National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for demand sector technology

  1. Buildings sector demand-side efficiency technology summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; Schuman, J.

    1994-03-01

    This report provides descriptions of the following energy efficiency technologies: energy management systems; electronic fluorescent ballasts; compact fluorescent lamps; lighting controls; room air conditioners; high albedo materials, coatings and paints; solar domestic water heaters; heat pump water heaters; energy-efficient motors; adjustable-speed drives; energy-efficient refrigerators; daylight control glazing; insulating glazing; solar control glazing; switchable glazing; tree planting; and advanced insulation. For each technology, the report provides a description of performance characteristics, consumer utility, development status, technology standards, equipment cost, installation, maintenance, conservation programs, and environmental impacts.

  2. Residential Demand Sector Data, Commercial Demand Sector Data, Industrial Demand Sector Data - Annual Energy Outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing consumption and prices by sector and census division for 2006 - includes residential demand, commercial demand, and industrial demand

  3. Cross-sector Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  4. Commercial Sector Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  5. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  6. Demand Response Technology Roadmap A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meetings and workshops convened to develop content for the Demand Response Technology Roadmap. The project team has developed this companion document in the interest of providing...

  7. Model Documentation Report: Commercial Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  8. Energy technologies and their impact on demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drucker, H.

    1995-06-01

    Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

  9. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

  10. Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This reference document provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. The NEMS Residential Sector Demand Module is currently used for mid-term forecasting purposes and energy policy analysis over the forecast horizon of 1993 through 2020. The model generates forecasts of energy demand for the residential sector by service, fuel, and Census Division. Policy impacts resulting from new technologies, market incentives, and regulatory changes can be estimated using the module. 26 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Promising Technology: Demand Control Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand control ventilation (DCV) measures carbon dioxide concentrations in return air or other strategies to measure occupancy, and accurately matches the ventilation requirement. This system reduces ventilation when spaces are vacant or at lower than peak occupancy. When ventilation is reduced, energy savings are accrued because it is not necessary to heat, cool, or dehumidify as much outside air.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles | Department of Energy Transitioning the Transportation Sector - Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector - Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles This report, titled "Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles" is based

  13. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction ...

  14. DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector Outreach DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector Outreach May 24, 2016 - 4:08pm ...

  15. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector U.S. Department of Energy Page i Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector U.S. Department of Energy Page iii Table of Contents Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction

  16. Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  17. Development and Demonstration of the Open Automated Demand Response Standard for the Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen; Rasin, Josh; Perry, Tim

    2009-11-30

    The goal of this study was to demonstrate a demand response system that can signal nearly every customer in all sectors through the integration of two widely available and non- proprietary communications technologies--Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) over lnternet protocol and Utility Messaging Channel (UMC) over FM radio. The outcomes of this project were as follows: (1) a software bridge to allow translation of pricing signals from OpenADR to UMC; and (2) a portable demonstration unit with an lnternet-connected notebook computer, a portfolio of DR-enabling technologies, and a model home. The demonstration unit provides visitors the opportunity to send electricity-pricing information over the lnternet (through OpenADR and UMC) and then watch as the model appliances and lighting respond to the signals. The integration of OpenADR and UMC completed and demonstrated in this study enables utilities to send hourly or sub-hourly electricity pricing information simultaneously to the residential, commercial and industrial sectors.

  18. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated

  19. Maintaining urban gas systems demands special technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglero, T.F. )

    1994-04-01

    Brooklyn Union Gas Co. has been providing gas to 50% of the population of New York City for the last 100 years. The company has constructed an elaborate gas distribution network that includes a gas main under nearly every city street in a service territory that includes Brooklyn, Staten Island and parts of Queens. Conventional ways of pipeline construction and maintenance are inadequate in today's environment of heightened competition, increased regulations and, most importantly, demanding customer expectations of quality service. As a result, Brooklyn Union Gas must use special construction and maintenance methods in its operations, and in particular trenchless technologies. Over the past 10 years the company has paid close attention to developing a variety of trenchless techniques. Like many gas distribution companies providing service in densely populated urban areas, Brooklyn Union must operate and maintain its gas distribution network in a challenging environment of increasing governmental regulation and escalating field construction costs. Technological innovation is not a luxury, but instead a necessity to achieve corporate growth, regulatory compliance and greater customer satisfaction. Trenchless technologies offset rising pipe installation costs and provide benefits both to the customer and the company. Of special value to Brooklyn Union is the development of systems that renovate old metal pipes by lining. Such techniques are described.

  20. Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Sector Fred Joseck U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Transportation

  1. Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

  2. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use. To perform this analysis, the U.S. Department of Energy commissioned Deloitte MarketPoint to examine scenarios in its North American Integrated Model (NAIM), which simultaneously models the electric power and the natural gas sectors. This study concludes that, under scenarios in which natural gas demand from the electric power sector increases, the incremental increase in interstate natural gas pipeline expansion is modest, relative to historical capacity additions. Similarly, capital expenditures on new interstate pipelines in the scenarios considered here are projected to be significantly less than the capital expenditures associated with infrastructure expansion over the last 15 years.

  3. Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program » Pilot Projects » Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters On Oct. 4, 2011, Ethan MacCormick, VP for Services to Energy Businesses at Performance Systems Development, presented a Webinar about On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters and how to properly monitor their installation. View the webinar presentation. More Information Some resources and tools mentioned in the

  4. Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    For the industrial sector, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8% of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9% of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50% of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

  5. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  6. DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector Outreach

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector Outreach DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector Outreach May 24, 2016 - 4:08pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) is underway in its inaugural year of operation. This week, the DOE kicked off a new round of private sector outreach with a webinar on the TCF. The TCF is an approximately $20 million annual fund that will match

  7. Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

    2013-01-17

    Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suite—as well as potential future suites—of thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sector’s water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

  8. Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation covers the Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment from Oakridge National Laboratory. The presentation is from the FUPWG Spring Meeting, held on May 22, 2013 in San Francisco, California.

  9. Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  10. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2008-05-13

    With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy

  11. Nexus of Energy Use and Technology in the Buildings Sector

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nexus of Energy Use and Technology in the Buildings Sector EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC Tom Leckey, EIA Director, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Statistics 2. Select segments 1. Select Primary Sampling Units (PSUs) - counties or groups of counties Main St Diagonal Ave 3. Select buildings How is CBECS Conducted? Nexus of Energy Use and and Technology, Buildings July 15, 2014 2 * No comprehensive source of buildings exists * Area frame - Randomly select small,

  12. Mitigation technologies and measures in energy sector of Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilifosova, O.; Danchuk, D.; Temertekov, T.

    1996-12-31

    An important commitment in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change is to conduct mitigation analysis and to communicate climate change measures and policies. In major part reducing CO{sub 2} as well as the other greenhouse gas emissions in Kazakstan, can be a side-product of measures addressed to increasing energy efficiency. Since such measures are very important for the national economy, mitigation strategies in the energy sector of Kazakstan are directly connected with the general national strategy of the energy sector development. This paper outlines the main measures and technologies in energy sector of Kazakstan which can lead to GHG emissions reduction and presents the results of current mitigation assessment. The mitigation analysis is addressed to energy production sector. A baseline and six mitigation scenarios were developed to evaluate the most attractive mitigation options, focusing on specific technologies which have been already included in sustainable energy programs. According to the baseline projection, Kazakstan`s CO{sub 2} emissions will not exceed their 1990 level until 2005. The potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction is estimated to be about 11 % of the base line emission level by the end of considered period (in 2020). The main mitigation options in the energy production sector in terms of mitigation potential and technical and economical feasibility include rehabilitation of thermal power plants aimed to increasing efficiency, use of nuclear energy and further expansion in the use of hydro energy based on small hydroelectric power plants.

  13. DOE/EIA-M066(2010) Commercial Sector Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  14. DOE/EIA-M066(2009) Commercial Sector Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  15. ImSET: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, Joseph M.; Scott, Michael J.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2005-07-19

    This version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the ''next generation'' of the previously developed Visual Basic model (ImBUILD 2.0) that was developed in 2003 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. More specifically, a special-purpose version of the 1997 benchmark national Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) -developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version allows for more complete and automated analysis of the essential features of energy efficiency investments in buildings, industry, transportation, and the electric power sectors. This version also incorporates improvements in the treatment of operations and maintenance costs, and improves the treatment of financing of investment options. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act.

  16. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2010-08-02

    This study examines the use of OpenADR communications specification, related data models, technologies, and strategies to send dynamic prices (e.g., real time prices and peak prices) and Time of Use (TOU) rates to commercial and industrial electricity customers. OpenADR v1.0 is a Web services-based flexible, open information model that has been used in California utilities' commercial automated demand response programs since 2007. We find that data models can be used to send real time prices. These same data models can also be used to support peak pricing and TOU rates. We present a data model that can accommodate all three types of rates. For demonstration purposes, the data models were generated from California Independent System Operator's real-time wholesale market prices, and a California utility's dynamic prices and TOU rates. Customers can respond to dynamic prices by either using the actual prices, or prices can be mapped into"operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different methods for mapping actual prices. Some of these methods were implemented in demonstration projects. The study results demonstrate show that OpenADR allows interoperability with existing/future systems/technologies and can be used within related dynamic pricing activities within Smart Grid.

  17. Demand forecasting for automotive sector in Malaysia by system dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zulkepli, Jafri Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Fong, Chan Hwa

    2015-12-11

    In general, Proton as an automotive company needs to forecast future demand of the car to assist in decision making related to capacity expansion planning. One of the forecasting approaches that based on judgemental or subjective factors is normally used to forecast the demand. As a result, demand could be overstock that eventually will increase the operation cost; or the company will face understock, which resulted losing their customers. Due to automotive industry is very challenging process because of high level of complexity and uncertainty involved in the system, an accurate tool to forecast the future of automotive demand from the modelling perspective is required. Hence, the main objective of this paper is to forecast the demand of automotive Proton car industry in Malaysia using system dynamics approach. Two types of intervention namely optimistic and pessimistic experiments scenarios have been tested to determine the capacity expansion that can prevent the company from overstocking. Finding from this study highlighted that the management needs to expand their production for optimistic scenario, whilst pessimistic give results that would otherwise. Finally, this study could help Proton Edar Sdn. Bhd (PESB) to manage the long-term capacity planning in order to meet the future demand of the Proton cars.

  18. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  19. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-08-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) performed a technology demonstration and evaluation for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in Seattle City Light's (SCL) service territory. This report summarizes the process and results of deploying open automated demand response (OpenADR) in Seattle area with winter morning peaking commercial buildings. The field tests were designed to evaluate the feasibility of deploying fully automated demand response (DR) in four to six sites in the winter and the savings from various building systems. The project started in November of 2008 and lasted 6 months. The methodology for the study included site recruitment, control strategy development, automation system deployment and enhancements, and evaluation of sites participation in DR test events. LBNL subcontracted McKinstry and Akuacom for this project. McKinstry assisted with recruitment, site survey collection, strategy development and overall participant and control vendor management. Akuacom established a new server and enhanced its operations to allow for scheduling winter morning day-of and day-ahead events. Each site signed a Memorandum of Agreement with SCL. SCL offered each site $3,000 for agreeing to participate in the study and an additional $1,000 for each event they participated. Each facility and their control vendor worked with LBNL and McKinstry to select and implement control strategies for DR and developed their automation based on the existing Internet connectivity and building control system. Once the DR strategies were programmed, McKinstry commissioned them before actual test events. McKinstry worked with LBNL to identify control points that can be archived at each facility. For each site LBNL collected meter data and trend logs from the energy management and control system. The communication system allowed the sites to receive day-ahead as well as day-of DR test event signals. Measurement of DR was

  20. Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

  1. Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

    2008-11-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

  2. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its model. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

  3. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

    2010-03-17

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides

  4. Reducing Demand through Efficiency and Services: Impacts and Opportunities in Buildings Sector (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-02-02

    Mary Ann Piette, Deputy of LBNL's Building Technologies Department and Director of the Demand Response Research Center, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  5. Reducing Demand through Efficiency and Services: Impacts and Opportunities in Buildings Sector (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann [Director, Demand Response Research Center

    2011-06-08

    Mary Ann Piette, Deputy of LBNL's Building Technologies Department and Director of the Demand Response Research Center, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  6. Lighting Business Case -- A Report Analyzing Lighting Technology Opportunities with High Return on Investment Energy Savings for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Carol C.; Richman, Eric E.

    2005-12-30

    This document analyzes lighting technology opportunities with high return on investment energy savings for the Federal sector.

  7. Residential Sector Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stoves Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 2002-5,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Household energy consumption by...

  8. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  9. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Earth Day is a great reminder of the importance of caring for the environment, but in addition to April 22, the Department of Energy (DOE) works year round to address climate change issues and ensure energy security for the U.S. While conscientious energy use is critical to addressing threats from climate change, the issue can be more complicated than just increasing efficiency in energy-intensive sectors like manufacturing. The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) is

  10. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  11. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt043tierickson2011p

  12. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt043tierickson2012o

  13. Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

    1980-10-10

    This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

  14. Identifying new technologies that save energy and reduce costs to the Federal sector: The New Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, W.D.M.; Conover, D.R.; Stockmeyer, M.K.

    1995-11-01

    In 1990 the New Technology Demonstration Program (formerly the Test Bed Demonstration Program) was initiated by the US Department of Energy`s Office (DOE`s) of Federal Energy Management Programs with the purpose of accelerating the introduction of new technologies into the Federal sector. The program has since expanded into a multi-laboratory collaborative effort that evaluates new technologies and shares the results with the Federal design and procurement communities. These evaluations are performed on a collaborative basis which typically includes technology manufacturers, Federal facilities, utilities, trade associations, research institutes, and other in partnership with DOE. The end result is a range of effective technology transfer tools that provide operations and performance data on new technologies to Federal designers, building managers, and procurement officials. These tools assist in accelerating a technology`s Federal application and realizing reductions in energy consumption and costs.

  15. Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking DemandResponse and Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2005-09-02

    This paper presents a preliminary framework to describe how advanced controls can support multiple modes of operations including both energy efficiency and demand response (DR). A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide status is outlined. The role of energy management and control systems for DR is described. Building systems such as HVAC and lighting that utilize control technologies and strategies for energy efficiency are mapped on to DR and demand shedding strategies are developed. Past research projects are presented to provide a context for the current projects. The economic case for implementing DR from a building owner perspective is also explored.

  16. Demonstrating and Deploying Private Sector Technologies at DOE Sites - Issues to be Overcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedick, R. C.

    2002-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) continues to pursue cost-effective, environmental cleanup of the weapons complex sites with a concomitant emphasis on deployment of innovative technologies as a means to this end. The EM Office of Science and Technology (OST) pursues a strategy that entails identification of technologies that have potential applications throughout the DOE complex: at multiple DOE sites and at multiple facilities on those sites. It further encourages a competitive procurement process for the various applications entailed in the remediation of a given facility. These strategies require a competitive private-sector supplier base to help meet EM needs. OST supports technology development and deployment through investments in partnerships with private industry to enhance the acceptance of their technology products within the DOE market. Since 1992, OST and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have supported the re search and development of technology products and services offered by the private sector. During this time, NETL has managed over 140 research and development projects involving industrial and university partners. These projects involve research in a broad range of EM related topics, including deactivation and decommissioning, characterization, monitoring, sensors, waste separation, groundwater remediation, robotics, and mixed waste treatment. Successful partnerships between DOE and Industry have resulted in viable options for EM's cleanup needs, and require continued marketing efforts to ensure that these technology solutions are used at multiple DOE sites and facilities.

  17. Subsea innovative boosting technologies on deep water scenarios -- Impacts and demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caetano, E.F.; Mendonca, J.E.; Pagot, P.R.; Cotrim, M.L.; Camargo, R.M.T.; Assayag, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the importance of deep water scenario for Brazil, the PETROBRAS Deep and Ultra-Deep Water R and D Program (PROCAP-2000) and the candidate fields for the deployment of subsea innovative boosting technologies (ESPS -- electrical submersible pump in subsea wells, SSS -- subsea separation systems and SBMS -- subsea multiphase flow pumping system) as well as the problems associated with the flow assurance in such conditions. The impact of those innovative systems, their technological stage and remaining demands to make them available for deployment in offshore subsea areas, mainly in giant deepwater fields, are discussed and predicted.

