzi, Safar Hatami growth in electrical energy consumption under worst- case demand conditions [1]. To avoid expending 90089 {hgoudarz, shatami, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--Demand response is an important part of the smart

Pedram, Massoud

74

A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources Contribution of intelligent line switching, demand response resources (DRRs), FACTS devices and PMUs is key in the smart grid events as a result of voluntary load curtailments. Index Terms--Electricity Markets, Demand Response re

Gross, George

75

Guidelines for Marketing Demand-Side Management in the Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the past decade, electric and gas utilities throughout the nation, not just in hot and humid climates, have promoted energy efficiency through a variety of demand-side management (DSM) programs. In 1984, the Electric Power Research Institute...

George, S. S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Demand Side Strategies for Energy Efficiency in University of British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a project/report". #12;DEMAND&SIDE)STRATEGIES)FOR)ENERGY)EFFICIENCY) INUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Demand Side Strategies for Energy Efficiency in University of British Columbia Residences Jennifer Clark, Nate Croft, Liam Fast

77

Demand side management in India: Opportunities and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India`s electricity demand has been growing by more than 8% per year over the last decade. However, despite the fact that more than 70% of its 130 million households do not have access to electricity, demand for electricity has outstripped supply resulting in frequent blackouts and routine brownouts. India`s per capita consumption of electricity is about 240 KWh compared to about 500 KWh in other developing countries and 7,000 KWh in developed nations. According to the Fifteenth Power Survey by Indian Ministry of Energy, per capita energy consumption is projected to grow at about 5.5% per year until 2020, when India`s population is projected to reach 1.2 billion people. Based on these projections, India will need a generating capacity of 450,000 MW in 2020, compared to the current capacity of about 80,000 MW. Considering rising costs, limited fuel supply, and shortages of capital for power plant construction, it is unlikely that projected capacity will be realized. The only viable option would be to utilize available power through intensive energy efficiency improvements and load management.

Nezhad, H.G.; Mehta, J.V.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response underof Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response underof Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Multi-scale Demand-Side Management for Continuous Power-intensive Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(DR) Reduce demand on operational level Energy Efficiency (EE) Permanently reduce power consumption Demand-Side Management (DSM) "Systematic utility and government activities designed to change the amount and/or timing of the customer's use of electricity for the collective benefit of the society

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

80

Abstract--Implementation of Distribution Automation (DA) and Demand Side Management (DSM) intended to serve both  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Implementation of Distribution Automation (DA) and Demand Side Management (DSM) intended with differentiate QoS in a multitasking environment. I. INTRODUCTION ODERN society demands a reliable and high by the distribution utility for the security. REMPLI (Remote Energy Management over Power Lines and Internet) system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SGDP Report: Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstrati...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited demand response resources, both conventional and renewable, to integrate more effectively with electric...

82

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Response: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Coordination of Energy Efficiency and...

83

Supply-side Resources & Planning Assumptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- station Solar PV (from 6th Plan) 25 MW dc/20 MW net ac output using flat plate non concentrating single) ­ Storage Resource assessment data needs and applications R d f t Resources proposed for assessment Forecasts ProCost 46/19/2013 #12;6/19/2013 3 Resource data & planning assumptions Reference plant (New

84

Overview of Demand Side Response | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthewith2009 DOETransmission SaraOverview

85

Agreement for Energy Conservation and Demand Side Management Services  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdfAboutSheet,ProposedEnergySITINGDepartment

86

Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithunCenter Jump to:2 Rules,NellisAntilles:

87

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie,InfieldInstalledResearchEnergy Sources, and

88

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie,InfieldInstalledResearchEnergy Sources,

89

On-Demand Based Wireless Resources Trading for Green Communications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of Green Communications is to reduce the energy consumption of the communication system as much as possible without compromising the quality of service (QoS) for users. An effective approach for Green Wireless Communications is On-Demand strategy, which scales power consumption with the volume and location of user demand. Applying the On-Demand Communications model, we propose a novel scheme -- Wireless Resource Trading, which characterizes the trading relationship among different wireless resources for a given number of performance metrics. According to wireless resource trading relationship, different wireless resources can be consumed for the same set of performance metrics. Therefore, to minimize the energy consumption for given performance metrics, we can trade the other type of wireless resources for the energy resource under the demanded performance metrics. Based on the wireless resource trading relationship, we derive the optimal energy-bandwidth and energy-time wireless resource trading ...

Cheng, Wenchi; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Qiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (Interoperability Project) was awarded to Con Edison in 2009. The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited Demand Response resources to integrate more effectively with electric delivery companies and regional transmission organizations.

Wellington, Andre

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty AfzalEnergy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty ?DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response as a resource.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response the resource and describes some of the potential advantages and problems of the development of demand response. WHAT IS DEMAND RESPONSE? Demand response is a change in customers' demand for electricity corresponding

93

ZONAL PRICING AND DEMAND-SIDE BIDDING IN THE NORWEGIAN ELECTRICITY MARKET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PWP-063 ZONAL PRICING AND DEMAND-SIDE BIDDING IN THE NORWEGIAN ELECTRICITY MARKET Tor Arnt Johnsen of the Program on Workable Energy Regulation (POWER). POWER is a program of the University of California Energy. University of California Energy Institute 2539 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www

California at Berkeley. University of

94

Advanced Demand Side Management for the Future Smart Grid Using Mechanism Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

meter. All smart meters are connected to not only the power grid but also a communication infrastructure. This allows two-way communication among smart meters and the utility company. We analytically model each user1 Advanced Demand Side Management for the Future Smart Grid Using Mechanism Design Pedram Samadi

Wong, Vincent

95

DEMAND SIDE ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION PROGRAM Measurement and Verification Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEMAND SIDE ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION PROGRAM Measurement and Verification Program 4 operating hours for the lights in each room a. Assign a usage category to each room in all buildings (e electrical usage and savings in room by room spreadsheet d. Subtotal savings by building

Hofmann, Hans A.

96

DEMAND SIDE ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION PROGRAM Measurement and Verification Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEMAND SIDE ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION PROGRAM Measurement and Verification Program 4 Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF) and building demographics for savings calculations 4-retrofit; calculate savings in room by room spreadsheet 5. Pre-retrofit (Process water audit) ­ Walk buildings

Hofmann, Hans A.

97

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory, Wind Power Integration, Markov Chain, Dynamic Potential Game Theory, Nash Equilibrium. I. INTRODUCTION the intermittency in wind power generation. Our focus is on an isolated microgrid with one wind turbine, one fast

Huang, Jianwei

98

Smart grid-demand side response model to mitigate prices and peak impact on the electrical system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aims of this project is to develop demand side response model which assists electricity consumers who are exposed to the market price through aggregator… (more)

Marwan, Marwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Coordinated Aggregation of Distributed Demand-Side Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-5706 Phone: 480-965-1643 Fax: 480-965-0745 Notice Concerning Copyright Material PSERC members are given is given to this document as the source material. This report is available for downloading from the PSERC website. 2014 Cornell University. All rights reserved #12;Acknowledgements This is the final report

100

Text and slides of presentation originally presented to the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board regarding the province's Demand Side Management program,19 April 2010.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regarding the province's Demand Side Management program,19 April 2010. ERG/201003 Nova Scotia's Demand Side Scotia's Demand Side Management program: Concerns and recommendations1 Larry Hughes, PhD Energy Research restrictions, I will discuss only two of my concerns regarding Nova Scotia's Demand Side Management (DSM

Hughes, Larry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Demand-side issues of the service economy Paru dans : Review of Political Economy, Vol. 16, No. 4, Oct. 2004.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand-side issues of the service economy Paru dans : Review of Political Economy, Vol. 16, No. 4 the relevance of the demand-side approach to the development of a service economy. Its starts by addressing some in "Review of Political Economy 16, 4 (2004) 473-483" #12;2 1. Introduction Since the 1980s, most

Boyer, Edmond

102

Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options Neufville Professor of Engineering Systems Chair, ESD Education Committee #12;2 #12;3 Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities By Chia

de Weck, Olivier L.

103

Museum-on-Demand: Dynamic management of resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Museum-on-Demand: Dynamic management of resources in World Wide Web museums Fabrizio Furano: Given the problem of building virtual museums, this paper discusses the tasks of retrieving, assembling. A virtual museum construction approach is pre- sented, in which a comprehensive database and a complex

Celentano, Augusto

104

Demand Response Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind an solar power generation. However, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado test system. We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating

Hummon, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Photovoltaics for demand-side management utility markets: A utility/customer partnership approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems located at customer sites can be used to meet utility needs for demand-side management (DSM) applications. PV-DSM can also represent a high-value intermediate market for PV in the utility sector. Maximum value for PV in DSM applications can be achieved by incorporating a dispatching capability to PV systems (through the addition of storage). This enables utilities to evaluate PV systems as a peak-shaving technology. To date, peak-shaving has been the higher value DSM application for US utilities. This analysis of the value of dispatchable PV-DSM systems indicates that small-scale, customer-sited systems are approaching competitive cost levels in several regions of the US that have favorable load matching and peak demand pricing characteristics. This paper presents the results for PV-DSM systems located within the service territories of five case study utilities.

Byrne, J.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C.; Wang, Y.D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power and Light Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Wallace, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Shady Side, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search|Sewaren, NewShadow Flicker Jump to:Hollow,Side,

107

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis (HyDRA) Model  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health and ProductivityEnergyEnergyHybridAnalysisContaminationDemand and

108

Demand-Side and Supply-Side Load Management: Optimizing with Thermal Energy Storage (TES) for the Restructuring Energy Marketplace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-side regarding power generation. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can provide the flexibility essential to the economical management of power. In large industrial applications, the added value of TES has been demonstrated, not only in managing operating costs...

Andrepont, J. S.

109

2013 Strategic Planning Initiative Market/Demand Resources Index of Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workforce Profile 16. WWAMI Physician Workforce 2005 17. UA Expanding Access to Health Programs (EAHP) Plan 18. State Health Care Workforce Development Planning Grant Planning Alaska's Health Workforce FINAL;2013 Strategic Planning Initiative Market/Demand Resources Title: 2009 Alaska Health Workforce Vacancy Study

Pantaleone, Jim

110

Abstract--Smart Grid technology appears necessary to succeed in activating the demand through demand side management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract--Smart Grid technology appears necessary to succeed in activating the demand through recommendations regarding the instruments that should be implemented to maximize the benefits of smart grids by the European Union. The development of smart grids (SG) is a possible solution for achieving these goals [1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

111

Side-payment profitability and interacting eyeball ISPs under convex demand-response modeling congestion-sensitive applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is concerned with the issue of side payments between content providers (CPs) and Internet service (access bandwidth) providers (ISPs) in an Internet that is potentially not neutral. We herein generalize past results modeling the ISP and CP interaction as a noncooperative game in two directions. We consider different demand response models (price sensitivities) for different provider types in order to explore when side payments are profitable to the ISP. Also, we consider convex (non-linear) demand response to model demand triggered by traffic which is sensitive to access bandwidth congestion, particularly delay-sensitive interactive real-time applications. Finally, we consider a model with two competing "eyeball" ISPs with transit pricing of net traffic at their peering point to study the effects of caching remote content.

Kesidis, George

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters.

113

Tackling Co-existence and Fairness Challenges in Autonomous Demand Side Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fulfilling the user's energy needs. The literature on DSM with smart pricing is extensive. One thread Side Management, Energy Consumption Scheduling, Co-existence, Fairness, Game Theory. I. INTRODUCTION the energy consumption at the consumer side of the meter [1]. One approach in DSM is direct load control (DLC

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

114

Memorandum: Cost-effectiveness valuation framework for Demand Response Resources: Guidelines and Suggestions (DRAFT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Memorandum: Cost-effectiveness valuation framework for Demand Response Resources: Guidelines and Suggestions (DRAFT) To: Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Cost-Effectiveness Working Group From: Chuck Northwest Demand Response Project agreed to form three Working Groups to explore DR issues in more detail

115

The Photovoltaic Crisis and the Demand-side Generation in Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The RES-E promotion policy in Spain gave priority to the photovoltaic (henceforth, PV) ground-mounted installations. For years, the coupling of customer-side generation coupled with excess energy exports was never specifically considered. However...

Mir-Artigues, Pere

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Societal demand for increasing mineral resources continue to affect societythrough aspects as varied as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Societal demand for increasing mineral resources continue to affect societythrough aspects in investment. The discovery of new mineral resources requires increasing risk, increasing costs, and to provide trained individuals to industry. Vancouver has long been a global leader in exploration

Handy, Todd C.

117

Quantifying the Benefits of Resource Multiplexing in On-Demand Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Massachusetts Amherst San Jose, CA {abhishek,shenoy}@cs.umass.edu goyalp@us.ibm.com ABSTRACT On-demand dataQuantifying the Benefits of Resource Multiplexing in On-Demand Data Centers Abhishek Chandra centers host multiple applications on server farms by dynamically provisioning resources in response

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

118

Quantifying the Benefits of Resource Multiplexing in OnDemand Data Centers #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Massachusetts Amherst San Jose, CA {abhishek,shenoy}@cs.umass.edu goyalp@us.ibm.com ABSTRACT On­demand dataQuantifying the Benefits of Resource Multiplexing in On­Demand Data Centers # Abhishek Chandra centers host multiple applications on server farms by dynamically provisioning resources in response

Chandra, Abhishek

119

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energy ResourcesPark,isHydro orHydroelectricA)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Demand-side Management Strategies and the Residential Sector: Lessons from International Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from residential buildings represented 40% of world’s total primary consumption (IEA, 2008). Projections suggest that following the global economic downturn, demand for electricity from buildings is expected to grow at 3.1% between 2007 and 2020 (Mc... the energy-using performance of products such as electrical appliance and equipment, and even buildings (Crossley et al. 2000). Voluntary & negotiated agreements Formal quantified agreement between a government body and a business or organisation which...

Haney, Aoife Brophy; Jamasb, Tooraj; Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

122

Demand Side Dispatching, Part 1: A Novel Approach for Industrial Load Shaping Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) systems fo commercial HVAC applications. Load co trol generally involves scheduling the use of electrotechnologies (e.g. air compression, pumping) during off-peak periods only, an shutting them off during on-peak periods. In order to provide... incentives to the custom r to modulate his demand, most DSM progranis combine the foregoing technologies with l1ime of-Use rate structures, capital cost subsidies (rebates), and technical support services. 317 ESL-IE-93-03-45 Proceedings from...

Kumana, J. D.; Nath, R.

123

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources like wind and solar power [100, 19]. The goal ofof DFIG-based wind farms to power system short-termimpacts of wind generation on California power systems”. In:

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Pricing Resources on Demand Costas Courcoubetis, Sergios Soursos and Richard Weber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Pricing Resources on Demand Costas Courcoubetis, Sergios Soursos and Richard Weber Athens@statslab.cam.ac.uk Abstract-- Traditional contracts for network and computing resources are of "static" type where the customer is buying the right to use for a given price a fixed amount of resources

Weber, Richard

125

SGDP Report Now Available: Interoperability of Demand Response Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# ,Schools WhenSection BA2,5,

126

SGDP Report: Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# ,Schools WhenSection BA2,5,NY

127

BRENNAN --DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Senior Fellow, Resources for the Future email: brennan@umbc2.umbc.edu POWER Conference University that encourages on-peak consumption Incentives to overbuild generation plant Inability to bundle high;BRENNAN -- DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 5 Competition: Threat or Promise? · DSM programs funded by utilities

California at Berkeley. University of

128

The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14, 2011FebruaryofUESCCoordination

130

The Demand Side: Behavioral Patterns and Unpicked Low-Hanging Fruit  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c :0.1 Housing Unit3.1.Texas-Louisiana-*The

131

Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utility new-construction DSM programs. The ultimate goal of the task is to identify opportunities where states might work collaboratively with utilities to promote the adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy-efficient building energy codes.

Wise, B.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Danko, S.L.; Gilbride, T.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Societal demand for increasing mineral resources Canada has made significant contributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Societal demand for increasing mineral resources Canada has made significant contributions. The discovery of new mineral resources requires increasing risk, increasing costs, and increasingly effective Vancouver has long been a global leader continue to affect society through aspects as varied as high metal

Michelson, David G.

133

Development of Short-term Demand Forecasting Model Application in Analysis of Resource Adequacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of Short-term Demand Forecasting Model And its Application in Analysis of Resource will present the methodology, testing and results from short-term forecasting model developed by Northwest and applied the short-term forecasting model to Resource Adequacy analysis. These steps are presented below. 1

134

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consulting), and Dave Shroyer (SCG). Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for DataIAW Research Team, Demand Response Research Center, Lawrence

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Analytical Frameworks to Incorporate Demand Response in Long-term Resource Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost- effectiveness of Demand Response. ” Prepared for theon the National Action Plan on Demand Response, February.Role of Automated Demand Response. ” LBNL-4189E, November.

Satchwell, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

Cheng, Chia-Chin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

One Sided indeterminism alone is not a useful resource to simulate any nonlocal correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determinism, no signaling and measurement independence are some of the constraints required for framing Bell inequality. Any model simulating nonlocal correlations must either individually or jointly give up these constraints. Recently M. J. W. Hall (Phys Review A, \\textbf{84}, 022102 (2011)) derived different forms of Bell inequalities under the assumption of individual or joint relaxation of those constraints on both(i.e., two) the sides of a bipartite system. In this work we have investigated whether one sided relaxation can also be a useful resource for simulating nonlocal correlations or not. We have derived Bell-type inequalities under the assumption of joint relaxation of these constraints only by one party of a bipartite system. Interestingly we found that any amount of randomness in correlations of one party in absence of signaling between two parties is incapable of showing any sort of Bell-CHSH violation whereas signaling and measurement dependence individually can simulate any nonlocal correlations. We have also completed the proof of a recent conjecture due to Hall (Phys. Rev. A \\textbf{82}, 062117 (2010); Phys. Rev. A \\textbf{84}, 022102 (2011)) for one sided relaxation scenario only.

Biswajit Paul; Kaushiki Mukherjee; Debasis Sarkar

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 Table 2. Demand Side Management Framework for IndustrialDR Strategies The demand-side management (DSM) frameworkpresented in Table 2. Demand Side Management Framework for

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We take the perspective of a microgrid that has installed distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of distributed generation with combined heat and power applications. Given uncertain electricity and fuel prices, the microgrid minimizes its expected annual energy bill for various capacity sizes. In almost all cases, there is an economic and environmental advantage to using DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected annualized energy bill is reduced by 9percent while CO2 emissions decline by 25percent. Furthermore, the microgrid's risk is diminished as DER may be deployed depending on prevailing market conditions and local demand. In order to test a policy measure that would place a weight on CO2 emissions, we use a multi-criteria objective function that minimizes a weighted average of expected costs and emissions. We find that greater emphasis on CO2 emissions has a beneficial environmental impact only if DR is available and enough reserve generation capacity exists. Finally, greater uncertainty results in higher expected costs and risk exposure, the effects of which may be mitigated by selecting a larger capacity.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

FORECASTING WATER DEMAND USING CLUSTER AND REGRESSION ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FORECASTING WATER DEMAND USING CLUSTER AND REGRESSION ANALYSIS by Bruce Bishop Professor of Civil resources resulting in water stress. Effective water management ­ a solution Supply side management Demand side management #12;Developing a regression equation based on cluster analysis for forecasting water

Keller, Arturo A.

145

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Demand Response CostsSodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Low High AverageSodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Demand Response Costs

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Abstract --Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) demand response, distributed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to accurately estimate the transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies, where dynamics on time scales of seconds to minutes demand response. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population

Zhang, Wei

147

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL. Integrating Renewable Resources in California and thethe Integration of Renewable Resources David S. Watson,the Integration of Renewable Resources. California Energy

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Optimal Management of Renewable Resources with Growing Demand and Stock Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAi\\IAGEMEJ. 'n' OF RENEWABLE RESOURCES WIlli GROWING DEMANDthe problem of a renewable resource is: -f" (x*) P*] (~p). ~MA. ? \\IAGEMENl' OF RENEWABLE RESOURCES WIlli GROWING

Berck, Peter

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Piette, LBNL. Integrating Renewable Resources in Californiaprocurement from eligible renewable energy resources to 33%to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources David S.