  18. Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

    2011-07-01

    Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

  19. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar

  20. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-06-02

    We present an Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specifications (OpenADR) data model capable of communicating real-time prices to electricity customers. We also show how the same data model could be used to for other types of dynamic pricing tariffs (including peak pricing tariffs, which are common throughout the United States). Customers participating in automated demand response programs with building control systems can respond to dynamic prices by using the actual prices as inputs to their control systems. Alternatively, prices can be mapped into"building operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different strategies customers could use to map prices to operation modes. Our results show that OpenADR can be used to communicate dynamic pricing within the Smart Grid and that OpenADR allows for interoperability with existing and future systems, technologies, and electricity markets.

  1. Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler , Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; ,, Hirohisa Aki; Lai, Judy

    2009-05-26

    The US Department of Energy has launched the Zero-Net-Energy (ZNE) Commercial Building Initiative (CBI) in order to develop commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge energy-efficient technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. We examine how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or carbon-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies, such as photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive / demand-response technologies. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function: the minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and carbon / CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the CBI. Using a nursing home in northern California and New York with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNE building requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve ZNE. For comparison, we analyze a nursing home facility in New York to examine the effects of a flatter tariff structure and different load profiles. It has trouble reaching ZNE status and its load reductions as well as efficiency measures need to be more effective than those in the CA case

  2. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  3. Demand Response | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technology Development Smart Grid Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the ...

  4. DemandDirect | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DemandDirect Place: Woodbury, Connecticut Zip: 6798 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product: DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load...

  5. ISTUM PC: industrial sector technology use model for the IBM-PC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, J.M.; Kaplan, D.T.

    1984-09-01

    A project to improve and enhance the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) was originated in the summer of 1983. The project had dix identifiable objectives: update the data base; improve run-time efficiency; revise the reference base case; conduct case studies; provide technical and promotional seminars; and organize a service bureau. This interim report describes which of these objectives have been met and which tasks remain to be completed. The most dramatic achievement has been in the area of run-time efficiency. From a model that required a large proportion of the total resources of a mainframe computer and a great deal of effort to operate, the current version of the model (ISTUM-PC) runs on an IBM Personal Computer. The reorganization required for the model to run on a PC has additional advantages: the modular programs are somewhat easier to understand and the data base is more accessible and easier to use. A simple description of the logic of the model is given in this report. To generate the necessary funds for completion of the model, a multiclient project is proposed. This project will extend the industry coverage to all the industrial sectors, including the construction of process flow models for chemicals and petroleum refining. The project will also calibrate this model to historical data and construct a base case and alternative scenarios. The model will be delivered to clients and training provided. 2 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  6. EIA projections of coal supply and demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, D.E.

    1989-10-23

    Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

  7. ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2009-05-22

    This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)–developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic

  8. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector This ...

  9. Considerations in forecasting the demand for carbon sequestration and biotic storage technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has identified forestry and other land-use based mitigation measures as possible sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. An overview of sequestration and biotic storage is presented, and the potential impacts of the use of carbon sequestration as a mitigation technology are briefly noted. Carbon sequestration is also compare to other mitigation technologies. Biotic mitigation technologies are concluded to be a legitimate and potentially important part of greenhouse gas mitigation due to their relatively low costs, ancillary benefits, and climate impact. However, not all biotic mitigation techniques perfectly match the idealized definition of a mitigation measure, and policies are becoming increasingly biased against biotic technologies.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Evaluation of Dynamic Wireless Charging Demand

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Vehicle Systems

  11. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies ...

  12. Cost-effective retrofit technology for reducing peak power demand in small and medium commercial buildings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nutaro, James J.; Fugate, David L.; Kuruganti, Teja; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Starke, Michael R.

    2015-05-27

    We describe a cost-effective retrofit technology that uses collective control of multiple rooftop air conditioning units to reduce the peak power consumption of small and medium commercial buildings. The proposed control uses a model of the building and air conditioning units to select an operating schedule for the air conditioning units that maintains a temperature set point subject to a constraint on the number of units that may operate simultaneously. A prototype of this new control system was built and deployed in a large gymnasium to coordinate four rooftop air conditioning units. Based on data collected while operating this prototype,more » we estimate that the cost savings achieved by reducing peak power consumption is sufficient to repay the cost of the prototype within a year.« less

  13. Cost-effective retrofit technology for reducing peak power demand in small and medium commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutaro, James J.; Fugate, David L.; Kuruganti, Teja; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Starke, Michael R.

    2015-05-27

    We describe a cost-effective retrofit technology that uses collective control of multiple rooftop air conditioning units to reduce the peak power consumption of small and medium commercial buildings. The proposed control uses a model of the building and air conditioning units to select an operating schedule for the air conditioning units that maintains a temperature set point subject to a constraint on the number of units that may operate simultaneously. A prototype of this new control system was built and deployed in a large gymnasium to coordinate four rooftop air conditioning units. Based on data collected while operating this prototype, we estimate that the cost savings achieved by reducing peak power consumption is sufficient to repay the cost of the prototype within a year.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Smith Electric Vehicles at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Smith Electric...

  15. Lab-Corps Pilot Accelerates Private-Sector Adoption of Game-Changing Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last week, the EERE Lab-Corps Initiative graduated its first class of top scientists who’ve gone back to school to gain an entrepreneurial education. With technologies ranging from bioenergy to building efficiencies, this $2.3 million pilot program, managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), trains top lab researchers across the nation on how to move high-impact national laboratory-invented technologies into the market.

  16. Climate change, insurance, and the buildings sector: Technological synergisms between adaptation and mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2002-11-01

    Examining the intersection of risk analysis and sustainable energy strategies reveals numerous examples of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies that offer insurance loss-prevention benefits. The growing threat of climate change provides an added motivation for the risk community to better understand this area of opportunity. While analyses of climate change mitigation typically focus on the emissions-reduction characteristics of sustainable energy technologies, less often recognized are a host of synergistic ways in which these technologies also offer adaptation benefits, e.g. making buildings more resilient to natural disasters. While there is already some relevant activity, there remain various barriers to significantly expanding these efforts. Achieving successful integration of sustainable energy considerations with risk-management objectives requires a more proactive orientation, and coordination among diverse actors and industry groups.

  17. Examination of the factors and issues for an environmental technology utilization partnership between the private sector and the Department of Energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouse, P.

    1997-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) held a meeting on November 12, 1992 to evaluate the DOE relations with industry and university partners concerning environmental technology utilization. The goal of this meeting was to receive feedback from DOE industry and university partners for the identification of opportunities to improve the DOE cooperative work processes with the private sector. The meeting was designed to collect information and to turn that information into action to improve private sector partnerships with DOE.

  18. The Potential for Energy-Efficient Technologies to Reduce Carbon Emissions in the United States: Transport Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1997-07-01

    The world is searching for a meaningful answer to the likelihood that the continued build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will cause significant changes in the earth`s climate. If there is to be a solution, technology must play a central role. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the potential for cost-effective technological changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. transportation sector by the year 2010. Other papers in this session address the same topic for buildings and industry. U.S.transportation energy use stood at 24.4 quadrillion Btu (Quads) in 1996, up 2 percent over 1995 (U.S. DOE/EIA, 1997, table 2.5). Transportation sector carbon dioxide emissions amounted to 457.2 million metric tons of carbon (MmtC) in 1995, almost one third of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (U.S. DOE/EIA,1996a, p. 12). Transport`s energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions are growing, apparently at accelerating rates as energy efficiency improvements appear to be slowing to a halt. Cost-effective and nearly cost-effective technologies have enormous potential to slow and even reverse the growth of transport`s CO{sub 2} emissions, but technological changes will take time and are not likely to occur without significant, new public policy initiatives. Absent new initiatives, we project that CO{sub 2} emissions from transport are likely to grow to 616 MmtC by 2010, and 646 MmtC by 2015. An aggressive effort to develop and implement cost-effective technologies that are more efficient and fuels that are lower in carbon could reduce emissions by about 12% in 2010 and 18% in 2015, versus the business-as- usual projection. With substantial luck, leading to breakthroughs in key areas, reductions over the BAU case of 17% in 2010 and 25% in 2015,might be possible. In none of these case are CO{sub 2} emissions reduced to 1990 levels by 2015.

  19. Reducing electric sector CO{sub 2} emissions under competition: Facilitating technology development and turnover on both sides of the meter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connors, S.R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper reviews the technological and institutional factors involved in achieving long-term reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions in the electric sector. A case study of the New England electric sector is used to illustrate factors associated with energy infrastructure turnover and technology development and use. Opportunities for joint implementation of CO{sub 2} reductions are identified, as well as strategies which leverage CO{sub 2} emissions reductions to achieve reductions in other emissions, and to facilitate cost and environmental risk mitigation. Impacts of environmental performance constraints on the electric industry are also identified and analyzed. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  1. Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................... 1 4 2. Technology Assessment and Potential ................................................................................................................. 5 5 2.1 Chemical Industry Focus

  2. Residential Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

  3. Scenarios of energy demand and efficiency potential for Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzvetanov, P.; Ruicheva, M.; Denisiev, M.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents aggregated results on macroeconomic and final energy demand scenarios developed within the Bulgarian Country Study on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Mitigation, supported by US Country Studies Program. The studies in this area cover 5 main stages: (1) {open_quotes}Baseline{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Energy Efficiency{close_quotes} socioeconomic and energy policy philosophy; (2) Modeling of macroeconomic and sectoral development till 2020; (3) Expert assessments on the technological options for energy efficiency increase and GHG mitigation in the Production, Transport and Households and Services Sectors; (4) Bottom-up modeling of final energy demand; and (5) Sectoral and overall energy efficiency potential and policy. Within the Bulgarian Country Study, the presented results have served as a basis for the final integration stage {open_quotes}Assessment of the Mitigation Policy and Measures in the Energy System of Bulgaria{close_quotes}.

  4. Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The penetration rate for central air-conditioning is estimated by means of time series analysis of RECS survey data. Water Heating: Solar Water Heaters Market shares for solar...

  5. Model Documentation Report: Industrial Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    factors are multiplicative for all fuels which have values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. The equation for total industrial electricity consumption is below....

  6. Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stoves Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 2006,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Household energy consumption by...

  7. Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stoves Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 2001,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Household energy consumption by...

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    RenewableAlternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication...

  9. Demand Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand Response Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee ...

  10. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Electric Power Sector | Department of Energy Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use. To perform this

  11. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  12. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demand Dispatch-Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid 10 August 2011 DOE/NETL- DE-FE0004001 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Prepared by: National Energy Technology Laboratory Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

  13. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity Advanced Vehicle...

  14. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

  15. Drivers of Future Energy Demand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Drivers of Future Energy Demand in China Asian Energy Demand Outlook 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 14, 2014 Valerie J. Karplus MIT Sloan School of Management 2 www.china.org.cn www.flickr.com www.wikimedia.org globalchange.mit.edu Global Climate Change Human Development Local Pollution Industrial Development & Resource Needs How to balance? 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 1981 1991 2001 2011 Non-material Sectors/Other Construction Commercial consumption Residential consumption

  16. Vehicle Technologies Program - Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-08-01

    R&D drives innovation while lowering technology costs, which then enables the private sector to accelerate clean technology deployment. Along with R&D, DOE's Vehicles Technologies Program deploys clean, efficient vehicle technologies and renewable fuels, which reduce U.S. demand for petroleum products.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Unlocking Private Sector Financing for Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by National Association of State Energy Officials at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  18. Advanced Methods for Incorporating Solar Energy Technologies into Electric Sector Capacity-Expansion Models: Literature Review and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Eurek, K.; Margolis, R.

    2014-07-01

    Because solar power is a rapidly growing component of the electricity system, robust representations of solar technologies should be included in capacity-expansion models. This is a challenge because modeling the electricity system--and, in particular, modeling solar integration within that system--is a complex endeavor. This report highlights the major challenges of incorporating solar technologies into capacity-expansion models and shows examples of how specific models address those challenges. These challenges include modeling non-dispatchable technologies, determining which solar technologies to model, choosing a spatial resolution, incorporating a solar resource assessment, and accounting for solar generation variability and uncertainty.

  19. Sector 9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector 9 About Science and Research Beamlines Operations and Schedule Safety Search APS ... Search Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Contacts Advisory Committee Beamlines...

  20. Energy use and CO2 emissions of China’s industrial sector from a global perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Kyle, G. Page; Yu, Sha; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Luckow, Patrick W.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhang, Xiliang; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-07-10

    The industrial sector has accounted for more than 50% of China’s final energy consumption in the past 30 years. Understanding the future emissions and emissions mitigation opportunities depends on proper characterization of the present-day industrial energy use, as well as industrial demand drivers and technological opportunities in the future. Traditionally, however, integrated assessment research has handled the industrial sector of China in a highly aggregate form. In this study, we develop a technologically detailed, service-oriented representation of 11 industrial subsectors in China, and analyze a suite of scenarios of future industrial demand growth. We find that, due to anticipated saturation of China’s per-capita demands of basic industrial goods, industrial energy demand and CO2 emissions approach a plateau between 2030 and 2040, then decrease gradually. Still, without emissions mitigation policies, the industrial sector remains heavily reliant on coal, and therefore emissions-intensive. With carbon prices, we observe some degree of industrial sector electrification, deployment of CCS at large industrial point sources of CO2 emissions at low carbon prices, an increase in the share of CHP systems at industrial facilities. These technological responses amount to reductions of industrial emissions (including indirect emission from electricity) are of 24% in 2050 and 66% in 2095.

  1. Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S.

    1996-08-01

    Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

  2. Commercial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  3. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-08-15

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

  4. Demand Response Energy Consulting LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Response Energy Consulting LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Demand Response & Energy Consulting LLC Place: Delanson, New York Zip: NY 12053 Sector: Efficiency Product:...

  5. Interim Data Changes in the Short-term Energy Outlook Data Systems Related to Electric Power Sector and Natural Gas Demand Data Revisions (Released in the STEO December 2002)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Beginning with the December 2002 issue of the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), electricity generation and related fuel consumption totals will be presented on a basis that is consistent with the definitions and aggregates used in the 2001 edition of EIA's Annual Energy Review (AER). Particularly affected by these changes are the demand and balancing item totals for natural

  6. Demand Response Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 5 D E M A N D R E S P O N S E T E C H N O L O G Y R O A D M A P Development of this roadmap occurred in stages between May 2014 and February 2015. The Bonneville Power...

  7. Energy conservation and electricity sector liberalization: Case-studies on the development of cogeneration, wind energy and demand-side management in the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slingerland, S.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, the development of cogeneration, wind energy and demand-side management in the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom are compared. It is discussed to what extent these developments are determined by the liberalization process. Three key liberalization variables are identified: unbundling, privatization and introduction of competition. The analysis suggests that unbundling prior to introduction of full competition in generation is particularly successful in stimulating industrial cogeneration; simultaneous introduction of competition and unbundling mainly stimulates non-cogeneration gas-based capacity; and introduction of competition in itself is likely to impede the development of district-heating cogeneration. Furthermore, it is argued that development of wind energy and demand-side management are primarily dependent on the kind of support system set up by policy makers rather than on the liberalization process. Negative impacts of introduction of competition on integrated resource planning and commercial energy services could nevertheless be expected.

  8. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in ... More Documents & Publications Technology Performance Exchange - 2013 BTO Peer Review ...

  9. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-09-30

    measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

  10. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-15

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  11. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In February 2014, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the ...

  12. Solar energy research and development: federal and private sector roles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The Energy Research Advisory Board convened a Solar R and D Panel to determine the status of the solar industry and solar R and D in the United States and to recommend to DOE appropriate roles for the Federal and private sectors. The Panel's report acknowledges the new Administration policy reorienting the Federal role in energy development to long-term, high-risk, high-payoff R and D, and leaving commercialization to the private sector. The Panel's recommendations are further predicated on an assumption of continued, substantially reduced funding in the near-term. The Panel found that solar energy technologies have progressed significantly in the past 10 years and represent a group of highly promising energy options for the United States. However, it also found the solar industry to be in a precarious condition, fluctuating energy demand and prices, and uncertain Federal tax and regulatory policies. The Business Energy and Residential Tax Credits are essential to the near-term health of the solar industry. Commercialization has already begun for some solar technologies; for others, decreases in Federal funding will result in a slowdown or termination. The primary Federal roles in solar R and D should be in support of basic and applied research, high-risk, high-payoff technology development and other necessary research for which there are insufficient market incentives. The Federal Government should also move strongly to transfer technology to the private sector for near-commerical technologies. Large demonstration and commercialization projects cannot be justified for Federal funding under current economic conditions. These should be pursued by the private sector. The Panel examined seven technology areas and made specific findings and recommendations for each.

  13. Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

    2003-08-24

    It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

  14. Demand Response Performance and Communication Strategy: AHRI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Demand Response Performance and Communication Strategy: AHRI and CEE DOE Building Technologies Office Conference NREL, Golden, Colorado, May 1, 2014 | 2 A Growing Crisis: Peak ...

  15. Identifying Opportunities and Impacts of Fuel Switching in the Industrial Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Ramesh C.; Jamison, Keith; Thomas, Daniel E.

    2006-08-01

    The underlying purpose of this white paper is to examine fuel switching opportunities in the U.S. industrial sector and make strategic recommendations—leading to application of the best available technologies and development of new technologies—that will introduce fuel use flexibility as an economically feasible option for plant operators, as a means to condition local fuel demands and a hedge against the local rises in fuel prices.

  16. Philippines' downstream sector poised for growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-11

    This paper reports that the Philippines' downstream sector is poised for sharp growth. Despite a slip in refined products demand in recent years, Philippines products demand will rebound sharply by 2000, East-West Center (EWC), Honolulu, predicts. Philippines planned refinery expansions are expected to meet that added demand, EWC Director Fereidun Fesharaki says. Like the rest of the Asia-Pacific region, product specifications are changing, but major refiners in the area expect to meet the changes without major case outlays. At the same time, Fesharaki says, push toward deregulation will further bolster the outlook for the Philippines downstream sector.

  17. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

  18. Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; McKane, Aimee; Goli, Sasank; Therkelsen, Peter; Olsen, Daniel

    2012-01-18

    California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This,study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with

  19. Research Projects in Industrial Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

  20. DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues National Energy Sector Cyber Organization Notice of Intent February 11, 2010 The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announced on Jan. 7 that it intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for a National Energy Sector Cyber Organization, envisioned as a partnership between the federal government and energy sector stakeholders to protect the bulk power electric grid and aid the integration of smart grid technology to enhance the security

  1. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt071_vss_cesiel_2011_o.pdf (760.6 KB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity

  2. Ashkelon Technological Industries ATI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ashkelon Technological Industries (ATI) Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Government Public sector ) References: Ashkelon...

  3. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

    2009-05-18

    The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

  4. Impacts of Temperature Variation on Energy Demand in Buildings (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    In the residential and commercial sectors, heating and cooling account for more than 40% of end-use energy demand. As a result, energy consumption in those sectors can vary significantly from year to year, depending on yearly average temperatures.

  5. Program Design Analysis using BEopt Building Energy Optimization Software: Defining a Technology Pathway Leading to New Homes with Zero Peak Cooling Demand; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

    2006-08-01

    An optimization method based on the evaluation of a broad range of different combinations of specific energy efficiency and renewable-energy options is used to determine the least-cost pathway to the development of new homes with zero peak cooling demand. The optimization approach conducts a sequential search of a large number of possible option combinations and uses the most cost-effective alternatives to generate a least-cost curve to achieve home-performance levels ranging from a Title 24-compliant home to a home that uses zero net source energy on an annual basis. By evaluating peak cooling load reductions on the least-cost curve, it is then possible to determine the most cost-effective combination of energy efficiency and renewable-energy options that both maximize annual energy savings and minimize peak-cooling demand.

  6. Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

  7. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% - 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  8. Hydrocarbon Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hydrocarbon Technologies Place: Lawrenceville, New Jersey Zip: 8648 Sector: Efficiency Product: String representation...

  9. Bioconversion Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Bioconversion Technologies Place: United Kingdom Sector: Biofuels Product: Second-generation biofuels technology developer References: Bioconversion...

  10. Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering

  11. Transportation Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and historic yearly values for car prices at different production levels by applying an additive adjustment to the price of a gasoline-fueled vehicle. a) Car and Light Truck at...

  12. Industrial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    factors are multiplicative for all fuels which have values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) - - - fg...

  13. Residential Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stoves Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 2001,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Household energy consumption by...

  14. An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-02-01

    Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

  15. Chapter 2: Energy Sectors and Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Energy Sectors and Systems September 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review 2 Energy Sectors and Systems Issues and RDD&D Opportunities Energy systems are becoming increasingly interconnected and complex. Integrated energy systems present both opportunities for performance improvement as well as risks to operability and security. The size and scope of these opportunities and risks are just beginning to be understood. This chapter addresses both the key issues of energy sectors and their

  16. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2010-01-08

    July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  17. DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the federal government and energy sector stakeholders to protect the bulk power electric grid and aid the integration of smart grid technology to enhance the security of the grid. ...

  18. Market Report for the Industrial Sector, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastri, Bhima; Brueske, Sabine; de los Reyes, Pamela; Jamison, Keith; Justiniano, Mauricio; Margolis, Nancy; Monfort, Joe; Raghunathan, Anand; Sabouni, Ridah

    2009-07-01

    This report provides an overview of trends in industrial-sector energy use. It focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors and several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry.

  19. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be used by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.

  20. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be usedmore » by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.« less

  1. Chapter 3: Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Technology Assessment | Electric Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Energy Storage Chapter 3: Technology Assessments Introduction Electric energy storage technologies (EESTs) have the potential to significantly improve the operating capabilities of the grid as well as mitigate infrastructure investments. The key characteristic of energy storage technologies is their ability to store electricity produced at one time for use at another time, balancing supply and demand. This capability can be used to address a number of challenges facing the power sector

  2. 2016 Technology Innovation Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects FY 2016 Technology Innovation Project Briefs Demand Response TIP 292: Advanced Heat Pump Water Heater Research TIP 336: Scaled Deployment and Demonstration of Demand...

  3. Promising Technologies List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about promising new and underutilized energy-saving technologies available for Federal and commercial building sector deployment. To identify promising technologies,...

  4. Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) collaborated to examine the interdependencies between two critical infrastructure sectors - Dams and Energy. The study highlights the importance of hydroelectric power generation, with a particular emphasis on the variability of weather patterns and competing demands for

  5. Briza Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Briza Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Briza Technologies Place: Hillsborough, New Jersey Zip: 8844 Sector: Wind energy Product: Developing wind turbine technology....

  6. Public Finance Mechanisms to Catalyze Sustainable Energy Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    all aspects of the sector including technology innovation, project development, (SME) business and industry support, consumer awareness and end-user finance. Regardless of...

  7. Evolving Role of the Power Sector Regulator: A Clean Energy Regulators Initiative Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, O.; Miller, M.; Bazilian, M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper seeks to briefly characterize the evolving role of power sector regulation. Given current global dynamics, regulation of the power sector is undergoing dramatic changes. This transformation is being driven by various factors including technological advances and cost reductions in renewable energy, energy efficiency, and demand management; increasing air pollution and climate change concerns; and persistent pressure for ensuring sustainable economic development and increased access to energy services by the poor. These issues add to the already complex task of power sector regulation, of which the fundamental remit remains to objectively and transparently ensure least-cost service delivery at high quality. While no single regulatory task is trivial to undertake, it is the prioritization and harmonization of a multitude of objectives that exemplifies the essential challenge of power sector regulation. Evolving regulatory roles can be understood through the concept of existing objectives and an additional layer of emerging objectives. Following this categorization, we describe seven existing objectives of power sector regulators and nine emerging objectives, highlighting key challenges and outlining interdependencies. This essay serves as a preliminary installment in the Clean Energy Regulatory Initiative (CERI) series, and aims to lay the groundwork for subsequent reports and case studies that will explore these topics in more depth.

  8. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 1: Building prototype analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    This report provides a detailed description of, and the baseline assumptions and simulation results for, the building prototype simulations conducted for the building types designated in the Work Plan for Demand-side Management Assessment of Hawaii`s Demand-Side Resources (HES-4, Phase 2). This report represents the second revision to the initial building prototype description report provided to DBEDT early in the project. Modifications and revisions to the prototypes, based on further calibration efforts and on comments received from DBEDT Staff have been incorporated into this final version. These baseline prototypes form the basis upon which the DSM measure impact estimates and the DSM measure data base were developed for this project. This report presents detailed information for each of the 17 different building prototypes developed for use with the DOE-21E program (23 buildings in total, including resorts and hotels defined separately for each island) to estimate the impact of the building technologies and measures included in this project. The remainder of this section presents some nomenclature and terminology utilized in the reports, tables, and data bases developed from this project to denote building type and vintage. Section 2 contains a more detailed discussion of the data sources, the definition of the residential sector building prototypes, and results of the DOE-2 analysis. Section 3 provides a similar discussion for the commercial sector. The prototype and baseline simulation results are presented in a separate section for each building type. Where possible, comparison of the baseline simulation results with benchmark data from the ENERGY 2020 model or other demand forecasting models specific to Hawaii is included for each building. Appendix A contains a detailed listing of the commercial sector baseline indoor lighting technologies included in the existing and new prototypes by building type.

  9. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you...

  10. Residential Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in-home displays with controllable home area network capabilities and thermal storage devices for home heating. Goals and objectives: Reduce the City's NCP demand above...

  11. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Contract: DE-FE0004001 Demand Dispatch- ... ISO Independent System Operators LMP Locational Marginal Price MW Mega-watt MWh ... today My generator may come on and off ...

  12. Electric energy sector in Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastos, C.M.

    1994-06-01

    This article describes how the organization of the electric energy sector in Argentina has changed dramatically from a sector in which state-owned companies worked under a central planning to one in which private companies make their own decisions. The way that the electrical system used to work can be shown by these statements: demand growth estimated by central planning team; projects to be developed and the timetable determined by the same team; unit operations ruled by central dispatch, and under state-owned companies responsibility; integration with neighbor countries focused on physical projects, such as Salto Grande with Uruguay and Yacyreta with Paraguay. Today the electrical system works under these rules: the system has been vertically separated and the companies cannot be integrated; electric energy is considered as an ordinary wealth and the value that consumers give it is taken into account, (the distribution companies pay consumers a penalty for the energy that they cannot supply, the penalty is worth the economic damage consumers suffer due to its lack); producers have to compete for demand. They can sell in two ways: sell under private agreements or sell to the system. Both ways of selling compete with each other because the system buys giving priority to lower costs and, as a consequence, some of the producers do not sell at all.

  13. VICA Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: VICA Technologies LLC Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Zip: 19104 Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product:...

  14. Lithium Technology Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lithium Technology Corporation Place: Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania Zip: PA 19462 Sector: Vehicles Product:...

  15. Siemens Technology Accelerator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Accelerator Jump to: navigation, search Name: Siemens Technology Accelerator Place: Germany Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Subsidiary ...

  16. Albuquerque Technology Incubator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Albuquerque Technology Incubator Jump to: navigation, search Name: Albuquerque Technology Incubator Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal...

  17. Premier Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Premier Solar Technologies Name: Premier Solar Technologies Place: Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Integrated Storage Collector Website:...

  18. Sunnyside Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies, Inc Place: Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip: 55413 Sector: Carbon, Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Technology firm developing advanced materials and nanotechnologies including...

  19. 2014 Energy Sector Specific Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sector-Specific Plan Energy Sector-Specific Plan 2015 ii Page intentionally left blank Energy Sector-Specific Plan 2015 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE ......

  20. Taiwan: An energy sector study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, T.; Fridley, D.; Kang, Wu

    1988-03-01

    A study on the economy of Taiwan, with special reference to the energy sector, revealed the following: Taiwan's rapid export-driven economic growth in the 1970s and 1980s has earned them the rank of ''Newly Industrialized Countries.'' Coal reserves measure less than 1 billion tons, and annual output has declined to below 2 million tons per year. Marginal amounts of crude are produced. Natural gas resources have been exploited both on- and offshore, through production amounts to little more than 1 billion cubic meters per year. Domestic hydrocarbon production is forecast to decline. Taiwan prssesses an estimated 5300 mW of exploitable hydropower capacity, of which 2564 mW had been installed by 1986. Taiwan has undertaken a massive program of nuclear power construction in response to the rapid rise in oil prices during the 1970s. Energy demand has risen an average of 9.0 percent per year since 1954, while real GNP has grown 8.6 percent per year. Sine 1980, oil has provided a lower share of total energy demand. Oil demand for transport has continued to grow rapidly. Declining production of domestic natural gas has led Taiwan to initiate LNG imports from Indonesia beginning in 1990. Coal has regained some of its earlier importance in Taiwan's energy structure. With declining domestic production, imports now provide nearly 90 percent of total coal demand. Taiwan is basically self-sufficient in refining capacity. Energy demand is expected to grow 5.4 percent per year through the yeat 2000. With declining output of domestic resources, energy dependency on imports will rise from its current 90 percent level. Government policy recognizes this external dependency and has directed it efforts at diversification of suppliers. 18 refs., 11 figs., 40 tabs.

  1. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Commercial Demand...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    chosen to meet the projected service demands for the seven major end uses. Once technologies are chosen, the energy consumed by the equipment stock (both existing and purchased...

  2. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee T.; Piette, Mary Ann; Faulkner, David; Ghatikar, Girish; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Adesola, Bunmi; Murtishaw, Scott; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-01-31

    In 2006 the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) formed an Industrial Demand Response Team to investigate opportunities and barriers to implementation of Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) systems in California industries. Auto-DR is an open, interoperable communications and technology platform designed to: Provide customers with automated, electronic price and reliability signals; Provide customers with capability to automate customized DR strategies; Automate DR, providing utilities with dispatchable operational capability similar to conventional generation resources. This research began with a review of previous Auto-DR research on the commercial sector. Implementing Auto-DR in industry presents a number of challenges, both practical and perceived. Some of these include: the variation in loads and processes across and within sectors, resource-dependent loading patterns that are driven by outside factors such as customer orders or time-critical processing (e.g. tomato canning), the perceived lack of control inherent in the term 'Auto-DR', and aversion to risk, especially unscheduled downtime. While industry has demonstrated a willingness to temporarily provide large sheds and shifts to maintain grid reliability and be a good corporate citizen, the drivers for widespread Auto-DR will likely differ. Ultimately, most industrial facilities will balance the real and perceived risks associated with Auto-DR against the potential for economic gain through favorable pricing or incentives. Auto-DR, as with any ongoing industrial activity, will need to function effectively within market structures. The goal of the industrial research is to facilitate deployment of industrial Auto-DR that is economically attractive and technologically feasible. Automation will make DR: More visible by providing greater transparency through two-way end-to-end communication of DR signals from end-use customers; More repeatable, reliable, and persistent because the automated controls

  3. Making the market right for environmentally sound energy-efficient technologies: US buildings sector successes that might work in developing countries and Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-12-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, when energy prices were high, all Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries improved their E/GNP by about 2.5% annually. Increased energy efficiency accounted for 2/3rds of this improvement; the remaining portion was due to structural changes in the economy. In the US, analytic and policy tools that have successfully promoted energy efficiency include integrated resource planning, energy use labels, energy use standards, ``Golden Carrot`` incentive programs, and revenue-neutral ``feebates.`` In addition, a number of low cost, environmentally sound, energy-efficient technologies, such as electronic ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows, have recently been developed. We discuss how many of these policies and technologies are probably exportable to developing countries and Eastern Europe, giving examples of successful starts in India, the ASEAN countries, and Brazil.

  4. Demand Response- Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use customers, designed to induce lower electricity use typically at times of high market prices or when grid reliability is jeopardized.

  5. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance On January 8, 2015, the Energy Department released guidance to help the energy sector establish or align existing cybersecurity risk management programs to meet the objectives of the Cybersecurity Framework released by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) in February 2014. The voluntary Cybersecurity Framework consists of standards, guidelines, and

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis: Electric Sector Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Sector Integration Integrating higher levels of renewable resources into the U.S. electricity system could pose challenges to the operability of the nation's grid. NREL's electric sector integration analysis work investigates the potential impacts of expanding renewable technology deployment on grid operations and infrastructure expansion including: Feasibility of higher levels of renewable electricity generation. Options for increasing electric system flexibility to accommodate higher

  7. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  8. Demand Response Dispatch Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-31

    The Demand Response (DR) Dispatch Tool uses price profiles to dispatch demand response resources and create load modifying profiles. These annual profiles are used as inputs to production cost models and regional planning tools (e.g., PROMOD). The tool has been effectively implemented in transmission planning studies conducted by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council via its Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee. The DR Dispatch Tool can properly model the dispatch of DR resources for both reliability and economic conditions.