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for DR and demand side management, along with operationalresponse), DSM (demand side management), DR strategy, air

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Comfort demand leading the optimization to energy supply from the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The control of loads in the building, may also be a resource to the grid using the flexibilities in service of the grid in Demand Side Management (DSM) scenarios as so called Demand Response (DR) or Load Control (LC). (Callaway and Hiskens 2011) However... of energy management, building management, and comfort management have to be developed to anticipate on the coming possible changes on Demand Side Management by Demand Response (DR) and Load Control (LC). This study is a first step towards...

Aduba,K.; Zeiler,W.; Boxem,G.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Environmental and Resource Economics Household Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid income change Article Type and changing demographics. We estimate income and price elasticities for these energy types using a two effects into account, we find that total energy is price-inelastic for all income groups. For individual

153

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildings. A demand-side management framework from buildingthe integration of DR in demand-side management activitiesdevelopments. The demand-side management (DSM) framework

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001. “Electricity Demand Side Management Study: Review ofEpping/North Ryde Demand Side Management Scoping Study:Energy Agency Demand Side Management (IEA DSM) Programme:

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

perspective, a demand-side management framework with threethe integration of DR in demand-side management activitiesdevelopments. The demand-side management (DSM) framework

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research 50 (2014) 885-922 Submitted 4/14; published 8/14 Demand Side Energy Management via Multiagent Coordination in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract A key challenge in creating a sustainable and energy-efficient society is to make consumer demand propose a novel multiagent coordination algorithm, to shape the energy demand of the cooperativeJournal of Artificial Intelligence Research 50 (2014) 885-922 Submitted 4/14; published 8/14 Demand

Sadeh, Norman M.

157

Development of cold seawater air conditioning systems for application as a demand side management tool for Hawaii and other subtropical climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the proximity to deep cold seawater for many coastal regions in Hawaii and the high demand for air conditioning in large buildings, seawater air conditioning (SWAC) is a major potential sustainable energy resource for Hawaii and other subtropical regions of the world. The basic concept of seawater air conditioning is the use deep cold seawater to cool the chilled water in one or more air conditioned buildings as opposed to using energy intensive refrigeration systems. The economic viability of the seawater air conditioning is determined by comparing the construction and operating costs of the seawater supply system to the construction and operating costs of conventional air conditioning systems. The State of Hawaii commissioned an analysis to identify the technical and economic opportunities and limitations in the use of SWAC in Hawaii. The result of this work is a feasibility analysis of SWAC systems in the state and the potential associated energy savings. The study looked at the prospects of installing such a system at a major new resort development on Oahu called West Beach.

Kaya, M.H. [State of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the need and methods for commercial building sector involvement in demand response (DR). We summarize, including architects, engineers, consultants, contractors, and building owners and managers. Finally, we in the US increased the focus on the need for flexible demand-side resources to address four major

159

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response”, May 2007. LBNL-59975 38the Role of Automated Demand Response, 2010. Watson, D. , N.Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable Integration of

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

driven building response. Demand Side Management Energybuildings. Table 1 outlines how DR fits into historical demand side management (

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information New YorkGeothermal

163

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduction of a demand-side management (DSM) framework forof building controls. Demand-Side Management Framework forDOE 2006). The demand-side management (DSM) framework

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Motor proteins traffic regulation by supply-demand balance of resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In cells and in vitro assays the number of motor proteins involved in biological transport processes is far from being unlimited. The cytoskeletal binding sites are in contact with the same finite reservoir of motors (either the cytosol or the flow chamber) and hence compete for recruiting the available motors, potentially depleting the reservoir and affecting cytoskeletal transport. In this work we provide a theoretical framework to study, analytically and numerically, how motor density profiles and crowding along cytoskeletal filaments depend on the competition of motors for their binding sites. We propose two models in which finite processive motor proteins actively advance along cytoskeletal filaments and are continuously exchanged with the motor pool. We first look at homogeneous reservoirs and then examine the effects of free motor diffusion in the surrounding medium. We consider as a reference situation recent in vitro experimental setups of kinesin-8 motors binding and moving along microtubule filaments in a flow chamber. We investigate how the crowding of linear motor proteins moving on a filament can be regulated by the balance between supply (concentration of motor proteins in the flow chamber) and demand (total number of polymerised tubulin heterodimers). We present analytical results for the density profiles of bound motors, the reservoir depletion, and propose novel phase diagrams that present the formation of jams of motor proteins on the filament as a function of two tuneable experimental parameters: the motor protein concentration and the concentration of tubulins polymerized into cytoskeletal filaments. Extensive numerical simulations corroborate the analytical results for parameters in the experimental range and also address the effects of diffusion of motor proteins in the reservoir.

Luca Ciandrini; I. Neri; Jean-Charles Walter; O. Dauloudet; A. Parmeggiani

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Deployment of Demand Response as a Real-Time Resource in Organized Markets  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has beenFinancialSilver Peak AreaSolar| Open

167

US DOE Hydrgoen Program- HyDRA (Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy,UCOR Contract &on EnergyReports and|

168

US DOE Hydrgoen Program- HyDRA (Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New Energyof Energy8,November 2012U.S. Department of

169

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the4. Status of Demand Side Management in Midwest ISO 5.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Integrated Resource Planning: A Dialogue with ELCON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the building of generating units. Planning decisions would now include alternative energy sources 2 and demand side management. Also very important in the IRP process is the evaluation of external impacts of any planning decision with a special focus... and demand resources in electricity markets. In this paper we provide a definition of that concept and discuss two of its main features: Demand-side Management programs and environmental externalities. We also examine a number of positions taken by ELCON...

Treadway, N.; Torrent, G.

171

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfers or options. Demand-side management includes thepricing schemes, and demand-side management for urban water,of alternate demand side management, particularly

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commission demand-side management energy efficiencyefficiency or other demand-side management programs (seeefficiency or other demand-side management programs (see

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Piette, Integrating Renewable Resources in California andEnable Integration of Renewable Resources,” February 2012.ntegration of Renewable Resources at 20% RPS,” CAISO, August

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. A. Piette, Integrating Renewable Resources in CaliforniaEnable Integration of Renewable Resources,” February 2012.P. Worhach, ”|ntegration of Renewable Resources at 20% RPS,”

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table x provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Look Ahead at Demand Response in New England  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the demand response programs developed and in operation in New England, and the revised designs for participation in the forward capacity market. This description will include how energy efficiency, demand-side resources, and distributed generation are eligible to participate in this new forward capacity market. The paper will also discuss various methods that can be used to configure and communicate with demand response resources and important concerns in specifying interfaces that accommodate multiple technologies and allow technology choice and evolution.

Burke, Robert B.; Henderson, Michael I.; Widergren, Steven E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ongoing pilot demand-side management (DSM) programs ina comprehensive demand-side management (DSM) pilot program,a directive on demand-side management (DSM) in late 2010.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pottebaum et al. Event Definition for Intelligent Resource Management Event Definition for the Application of Event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of resource management (use case and demand side) and event processing (technology and supply side). MethodsPottebaum et al. Event Definition for Intelligent Resource Management Event Definition for the Application of Event Processing to Intelligent Resource Management Jens Pottebaum University of Paderborn, C

Paliouras, George

182

Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management- good housekeeping Pricing ­ Time of Use Tariffs DSM Programme = DSM option +programme structure

Banerjee, Rangan

183

Electric Utility Demand-Side Evaluation Methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in the case of electric utilities society and the ratepayer. Commissio~ Substanti ve Rul es Sec. 23.22 stops short of specifying an evaluation methodology or requiring a benefit-cost analysis for each conservation program, but it does require that util... of view using a standard benefit-cost methodology. The methodology now in use by several. electric utilities and the Public Utility Commlsslon of Texas includes measures of efficiency and equity. The nonparticipant test as a measure of equity...

Treadway, N.

184

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reports from Task XVII participants, including Austria, Finland, Italy, Korea, the Netherlands, Spain and the United States. Annex 8 provides a list of software tools for...

185

Demand Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

186

The business value of demand response for balance responsible parties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? By using IT-solutions, the flexibility on the demand side in the electrical systems could be increased. This is called demand response and is part… (more)

Jonsson, Mattias

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MARKETS – REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. ANDMARKETS – REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. ANDend-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Environmental Energy Technologies Division March 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7   4.2 Demand Side Management (DSM) Portfolioresponse programs. Demand Side Management – Strategiesof the demand side management (DSM) portfolio – projected

Satchwell, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the presence of renewable resources and on the amount ofprimarily from renewable resources, and to a limited extentintegration of renewable resources and deferrable demand. We

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Side Management Framework for Industrial Facilities provides three major areas for changing electric loads in industrial buildings:

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand-side management activities and commercial buildings’demand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Figure 1 provides continuous energy management concepts for shaping electric loads in buildings,demand-side management activities, DR methods and levels of automation. We highlight OpenADR as a standard for commercial buildings

Kiliccote, Sila

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011 Sila Kiliccote Deputy, Demand Response Research Center Program Manager, Building Technologies Department Environmental Energy Technologies only as needed) · Energy Efficiency strategies are permanent (occur daily) 4 #12;Demand-Side

Kammen, Daniel M.