  9. Power Sector Modeling 101

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Erin Boyd Department of Energy - Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis erin.boyd@hq.doe.gov DOE's Technical Assistance Website www.energy.gov/ta Power Sector Modeling 101 2 Presentation Description - DOE Power Sector Modeling 101 With increased energy planning needs and new regulations, environmental agencies, state energy offices and others have expressed more of an interest in electric power sector models, both for (a) interpreting the results and potential applications of modeling from

  10. Precede Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Precede Technologies Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Precede...

  11. Renewable Energy Technologies for Rural Electrification - The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Technologies for Rural Electrification - The Role of the Private Sector AgencyCompany...

  12. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from

  13. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Technology Delivering science to the marketplace through commercialization, spinoffs and industry partnerships. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Gary Grider (second from right) with the 2015 Richard P. Feynman Innovation Prize. Also pictured (left to right): Duncan McBranch, Chief Technology Officer of Los Alamos National Laboratory; Terry Wallace, Program Associate Director for Global Security at Los Alamos; and Lee

  14. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow ... Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions ...

  15. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The HiWAIS technology is a significant step forward in the warfighter support arena. Honeybees for Explosive Detection Honeybees for Explosive Detection Los Alamos researchers have ...

  16. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes03_guttman_040213.pdf (544.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Technology Performance Exchange - 2013 BTO Peer Review Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Building America System Research

  17. Regulation Services with Demand Response - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulation Services with Demand Response Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About This Technology Using grid frequency information, researchers have created algorithms that intelligently control power demand while meeting consumer objectives (i.e. target pricing). Using grid frequency information, researchers have created algorithms that intelligently control power demand while meeting consumer objectives (i.e. target pricing). Technology Marketing Summary Grid Friendly(tm)

  18. Evaluation of the Contribution of the Building Sector to PM2.5 Emissions in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Fridley, David

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we quantify the current and potential contribution of China’s building sector to direct primary and indirect PM2.5 emissions and co-benefits of key pollution reduction strategies of energy efficiency, fuel switching and pollution control technologies on PM2.5 emissions reduction. We use a bottom-up end-use accounting model to model residential and commercial buildings’ coal demand for heating and electricity demand in China’s Northern and Transition climate zones from 2010 to 2030. The model is then used to characterize the current coal-based heating (e.g., district heating, combined heat and power generation, small-scale coal-fired boilers) and power generation technologies to estimate direct and indirect PM2.5 emissions. Model scenarios are developed to evaluate and compare the potential co-benefits of efficiency improvements, fuel switching and pollution control technologies in reducing building-related direct and indirect PM2.5 emissions. An alternative pathway of development in which district heating is introduced to China’s Transition zone to meet growing demand for heat is also modeled to evaluate and quantify the potential impact on PM2.5 emissions.

  19. Refrigerated Warehouse Demand Response Strategy Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Doug; Castillo, Rafael; Larson, Kyle; Dobbs, Brian; Olsen, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    This guide summarizes demand response measures that can be implemented in refrigerated warehouses. In an appendix, it also addresses related energy efficiency opportunities. Reducing overall grid demand during peak periods and energy consumption has benefits for facility operators, grid operators, utility companies, and society. State wide demand response potential for the refrigerated warehouse sector in California is estimated to be over 22.1 Megawatts. Two categories of demand response strategies are described in this guide: load shifting and load shedding. Load shifting can be accomplished via pre-cooling, capacity limiting, and battery charger load management. Load shedding can be achieved by lighting reduction, demand defrost and defrost termination, infiltration reduction, and shutting down miscellaneous equipment. Estimation of the costs and benefits of demand response participation yields simple payback periods of 2-4 years. To improve demand response performance, it’s suggested to install air curtains and another form of infiltration barrier, such as a rollup door, for the passageways. Further modifications to increase efficiency of the refrigeration unit are also analyzed. A larger condenser can maintain the minimum saturated condensing temperature (SCT) for more hours of the day. Lowering the SCT reduces the compressor lift, which results in an overall increase in refrigeration system capacity and energy efficiency. Another way of saving energy in refrigerated warehouses is eliminating the use of under-floor resistance heaters. A more energy efficient alternative to resistance heaters is to utilize the heat that is being rejected from the condenser through a heat exchanger. These energy efficiency measures improve efficiency either by reducing the required electric energy input for the refrigeration system, by helping to curtail the refrigeration load on the system, or by reducing both the load and required energy input.

  20. Demand Response Dispatch Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-31

    The Demand Response (DR) Dispatch Tool uses price profiles to dispatch demand response resources and create load modifying profiles. These annual profiles are used as inputs to production cost models and regional planning tools (e.g., PROMOD). The tool has been effectively implemented in transmission planning studies conducted by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council via its Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee. The DR Dispatch Tool can properly model the dispatch of DR resources for bothmore » reliability and economic conditions.« less

  1. Demand Response | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in

  2. Budasolar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Budasolar Technologies Place: Budapest, Hungary Zip: H - 1121 Sector: Solar Product: BudaSolar is a developer of thin film technologies and...

  3. Mears Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Waltham, Massachusetts Zip: 2451 Sector: Solar Product: Waltham-based developer of manufacturing technology for semiconductor chip producers. The firm's MEARS Silicon Technology...

  4. Clearpower Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clearpower Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clearpower Technology Place: Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Zip: BT3 9DT Sector: Wind energy Product: Clearpower...

  5. Unimicron Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unimicron Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Unimicron Technology Place: Taoyuan, Taiwan Sector: Solar Product: Unimicron established solar venture jointly with United...

  6. Greenbox Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenbox Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greenbox Technology Place: San Bruno, California Zip: 94066 Sector: Carbon Product: California-based, interactive energy...

  7. Evince Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evince Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Evince Technology Place: United Kingdom Sector: Efficiency, Wind energy Product: String representation "Evince has pion ... ing...

  8. Greenward Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greenward Technologies Address: PO Box 203814 Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78720 Region: Texas Area Sector: Wind energy Product:...

  9. MAK Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MAK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: MAK Technologies Place: Lebanon, New Jersey Zip: 8833 Sector: Solar Product: Designs and installs solar electric and solar...

  10. Wakonda Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: Wakonda Technologies Name: Wakonda Technologies Address: 2A Gill Street Place: Woburn, Massachusetts Zip: 01801 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Solar Product: High...

  11. Demand Charges | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demand Charges Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDemandCharges&oldid488967" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  12. Ener Solar Technology srl | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ener Solar Technology srl Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ener Solar Technology srl Place: Italy Sector: Solar Product: Solar project developer. References: Ener Solar Technology...

  13. Midwest Underground Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Underground Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Underground Technology Facility Midwest Underground Technology Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind...

  14. Impact Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Impact Technologies LLC Place: Tulsa, OK Zip: 74153 Sector: Geothermal energy Product: drilling technology Phone Number:...

  15. World Waste Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Waste Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: World Waste Technologies Place: San Diego, California Sector: Biofuels Product: Technology developer that focuses on converting...

  16. Efun Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Efun Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Efun Technology Co Ltd. Place: Tainan, Taiwan Zip: 70955 Sector: Solar Product: Efun Technology principally engaged in the...

  17. Ryle Technology Ltd UK | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Ltd UK Place: United Kingdom Sector: Wind energy Product: Focused on wind blade technology development. References: Ryle Technology Ltd UK1 This article is a stub....

  18. American Electric Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Electric Technologies Inc Place: Houston, Texas Zip: TX 77087 Sector: Services Product: American Electric Technologies...

  19. Bio Gas Technologies LTd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Technologies LTd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bio-Gas Technologies LTd Place: Norwalk, Ohio Zip: 44857 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Bio-gas Technologies is involved...

  20. Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01

    The recent electricity crisis in California and elsewhere has prompted new research to evaluate demand response strategies in large facilities. This paper describes an evaluation of fully automated demand response technologies (Auto-DR) in five large facilities. Auto-DR does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a facility through receipt of an external communications signal. This paper summarizes the measurement and evaluation of the performance of demand response technologies and strategies in five large facilities. All the sites have data trending systems such as energy management and control systems (EMCS) and/or energy information systems (EIS). Additional sub-metering was applied where necessary to evaluate the facility's demand response performance. This paper reviews the control responses during the test period, and analyzes demand savings achieved at each site. Occupant comfort issues are investigated where data are available. This paper discusses methods to estimate demand savings and results from demand response strategies at five large facilities.

  1. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01

    This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is

  2. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12

    The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1

  3. International Energy Outlook 2016-Transportation sector energy consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - Energy Information Administration 8. Transportation sector energy consumption print version Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, transportation sector delivered energy consumption increases at an annual average rate of 1.4%, from 104 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2012 to 155 quadrillion Btu in 2040. Transportation energy demand growth occurs almost entirely in regions outside of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

  4. The Italian energy sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The energy sector in Italy, as in Europe and in many other areas of the world, is undergoing rapid and profound changes. The 1986 ratification of the European Single Act was intended to create a European internal market, where circulation of people, capital, goods, and services would reach the highest possible liberalization. In 1988, in the document The Energy Internal Market, the European Union (EU) commission stressed the need for creation of an internal energy market--free of obstacles--to increase security of supply, to reduce costs, and to strengthen the competitiveness of the European economic system. In 1990, the Community Council adopted directives to implement the EU energy sector. This article describes Italy`s role as part of the EU energy sector. It covers the following topics: the Italian energy sector; electricity vs gas transportation; project finance; recent developments advance Italian power industry; specifying powerplant components -- Italian stype; buyers` guide to Italian equipment, services.

  5. Chemical Sector Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACChemical Sector Analysis content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of capabilities for analyzing the consequences of disruptions to the chemical manufacturing industry. Each capability provides a different but complementary perspective on the questions of interest-questions like Given an event, will the entire chemical sector be impacted or just parts? Which chemicals, plants,

  6. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  7. Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ISER’s partnerships with the private sector are a strength which has enabled the division to respond to the needs of the sector and the nation.

  8. travel-demand-modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Demand Modeling for a Small sized MPO Using TRANSIMS Mohammad Sharif Ullah Champaign County Regional Planning Commission 1776 E Washington Street, Urbana, IL 61802 Phone: 217 328 3313 Ext 124 Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ================ Mohammad Sharif Ullah, Senior Transportation Engineer, CCRPC, Urbana, IL Asadur Rahman, PhD student, IIT, Chicago, IL Rita Morocoima-Black, Planning & Comm.

  9. Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience The Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience is an initiative to enhance U.S. energy security by improving the resilience of energy infrastructure to extreme weather and climate change impacts. The goal is to accelerate investment in technologies, practices, and policies that will enable a resilient 21st century energy system. Under this Partnership, owners and operators of energy assets

  10. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

  11. Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water–energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Patel, Pralit L.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2015-05-01

    Water withdrawal for electricity generation in the United States accounts for approximately half the total freshwater withdrawal. With steadily growing electricity demands, a changing climate, and limited water supplies in many water-scarce states, meeting future energy and water demands poses a significant socio-economic challenge. Employing an integrated modeling approach that can capture the energy-water interactions at regional and national scales is essential to improve our understanding of the key drivers that govern those interactions and the role of national policies. In this study, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a technologically-detailed integrated model of the economy, energy, agriculture and land use, water, and climate systems, was extended to model the electricity and water systems at the state level in the U.S. (GCAM-USA). GCAM-USA was employed to estimate future state-level electricity generation and consumption, and their associated water withdrawals and consumption under a set of six scenarios with extensive details on the generation fuel portfolio, cooling technology mix, and their associated water use intensities. Six scenarios of future water demands of the U.S. electric-sector were explored to investigate the implications of socioeconomics development and growing electricity demands, climate mitigation policy, the transition of cooling systems, electricity trade, and water saving technologies. Our findings include: 1) decreasing water withdrawals and substantially increasing water consumption from both climate mitigation and the conversion from open-loop to closed-loop cooling systems; 2) open trading of electricity benefiting energy scarce yet demand intensive states; 3) within state variability under different driving forces while across state homogeneity under certain driving force ; 4) a clear trade-off between water consumption and withdrawal for the electricity sector in the U.S. The paper discusses this withdrawal

  12. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and

  13. Executive Order 13693 Training Now Available On Demand | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Executive Order 13693 Training Now Available On Demand Executive Order 13693 Training Now Available On Demand January 4, 2016 - 8:00am Addthis Executive Order (E.O.) 13693: Recent Developments, Implementation Updates, and Opportunities Training is now available on-demand. The seminar covers the major goals of E. O. 13693 and offers examples of technologies and concepts the U.S. Department of Energy and other federal agencies are using to meet these goals. Addthis Related Articles

  14. 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Daghouth, Naim; Hoen, Ben; Mills, Andrew; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Millstein, Dev; Hansen, Dana; Porter, Kevin; Widiss, Rebecca; Buckley, Michael; Oteri, Frank; Smith, Aaron; Tegen, Suzanne

    2015-08-06

    Wind power capacity additions in the United States rebounded in 2014, and continued growth through 2016 is anticipated. Recent and projected near-term growth is supported by the industry’s primary federal incentive—the production tax credit (PTC)—which is available for projects that began construction by the end of 2014. Wind additions are also being driven by recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind power technologies, which have resulted in the lowest power sales prices ever seen in the U.S. wind sector. Growing corporate demand for wind energy and state-level policies play important roles as well. Expectations for continued technological advancements and cost reductions may further boost future growth. At the same time, the prospects for growth beyond 2016 are uncertain. The PTC has expired, and its renewal remains in question. Continued low natural gas prices, modest electricity demand growth, and limited near-term demand from state renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have also put a damper on growth expectations. These trends, in combination with increasingly global supply chains, have limited the growth of domestic manufacturing of wind equipment. What they mean for wind power additions through the end of the decade and beyond will be dictated in part by future natural gas prices, fossil plant retirements, and policy decisions.

  15. Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-12-01

    DRQAT (Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool) is the tool for assessing demand response saving potentials for large commercial buildings. This tool is based on EnergyPlus simulations of prototypical buildings and HVAC equipment. The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. The assessment tools will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfor impact for various demand responsive strategies.more » Users of the tools will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tools will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points adjustment.« less

  16. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2008-07-29

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  17. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  18. EERE Technology Commercialization and Deployment Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fulfill its mission Licensing Intellectual Property build constituencies ... sector engagement, including venture capital firms Technology Transfer Working ...

  19. High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset...

  20. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  1. California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand September 20, 2012 - 1:15pm Addthis Ever wonder how we get the materials for the advanced batteries that power our cell phones, laptops, and even some electric vehicles? The U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) is working with California's Simbol Materials to develop technologies that extract battery materials

  2. Fuel Cycle Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Initiatives Fuel Cycle Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies Preparing for Tomorrow's Energy Demands Powerful imperatives drive the continued need for...

  3. Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector Report that investigates the anticipated demand for various vessel types associated with offshore wind development in the United States through 2030 and assesses related market barriers and mitigating policy options. Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector (14.82 MB) Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore

  4. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2006-07-24

    , intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

  5. The latest developments and outlook for hydrogen liquefaction technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlig, K.; Decker, L.

    2014-01-29

    Liquefied hydrogen is presently mainly used for space applications and the semiconductor industry. While clean energy applications, for e.g. the automotive sector, currently contribute to this demand with a small share only, their demand may see a significant boost in the next years with the need for large scale liquefaction plants exceeding the current plant sizes by far. Hydrogen liquefaction for small scale plants with a maximum capacity of 3 tons per day (tpd) is accomplished with a Brayton refrigeration cycle using helium as refrigerant. This technology is characterized by low investment costs but lower process efficiency and hence higher operating costs. For larger plants, a hydrogen Claude cycle is used, characterized by higher investment but lower operating costs. However, liquefaction plants meeting the potentially high demand in the clean energy sector will need further optimization with regard to energy efficiency and hence operating costs. The present paper gives an overview of the currently applied technologies, including their thermodynamic and technical background. Areas of improvement are identified to derive process concepts for future large scale hydrogen liquefaction plants meeting the needs of clean energy applications with optimized energy efficiency and hence minimized operating costs. Compared to studies in this field, this paper focuses on application of new technology and innovative concepts which are either readily available or will require short qualification procedures. They will hence allow implementation in plants in the close future.

  6. A Look Ahead at Demand Response in New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Robert B.; Henderson, Michael I.; Widergren, Steven E.

    2008-08-01

    The paper describes the demand response programs developed and in operation in New England, and the revised designs for participation in the forward capacity market. This description will include how energy efficiency, demand-side resources, and distributed generation are eligible to participate in this new forward capacity market. The paper will also discuss various methods that can be used to configure and communicate with demand response resources and important concerns in specifying interfaces that accommodate multiple technologies and allow technology choice and evolution.

  7. Demand Response Research Center and Open Automated Demand Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Capacity Bidding Real- Dme Pricing Demand Response Opportunities: Advance Notice and Duration of Response End Use Type Modulate OnOff Max. Response Time HVAC Chiller ...

  8. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie

    2013-11-01

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  9. Triton Sea Wave Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Triton Sea Wave Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Triton Sea Wave Technologies Address: 22 A Thrakis Zip: 15669 Region: Greece Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year...

  10. Clean Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clean Energy Technologies Place: Overland Park, Kansas Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Producer of ethanol and other renewable...

  11. Pihsiang Energy Technology PHET | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Technology (PHET) Place: Taiwan Sector: Vehicles Product: Taiwanese LiFePO4 battery manufacture makes propulsion of vehicles. References: Pihsiang Energy Technology...

  12. National Technology Enterprises Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Enterprises Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: National Technology Enterprises Co Place: Kuwait Sector: Services Product: Services & Support (Clean Energy) (...

  13. Carbon Limiting Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limiting Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Limiting Technologies Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: N1 8HA Sector: Carbon Product: UK-based...

  14. Solterra Renewable Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Solar Product: Solterra is a technology development firm focused on thin-film quantum dot solar cells. References: Solterra Renewable Technologies Inc.1 This article is...

  15. Essential Innovations Technology Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Essential Innovations Technology Corp Place: Bellingham,, Washington State Zip: 98225 Sector: Geothermal energy, Services Product:...

  16. Hawaii Oceanic Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oceanic Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Oceanic Technology Inc Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.hioceanictech.com This...

  17. Diamond Wire Technology LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wire Technology LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Diamond Wire Technology LLC Place: Colorado Springs, Colorado Zip: 80916 Sector: Solar Product: US-based manufacturer of...

  18. Zhonghuite PV Technology Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zhonghuite PV Technology Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhonghuite PV Technology Co Place: Jiangxi Province, China Sector: Solar Product: Jiangxi-based solar project...

  19. Zenith Materials Technology Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Materials Technology Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zenith Materials Technology Corp. Place: Hsinchu, Taiwan Sector: Solar Product: Taiwan-based manufacturer of solar ingot...

  20. River Valley Technology Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley Technology Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: River Valley Technology Center Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services (...

  1. Si Brilliant Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Si Brilliant Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Si-Brilliant Technology Ltd Place: Zhejiang Province, China Sector: Solar Product: Chinese solar-grade polysilicon...

  2. Kinsus Interconnect Technology Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kinsus Interconnect Technology Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kinsus Interconnect Technology Corp Place: Taiwan Sector: Solar Product: Engaged in the manufacture of chip...

  3. Geo Energy Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geo Energy Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Geo Energy Technology Place: Gangwon-Do, Korea (Republic) Zip: 210-792 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturs biodiesel plants...

  4. Village Hydro Technology Module | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Technology Module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Village Hydro Technology Module AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus...

  5. Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporate Technology CT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Siemens Corporate Technology (CT) Place: Erlangan, Germany Sector: Solar Product: R&D lab for Siemens AG. Currently...

  6. Superior Process Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Process Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Superior Process Technology Inc Place: Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip: 55424 Sector: Services Product: Biodiesel production...

  7. Sunborne Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunborne Energy Technologies Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 2138 Sector: Solar Product: Massachusetts-based solar thermal...

  8. BizLink Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BizLink Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: BizLink Technology Place: Fremont, California Zip: 94538 Sector: Solar Product: California-based manufacturer of solar modules,...

  9. Targray Technology International Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Targray Technology International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Targray Technology International Inc. Place: Kirkland QC, Quebec, Canada Zip: H9J 3Z4 Sector: Solar Product:...

  10. Teamwork Technology See Tocardo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Jump to: navigation, search Name: Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Region: Netherlands Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is...

  11. Misgav Technology Center MTC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Misgav Technology Center MTC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Misgav Technology Center (MTC) Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services (...

  12. Cnano Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cnano Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cnano Technology Ltd Place: Menlo Park, California Zip: 94025 Sector: Carbon, Efficiency, Solar Product: US-based...

  13. Boston Technology Venture Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Venture Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Boston Technology Venture Center Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services (...

  14. Polymer Technology Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Polymer Technology Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Polymer Technology Corp Place: Menomonie, Wisconsin Zip: 54751 Sector: Services Product: A provider of contract...

  15. Austin Technology Incubator ATI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Incubator ATI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Austin Technology Incubator (ATI) Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services (...

  16. Acclaim Technology Services ATS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acclaim Technology Services ATS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Acclaim Technology Services (ATS) Place: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Zip: 600 028 Sector: Biomass Product:...

  17. SVV Technology Innovations SVVTI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SVV Technology Innovations SVVTI Jump to: navigation, search Name: SVV Technology Innovations (SVVTI) Sector: Solar Product: Introduced a new family of solar concentrating...

  18. Biomass Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biomass Energy Technology Module AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area:...

  19. TRC Advanced Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: TRC Advanced Technologies Inc Name: TRC Advanced Technologies Inc Address: 8700 Commerce Park Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77036 Region: Texas Area Sector: Solar Product:...

  20. RE fuel Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fuel Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: RE-fuel Technology Ltd Place: Wiltshire, United Kingdom Sector: Efficiency Product: RE-Fuel is developing high efficiency...

  1. Wind Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Energy Technology Module AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area:...

  2. Green Energy Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Energy Technologies LLC Place: Akron, Ohio Zip: 44333 Sector: Wind energy Product: Ohio-based micro-scale wind power...

  3. Automation Alley Technology Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alley Technology Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Automation Alley Technology Center Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services (...

  4. Environmental Technologies Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name: Environmental Technologies Fund Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: W1J 6EQ Sector: Services Product: ETF Manager...

  5. Innovative Materials Processing Technologies Ltd IMPT | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Materials Processing Technologies Ltd IMPT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Innovative Materials Processing Technologies Ltd (IMPT) Place: United Kingdom Zip: NG1 1GF Sector:...

  6. United Technologies Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Technologies Corp Place: Hartford, Connecticut Zip: CT 06101 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: UTC is a global technology corporation with activities in aerospace,...

  7. Collier Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Collier Technologies Inc Place: Reno, Nevada Zip: NV 89502 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Collier is a low emissions technology development and licensing company,...

  8. Protium Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Protium Energy Technologies Place: Emmaus, Pennsylvania Zip: 18049 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: A business, and technology consultancy service in the field of hydrogen,...

  9. Hydrogain Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Hydrogain Technologies Inc Place: Florida Zip: FL 33069 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Developers of hydrogen fuel generation and storage technology for...

  10. Prism Solar Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Prism Solar Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Prism Solar Technologies Inc Place: Stone Ridge, New York Zip: 12484 Sector: Solar Product: JV formed between Direct...

  11. Greenvest Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenvest Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greenvest Technologies Inc Place: New Jersey Zip: 7481 Sector: Biofuels, Wind energy Product: Focused on wind energy...

  12. Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Maglev Wind Turbine Technologies Place: Sierra Vista, Arizona Zip: 85635 Sector: Wind energy Product: The new...

  13. Illinois Sustainable Technologies Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name Illinois Sustainable Technologies Center Facility Illinois Sustainable Technologies Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  14. Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus...

  15. The Current State of Energy Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy releases the second Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR), exploring the current state of technologies and R&D in key energy sectors.

  16. Fat Spaniel Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fat Spaniel Technologies Address: 2 W. Santa Clara Street Place: San Jose, California Zip: 95113 Region: Bay Area Sector:...

  17. World Wise Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wise Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: World Wise Technologies Inc Place: Carson City, Nevada Zip: 89701 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Develops renewable...

  18. Five Star Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Star Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Five Star Technologies Place: Independence, Ohio Zip: 44131 Sector: Solar Product: US manufacturer of inks and pastes for the...

  19. Timo Technology Company Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Seoul, Korea (Republic) Sector: Solar Product: Korean-based Timo Technology has a joint venture with Australia's Dyesol for dye solar cell technology. References: Timo...

  20. Inventure Chemical Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Inventure Chemical Technology Address: P.O. Box 530 Place: Gig Harbor, Washington Zip: 98335 Region: Pacific Northwest Area Sector:...

  1. Gaia Power Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gaia Power Technologies Place: New York, New York Zip: 10038 Sector: Efficiency Product: Provides distributed electrical power...

  2. Beijing EEDT Technology Trade Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EEDT Technology Trade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing EEDT Technology & Trade Co Ltd Place: Beijing, China Sector: Carbon Product: Beijing EEDT Technology & Trade...

  3. A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    industry sectors, and complements ongoing technology road-mapping exercises for other key energy technologies." References "A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and...

  4. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; and 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?

  5. Restructuring our Transportation Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  6. Searching for Dark Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Searching for Dark Sector Physics with MiniBooNE Georgia Karagiorgi, Columbia University On behalf of the MiniBooNE Collaboration 3 rd International Conference on New Frontiers in Physics August 6, 2014 MiniBooNE: Past & current highlights MiniBooNE, an accelerator-based neutrino experiment at Fermilab, has run for 10 years with neutrino and antineutrino beams, collecting data for ~2x10 21 POT, amounting to 100k's of neutrino interactions. It has been able to address the two-neutrino

  7. DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI, Feb 2010 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI, Feb 2010 DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI, Feb 2010 The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announced on Jan. 7 that it intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for a National Energy Sector Cyber Organization, envisioned as a partnership between the federal government and energy sector stakeholders to protect the bulk power electric grid and aid the integration of smart

  8. A proposed office of technology development education program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was formed within the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up radioactive and hazardous wastes on US government sites associated with the production and use of nuclear weapon materials In order to insure the development and demonstration of technologies necessary for the task, EM established an office of Technology Development (OTD). Furthermore, in order to accomplish this massive effort, DOE and its contractors will need large numbers of technically trained people. Because of the demands on the same pool of such individuals by other government agencies and the private sector, it is not clear that the supply will be sufficient to meet the competing demands.

  9. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01

    This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

  10. Coulomb Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Coulomb Technologies Address: 1692 Dell Ave. Place: Campbell, California Zip: 95008 Region: Bay Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Networked...

  11. Technology Deployment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (FEMP) provides the federal government and commercial buildings sector with unbiased information about energy- and water-efficient technologies available for deployment. FEMP ...

  12. Electrogen Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Place: Nairobi, Kenya Sector: Solar Product: A Kenyan firm who sets up a solar panel joint venture with a Chinese firm in Kenya. Coordinates: -1.277298,...

  13. Greenwood Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 98005 Sector: Efficiency Product: Greenwood Technologies sells high efficiency wood burning stoves Coordinates: 47.61002, -122.187549 Show Map Loading map......

  14. SVTC Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: SVTC Technologies Address: 3901 North First Street Place: San Jose, California Zip: 95134 Region: Bay Area Sector: Solar Product: Provides emiconductor...

  15. Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector: Solar Product: Dubai-based solar photovoltaic module manufacturing company. References: Solar Technologies1 This article is a...

  16. Gulfstream Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Gulfstream Technologies Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  17. China, India demand cushions prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, M.

    2006-11-15

    Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

  18. Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    Information is presented concerning engineering, personnel, reactor operators, health physics personnel, competing demands on technical manpower, personnel management issues, and emerging technology.

  19. Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    demand based on medium- to long-term scenarios of socio-economic, technological and demographic developments. " References "MAED 2" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  20. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  1. Irrigation and the demand for electricity. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddigan, R. J.; Chern, W. S.; Gallagher, C. A.

    1980-03-01

    In order to anticipate the need for generating capacity, utility planners must estimate the future growth in electricity demand. The need for demand forecasts is no less important for the nation's Rural Electric Cooperatives (RECs) than it is for the investor-owned utilities. The RECs serve an historically agrarian region; therefore, the irrigation sector accounts for a significant portion of the western RECs' total demand. A model is developed of the RECs' demand for electricity used in irrigation. The model is a simultaneous equation system which focuses on both the short-run utilization of electricity in irrigation and the long-run determination of the number of irrigators using electricity. Irrigation demand is described by a set of equations in which the quantity of electricity demanded, the average electricity price, the number of irrigation customers, and the ratio of electricity to total energy used for irrigation are endogenous. The structural equations are estimated using pooled state-level data for the period 1961-1977. In light of the model's results, the impact of changes in relative energy prices on irrigation can be examined.

  2. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, ...

  3. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of Contents...

  4. The Role of the Sellafield Ltd Centres of Expertise in Engaging with the Science, Environment and Technology Supply Chain and University Sector to Support Site Operations and Decommissioning in the UK Nuclear Industry - 13018

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, Ed; Connor, Donna; Keighley, Debbie

    2013-07-01

    The development and maintenance of the broad range of the highly technical skills required for safe and successful management of nuclear sites is of vital importance during routine operations, decommissioning and waste treatment activities.. In order to maintain a core team of technical experts, across all of the disciplines required for these tasks, the approach which has been taken by the Sellafield Ltd has been the formation of twenty five Centres of Expertise (CoE), each covering key aspects of the technical skills required for nuclear site operations. Links with the Specialist University Departments: The CoE leads are also responsible for establishing formal links with university departments with specialist skills and facilities relevant to their CoE areas. The objective of these links is to allow these very specialist capabilities within the university sector to be more effectively utilized by the nuclear industry, which benefits both sectors. In addition to the utilization of specialist skills, the university links are providing an important introduction to the nuclear industry for students and researchers. This is designed to develop the pipeline of potential staff, who will be required in the future by both the academic and industrial sectors. (authors)

  5. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  6. SSL Demonstration: Area Lighting, Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area, AZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-28

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations at the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona. The retrofit was documented to better understand LED technology performance in high-temperature environments. This document is a summary brief of the Phase 1.0 and 1.1 reports previously published on this demonstration.

  7. A Comparison of Cross-Sector Cyber Security Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Evans

    2005-09-01

    This report presents a review and comparison (commonality and differences) of three cross-sector cyber security standards and an internationally recognized information technology standard. The comparison identifies the security areas covered by each standard and reveals where the standards differ in emphasis. By identifying differences in the standards, the user can evaluate which standard best meets their needs. For this report, only cross-sector standards were reviewed.

  8. Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

  9. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and implement a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of demand response resources and to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to assess economic value of the realizable potential of demand response for ancillary services.

  10. Sector Collaborative on Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-06-01

    Helps stakeholders identify and act on cost-effective opportunities for expanding energy efficiency resources in the hospitality, retail, commercial real estate, grocery, and municipal sectors.

  11. Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant challenges from severe weather, hot summers, and about 2% annual load growth. To better control costs and manage electric reliability under these conditions, OG&E is pursuing demand response strategies made possible by implementation of smart grid technologies, tools, and techniques from

  12. Demand Response- Policy: More Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE's commitment to ensuring non-wires options to modernize the nation's electricity delivery system includes ongoing support of a number of national and regional activities in support of demand response.

  13. Industrial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  14. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  15. Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

  16. AEO2017 Modeling updates in the transportation sector

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 For AEO2017 Transportation Working Group August 31, 2016 | Washington, DC By Melissa Lynes, John Maples, Mark Schipper, and David Stone Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Modeling updates in the transportation sector Updates to the Annual Energy Outlook 2017 * Transportation demand model highlights - 10-year extension of last-year projection, AEO2016 is 2040 and AEO2017 is 2050 - Battery costs for electric vehicles - Phase 2 greenhouse gas and fuel efficiency standards for

  17. Coal sector profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-05

    Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

  18. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

  19. End-Use Sector Flowchart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This system of energy intensity indicators for total energy covers the economy as a whole and each of the major end-use sectors—transportation, industry, commercial and residential—identified in Figure 1. By clicking on any of the boxes with the word "Sector" in the title will reveal the more detailed structure within that sector.