195

Value of Demand Response -Introduction Klaus Skytte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pool Spot Time of use tariffs Load management Consumers active at the spot market Fast decrease in demand to prices. Similar to Least-cost planning and demand-side management. DR differs by using prices side. Investors want more stable prices ­ less fluctuations. Higher short-term security of supply

196

Strategic Pricing and Resource Allocation: Framework and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Garcia, “Autonomous demand side management based on game-treating pricing-based demand-side management and the systemdesigning the demand-side management and data center opera-

Ren, Shaolei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013, Rethymnon, Greece A Comparative Assessment of Demand Response and Energy Storage Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy for discharge over periods of hours, such as large-scale battery storage, compressed air energy, Rethymnon, Greece A Comparative Assessment of Demand Response and Energy Storage Resource Economic system operators, policy makers and other grid stakeholders in the expanded utilization of energy storage

Gross, George

199

On Using Complex Event Processing for Dynamic Demand Response Optimization in Microgrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DR. Our focus is on demand-side management rather than supply-side constraints. Continuous data from that can benefit demand-side management in DR, an accessible means to define them at a higher level California Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA Email: {simmhan, prasanna}@usc.edu Abstract--Demand-side load reduction

Prasanna, Viktor K.

200

Multi-period Optimal Procurement and Demand Responses in the Presence of Uncertain Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Grid involves changes in both the demand side and supply side. On the supply side, more renewable energy will be integrated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution. On the demand side, smarter demand management systems will be available to respond to the electricity price and improve

Low, Steven H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The increasing world energy demand, depletion and unequal distribution of fossil resources, and the dangers caused by climate change are the driving forces for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Summary The increasing world energy demand, depletion and unequal distribution of fossil demand, many nations have established new regimes on renewable energy. For instance, the European of alternative energy sources. In view of the GHG emission reduction target agreed upon in the Kyoto protocol

van den Brink, Jeroen

202

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand-Side Management Framework for Commercial BuildingsTimes (NYT) Building and Its Demand-Side Management Lawrencedemand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table 1 provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case studies and additional resources on implementing renewable energy in Federal new construction and major renovations are available.

204

Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As-Usual; DSM=Demand Side Management; EE=Energy Efficiency;of the demand side management (DSM) portfolio – projectedshareholder returns. 11 4.2 Demand side management portfolio

Satchwell, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side Management - Battery Energy Storage System Project schematic...

206

NWPPA showcases demand response in Port Angeles, upgrades at...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

commitment to demand-side management and recent improvements at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery that's saving energy and benefiting fish. A pair of BPA-supported projects...

207

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch AreasResearch GeneResources Resources

209

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

210

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Demand Side Management #12;Current Programs/Tariffs ­ Load Control Programs Cool Keeper, Utah (currentlyDemand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director 33 MW, building to 90 MW) Irrigation load control, Idaho (35 MW summer, 2004) Lighting load control

211

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and individuals. DEMAND RESPONSE BUILDINGS RESEARCH Recentand event driven building response. Demand Side ManagementDemand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building,

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program September 2010 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A

214

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

215

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

216

Demand Response  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix U.S. Department of Energy | December 2012 Table of Contents

217

Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch AreasResearch Gene

218

Demand Response in the West: Lessons for States and Provinces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This paper is submitted in fulfillment of DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-015F22369 on the experience of western states/provinces with demand response (DR) in the electricity sector. Demand-side resources are often overlooked as a viable option for meeting load growth and addressing the challenges posed by the region's aging transmission system. Western states should work together with utilities and grid operators to facilitate the further deployment of DR programs which can provide benefits in the form of decreased grid congestion, improved system reliability, market efficiency, price stabilization, hedging against volatile fuel prices and reduced environmental impacts of energy production. This report describes the various types of DR programs; provides a survey of DR programs currently in place in the West; considers the benefits, drawbacks and barriers to DR; and presents lessons learned and recommendations for states/provinces.

Douglas C. Larson; Matt Lowry; Sharon Irwin

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files Data FilesFeFe-HydrogenaseDemand

220

Optimal Demand Response Capacity of Automatic Lighting Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To remedy this problem, different demand side management programs have been proposed to shape the energy prior studies have extensively studied the capacity of offering demand response in buildings and office buildings. Keywords: Demand response, automatic lighting control, commercial and office buildings

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Smoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for autonomous demand side management within one house. The DRS devices are able to sense and control the peak energy consumption or demand. We assume that several appliances within one building access to oneSmoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid Shaojie Tang , Qiuyuan Huang

Li, Xiang-Yang

222

Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is a demand-side management strategy to reduce electricity use during times of high peak electric loads;1 Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest

223

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential demand response in commercial buildings with EMCSbuildings for integrated energy efficiency and demand response (buildings provide an excellent resource for demand response.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

,"Table 4.B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPrice Sold to9"3 andJanuary3a. JanuaryB

225

Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

Coughlin, Katie

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Demand-Side Management and Energy Efficiency Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs, and the average cost per kWh saved. Using utilitythat the average per kWh program costs reported by utilities

Auffhammer, Maximilian; Blumstein, Carl; Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible...

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Buildings sector demand-side efficiency technology summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides descriptions of the following energy efficiency technologies: energy management systems; electronic fluorescent ballasts; compact fluorescent lamps; lighting controls; room air conditioners; high albedo materials, coatings and paints; solar domestic water heaters; heat pump water heaters; energy-efficient motors; adjustable-speed drives; energy-efficient refrigerators; daylight control glazing; insulating glazing; solar control glazing; switchable glazing; tree planting; and advanced insulation. For each technology, the report provides a description of performance characteristics, consumer utility, development status, technology standards, equipment cost, installation, maintenance, conservation programs, and environmental impacts.

Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; Schuman, J. [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Industrial Rates and Demand-Side Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Southwestern Public Service, Southwestern Electric Power, City of Austin, West Texas Utilities, EI Paso Electric, and Texas-New Mexico Power. Wholesale sales by major utilities included in "Others" category. Texas service areas only. Percentages based...,928,250 31.8% Texas Total 49,521 13,804 25.8% 93,847,494 36.9% wI Self-Gen 49,521 17,619 30.7% 119,841042 42.8% Note: Utilities are: TV Electric, Houston Lighting & Power, GulfStates Utilities, Central Power and Light, City Public Service (San Antonio...

Kasprowicz, L. M.; House, R.

230

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become...

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

231

An alternative to the proposed Demand Side Management program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the use of energy is becoming of paramount importance. Many governments and energy suppliers are searching

Hughes, Larry

232

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Abstract--This paper formulates and develops a peak demand control tool for electric systems within the framework of direct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques. Index Terms--Demand Side Management, direct load control, peak demand control, genetic algorithms in order to evaluate the suitability of the decision chosen. The Demand Side Management (DSM) plans attempt for central air conditioning systems in commercial buildings, hence allowing a measured control of peak demand

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

235

Abstract--This paper formulates and develops a peak demand control tool for electric systems within the framework of direct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques. Index Terms--Demand Side Management, direct load control, peak demand control, genetic algorithms in order to evaluate the suitability of the decision chosen. Demand Side Management (DSM) plans attempt for central air conditioning systems in commercial buildings, hence allowing a measured control of peak demand

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

236

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A demand-side management framework from building operationsdemand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table 2 provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:buildings in California. This paper summarizes the integration of DR in demand-side management

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a building operations perspective, a demand-side managementdemand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table 2 provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:buildings in California. This report summarizes the integration of DR in demand-side management

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

242

Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook 2008-2017 0 ST98-2008 Energy Resources RESOURCES CONSERVATION BOARD ST98-2008: Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook 2008: Reserves Andy Burrowes, Rick Marsh, Nehru Ramdin, and Curtis Evans; Supply/Demand and Economics

Laughlin, Robert B.

243

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 2: Final residential and commercial building prototypes and DOE-2.1E developed UECs and EUIs; Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This section contains the detailed measured impact results and market segment data for each DSM case examined for this building type. A complete index of all base and measure cases defined for this building type is shown first. This index represents an expansion of the base and measure matrix presented in Table 1 (residential) or Table 2 (commercial) for the applicable sector. Following this index, a summary report sheet is provided for each DSM measure case in the order shown in the index. The summary report sheet contains a host of information and selected graphs which define and depict the measure impacts and outline the market segment data assumptions utilized for each case in the DBEDT DSM Forecasting models. The variables and figures included in the summary report sheet are described. Numerous tables and figures are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOE AccidentWasteZone Modeling |Demand Response Demand

245

Empirical analysis of the spot market implications ofprice-elastic demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulated electricity industries share one common feature: the absence of any significant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, electricity industries continue to charge most consumers an average cost based on regulated retail tariff from the era of vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are forced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in open markets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who are sometimes forbidden by regulators from signing hedging contracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time (or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price of electricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumption in response to price signals. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic, and electricity generation resources can be stretched to the point where system stability is threatened. This, then, facilitates many other problems associated with electricity markets, such as market power and price volatility. Indeed, economic theory suggests that even modestly price-responsive demand can remove the stress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To test this theory, we use actual generator bid data from the New York control area to construct supply stacks, and intersect them with demand curves of various slopes to approximate different levels of demand elasticity. We then estimate the potential impact of real-time pricing on the equilibrium spot price and quantity. These results indicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a more price-elastic demand. Such analysis can provide policymakers with a measure of how effective price-elastic demand can potentially reduce prices and maintain consumption within the capability of generation resources.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part I: Load Availability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-6417E Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part I: Load Availability Profiles Resources 4 #12;#12;#12;CHAPTER 3: Results: DR Profiles 3.1 Projected Demand Response Availability in 2020

247

A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix in wholesale electricity pools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past several decades, many demand-side participation features have been applied in the electricity power systems. These features, such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response, add uncertainties ...

Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A new wholesale bidding mechanism for enhanced demand response in smart grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calls to improve customer participation as a key element of smart grids have reinvigorated interest in demand-side features such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response. In the context of deregulated ...

Wang, Jiankang

249

Climate change mitigation and co-benefits of feasible transport demand policies in Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i n f o Keywords: Climate change mitigation Transport demand management External costs Urban and potential impacts of travel demand management help to define policy instruments that mitigate the damaging. The paper investi- gates the role of demand elasticities and demonstrates that joint demand and supply-side

Kammen, Daniel M.

250

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

required by MRTU AS and energy markets. Both California ISOopening electricity markets to energy storage competition.energy, improvement of grid infrastructure, and market

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings,Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings",demand response and energy efficiency functions into the design of buildings,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Summer of 2006: A Milestone in the Ongoing Maturation of Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007) Figure 7. U.S. Demand Response Resources in 2005Proposals to Augment 2007 Demand Response Programs, Aug. 22,Efforts to Improve Demand Response Programs for State to

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Engel, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

SGDP Report Now Available: Interoperability of Demand Response...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited demand response resources, both conventional and renewable, to integrate more effectively with electric...

254

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy-2 Demand Forecast Disaggregation......................................................1-4 Statewide

258

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-5555E Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources David S The work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded ABSTRACT This study examines how fast automated demand response (AutoDR) can help mitigate grid balancing

259

Date: June 12, 2007 To: Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date: June 12, 2007 To: Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project From: Rich Sedano/RAP and Chuck, 2007 meeting of the Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project, we agreed to form three Working Groups for the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of Demand Response resources. One potential outcome would be for state

260

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

262

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

263

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

264

Side-Channel Oscilloscope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Side-Channel Analysis used for codebreaking could be used constructively as a probing tool for internal gates in integrated circuits. This paper outlines basic methods and mathematics for that purpose

Chaudhuri, Sumanta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue- ple users cooperate to perform load demand scheduling in order to minimize the electricity generation between electricity consumption and generation. On the consumption side, electric demand ramps up

Pedram, Massoud

266

Cautious Risk-Takers: Investor Preferences and Demand for Active Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cautious Risk-Takers: Investor Preferences and Demand for Active Management Valery Polkovnichenko and Demand for Active Management Abstract Actively managed mutual funds have distinct return distributions from the equally important side of investor demand. We take funds returns as given and use them

O'Toole, Alice J.

267

Optimal Demand Bidding for Time-Shiftable Loads Hamed Mohsenian-Rad, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ahead market, real-time market, demand side management, multi-stage stochastic optimization, closed1 Optimal Demand Bidding for Time-Shiftable Loads Hamed Mohsenian-Rad, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract and enhancing demand response and peak-load shaving programs. In this paper, we seek to answer the following

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

268

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. , and James M. Gri¢ n. 1983. Gasoline demand in the OECDof dynamic demand for gasoline. Journal of Econometrics 77(An empirical analysis of gasoline demand in Denmark using

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

Heffner, Grayson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sterner. 1991. Analysing gasoline demand elasticities: A2011. Measuring global gasoline and diesel price and incomeMutairi. 1995. Demand for gasoline in Kuwait: An empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Progress toward Producing Demand-Response-Ready Appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes several historical and ongoing efforts to make small electrical demand-side devices like home appliances more responsive to the dynamic needs of electric power grids. Whereas the utility community often reserves the word demand response for infrequent 2 to 6 hour curtailments that reduce total electrical system peak load, other beneficial responses and ancillary services that may be provided by responsive electrical demand are of interest. Historically, demand responses from the demand side have been obtained by applying external, retrofitted, controlled switches to existing electrical demand. This report is directed instead toward those manufactured products, including appliances, that are able to provide demand responses as soon as they are purchased and that require few, or no, after-market modifications to make them responsive to needs of power grids. Efforts to be summarized include Open Automated Demand Response, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturer standard CHA 1, a simple interface being developed by the U-SNAP Alliance, various emerging autonomous responses, and the recent PinBus interface that was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Sastry, Chellury

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Commercial and Industrial Base Intermittent Resource Management Pilot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This scoping study summarizes the challenges with integrating wind and solar generation into the California's electricity grid. These challenges include: Smoothing intra-hour variability; - Absorbing excess renewable energy during over-generation periods; - Addressing morning and evening ramping periods. In addition, there are technical challenges to integrating retail demand response (DR) triggered by the wholesale conditions into the CAISO markets. The study describes the DR programs available to the consumers through the utilities in California and CAISO's ancillary services market because an integration of the wholesale and retail DR requires an understanding of these different offerings and the costs associated with acquiring them. Demand-side active and passive storage systems are proposed as technologies that may be used to mitigate the effects of intermittence due to renewable generation. Commercial building technologies as well as industrial facilities with storage capability are identified as targets for the field tests. Two systems used for ancillary services communications are identified as providing the triggers for DR enablement. Through the field tests, issues related to communication, automation and flexibility of demand-side resources will be explored and the performance of technologies that participate in the field tests will be evaluated. The major outcome of this research is identifying and defining flexibility of DR resources and optimized use of these resources to respond to grid conditions.

Kiliccote, Sila; Sporborg, Pamela; Sheik, Imran; Huffaker, Erich; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Side terminal battery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A side terminal battery and method of making same is shown and described. In particular, the terminal includes an electrically conductive plug disposed within an externally extending boss. The plug does not extend into the battery. Rather, a riser is welded to the plug through an aperture disposed at the base of the boss. The terminal is mechanically crimped to further ensure the leak-resistant soundness of the joint between the plug and riser.

Clingenpeel, W.R.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

280

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

282

Beyond Dominant Resource Fairness: Extensions, Limitations, and Indivisibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beyond Dominant Resource Fairness: Extensions, Limitations, and Indivisibilities DAVID C. PARKES We study the problem of allocating multiple resources to agents with heterogeneous demands this problem under the assumption that agents demand the resources in fixed proportions, known in economics

Fiat, Amos

283

Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies Photo of a dark brown perforated metal wall is pictured on the side of an...

284

Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications ofPrice-Responsive Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulatedelectricity industries share one common feature: the absence of anysignificant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, most electricity consumers stillpay an average cost based regulated retail tariff held over from the eraof vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are oftenforced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in openmarkets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who aresometimes additionally forbidden by regulators from signing hedgingcontracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time(or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price ofelectricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumptionaccordingly. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic,which together with the non storability of electricity that requiresmarket clearing over very short time steps spawn many other problemsassociated with electricity markets, such as exercise of market power andprice volatility. Indeed, electricity generation resources can bestretched to the point where system adequacy is threatened. Economictheory suggests that even modest price responsiveness can relieve thestress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To quantify thiseffect, actual generator bid data from the New York control area is usedto construct supply stacks and intersect them with demand curves ofvarious slopes to approximate the effect of different levels of demandresponse. The potential impact of real-time pricing (RTP) on theequilibrium spot price and quantity is then estimated. These resultsindicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a moreprice-responsive demand providing policymakers with a measure of howprices can be potentially reduced and consumption maintained within thecapability of generation assets.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Resource Adequacy INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

whether there are sufficient non-hydro resources available to meet loads when the "fuel" for hydroelectric the amount of water for hydroelectric generation) and temperature (which affects the demand for electricity

286

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEST PRACTICES AND RESULTS OF DR IMPLEMENTATION . 31 Encouraging End-User Participation: The Role of Incentives 16 Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Customer focused collaborative demand planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many firms worldwide have adopted the process of Sales & Operations Planning (S&OP) process where internal departments within a firm collaborate with each other to generate a demand forecast. In a collaborative demand ...

Jha, Ratan (Ratan Mohan)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Demand Response: Load Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

Simon, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

TRAVEL DEMAND AND RELIABLE FORECASTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRAVEL DEMAND AND RELIABLE FORECASTS FOR TRANSIT MARK FILIPI, AICP PTP 23rd Annual Transportation transportation projects § Develop and maintain Regional Travel Demand Model § Develop forecast socio in cooperative review during all phases of travel demand forecasting 4 #12;Cooperative Review Should Include

Minnesota, University of

292

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 Gorin Principal Authors Lynn Marshall Project Manager Kae C. Lewis Acting Manager Demand Analysis Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency and Demand Analysis Division Scott W. Matthews Acting

293

Demand Forecasting of New Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Forecasting of New Products Using Attribute Analysis Marina Kang A thesis submitted Abstract This thesis is a study into the demand forecasting of new products (also referred to as Stock upon currently employed new-SKU demand forecasting methods which involve the processing of large

Sun, Yu

294

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

295

Barriers to reducing energy demand in existing building stock -a perspective based on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barriers to reducing energy demand in existing building stock - a perspective based on observation another radiator." #12;Typical End User Training #12;Demand Side Problem #12;Workman Mis(?)conceptions "If, interviews, probes, home inspections intervention - management committees, "message of the month", magazine

Carletta, Jean

296

Siding | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,Pvt LtdShrub Oak, New York: EnergySibley

297

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-­?Water  Interdependencies   and  the  Emerging  Energy  Demands  on  Water  Resources."  Report  SAND.  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Power system balancing with high renewable penetration : the potential of demand response .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigated the ability of responsive demand to stabilize the electrical grid when intermittent renewable resources are present. The WILMAR stochastic unit commitment model… (more)

Critz, David Karl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility, allowing for demand-side management arrangements.resource planning, demand-side management, and building

Lasseter, R. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for each day type for the demand response study - moderate8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and best practices to guide HECO demand response developmentbest practices for DR renewable integration – Technically demand responseof best practices. This is partially because demand response

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of control. Water heater demand response options are notcurrent water heater and air conditioning demand responsecustomer response Demand response water heater participation

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on Building

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In terms of demand response capability, building operatorsautomated demand response and improve building energy andand demand response features directly into building design

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEMAND RESPONSE .7 Wholesale Marketuse at times of high wholesale market prices or when systemenergy expenditure. In wholesale markets, spot energy prices

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers` short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners` (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/13/2013 1 © 2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand Response Balance: Energy #12;2/13/2013 2 3 PGE Load ­ Resource Balance: Winter Capacity 4 Traditional Role decade, access to a material portion of its legacy hydro resources. Meanwhile, PGE (and other IOU

319

Energy technologies and their impact on demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

Drucker, H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Residential Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnaires

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5... for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 5 What is Demand Response? ?The temporary reduction of electricity demanded from the grid by an end-user in response to capacity shortages, system reliability events, or high wholesale...