  20. Auli Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Auli Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Auli Technology Place: Brazil Zip: 12.223.900 Sector: Wind energy Product: 500kW to 800kW wind turbine designer and manufacturer...

  1. Kinarot Jordan Valley Technological Incubator | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Jordan Valley Technological Incubator Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Kinarot - Jordan...

  2. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects With roughly 80% of the U.S. electricity demand originating from coastal states, ...

  3. Turkey energy and environmental review - Task 7 energy sector modeling : executive summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-02-28

    Turkey's demand for energy and electricity is increasing rapidly. Since 1990, energy consumption has increased at an annual average rate of 4.3%. As would be expected, the rapid expansion of energy production and consumption has brought with it a wide range of environmental issues at the local, regional and global levels. With respect to global environmental issues, Turkey's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have grown along with its energy consumption. Emissions in 2000 reached 211 million metric tons. With GDP projected to grow at over 6% per year over the next 25 years, both the energy sector and the pollution associated with it are expected to increase substantially. This is expected to occur even if assuming stricter controls on lignite and hard coal-fired power generation. All energy consuming sectors, that is, power, industrial, residential, and transportation, will contribute to this increased emissions burden. Turkish Government authorities charged with managing the fundamental problem of carrying on economic development while protecting the environment include the Ministry of Environment (MOE), the Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR), and the Ministry of Health, as well as the Turkish Electricity Generation & Transmission Company (TEAS). The World Bank, working with these agencies, is planning to assess the costs and benefits of various energy policy alternatives under an Energy and Environment Review (EER). Eight individual studies have been conducted under this activity to analyze certain key energy technology issues and use this analysis to fill in the gaps in data and technical information. This will allow the World Bank and Turkish authorities to better understand the trade-offs in costs and impacts associated with specific policy decisions. The purpose of Task 7-Energy Sector Modeling, is to integrate information obtained in other EER tasks and provide Turkey's policy makers with an integrated systems analysis of the various options for

  4. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  5. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  6. Issues in Energy Economics Led by Emerging Linkages between the Natural Gas and Power Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, Jeremy B.

    2007-09-15

    Fuel prices in 2006 continued at record levels, with uranium continuing upward unabated and coal, SO{sub 2} emission allowances, and natural gas all softening. This softening did not continue for natural gas, however, whose prices rose, fell and rose again, first following weather influences and, by the second quarter of 2007, continuing at high levels without any support from fundamentals. This article reviews these trends and describes the remarkable increases in fuel expenses for power generation. By the end of 2005, natural gas claimed 55% of annual power sector fuel expenses, even though it was used for only 19% of electric generation. Although natural gas is enormously important to the power sector, the sector also is an important driver of the natural gas market-growing to over 28% of the market even as total use has declined. The article proceeds to discuss globalization, natural gas price risk, and technology developments. Forces of globalization are poised to affect the energy markets in new ways-new in not being only about oil. Of particular interest in the growth of intermodal traffic and its a little-understood impacts on rail traffic patterns and transportation costs, and expected rapidly expanding LNG imports toward the end of the decade. Two aspects of natural gas price risk are discussed: how understanding the use of gas in the power sector helps define price ceilings and floors for natural gas, and how the recent increase in the natural gas production after years of record drilling could alter the supply-demand balance for the better. The article cautions, however, that escalation in natural gas finding and development costs is countering the more positive developments that emerged during 2006. Regarding technology, the exploitation of unconventional natural gas was one highlight. So too was the queuing up of coal-fired power plants for the post-2010 period, a phenomenon that has come under great pressure with many consequences including increased

  7. Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Generating...

  8. Demand Management Institute (DMI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demand Management Institute (DMI) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Demand Management Institute (DMI) Address: 35 Walnut Street Place: Wellesley, Massachusetts Zip: 02481 Region:...

  9. Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 (Text Version) Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 (Text...

  10. Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Generating Demand for Multifamily Building Upgrades Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Generating ...

  11. The challenge for stormwater technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjertberg, E.

    1999-07-01

    Manufacturers of innovative ultra-urban stormwater treatment technologies see an upsurge in demand for their engineered devices driven largely by new regulatory compliance requirements. In spite of this, they are having difficulty selling their products on the scale they envisioned because prospective buyers and operators of stormwater treatment equipment are unsure about how these new devices will actually perform in a given application. Government officials worry about the validity of manufacturer claims. Besides the obvious concern over bias introduced in tests, they are concerned about the transferability of test results from location to location. The demand-side community wants assurances that testing was performed consistently in well-defined site conditions and that the technical protocols under which various field tests were conducted were rigorous and carefully observed. The marketplace needs relevant information it can trust. The most effective way to provide that information is through a consensus-based process, directly involving the community of stakeholders who will ultimately make the decisions regarding the approval, adoption, and use of the technology. To provide a private sector, market-based approach to this objective evaluation process, a new Environmental Technology Evaluation center (EvTEC) was created in October 1996 through the Civil Engineering Research Foundation (CERF).

  12. Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Almeida, A.T.; Fisk, W.J.

    1997-07-01

    In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

  13. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

    2009-02-28

    The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

  14. General Renewable Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: General Renewable Energy Technology Module AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy...

  15. Iflect Technologies India Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iflect Technologies India Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Iflect Technologies India Pvt. Ltd Place: Navi Mumbai, India Zip: 400706 Sector: Solar Product: Mumbai-based...

  16. Indian National Institute of Ocean Technology | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Ocean Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Indian National Institute of Ocean Technology Place: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Sector: Ocean Product: Research institute...

  17. Voith Hydro Ocean Current Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Current Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Voith Hydro Ocean Current Technologies Place: Germany Sector: Hydro Product: Germany-based JV between Voith Hydro and...

  18. Bioethanol Secience and Technology Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioethanol Secience and Technology Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bioethanol Secience and Technology Centre Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Sector: Biofuels Product:...

  19. Energy Conservation Technologies Econ Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Econ Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Conservation Technologies (Econ) Inc Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80301 Sector: Efficiency, Solar Product: Energy...

  20. Beijing Sunda Solar Energy Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sunda Solar Energy Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Sunda Solar Energy Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100083 Sector:...

  1. MAGI Solar Energy Technology Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MAGI Solar Energy Technology Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: MAGI Solar Energy Technology Co Place: Yixing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip: 214203 Sector: Solar Product: Chinese...

  2. Sunworld Solar Energy Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sunworld Solar Energy Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunworld Solar Energy Technology Co Ltd Place: Shanghai, Shanghai Municipality, China Zip: RM1501 Sector:...

  3. Guangdong Mingyang Wind Power Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mingyang Wind Power Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guangdong Mingyang Wind Power Technology Co Ltd Place: Zhongshan City, Guangdong Province, China Sector:...

  4. Beijing Wende Xingye Wind Power Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wende Xingye Wind Power Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Wende Xingye Wind Power Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing, China Sector: Wind energy Product:...

  5. Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Energy Technology AS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Address: PO Box 399 Place: Harstad Zip: 9484 Region: Norway Sector: Marine and...

  6. Peru-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program AgencyCompany Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector...

  7. Mali-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Mali-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program AgencyCompany Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector...

  8. Guodian Longyuan Power Technology Engineering Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Longyuan Power Technology Engineering Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guodian Longyuan Power Technology Engineering Co Ltd Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector:...

  9. Jiangxi Jinli Permanent Magnet Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jinli Permanent Magnet Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jiangxi Jinli Permanent Magnet Technology Co Ltd Place: Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province, China Sector: Wind...

  10. SSC HHV Solar Technologies JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies JV Place: Ontario, Canada Sector: Solar Product: Canada-based thin film solar panel manufacturing facility. References: SSC & HHV Solar Technologies JV1 This...

  11. Schmid Silicon Technology GmbH SST | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Schmid Silicon Technology GmbH SST Jump to: navigation, search Name: Schmid Silicon Technology GmbH (SST) Place: Freudenstadt, Germany Zip: D-72250 Sector: Solar Product:...

  12. Fenglilai Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fenglilai Technology Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fenglilai Technology Development Co Ltd Place: Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China Sector: Wind energy...

  13. ClearFuels Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ClearFuels Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: ClearFuels Technology Inc Place: Aiea, Hawaii Zip: 96701 Sector: Biofuels Product: Hawaii-based biofuels processing...

  14. Tangshan Fengmei Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tangshan Fengmei Technology Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tangshan Fengmei Technology Development Co Ltd Place: Tangshan, Hebei Province, China Sector:...

  15. Xuntianyu Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xuntianyu Technology Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xuntianyu Technology Development Co Ltd Place: Nanyang, Henan Province, China Zip: 473240 Sector: Solar...

  16. Acro Energy Technologies formerly Lonestar Capital | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Technologies formerly Lonestar Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Acro Energy Technologies (formerly Lonestar Capital) Place: Oakdale, California Zip: 95361 Sector:...

  17. Palmetto Fuel Cell Technologies LLC PFCT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Palmetto Fuel Cell Technologies LLC (PFCT) Place: Columbia, South Carolina Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Services Product: A fuel cell and hydrogen services and technology development...

  18. Wind Energy Systems Technologies LLC WEST | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Technologies LLC WEST Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wind Energy Systems Technologies LLC (WEST) Place: New Iberia, Louisiana Sector: Wind energy Product: Wants to...

  19. Top Green Energy Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Energy Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Top Green Energy Technologies Inc Place: Jhunan, Taiwan Zip: 350 Sector: Solar Product: Top Green is a manufacturer...

  20. Zesheng Bioegineering Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bioegineering Technology Co Ltd Place: Shandong Province, China Zip: 271500 Sector: Bioenergy Product: A company engages in bioenergy technology research and project development....

  1. American Science and Technology Corporation AST | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Science and Technology Corporation AST Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Science and Technology Corporation (AST) Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60622 Sector: Services...

  2. Wuhan Guoce Science Technology Co Ltd Guoce | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guoce Science Technology Co Ltd Guoce Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wuhan Guoce Science & Technology Co., Ltd (Guoce) Place: Wuhan, Hubei Province, China Sector: Wind energy...

  3. Jiangxi Gemei Science and Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gemei Science and Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jiangxi Gemei Science and Technology Inc Place: Fuzhou, Jiangxi Province, China Sector: Solar Product: Jiangxi...

  4. Goldwind Science Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Goldwind Science & Technology Co Ltd Place: Urumqi, Xinjiang Autonomous Region, China Zip: 830000 Sector: Wind energy...

  5. Feng Fa Science and Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Feng Fa Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Feng Fa Science and Technology Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Sector: Wind energy Product: A VCPE...

  6. Zhejiang Cineng PV Science Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cineng PV Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang Cineng PV Science & Technology Co Ltd Place: Cixi, Zhejiang Province, China Sector: Solar Product: A...

  7. Jiuquan Xinmao Science and Technology Wind Power | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Science and Technology Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jiuquan Xinmao Science and Technology Wind Power Place: Gansu Province, China Sector: Wind energy Product: Gansu...

  8. Beijing Corona Science Technology Co Ltd BCST | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corona Science Technology Co Ltd BCST Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Corona Science & Technology Co Ltd (BCST) Place: Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100083 Sector:...

  9. King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology Place: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Zip: 11442 Sector: Solar...

  10. Guofu Bioenergy Science Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guofu Bioenergy Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guofu Bioenergy Science & Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100101 Sector:...

  11. Tianjin Tai Yang Photo electronic Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tai Yang Photo electronic Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tianjin Tai Yang Photo-electronic Technology Co., Ltd Place: Tianjin Municipality, China Sector: Solar...

  12. SM Environmental Technologies Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SM Environmental Technologies Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SM Environmental Technologies Pvt. Ltd. Place: Tamil Nadu, India Sector: Biomass Product: Chennai-based...

  13. Aker Wade Power Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aker Wade Power Technologies LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aker Wade Power Technologies LLC Place: Charlottesville, Virginia Zip: 22911 Sector: Services, Vehicles Product:...

  14. Accord Global Environment Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Accord Global Environment Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing, China Zip: 100022 Sector: Services Product: Accord Global Environmental Technology Co Ltd (AGET) is an independent...

  15. GreenChek Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GreenChek Technology Inc Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94111 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Maker of onboard hydrogen generation and injection (OHGI) technology to...

  16. EERC National Center for Hydrogen Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Center for Hydrogen Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: EERC National Center for Hydrogen Technology Place: Grand Forks, North Dakota Zip: 58203 Sector: Hydro,...

  17. Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd Place: Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Sector: Wind...

  18. Sustainable Technologies Museum Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Technologies Museum Wind Farm Facility Sustainable Technologies Museum Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  19. Vestas Wind Technology China Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vestas Wind Technology China Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vestas Wind Technology (China) Co Ltd Place: Tianjin Municipality, China Zip: 300462 Sector: Wind energy...

  20. China Energy Conservation Solar Energy Technologies CECS | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation Solar Energy Technologies CECS Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Energy Conservation Solar Energy Technologies (CECS) Place: China Sector: Solar Product:...

  1. China Titans Energy Technology Group Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Titans Energy Technology Group Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Titans Energy Technology Group Co Ltd Place: Zhuhai, Guangdong Province, China Sector: Solar,...

  2. Phoenix American Rooftop Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    American Rooftop Solar Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Phoenix American Rooftop Solar Technologies Place: Michigan Zip: 48168 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer of...

  3. Maharishi Solar Technology Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maharishi Solar Technology Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Maharishi Solar Technology Pvt Ltd Place: New Delhi, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip: 110044 Sector: Solar Product:...

  4. Xi an Huanghe Photovoltaic Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Huanghe Photovoltaic Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xi'an Huanghe Photovoltaic Technology Co Ltd Place: Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, China Sector: Solar Product:...

  5. BIG SUN Energy Technology Incorporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Incorporation Place: Taiwan Zip: 303 Sector: Solar Product: Taiwan-based solar cell manufacturer. References: BIG SUN Energy Technology Incorporation1 This...

  6. Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd Place: Baroda, Gujarat, India Zip: 390 008 Sector:...

  7. Beijing Shenzhou Daxu Bio Energy Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shenzhou Daxu Bio Energy Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Shenzhou Daxu Bio-Energy Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Biomass...

  8. Beijing Ideal land Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ideal land Technology Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Ideal-land Technology Development Co Ltd Place: China Sector: Biofuels Product: Biofuels (...

  9. Jiangsu JIXIN Wind Energy Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JIXIN Wind Energy Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jiangsu JIXIN Wind Energy Technology Co Ltd Place: Jiangyin, Jiangsu Province, China Sector: Wind energy...

  10. Viryd Technologies Ningbo Shentong JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies & Ningbo Shentong JV Place: China Sector: Wind energy Product: China-based joint venture to manufacture wind turbines. References: Viryd Technologies & Ningbo...

  11. Demand Response in the West: Lessons for States and Provinces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Larson; Matt Lowry; Sharon Irwin

    2004-06-29

    OAK-B135 This paper is submitted in fulfillment of DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-015F22369 on the experience of western states/provinces with demand response (DR) in the electricity sector. Demand-side resources are often overlooked as a viable option for meeting load growth and addressing the challenges posed by the region's aging transmission system. Western states should work together with utilities and grid operators to facilitate the further deployment of DR programs which can provide benefits in the form of decreased grid congestion, improved system reliability, market efficiency, price stabilization, hedging against volatile fuel prices and reduced environmental impacts of energy production. This report describes the various types of DR programs; provides a survey of DR programs currently in place in the West; considers the benefits, drawbacks and barriers to DR; and presents lessons learned and recommendations for states/provinces.

  12. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Chinese Transportation Fuel Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, China has experienced tremendous growth in its transportation sector. By the end of 2010, China's road infrastructure had emerged as the second-largest transportation system in the world after the United States. Passenger vehicle sales are dramatically increasing from a little more than half a million in 2000, to 3.7 million in 2005, to 13.8 million in 2010. This represents a twenty-fold increase from 2000 to 2010. The unprecedented motorization development in China led to a significant increase in oil demand, which requires China to import progressively more petroleum from other countries, with its share of petroleum imports exceeding 50% of total petroleum demand since 2009. In response to growing oil import dependency, the Chinese government is adopting a broad range of policies, including promotion of fuel-efficient vehicles, fuel conservation, increasing investments in oil resources around the world, and many others.

  13. Technology & Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demonstration Project Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project Resources & Links Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand...