322

California's Electricity Supply and Demand Balance Over the Next Five Years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the resources of the system. The Commission's 2003 Baseline Demand forecast assumes the following assumptions September October 1 CEC 2003 Baseline Demand Forecast (1-in-2 Weather)1, 2 31 California's Electricity Supply and Demand Balance Over the Next Five Years The Energy Commission

323

Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems with Variable Resources Electric Energy System #12;#12;Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems benefits correspond to a real-world power system, as we use actual data on demand-response and wind

324

Driving Demand | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

strategies, results achieved to date, and advice for other programs. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements. This guide, developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National...

325

Demand Response Technology Roadmap A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

workshop agendas, presentation materials, and transcripts. For the background to the Demand Response Technology Roadmap and to make use of individual roadmaps, the reader is...

326

Demand Response Technology Roadmap M  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between May 2014 and February 2015. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Demand Response Executive Sponsor Team decided upon the scope of the project in May. Two subsequent...

327

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product estimates. Margaret Sheridan provided the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand

328

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined provided estimates for demand response program impacts and contributed to the residential forecast. Mitch

329

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

330

Managing Increased Charging Demand  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergy Maine09 BalanceStorage and Managing

331

Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Harnessing the power of demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

2006 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of both the Federal system and the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This surplus energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These energy deficits will be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. This study incorporates information on Pacific Northwest (PNW) regional retail loads, contract obligations, and contract resources. This loads and resources analysis simulates the operation of the power system in the PNW. The simulated hydro operation incorporates plant characteristics, streamflows, and non-power requirements from the current Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). Additional resource capability estimates were provided by BPA, PNW Federal agency, public agency, cooperative, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers furnished through annual PNUCC data submittals for 2005 and/or direct submittals to BPA. The 2006 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary document of Federal system and PNW region loads and resources, and (2) a technical appendix which presents regional loads, grouped by major PNW utility categories, and detailed contract and resource information. The technical appendix is available only in electronic form. Individual customer information for marketer contracts is not detailed due to confidentiality agreements. The 2006 White Book analysis updates the 2004 White Book. This analysis shows projections of the Federal system and region's yearly average annual energy consumption and resource availability for the study period, OY 2007-2016. The study also presents projections of Federal system and region expected 1-hour monthly peak demand, monthly energy demand, monthly 1-hour peak generating capability, and monthly energy generation for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. BPA is investigating a new approach in capacity planning depicting the monthly Federal system 120-hour peak generating capability and 120-hour peak surplus/deficit for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. This document analyzes the PNW's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency;

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Vinyl Siding Institute (VSI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UCOpenVerona,HamptonVinland, Wisconsin: EnergySiding Institute

336

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartment of EnergyLight-Duty DieselReviewCalifornia |Side

337

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration -- Phase 2 Findings from the Summer of 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneering demonstration showing that existing utility load-management assets can provide an important electricity system reliability resource known as spinning reserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinning reserve as demonstrated in this project will give grid operators at the California Independent System Operator (CA ISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful new tool to improve reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lower grid operating costs.In the first phase of this demonstration project, we target marketed SCE?s air-conditioning (AC) load-cycling program, called the Summer Discount Plan (SDP), to customers on a single SCE distribution feederand developed an external website with real-time telemetry for the aggregated loads on this feeder and conducted a large number of short-duration curtailments of participating customers? air-conditioning units to simulate provision of spinning reserve. In this second phase of the demonstration project, we explored four major elements that would be critical for this demonstration to make the transition to a commercial activity:1. We conducted load curtailments within four geographically distinct feeders to determine the transferability of target marketing approaches and better understand the performance of SCE?s load management dispatch system as well as variations in the AC use of SCE?s participating customers;2. We deployed specialized, near-real-time AC monitoring devices to improve our understanding of the aggregated load curtailments we observe on the feeders;3. We integrated information provided by the AC monitoring devices with information from SCE?s load management dispatch system to measure the time required for each step in the curtailment process; and4. We established connectivity with the CA ISO to explore the steps involved in responding to CA ISO-initiated requests for dispatch of spinning reserve.The major findings from the second phase of this demonstration are:1. Demand-response resources can provide full response significantly faster than required by NERC and WECC reliability rules.2. The aggregate impact of demand response from many small, individual sources can be estimated with varying degrees of reliability through analysis of distribution feeder loads.3. Monitoring individual AC units helps to evaluate the efficacy of the SCE load management dispatch system and better understand AC energy use by participating customers.4. Monitoring individual AC units provides an independent data source to corroborate the estimates of the magnitude of aggregate load curtailments and gives insight into results from estimation methods that rely solely on distribution feeder data.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Parker, Eric; Bernier, Clark; Young, Paul; Sheehan, Dave; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Understanding recreationists' attitudes toward and preferences for natural resources conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With ever-increasing demands on scarce natural resources, understanding public attitudes toward natural resources is crucial to accomplishing various management goals for resource conservation and the provision of resource services. Despite numerous...

Oh, Chi-Ok

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Optimal Resource Adjustment Times in product development project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of resources. To consider future demand of resources to improve the resource allocation policy, a Foresighted Resource Allocation Policy model was proposed by Ford and Joglekar (2002) using system dynamics with control theory. Management delays, backlog...

Lee, Zee Woon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DemandDirect | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1 No38e4011f618bDeer Park,Dell Prairie,DeltaDemand

345

Demand Response (transactional control) - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files Data FilesFeFe-HydrogenaseDemandEnergy Analysis

346

Brushless machine having ferromagnetic side plates and side magnets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is provided having a cylindrical stator and a rotor that is spaced from a stator to define an annular primary air gap that receives AC flux from the stator. The rotor has a plurality of longitudinal pole portions disposed parallel to the axis of rotation and alternating in polarity around a circumference of the rotor. Each longitudinal pole portion includes portions of permanent magnet (PM) material and at least one of the longitudinal pole portions has a first end and an opposing second end and a side magnet is disposed adjacent the first end and a side pole is disposed adjacent the second end.

Hsu, John S

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

Full Rank Rational Demand Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a nominal income full rank QES. R EFERENCES (A.84)S. G. Donald. “Inferring the Rank of a Matrix. ” Journal of97-102. . “A Demand System Rank Theorem. ” Econometrica 57 (

LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Community Water Demand in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions to Texas water policy and planning problems will be easier to identify once the impact of price upon community water demand is better understood. Several important questions cannot be addressed in the absence of such information...

Griffin, Ronald C.; Chang, Chan

349

Fueling America Through Renewable Resources Purdue extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fueling America Through Renewable Resources BioEnergy Purdue extension Meeting the ethanol demand to the anticipated market demand signals by planting more corn after corn. Livestock farmers have often had corn #12; Fueling America Through Renewable Crops BioEnergy Meeting the Ethanol Demand: Consequences

Holland, Jeffrey

350

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Computer resources Computer resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

Yang, Zong-Liang

353

Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in regulation and load following . . . . Wholesale energyloads to deliver load following and regulation, withcontrolled loads for load following”. In: Proceedings of the

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in regulation and load following . . . . Wholesale energyclimate zone, while load following and arbitrage revenuesloads to deliver load following and regulation, with

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Introduction Increasing demands on limited water resources have made  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(reclamation or reuse) an attractive option for extending water supplies. Treatment technologies have evolved has increasingly been used for municipal irrigation, toilet flushing, industrial cooling, and other varyconsiderablybetweensystems.Theuseofrecycledwater is particularly beneficial to extending water supplies in arid climates

Sanderson, Mike

359

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Study of Energy Markets, 2002. [10] S.D. Braithwait,for the Study of Energy Markets, Aug. 2009. [13] CAEC.in organized wholesale energy markets. Federal Energy

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in organized wholesale energy markets. Federal Energyfor the Study of Energy Markets, 2002. [10] S.D. Braithwait,5.5.1 Direct participation in existing markets 5.5.2 Energy

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E.2 Heat pumps . . E.3 Water heaters . parameters v E.4An evaluation of the water heater load potential for=10040. [33] EERE. Lower water heater temperature for energy

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E.2 Heat pumps . . E.3 Water heaters . parameters v E.4analysis for residential water heater efficiency standards.An evaluation of the water heater load potential for

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

markets”. In: Electric Power Systems Research 78 (2008), pp.Gas and Electric Company Power Systems Engineering Research

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

markets”. In: Electric Power Systems Research 78 (2008), pp.Gas and Electric Company Power Systems Engineering Research

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity Central AC Heat pumps Water heaters Refrigeratorsas air conditioners, heat pumps, electric water heaters, andMerced). ACs Heat Pumps Combined Water Heaters Refrigerators

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity Central AC Heat pumps Water heaters Refrigeratorsas air conditioners, heat pumps, electric water heaters, andMerced). ACs Heat Pumps Combined Water Heaters Refrigerators

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY FORECAST Volume 1 in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard. Margaret Sheridan contributed to the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand

368

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY FORECAST Volume 2 Director #12; i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid provided the projections of commercial

369

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power at any one time, whereas on energy-limited grids, such as wind andpower-limited, such as micro-hydro, and those that are also energy- limited, such as wind andsolar and wind mini-grids. Grids that are only power-limited

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Beyond Leaks: Demand-side Strategies for Improving Compressed Air Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Staggering amounts of compressed air are wasted or misapplied in otherwise well run manufacturing facilities, often adding thousands of dollars in extra operating cost per year. The process of eliminating this expensive waste requires a thorough...

Howe, B.; Scales, B.

372

Simple models of district heating systems for load and demand side management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Research, Development and Demonstration on District Heating and Cooling, including the integration of CHP, not mentioned here, supplied information in various ways. All help is very much appreciated. Lyngby, December

373

Distributed generation and demand side management : applications to transmission system operation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity networks are undergoing a period of rapid change and transformation, with increased penetration levels of renewable-based distributed generation, and new influences on electricity end-use patterns from ...

Hayes, Barry Patrick

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Utility Demand Side Management- DSM Lessons: Experience is the Toughest Teacher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most utilities first became actively involved with energy conservation in the early 1980s with the federally mandated Residential Conservation Service (RCS) program. Legislation mandating a similar effort directed toward commercial and apartment...

Gilbert, S. M.

375

Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlled Electric Springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

voltage instability in renewable energy powered microgrids.Authority. (26 Feb). Clean and renewable energy. Available:federal government to 20% renewable energy target by 2020.

Soni, Jayantika; Krishnanand, KR; Panda, Sanjib

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Southwest Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Demand Side Management Program Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the many benefits of this program is the short time between initial audit and contract award. A project can be under construction within 60 days of completion of the audit. Light Emitting Diode (LED) Exit Signs - Over 9700 LED Exit Signs have been...

Gates, G. G.

377

The Risks and Rewards of Participation in Demand Side Bidding Programs; an Energy Service Company Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with participation by ESCOs in utility sponsored DSM programs: 1. Utility Competition ESCOs seeking to participate in utility sponsored DSM bidding programs must evaluate current and planned rebate and/or customized programs budgeted by utilities.... The utility customer lay appreciate having the choice between utility )onsored rebate programs and third party service roviders. However, from an ESCO viewpoint, ~mpetition with utility sponsored programs can -ode the market and thereby result...

Machold, W. D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Impacts of Utility-Sponsored Demand-Side Management Programs on Industrial Electricity Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this paper of the arguments and recommendations of DSM-advocates are general, particular attention is paid to the potentially damaging effects of these proposals on large commercial and industrial customers....

Rosenblum, J. I.

379

Demand-Side Planning in Texas-Past, Present, and Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improve efficiency in residential buildings; programs to improve efficiency in commercial/industrial buildings; and other programs. Residential program activity is predominant over program activity for other sectors and residential programs represent... and one utility includes an incentive. Rebates and other financial incentives are widely used to promote the installation of energy efficient air conditioners and heat pumps in both new and retrofit applications. Residential programs, for the most...

Biedrzycki, C.

380

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include low wattage water heaters that run overnight anduse the low wattage water heaters, in conjunction with solarspace heaters and water heaters were banned by village

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Demand Side Energy Saving though Proper Construction Practices and Materials Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy consumed during the construction of buildings and structures, including the embodied energy of the concrete and other construction materials, represent a considerable percentage that may reach 40% of the total energy consumed during the whole...

El-Hawary, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach to community micro hydro in Kalahandi, Orissa. Santechnologies, such as micro-hydro, biomass gasification,grids, such as many micro-hydro grids, will mainly concern

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Appropriate Technology. Alice Springs, Australia.Report of Intermediate Technology Consultants to Overseasand Communication Technologies and Development. Atlanta, GA.

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

low-power “heat storage cookers” for mini-grids withHolland et al. 2002). These cookers run at a low power forlow wattage rice cookers. Despite their functionality, these

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response A pilot program from NSTAR in Massachusetts,Massachusetts, aiming to test whether an intensive program of energy efficiency and demand response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Supply chain planning decisions under demand uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sales and operational planning that incorporates unconstrained demand forecasts has been expected to improve long term corporate profitability. Companies are considering such unconstrained demand forecasts in their decisions ...

Huang, Yanfeng Anna

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Conventional and Alternative Fuel Response Simulatormodified to include alternative fuel demand scenarios (whichvehicle adoption and alternative fuel demand) later in the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector, the demand response potential of California buildinga demand response event prohibit a building’s participationdemand response strategies in California buildings are

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

CARVE: A Cognitive Agent for Resource Value Estimation Jonathan Wildstrom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In ICAC, June 2008. CARVE: A Cognitive Agent for Resource Value Estimation Jonathan Wildstrom computational resources (processing, memory and I/O) are availably on demand at a market cost. On-demand access and accurately estimate the value of the resource. This paper introduces CARVE: a Cognitive Agent for Resource

Witchel, Emmett

392

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an overview of the economic opportunities for demand responsive control technologies and strategies in commercial buildings. The economic opportunities focus on advanced controls from a building owner’s perspective. The secondary objective is to evaluate.... Table 1 outlines how DR fits into historical demand side management (DSM) concepts. Column three compares DR with energy efficiency and daily peak load management. The emphasis for DR is dynamic control and event driven building response...

Kiliccote, S.; Piette, M. A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Exhausting Battery Statistics Understanding the energy demands on mobile handsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy models and resources managers designed for laptops [20] and data cen- ters [4] inapplicableExhausting Battery Statistics Understanding the energy demands on mobile handsets Narseo Vallina.surname@telekom.de ABSTRACT Despite the advances in battery technologies, mobile phones still suffer from severe energy

Cambridge, University of

397

OPUC Flexibility Planning Guidelines Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) · Demand management ­ smart grid controllable "withdrawal" and "recharge" #12;Jim Hicks Energy Strategies Jim Hicks Energy Strategies West, LLC #12;OPUC's New IRP Guidelines* · Integrated Resource Plans operational view of planning, including comprehensive multi-faceted VER integration strategy #12;Daily Wind

398

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wholesale prices and looming shortages in Western power markets in 2000-01, Portland General Electric programs for large customers remain, though they are not active at current wholesale prices. Other programs demand response for the wholesale market -- by passing through real-time prices for usage above a set

399

Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% ? 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing by solid evidence from three utility case studies. BACKGROUND Demand Response: demand response (DR

Perez, Richard R.

404

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid provided the projections

405

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid provided the projections

406

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work Sheridan provided the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid

407

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy for demand response program impacts and contributed to the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared

408

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work provided estimates for demand response program impacts and contributed to the residential forecast. Mitch

409

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

410

Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energy’s Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water

412

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

Global energy demand to 2060  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projection of global energy demand to the year 2060 is of particular interest because of its relevance to the current greenhouse concerns. The long-term growth of global energy demand in the time scale of climatic change has received relatively little attention in the public discussion of national policy alternatives. The sociological, political, and economic issues have rarely been mentioned in this context. This study emphasizes that the two major driving forces are global population growth and economic growth (gross national product per capita), as would be expected. The modest annual increases assumed in this study result in a year 2060 annual energy use of >4 times the total global current use (year 1986) if present trends continue, and >2 times with extreme efficiency improvements in energy use. Even assuming a zero per capita growth for energy and economics, the population increase by the year 2060 results in a 1.5 times increase in total annual energy use.

Starr, C. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

CCM: Scalable, On-Demand Compute Capacity Management for Cloud Datacenters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCM: Scalable, On-Demand Compute Capacity Management for Cloud Datacenters Mukil Kesavan, Irfan datacenters at scales of thousands of machines, for diverse workloads with variable demands. This enables resource availability for applications and better datacenter utilization levels. Extending prior studies

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

415

Dark Energy: Taking SidesDark Energy: Taking SidesDark Energy: Taking Sides The University of Chicago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark Energy: Taking SidesDark Energy: Taking SidesDark Energy: Taking Sides Rocky Kolb Barocky The University of Chicago #12;#12; Cold Dark Matter: (CDM) 25% Dark Energy (): 70% Stars: 0.5% H & He: gas 4 For Dark EnergyEvidence For Dark EnergyEvidence For Dark Energy 3) Baryon acoustic oscillations 4) Weak

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

416

Power system balancing with high renewable penetration : the potential of demand response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigated the ability of responsive demand to stabilize the electrical grid when intermittent renewable resources are present. The WILMAR stochastic unit commitment model was used to represent a version of ...

Critz, David Karl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Model for a Linked System of Multi-Purpose Reservoirs with Stochastic Inflows and Demands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-41 1972 A Model for a Linked System of Mulit-Purpose Reservoirs with Stochastic Inflows and Demands G.L. Curry J.C. Helm R.A. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.; Clark, R. A.

418

1.0 INTRODUCTION As the world's demand for energy continues to grow, unconventional gas will  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION As the world's demand for energy continues to grow, unconventional gas energy source in the world and plays host to a lot of natural gas resources. Between 3,500 and 9

419

Efficiency loss in a class of two-sided market mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the question of how to efficiently allocate resources among competing players in convex environments. We will analyze the efficiency loss of certain two-sided market mechanisms involving both consumers ...

Neumayer, Sebastian James

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

Hummon, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silain Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silasuccessfully in the wholesale non- spinning ancillary

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Aggregate Model for Heterogeneous Thermostatically Controlled Loads with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) – demand response, distributed generation, distributed storage - that are expected to be deployed, it is impractical to use detailed models of these resources when integrated with the transmission system. Being able to accurately estimate the fast transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies. On the other hand, a less complex model is more amenable to design feedback control strategies for the population of devices to provide ancillary services. The main contribution of this paper is to develop aggregated models for a heterogeneous population of Thermostatic Controlled Loads (TCLs) to accurately capture their collective behavior under demand response and other time varying effects of the system. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population and accounts for a second order effect necessary to accurately capture the collective dynamic behavior. The developed aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D (an open source distribution simulation software) under both steady state and severe dynamic conditions caused due to temperature set point changes.

Zhang, Wei; Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Chassin, David P.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

425

Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Todd, Duane [Alcoa; Caulfield, Michael [Alcoa; Helms, Brian [Alcoa

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

drivingdemandsocialmedia010611.pdf More Documents & Publications Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 Social Media for Natural...

427

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature-based demand response in buildings that havedemand response advantages of global zone temperature setup in buildings

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Demand Response Performance of GE Hybrid Heat Pump Water Heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a project to evaluate and document the DR performance of HPWH as compared to ERWH for two primary types of DR events: peak curtailments and balancing reserves. The experiments were conducted with GE second-generation “Brillion”-enabled GeoSpring hybrid water heaters in the PNNL Lab Homes, with one GE GeoSpring water heater operating in “Standard” electric resistance mode to represent the baseline and one GE GeoSpring water heater operating in “Heat Pump” mode to provide the comparison to heat pump-only demand response. It is expected that “Hybrid” DR performance, which would engage both the heat pump and electric elements, could be interpolated from these two experimental extremes. Signals were sent simultaneously to the two water heaters in the side-by-side PNNL Lab Homes under highly controlled, simulated occupancy conditions. This report presents the results of the evaluation, which documents the demand-response capability of the GE GeoSpring HPWH for peak load reduction and regulation services. The sections describe the experimental protocol and test apparatus used to collect data, present the baselining procedure, discuss the results of the simulated DR events for the HPWH and ERWH, and synthesize key conclusions based on the collected data.

Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes log demand in 1995. The composites board mills operating in Korea took advantage of flexibility environment changes on the production mix, some economic indications, statistics of demand and supply of wood

430

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 http with the mill consuming 450 000 m3 , amounting to 30% of total plywood log demand in 1995. The composites board, statistics of demand and supply of wood, costs and competitiveness were analysed. The reactions

431

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid provided the projections of commercial floor space

432

FINAL STAFF FORECAST OF 2008 PEAK DEMAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION FINAL STAFF FORECAST OF 2008 PEAK DEMAND STAFFREPORT June 2007 CEC-200 of the information in this paper. #12;Abstract This document describes staff's final forecast of 2008 peak demand demand forecasts for the respective territories of the state's three investor-owned utilities (IOUs

433

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

434

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

435

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

436

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

437

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators are new actors in the energy scenario: they gather a group of energy consumers and implement a demand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

438

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05 as a source of energy. Global supply and demand trends will have a profound impact on the ability to use our) Transportation energy demand in the U.S. has increased because of the greater use of less fuel efficient vehicles

Saldin, Dilano

439

Energy-water nexus : sustainability of coal and water resources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Energy and water are two precious natural resources with which demand will continue to grow with increased population growth. Coal provides a cheap and abundant… (more)

Hebel, Anna Kathleen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1 SpecialMaximizingResidential Buildings »Coil andDemand

442

Teacher Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Teacher Resources For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Teacher Resources Scavenger...

443

Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Scoping Study for Demand Respose DFT II Project in Morgantown, WV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This scoping study describes the underlying data resources and an analysis tool for a demand response assessment specifically tailored toward the needs of the Modern Grid Initiatives Demonstration Field Test in Phase II in Morgantown, WV. To develop demand response strategies as part of more general distribution automation, automated islanding and feeder reconfiguration schemes, an assessment of the demand response resource potential is required. This report provides the data for the resource assessment for residential customers and describes a tool that allows the analyst to estimate demand response in kW for each hour of the day, by end-use, season, day type (weekday versus weekend) with specific saturation rates of residential appliances valid for the Morgantown, WV area.

Lu, Shuai; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy demand and population changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since World War II, US energy demand has grown more rapidly than population, so that per capita consumption of energy was about 60% higher in 1978 than in 1947. Population growth and the expansion of per capita real incomes have led to a greater use of energy. The aging of the US population is expected to increase per capita energy consumption, despite the increase in the proportion of persons over 65, who consume less energy than employed persons. The sharp decline in the population under 18 has led to an expansion in the relative proportion of population in the prime-labor-force age groups. Employed persons are heavy users of energy. The growth of the work force and GNP is largely attributable to the growing participation of females. Another important consequence of female employment is the growth in ownership of personal automobiles. A third factor pushing up labor-force growth is the steady influx of illegal aliens.

Allen, E.L.; Edmonds, J.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Demand Forecast and Performance Prediction in Peer-Assisted On-Demand Streaming Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Forecast and Performance Prediction in Peer-Assisted On-Demand Streaming Systems Di Niu on the Internet. Automated demand forecast and performance prediction, if implemented, can help with capacity an accurate user demand forecast. In this paper, we analyze the operational traces collected from UUSee Inc

Li, Baochun

447

Risk Management for Video-on-Demand Servers leveraging Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk Management for Video-on-Demand Servers leveraging Demand Forecast Di Niu, Hong Xu, Baochun Li on demand history using time se- ries forecasting techniques. The prediction enables dynamic and efficient}@eecg.toronto.edu Shuqiao Zhao Multimedia Development Group UUSee, Inc. shuqiao.zhao@gmail.com ABSTRACT Video-on-demand (Vo

Li, Baochun

448

Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes. Developing novel schemes for demand response in smart electric gird is an increasingly active research area/SCADA for demand response in smart infrastructures face the following dilemma: On one hand, in order to increase

Sastry, S. Shankar

449

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that energy intensity is not necessarily a good indicator of energy efficiency, whereas by controllingUS Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

450

Integrated Water Resources Science and Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and increasing demand on limited resources. To meet this challenge, the National Oceanic and AtmosphericIntegrated Water Resources Science and Services (IWRSS) June, 2009 In the news nearly every day, water resources are widely considered to be one of the most significant challenges facing societies

451

Not Treaty Side2.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewportBig Eddyof H-2 andNot So Permafrost Under Fire

452

Another Side of Light - A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4» AnnualCertificationPlasma The

453

Another Side of Light - B  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4» AnnualCertificationPlasma

454

Another Side of Light - C  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4» AnnualCertificationPlasmaC.

455

Another Side of Light - D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4» AnnualCertificationPlasmaC.D.

456

The urban design of distributed energy resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed energy resources (DERs) are a considerable research focus for cities to reach emissions reduction goals and meet growing energy demand. DERs, consisting of local power plants and distribution infrastructure, ...

Sheehan, Travis (Travis P.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Water Resources Information Act is designed to prevent the lowering of the ground water table by requiring that adequate information is obtained to document current demand for water...

458

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities"Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L Band Commissioning Issues from an Automated Demand Response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

Goli, Sasank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fully Automated Demand  Response in Large Facilities.  Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.  Open Automated  Demand Response Communication Standards: 

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. McParland, Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Open Automated Demand Response", Grid Interop Forum,Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of

Kiliccote, Sila

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

FINAL DEMAND FORECAST FORMS AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION FINAL DEMAND FORECAST FORMS AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2007 INTEGRATED Table of Contents General Instructions for Demand Forecast Submittals.............................................................................. 4 Protocols for Submitted Demand Forecasts

470

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

description of six energy and demand management concepts.how quickly it can modify energy demand. This is not a newimprovements in both energy efficiency and demand response (

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute, “Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth: The Energyup Assessment of Energy Demand in India Transportationa profound effect on energy demand. Policy analysts wishing

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Building Systems and DR Strategies 16 Demand ResponseDemand Response Systems. ” Proceedings, 16 th National Conference on Building

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in California. DEMAND RESPONSE AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGSload and demand response against other buildings and alsoDemand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings",

Kiliccote, Sila

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: demand response, buildings, electricity use, Interface  Automated Demand Response  Building Automation of demand response in  commercial buildings.   One key 

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L BAutomated Demand Response National Conference on BuildingAutomated Demand Response National Conference on Building

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Demand response, automation, commercial buildings,Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings,Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand  Response for Small Commercial Buildings.   CEC?500?automated demand response  For small commercial buildings, AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE FOR SMALL COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Demand Response in New and Existing Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Strategies and National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. Inbased demand response information to building controlDemand Response Standard for the Residential Sector. California Energy Commission, PIER Buildings

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is manual demand response where building staff receive acommercial buildings’ demand response technologies andBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "demand side resources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Demand response, automation, commercial buildings,Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings,Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Y. Hossein Farzin Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy economics: Sustainable soil management, nonrenewable resources and conservation: energy demand Economics, The Environment and Economic Development, Economics of Energy and Environment, Advanced EXPERIENCE Fields of Concentration Environmental, Natural Resources, and Energy Economics Environmental

California at Davis, University of

485

Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

486

Budget Adjustment Single Sided Budget Adjustment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Budget Adjustment & Single Sided Budget Adjustment WELCOME! #12;Accessing Kuali · Campus://busfin.colostate.edu #12;What will be covered today? · When should I use a Budget Adjustment (BA) or Single Sided Budget · Error correction · Onesided vs. singlesided entries #12;When to use a Budget Adjustment · How do I know

Stephens, Graeme L.

487

Maximum-Demand Rectangular Location Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 1, 2014 ... Demand and service can be defined in the most general sense. ... Industrial and Systems Engineering, Texas A&M University, September 2014.

Manish Bansal

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 3.0 Previous Experience with Demand Responsive Lighting11 4.3. Prevalence of Lighting13 4.4. Impact of Title 24 on Lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Wastewater plant takes plunge into demand response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration, the Eugene-Springfield Water Pollution Control Facility in Eugene, Ore., was put through a series of demand response tests....

490

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

peak demand management. Photo sensors for daylight drivenare done by local photo-sensors and control hardwaresensing device in a photo sensor is typically a photodiode,

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response Controls for HVAC Systems Clifford Federspiel,tests. Figure 5: Specific HVAC electric power consumptioncontrol, demand response, HVAC, wireless Executive Summary

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition in RegionsDemand Response into Wholesale Electricity Markets,” (URL:1 2. Wholesale and Retails Electricity Markets in

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

prices or when grid reliability is jeopardized. In regions with centrally organized wholesale electricity markets, demand response can help stabilize volatile electricity prices...

494

Robust newsvendor problem with autoregressive demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 19, 2014 ... bust distribution-free autoregressive forecasting method, which copes .... (Bandi and Bertsimas, 2012) to estimate the demand forecast. As.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

495

Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 19, 2013 ... efficient linear programming formulation for the demand response of such a consumer who could be a price taker, industrial or commercial user ...

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

496

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water heaters with embedded demand responsive controls can be designed to automatically provide day-ahead and real-time response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in peak demand. This definition of energy efficiency makesthe following definitions are used: Energy efficiency refersThis definition implicitly distinguishes energy efficiency

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Rollout Scenario Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for...

499

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles...

500

Back-side readout semiconductor photomultiplier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to semiconductor photomultipliers. In one aspect, a device includes a p-type semiconductor substrate, the p-type semiconductor substrate having a first side and a second side, the first side of the p-type semiconductor substrate defining a recess, and the second side of the p-type semiconductor substrate being doped with n-type ions. A conductive material is disposed in the recess. A p-type epitaxial layer is disposed on the second side of the p-type semiconductor substrate. The p-type epitaxial layer includes a first region proximate the p-type semiconductor substrate, the first region being implanted with p-type ions at a higher doping level than the p-type epitaxial layer, and a second region disposed on the first region, the second region being doped with p-type ions at a higher doping level than the first region.

Choong, Woon-Seng; Holland, Stephen E

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z