  14. The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan J

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second

  15. WINDExchange: Wind Energy Market Sectors

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Market Sectors Printable Version Bookmark and Share Utility-Scale Wind Distributed Wind Motivations for Buying Wind Power Buying Wind Power Selling Wind Power Wind Energy Market Sectors U.S. power plants generate electricity for homes, factories, and businesses from a variety of resources, including coal, hydro, natural gas, nuclear, petroleum, and (non-hydro) renewable resources such as wind and solar energy. This power generation mix varies significantly across the country depending on

  16. Summary of Characteristics and Energy Efficiency Demand-side Management Programs in the Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatt, Sandy

    2010-04-01

    This report is the first in a series that seeks to characterize energy supply and industrial sector energy consumption, and summarize successful industrial demand-side management (DSM) programs within each of the eight North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) regions.

  17. The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochlin, Cliff

    2009-11-15

    Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

  18. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response. International Experiences and Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Ghatikar, Girish; Ni, Chun Chun; Dudley, Junqiao; Martin, Phil; Wikler, Greg

    2012-06-01

    Demand response (DR) is a load management tool which provides a cost-effective alternative to traditional supply-side solutions to address the growing demand during times of peak electrical load. According to the US Department of Energy (DOE), demand response reflects “changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.” 1 The California Energy Commission (CEC) defines DR as “a reduction in customers’ electricity consumption over a given time interval relative to what would otherwise occur in response to a price signal, other financial incentives, or a reliability signal.” 2 This latter definition is perhaps most reflective of how DR is understood and implemented today in countries such as the US, Canada, and Australia where DR is primarily a dispatchable resource responding to signals from utilities, grid operators, and/or load aggregators (or DR providers).

  19. Property:DeploymentSector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Property Name DeploymentSector Property Type String Description Depolyment Sector as used in cleanenergysolutions.org Allows the following values: Commercial...

  20. Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Presentation by Robert ...

  1. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector ...

  2. Demand Response: Lessons Learned with an Eye to the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Recovery Act, the Energy Department awarded $3.5 billion in funds to the electricity industry, including OG&E, to help catalyze the adoption of smart grid tools, technologies and techniques such as demand response that are designed to increase the electric grid’s flexibility, reliability, efficiency, affordability, and resiliency. Understanding lessons learned from these projects is vital.

  3. LNG demand, shipping will expand through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-02-09

    The 1990s, especially the middle years, have witnessed a dramatic turnaround in the growth of liquefied-natural-gas demand which has tracked equally strong natural-gas demand growth. This trend was underscored late last year by several annual studies of world LNG demand and shipping. As 1998 began, however, economic turmoil in Asian financial markets has clouded near-term prospects for LNG in particular and all energy in general. But the extent of damage to energy markets is so far unclear. A study by US-based Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL, reveals that LNG imports worldwide have climbed nearly 8%/year since 1980 and account for 25% of all natural gas traded internationally. In the mid-1970s, the share was only 5%. In 1996, the most recent year for which complete data are available, world LNG trade rose 7.7% to a record 92 billion cu m, outpacing the overall consumption for natural gas which increased 4.7% in 1996. By 2015, says the IGT study, natural-gas use would surpass coal as the world`s second most widely used fuel, after petroleum. Much of this growth will occur in the developing countries of Asia where gas use, before the current economic crisis began, was projected to grow 8%/year through 2015. Similar trends are reflected in another study of LNG trade released at year end 1997, this from Ocean Shipping Consultants Ltd., Surrey, U.K. The study was done too early, however, to consider the effects of the financial problems roiling Asia.

  4. Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

  5. Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Examining Future Global Energy Demand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Examining Future Global Transportation Energy Demand For EIA Energy Conference July 11, 2016 | Washington, DC By John Maples Outline * Model overview - Passenger travel - Freight travel - Energy consumption for 16 regions: * USA, Canada, Mexico/Chile, OECD Europe, Japan, S. Korea, Australia/New Zealand * Russia, Non-OECD Europe/Eurasia, China, India, Non-OECD Asia, Middle East, Africa, Brazil, Other South/Central * IEO2016 Reference case transportation projections * Preliminary scenario results

  7. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 2: Modeling Demand Response in a Production Cost Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable integration studies have evaluated many challenges associated with deploying large amounts of variable wind and solar generation technologies. These studies can evaluate operational impacts associated with variable generation, benefits of improved wind and solar resource forecasting, and trade-offs between institutional changes, including increasing balancing area cooperation and technical changes such as installing new flexible generation. Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility and can aid in integrating variable generation; however, integration analyses have not yet incorporated these resources explicitly into grid simulation models as part of a standard toolkit for resource planners.

  8. Energy-saving options for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from the Mongolian energy sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorjpurev, J.; Purevjal, O.; Erdenechimeg, Ch.

    1996-12-31

    The Energy sector is the largest contributor to GHG emission in Mongolia. The Energy sector emits 54 percent of CO2 and 4 percent of methane. All emissions of other greenhouse gases are accounted from energy related activities. The activities in this sector include coal production, fuel combustion, and biomass combustion at the thermal power stations and in private houses (stoves) for heating purposes. This paper presents some important Demand-side options considered for mitigation of CO2 emissions from energy sector such as Energy Conservation in Industrial Sector and in Buildings. Changes in energy policies and programmes in the Mongolian situation that promote more efficient and sustainable practices are presented in the paper. These energy saving measures will not only help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but will also promote economic development and alleviate other environmental problems.

  9. Energy and water sector policy strategies for drought mitigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelic, Andjelka; Vugrin, Eric D.; Loose, Verne W.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2009-03-01

    Tensions between the energy and water sectors occur when demand for electric power is high and water supply levels are low. There are several regions of the country, such as the western and southwestern states, where the confluence of energy and water is always strained due to population growth. However, for much of the country, this tension occurs at particular times of year (e.g., summer) or when a region is suffering from drought conditions. This report discusses prior work on the interdependencies between energy and water. It identifies the types of power plants that are most likely to be susceptible to water shortages, the regions of the country where this is most likely to occur, and policy options that can be applied in both the energy and water sectors to address the issue. The policy options are designed to be applied in the near term, applicable to all areas of the country, and to ease the tension between the energy and water sectors by addressing peak power demand or decreased water supply.

  10. Efforts to Harmonize Gas Pipeline Operations with the Demands of the Electricity Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ken

    2006-12-15

    A possible future course of action is for pipelines to continue their efforts to provide new services with FERC approval. Over time, pipelines could satisfy power generators by giving them the flexibility and services they desire and for which they are willing to pay. Another possibility is that FERC will enact new rules governing regional electricity markets that would function similarly to nationwide business practices. (author)

  11. Solar Technologies Installations Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installations Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Technologies Installations Ltd Place: Hampshire, United Kingdom Zip: S051 OHR Sector: Renewable Energy Product: A UK-based...

  12. Danish Technological Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute Place: Denmark Sector: Services Product: DTI develops, applies and disseminates research- and technologically-based knowledge for the Danish and International business...

  13. Device Conduit Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Zip: 94102 Sector: Vehicles Product: California-based developer of advanced battery systems for hybrids and electric vehicles. References: Device Conduit Technologies1...

  14. Chevron Technology Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chevron Technology Ventures LLC Address: 3901 Briarpark Drive Place: Houston Zip: 77042 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  15. Bion Environmental Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    York Zip: 11804 Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product: New York-based developer of livestock waste biomass technology and provider of waste remediation and renewable energy...

  16. Advanced Solar Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Sector: Solar Product: California-based domestic and commercial designer and installer of solar energy equipment. References: Advanced Solar Technologies Inc1 This...

  17. Contrel Technology Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Taiwan Zip: 744 Sector: Solar Product: Taiwan-based LCD and thin-film solar PV manufacturing and testing equipment maker. References: Contrel Technology Corp1 This article...

  18. Advanced Capacitor Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Capacitor Technologies Inc Place: Tokyo, Japan Zip: 196-8558 Sector: Carbon Product: Japanese manufacturer of ultracapacitors from...

  19. Triton Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Place: Reston, Virginia Zip: 20191 Sector: Hydro, Solar Product: Technology firm with activities in hydro microturbines and ethanol production. Merged with Solar Night...

  20. Valence Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Austin, Texas Zip: 78730 Sector: Vehicles Product: Valence develops and commercialises lithium phosphate rechargeable battery technologies for various uses from consumer...

  1. Rive Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rive Technology Inc Address: One Canal Park Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 02141 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Biofuels Product:...

  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hydrodynamics | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name Massachusetts Institute of Technology Address 77 Massachusetts Avenue Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02139 Sector Hydro Phone number (617) 254-4348 Website http:...

  3. Advanced AMR Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Advanced AMR Technologies Inc Address: 285 Newbury Street Place: Peabody, Massachusetts Zip: 01960 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Efficiency Product:...

  4. The Southern California Conversion Technology Demonstration Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conversion Technology Demonstration Project Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: - Waste to Energy Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website...

  5. Pan African Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Pan African Technologies Place: Nairobi, Kenya Sector: Solar Product: A Kenya-based solar panel manufacturer Coordinates: -1.277298, 36.806261 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Thompson Technology Industries TTI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TTI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Thompson Technology Industries (TTI) Place: Novato, California Zip: 94949 Sector: Solar Product: Designer and manufacturer of solar tracking...

  7. Technology Ventures Corporation TVC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation TVC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Technology Ventures Corporation (TVC) Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Charity...

  8. Surfect Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Surfect Technologies Inc Place: Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip: 87112 Sector: Solar Product: US-based manufacturer of computerised...

  9. UQM Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    80530 Sector: Vehicles Product: UQM Technologies develops and manufactures electric motors, generators and electronic controllers for electrically-propelled vehicles. It earns...

  10. Green Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Energy Technologies Address: 846 N. Cleveland Massilon Rd. Place: Akron, Ohio Zip: 44333 Sector: Wind energy Product: String representation "Agriculture;Bus ... acturer in...

  11. Green Fuel Technologies Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Fuel Technologies Corporation Address: 29 Smith Place Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 02138 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector:...

  12. Guangxi Chengjiyongxin Solar Technology Engineering Co Ltd |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Solar Product: Mainly engages in the research, production, sale, installing, maintenance of solar technology and integration of energy-saving engineering. Coordinates:...

  13. Window Industry Technology Roadmap | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization United States Department of Energy Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics Technology characterizations Resource Type Guide...

  14. Renewable Energy Technology Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Center Jump to: navigation, search Name: Renewable Energy Technology Center Place: Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany Zip: D-22335 Sector: Wind energy Product: RETC, a JV formed which will...

  15. Hynergreen Technologies SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Hynergreen Technologies SA Place: Sevilla, Spain Zip: 41002 Sector: Bioenergy Product: Hynergreen is a subsidiary of a Spanish bioenergy, IT and engineering...

  16. Fat Spaniel Technologies FST | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FST Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fat Spaniel Technologies (FST) Place: San Jose, California Zip: 95113 1824 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Provides software and...

  17. Fuel Cells Technology Transit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Cells Technology Transit Place: Clearwater, Florida Zip: 33767 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Involved in the development and research of energy models on Hydrogen Energy...

  18. China Technology Development Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Technology Development Corporation Place: Tortola, China Zip: 310012 Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar Product: Chinese company...

  19. China Technology Development Group Corporation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Group Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Technology Development Group Corporation Place: Hong Kong, Hong Kong Sector: Solar Product: Chinese...

  20. Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that play a neutral broker role with the private sector. The final marine energy case study proposes a similar approach to accelerate hydrokinetic marine energy technology...

  1. Promising Technologies List | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy-saving technologies that are commercially available for deployment in the federal and commercial building sectors. It previews a new Federal Energy Management...

  2. Nanowin Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Ltd Place: Tainan County, Taiwan Zip: 741 Sector: Solar Product: Taiwan-based CIGS solar cell turnkey solution provider. References: Nanowin Technology Co Ltd1 This...

  3. Energy Technology Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Technology Centre Place: Nuremberg, Germany Zip: 90443 Sector: Solar Product: Germany-based incubator and research housing facility,...

  4. Woodshed Technologies Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Ltd Address: Level 50 101 Collins St Place: Melbourne Zip: 3000 Region: Australia Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: +613 96539264 Website:...

  5. Lotus Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Lotus Solar Technologies Place: Cairo, Egypt Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Solar and wind energy consultants and contractors. Coordinates:...

  6. Surface Power Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Surface Power Technologies Place: Ireland Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: An Irish company supplying solar and micro-wind energy systems and...

  7. Technology Development Park PADETEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Park PADETEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Technology Development Park (PADETEC) Place: Brazil Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services (...

  8. LN Innovative Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: LN Innovative Technologies Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Partnership (investment, law etc) ) References: LN Innovative...

  9. Technology Transfer | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Through partnerships and licensing of its intellectual property rights, NREL seeks to reduce private sector risk in early stage technologies, enable investment in the adoption of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, reduce U.S. reliance on foreign energy sources, reduce carbon emissions, and increase U.S. industrial competitiveness. Text Version View a summary of our Fiscal Year 2015 technology partnership agreements. Learn more about our partnership

  10. Intelligent Grid Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Intelligent Grid Technologies Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (611 KB) Technology Marketing Summary With the increasing demand for new energy distribution methods including increased efficiency and alternative sources, Intelligent Grid technologies are on the cutting edge of demand. The

  11. STEO December 2012 - coal demand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in 2012 for the fourth year in a row. Domestic coal consumption is on track to total 829 million tons this year. That's the lowest level since 1992, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly energy forecast. Utilities and power plant operators are choosing to burn more lower-priced natural gas

  12. Near-term viability of solar heat applications for the federal sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.

    1991-12-01

    Solar thermal technologies are capable of providing heat across a wide range of temperatures, making them potentially attractive for meeting energy requirements for industrial process heat applications and institutional heating. The energy savings that could be realized by solar thermal heat are quite large, potentially several quads annually. Although technologies for delivering heat at temperatures above 100{degrees}C currently exit within industry, only a fairly small number of commercial systems have been installed to date. The objective of this paper is to investigate and discuss the prospects for near-term solar heat sales to federal facilities as a mechanism for providing an early market niche to the aid the widespread development and implementation of the technology. The specific technical focus is on mid-temperature (100{degrees}--350{degrees}C) heat demands that could be met with parabolic trough systems. Federal facilities have several relative to private industry that may make them attractive for solar heat applications relative to other sectors. Key features are specific policy mandates for conserving energy, a long-term planning horizon with well-defined decision criteria, and prescribed economic return criteria for conservation and solar investments that are generally less stringent than the investment criteria used by private industry. Federal facilities also have specific difficulties in the sale of solar heat technologies and strategies to mitigate these difficulties will be important. For the baseline scenario developed in this paper, the solar heat application was economically competitive with heat provided by natural gas. The system levelized energy cost was $5.9/MBtu for the solar heat case, compared to $6.8/MBtu for the life-cycle fuel cost of a natural gas case. A third-party ownership would also be attractive to federal users, since it would guarantee energy savings and would not need initial federal funds. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Transformative Reduction of Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Opportunities for Change in Technologies and Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura; Brown, Austin; Newes, Emily; Markel, Tony; Schroeder, Alex; Zhang, Yimin; Chipman, Peter; Johnson, Shawn

    2015-04-30

    The transportation sector is changing, influenced by concurrent, ongoing, dynamic trends that could dramatically affect the future energy landscape, including effects on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Battery cost reductions and improved performance coupled with a growing number of electric vehicle model offerings are enabling greater battery electric vehicle market penetration, and advances in fuel cell technology and decreases in hydrogen production costs are leading to initial fuel cell vehicle offerings. Radically more efficient vehicles based on both conventional and new drivetrain technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions per vehicle-mile. Net impacts also depend on the energy sources used for propulsion, and these are changing with increased use of renewable energy and unconventional fossil fuel resources. Connected and automated vehicles are emerging for personal and freight transportation systems and could increase use of low- or non-emitting technologies and systems; however, the net effects of automation on greenhouse gas emissions are uncertain. The longstanding trend of an annual increase in transportation demand has reversed for personal vehicle miles traveled in recent years, demonstrating the possibility of lower-travel future scenarios. Finally, advanced biofuel pathways have continued to develop, highlighting low-carbon and in some cases carbon-negative fuel pathways. We discuss the potential for transformative reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions through these emerging transportation-sector technologies and trends and present a Clean Transportation Sector Initiative scenario for such reductions, which are summarized in Table ES-1.

  14. Sector Profiles of Significant Large CHP Markets, March 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of market assessments of large CHP sector profiles of the chemicals, food, and pharmaceuticals sectors

  15. Priority mitigation measures in non-energy sector in Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizina, S.V.; Pilifosova, O.V.; Gossen, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    Fulfilling the Commitments on UN FCCC through the U.S. Country Studies Program, Kazakstan has developed the national GHG Inventory, vulnerability and adaptation assessment and estimated the possibility of mitigation measures in certain sectors. Next step is developing National Climate Change Action Plan. That process includes such major steps as setting priorities in mitigation measures and technologies, their comprehensive evaluation, preparation implementation strategies, developing the procedure of incorporation of the National Action Plan into other development plans and programs. This paper presents programs and measures that can reduce GHG emissions in non-energy sector. Measures in land-use change and forestry, agriculture and coal mining are considered. Current situation in non-energy sector of Kazakstan is discussed. The amount of GHG emissions reduction and cost analysis presented in this paper was developed with the use of IPCC recommendations.

  16. Chinese Oil Demand: Steep Incline Ahead

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Chinese Oil Demand: Steep Incline Ahead Malcolm Shealy Alacritas, Inc. April 7, 2008 Oil Demand: China, India, Japan, South Korea 0 2 4 6 8 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million BarrelsDay ...

  17. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes existing research and discusses current practices, opportunities, and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response programs.

  18. Isotope Production in Light of Increasing Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, B.

    2004-10-05

    This presentation is a part of the panel discussion on isotope production in light of increasing demand.

  19. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  20. Energy demand and population changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.L.; Edmonds, J.A.

    1980-12-01

    Since World War II, US energy demand has grown more rapidly than population, so that per capita consumption of energy was about 60% higher in 1978 than in 1947. Population growth and the expansion of per capita real incomes have led to a greater use of energy. The aging of the US population is expected to increase per capita energy consumption, despite the increase in the proportion of persons over 65, who consume less energy than employed persons. The sharp decline in the population under 18 has led to an expansion in the relative proportion of population in the prime-labor-force age groups. Employed persons are heavy users of energy. The growth of the work force and GNP is largely attributable to the growing participation of females. Another important consequence of female employment is the growth in ownership of personal automobiles. A third factor pushing up labor-force growth is the steady influx of illegal aliens.

  1. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  2. Hitachi High Technologies Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hitachi High-Technologies Corp Place: Tokyo, Japan Zip: 105-8717 Sector: Solar Product: Japan-based technology firm that is member of the...

  3. Wave Energy Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Energy Technologies Inc Address: 270 Sandy Cove Rd Place: Ketch Harbour Zip: B3V 1K9 Region: Canada Sector: Marine and...

  4. Bioenergy Technology Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bioenergy Technology Ltd Place: East Sussex, United Kingdom Zip: TN22 5RU Sector: Biomass Product: Firm dedicated to the use of...

  5. Cirrus Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc. Place: Nevada Zip: NV 89704 Sector: Wind energy Product: A US-based wind turbine technology developer. References: Cirrus Technologies, Inc.1 This article is a stub. You...

  6. Spectra Nova Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Spectra Nova Technologies Inc. Place: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Zip: K2E 7J5 Sector: Solar Product: A Canadian based technology company, active in...

  7. Technology Pathway Selection Effort

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIOMASS PROGRAM Technology Pathway Selection Effort Alicia Lindauer 27 November 2012 2 | Biomass Program eere.energy.gov * Setting R&D priorities * Benchmarking * Informing multi-sectoral analytical activities * Track Program R&D progress against goals * Identify technology process routes and prioritize funding * Program direction decisions: * Are we spending our money on the right technology pathways? * Within a pathway: Are we focusing our funding on the highest priority activities?

  8. Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, Gary; Wilcox, Edmund; Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank

    2013-01-02

    California agricultural irrigation consumes more than ten billion kilowatt hours of electricity annually and has significant potential for contributing to a reduction of stress on the grid through demand response, permanent load shifting, and energy efficiency measures. To understand this potential, a scoping study was initiated for the purpose of determining the associated opportunities, potential, and adoption challenges in California agricultural irrigation. The primary research for this study was conducted in two ways. First, data was gathered and parsed from published sources that shed light on where the best opportunities for load shifting and demand response lie within the agricultural irrigation sector. Secondly, a small limited survey was conducted as informal face-to-face interviews with several different California growers to get an idea of their ability and willingness to participate in permanent load shifting and/or demand response programs. Analysis of the data obtained from published sources and the survey reveal demand response and permanent load shifting opportunities by growing region, irrigation source, irrigation method, grower size, and utility coverage. The study examines some solutions for demand response and permanent load shifting in agricultural irrigation, which include adequate irrigation system capacity, automatic controls, variable frequency drives, and the contribution from energy efficiency measures. The study further examines the potential and challenges for grower acceptance of demand response and permanent load shifting in California agricultural irrigation. As part of the examination, the study considers to what extent permanent load shifting, which is already somewhat accepted within the agricultural sector, mitigates the need or benefit of demand response for agricultural irrigation. Recommendations for further study include studies on how to gain grower acceptance of demand response as well as other related studies such as

  9. Regulatory risks paralyzing power industry while demand grows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maize, K.; Peltier, R.

    2008-01-15

    2008 will be the year the US generation industry grapples with CO{sub 2} emission. Project developers are suddenly coal-shy, mostly flirting with new nuclear plants waiting impatiently in line for equipment manufacturers to catch up with the demand for wind turbines, and finding gas more attractive again. With no proven greenhouse gas sequestration technology on the horizon, utilities will be playing it safe with energy-efficiency ploys rather than rushing to contract for much-needed new generation.

  10. Chapter 4 - Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Complementing this evolving generation mix, technologies to enable higher efficiencies, ... contribute to a portfolio of technology options that can meet future regional demands. ...

  11. BPA seeks research partners to advance technology solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transmission technologies, data intelligence, next-generation energy efficiency and demand response technologies, generation asset management. A copy of each roadmap is...

  12. Water Impacts of the Electricity Sector (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation discusses the water impacts of the electricity sector. Nationally, the electricity sector is a major end-user of water. Water issues affect power plants throughout the nation.

  13. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-08-01

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  14. Working with the Real Estate Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Working with the Real Estate Sector, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 1, 2012. This call discussed effective strategies for working with the real estate sector.

  15. Commercialization of clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharucha, N.

    1994-12-31

    The steps to commercialization are reviewed in respect of their relative costs, the roles of the government and business sectors, and the need for scientific, technological, and economic viability. The status of commercialization of selected clean coal technologies is discussed. Case studies related to a clean coal technology are reviewed and conclusions are drawn on the factors that determine commercialization.

  16. From upstream to downstream: Megatrends and latest developments in Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kang; Pezeshki, S.; McMahon, J.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years, Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector has been characterized by reorganization, revitalization, regional cooperation, environmental awakening, and steady expansion. The pattern of these changes, which appear to be the megatrends of the region`s hydrocarbons sector development, will continue during the rest of the 1990s. To further study the current situation and future prospects of Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector, we critically summarize in this short article the key issues in the region`s oil and gas development. These megatrends in Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector development will impact not only the future energy demand and supply in the region, but also global oil flows in the North American market and across the Pacific Ocean. Each country is individually discussed; pipelines to be constructed are discussed also.

  17. Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

    2008-05-15

    As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

  18. The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Azevedo, Ines Lima; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

    2009-05-14

    The increasing concern about climate change as well as the expected direct environmental economic impacts of global warming will put considerable constraints on the US building sector, which consumes roughly 48percent of the total primary energy, making it the biggest single source of CO2 emissions. It is obvious that the battle against climate change can only be won by considering innovative building approaches and consumer behaviors and bringing new, effective low carbon technologies to the building / consumer market. However, the limited time given to mitigate climate change is unforgiving to misled research and / or policy. This is the reason why Lawrence Berkeley National Lab is working on an open source long range Stochastic Lite Building Module (SLBM) to estimate the impact of different policies and consumer behavior on the market penetration of low carbon building technologies. SLBM is designed to be a fast running, user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual interface. The tool is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies. It also incorporates consumer preferences and passive building systems as well as interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains). Furthermore, everything is based on service demand, e.g. a certain temperature or luminous intensity, instead of energy intensities. The core objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the practical approach used, to start a discussion process between relevant stakeholders and to build collaborations.

  19. SEP Special Projects Report: Buildings Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    The buildings section of this Sharing Success document describes SEP special projects in the buildings sector including funding.

  20. Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MSGP Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) The Multi-Sector General Permit authorizes the discharge of stormwater associated with industrial activity. What's New Documents submitted to EPRR in last 30 Days TBD What is the Multi-Sector General Permit? Storm water discharges from EPA specified industrial activities are regulated under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP). LANL regulated industrial activities include: Metal fabrication Power

  1. Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia (Presentation) Author Paul Brophy Conference World Geothermal Energy Summit; Jakarta, Indonesia; 20120706...

  2. Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

    1992-11-01

    This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

  3. Emerging Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies EERE Success Story-Software Platform Offers Underserved Smaller Buildings Sector an Innovative Solution for Cutting Energy Costs EERE Success Story-Software Platform Offers Underserved Smaller Buildings Sector an Innovative Solution for Cutting Energy Costs Virginia Tech is working with DOE to make BEMOSS a scalable, interoperable, plug-and-play building automation and energy management solution. Read more Report Highlights Significant Energy Savings

  4. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Piette, Mary Ann; Fujita, Sydny; McKane, Aimee; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Radspieler, Anthony; Mares, K.C.; Shroyer, Dave

    2009-12-30

    This study examines data center characteristics, loads, control systems, and technologies to identify demand response (DR) and automated DR (Open Auto-DR) opportunities and challenges. The study was performed in collaboration with technology experts, industrial partners, and data center facility managers and existing research on commercial and industrial DR was collected and analyzed. The results suggest that data centers, with significant and rapidly growing energy use, have significant DR potential. Because data centers are highly automated, they are excellent candidates for Open Auto-DR. 'Non-mission-critical' data centers are the most likely candidates for early adoption of DR. Data center site infrastructure DR strategies have been well studied for other commercial buildings; however, DR strategies for information technology (IT) infrastructure have not been studied extensively. The largest opportunity for DR or load reduction in data centers is in the use of virtualization to reduce IT equipment energy use, which correspondingly reduces facility cooling loads. DR strategies could also be deployed for data center lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Additional studies and demonstrations are needed to quantify benefits to data centers of participating in DR and to address concerns about DR's possible impact on data center performance or quality of service and equipment life span.

  5. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Domestic natural gas production was largely stagnant from the mid-1970s until about 2005. However, beginning in the late 1990s, advances linking horizontal drilling techniques with hydraulic fracturing allowed drilling to proceed in shale and other formations at much lower cost. The result was a slow, steady increase in unconventional gas production. The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset from the wider dialogue on natural gas; regarding the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity; existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and changes in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns; natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices; and demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years.

  6. Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-12

    This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

  7. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) | Department of Energy Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) This paper examines the behavioral assumptions that underlie California's residential sector energy efficiency programs and recommends improvements that will help to advance the state's ambitious greenhouse gas

  8. U.S.-India Collaboration Expands Indian Market for U.S. Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand-side management technologies can improve electricity reliability by managing how electricity consumers interact with the grid. Demand Response (DR), which is widely used in ...

  9. China’s rare earth supply chain: Illegal production, and response to new cerium demand

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nguyen, Ruby Thuy; Imholte, D. Devin

    2016-03-29

    As the demand for personal electronic devices, wind turbines, and electric vehicles increases, the world becomes more dependent on rare earth elements. Given the volatile, Chinese-concentrated supply chain, global attempts have been made to diversify supply of these materials. However, the overall effect of supply diversification on the entire supply chain, including increasing low-value rare earth demand, is not fully understood. This paper is the first attempt to shed some light on China’s supply chain from both demand and supply perspectives, taking into account different Chinese policies such as mining quotas, separation quotas, export quotas, and resource taxes. We constructedmore » a simulation model using Powersim Studio that analyzes production (both legal and illegal), production costs, Chinese and rest-of-world demand, and market dynamics. We also simulated new demand of an automotive aluminum-cerium alloy in the U.S. market starting from 2018. Results showed that market share of the illegal sector has grown since 2007 to 2015, ranging between 22% and 25% of China’s rare earth supply, translating into 59–65% illegal heavy rare earths and 14–16% illegal light rare earths. There would be a shortage in certain light and heavy rare earths given three production quota scenarios and constant demand growth rate from 2015 to 2030. The new simulated Ce demand would require supply beyond that produced in China. Lastly, we illustrated revenue streams for different ore compositions in China in 2015.« less

  10. Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships ISER's partnerships with the private sector are a strength which has enabled the division to ...

  11. Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the Finance Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy...

  12. Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment (Redirected from Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate...

  13. Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for the Transport Sector Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector PDF icon deer10karsner.pdf More Documents & Publications The ...

  14. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 4: The DBEDT DSM assessment model user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The DBEDT DSM Assessment Model (DSAM) is a spreadsheet model developed in Quattro Pro for Windows that is based on the integration of the DBEDT energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, with the output from the building energy use simulation model, DOE-2. DOE-2 provides DSM impact estimates for both energy and peak demand. The ``User`s Guide`` is designed to assist DBEDT staff in the operation of DSAM. Supporting information on model structure and data inputs are provided in Volumes 2 and 3 of the Final Report. DSAM is designed to provide DBEDT estimates of the potential DSM resource for each county in Hawaii by measure, program, sector, year, and levelized cost category. The results are provided for gas and electric and for both energy and peak demand. There are two main portions of DSAM, the residential sector and the commercial sector. The basic underlying logic for both sectors are the same. However, there are some modeling differences between the two sectors. The differences are primarily the result of (1) the more complex nature of the commercial sector, (2) memory limitations within Quattro Pro, and (3) the fact that the commercial sector portion of the model was written four months after the residential sector portion. The structure for both sectors essentially consists of a series of input spreadsheets, the portion of the model where the calculations are performed, and a series of output spreadsheets. The output spreadsheets contain both detailed and summary tables and graphs.

  15. MicroPlanet Technology Corp formerly HF Capital Corp | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Corp formerly HF Capital Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: MicroPlanet Technology Corp (formerly HF Capital Corp) Place: Seattle, Washington Zip: 98104 Sector:...

  16. New Mexico Hydrogen Technology Partners HyTep | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrogen Technology Partners HyTep Jump to: navigation, search Name: New Mexico Hydrogen Technology Partners (HyTep) Place: New Mexico Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: An alliance...

  17. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  18. Market leadership by example: Government sector energy efficiency in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Harris, Jeffrey; Breceda, Miguel; Campbell, Stephanie; Sachu, Constantine; della Cava, Mirka; Gonzalez Martinez, Jose; Meyer, Sarah; Romo, Ana Margarita

    2002-05-20

    Government facilities and services are often the largest energy users and major purchasers of energy-using equipment within a country. In developing as well as industrial countries, government ''leadership by example'' can be a powerful force to shift the market toward energy efficiency, complementing other elements of a national energy efficiency strategy. Benefits from more efficient energy management in government facilities and operations include lower government energy bills, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, less demand on electric utility systems, and in many cases reduced dependence on imported oil. Even more significantly, the government sector's buying power and example to others can generate broader demand for energy-efficient products and services, creating entry markets for domestic suppliers and stimulating competition in providing high-efficiency products and services. Despite these benefits, with the exception of a few countries government sector actions have often lagged behind other energy efficiency policies. This is especially true in developing countries and transition economies - even though energy used by public agencies in these countries may represent at least as large a share of total energy use as the public sector in industrial economies. This paper summarizes work in progress to inventory current programs and policies for government sector energy efficiency in developing countries, and describes successful case studies from Mexico's implementation of energy management in the public sector. We show how these policies in Mexico, begun at the federal level, have more recently been extended to state and local agencies, and consider the applicability of this model to other developing countries.

  19. Compressed Air Storage Strategies; Industrial Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Review the plant's compressed air demand patterns to determine whether storage would be benefcial. * Examine the ...

  20. Compressed Air System Control Strategies; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Understand your system require- ments by developing a pressure and a demand profle before investing in ...